Home > From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 1 00:35:08 2009

From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 1 00:35:08 2009

From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 1 00:35:08 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2009 06:35:08 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] FW: Please take one Second to vote for Me]: IN HARMS
WAY-Exploring the Bond Between Humans and Animals
Message-ID: <49D21C0C.2060108@gmail.com>


It appears that you do have to sign up and log in to cast your vote.
I am finding it hard to see the actual photos, though ... Vern

"I'm looking to do a photography documentary exploring the bond between people
who dedicate their lives to looking after animals in harms way around the world.
An elephant orphanage in Kenya,Dog an orangutan sanctuary in Borneo,and may more."

------------------------------------------------------------------------
From: jmott78 at hotmail.com
Subject: Please take one Second to Help Me
Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2009 03:23:11 -0700

Sorry for the blast email. I am asking you all a huge favor!!! I am in a
contest for "Name Your Dream Your Assignment." I am entering really
really late and the contest ends this Friday. Please please take one sec
to vote for my project. I will need over 1,000 votes to win so please
forward to your whole address book. If you only do me one favor do me
this, it's for $50,000 to shoot my worldwide photography project
documenting "People Helping Animals in Harms Way".
http://www.nameyourdreamassignment.com/the-ideas/jmott78/in-harms-way-exploring-the-bond-between-humans-and-animals/

Thank you so so much,
Justin

Justin Mott | Photographer
http://www.justinmott.com
Vietnam +84 97 2383 071
Blog: http://justinmott.blogspot.com
Current location: Hanoi, Vietnam

Represented by: Redux Pictures
Contact Marcel Saba for assignments
New York, New York 212-253-0399
marcelsaba at reduxpictures.com
http://www.reduxpictures.com


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 1 00:52:54 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2009 06:52:54 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Feature: Biochar May Help Save the Planet from Climate
Change
Message-ID: <49D22036.3080400@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Subject: Feature: Biochar May Help Save the Planet from Climate Change
Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2009 05:09:30 -0700
From: Yahoo Group <ashwani.vasishth at gmail.com>
Reply-To: envecolnews-owner at yahoogroups.com
To: Environmental Ecology News <envecolnews at yahoogroups.com>



http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/science/03/30/biochar.warming.energy/index.html

Mon March 30, 2009

*Can 'biochar' save the planet?
* * 'Biochar' may reduce greenhouse gases, produce clean energy, help
farming
* Organic waste can be turned into valuable, renewable resources
* Ancient farming method could improve crop yields
* Experts: Biochar could reduce harmful global CO2 levels

By Azadeh Ansari
CNN

ATHENS, Georgia (CNN) -- Over the railroad tracks, near Agriculture
Drive on the University of Georgia campus, sits a unique machine that
may hold one of the solutions to big environmental problems like energy,
food production and even global climate change.

Illustration Omitted:
Biochar's high carbon content and porous nature can help soil retain
water, nutrients, protect soil microbes.

"This machine right here is our baby," said UGA research engineer Brian
Bibens, who is one of a handful of researchers around the world working
on alternative ways to recycle carbon.

Biben's specialty is "biochar," a highly porous charcoal made from
organic waste. The raw material can be any forest, agricultural or
animal waste. Some examples are woodchips, corn husks, peanut shells,
even chicken manure.

Biben feeds the waste -- called "biomass" -- into an octagonally shaped
metal barrel where it is cooked under intense heat, sometimes above
1,000 degrees Fahrenheit, the organic matter is cooked through a
thermochemical process called "pyrolysis".

In a few hours, organic trash is transformed into charcoal-like pellets
farmers can turn into fertilizer. Gasses given off during the process
can be harnesed to fuel vehicles of power electric generators. Video
Watch how biochar is made and why it's important ?
Don't Miss

* In Depth: Edge of Discovery
* Obama invites major economies to energy forum

Biochar is considered by many scientists to be the "black gold" for
agriculture.

Its high carbon content and porous nature can help soil retain water,
nutrients, protect soil microbes and ultimately increase crop yields
while acting as natural carbon sink - sequestering CO2 and locking it
into the ground.

Biochar helps clean the air two ways: by preventing rotting biomass from
releasing harmful CO2 into the atmosphere, and by allowing plants to
safely store CO2 they pull out of the air during photosynthesis. See
more about how biochar works ?

"Soil acts as an enormous carbon pool, increasing this carbon pool could
significantly contribute to the reduction of CO2 in the atmosphere,"
said Christoph Steiner, one of the leading research scientist studying
biochar. "It gives us a chance to produce carbon negative energy."

Worldwide use of biochar could cut CO2 levels by 8 parts per million
within 50 years, according to NASA scientist James Hansen.

Global carbon levels in the air have been steadily increasing at an
alarming rate since the 1980s, according to NOAA. Since 2000, increases
of 2 parts per million of CO2 have been common, according to NOAA.
During the 1980s rates increased by 1.5 ppm per year.

The process of making biochar can also lead to other valuable products.

Some of the gases given off during the process can be converted to
electricity, others can be condensed and converted to gasoline, and
there are also some pharmaceutical applications for the by-products,
said Danny Day President and CEO of Eprida, a private firm in Athens,
Georgia currently exploring industry applications for the biochar process.

Although scientists look to biochar to improve the future, its origin
lies in the past.

For centuries indigenous South Americans living in the Amazon Basin used
a combination of charred animal waste and wood to make "terra preta,"
which means black earth, in Portuguese.

Thousands of years later, the terra preta soil remains fertile without
need for any added fertilizer, experts say.

"These terra preta soils are older than 500 years and they are still
black soil and very rich in carbon," said Steiner, a professor at the
University of Georgia. Reducing the need for deforestation to create
more cropland.

By using biochar concepts, terra preta soils have been proven to remain
fertile for thousands of years, preventing further harmful deforestation
for agricultural purposes. But still more large-scale tests need to be
conducted before biochar technology can be rolled out on a global scale.

Day says biomass -- that otherwise would be thrown away --could be
developed into entirely new markets for biofuels, electricity, biomass
extracts and pharmaceutical applications, in addition to biochar.
advertisement

"We have 3 billion people out there who are at risk for climate change
and they can be making money solving our global problem," said Day.

Industries can now begin to look at farmers around the world and pay
them for their agricultural wastes, said Day. "They can become the new
affluent."

/*** NOTICE: In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, this
material is distributed, without profit, for research and educational
purposes only. ***/
//


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 1 00:51:28 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2009 06:51:28 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Global Warming May Help Wetlands Counter Impacts of
Rising Sea Levels
Message-ID: <49D21FE0.4030603@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Subject: News: Global Warming May Help Wetlands Counter Impacts of
Rising Sea Levels
Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2009 05:05:40 -0700
From: Yahoo Group <ashwani.vasishth at gmail.com>
Reply-To: envecolnews-owner at yahoogroups.com
To: Environmental Ecology News <envecolnews at yahoogroups.com>



http://www.terradaily.com/reports/Climate_Change_To_Have_Paradoxical_Effects_In_Coastal_Wetlands_999.html

*Climate Change To Have Paradoxical Effects In Coastal Wetlands

*Illustration Omitted:
Coastal wetlands must build upward through the accumulation of
mineral and organic matter to maintain a constant elevation relative to
water levels; otherwise, they will drown and disappear. Climate change,
however, is causing acceleration in the rise of sea level, which would
seemingly put wetlands at risk of excessive flooding.

by Staff Writers
Washington DC (SPX) Mar 30, 2009

Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide is largely responsible for recent
global warming and the rise in sea levels.

However, a team of scientists, including two Smithsonian ecologists,
have found that this same increase in CO2 may ironically counterbalance
some of its negative effects on one of the planet's most valuable
ecosystems-wetlands.

The team's findings are being published in the Proceedings of the
National Academy of Sciences.

The team conducted their study for two years (2006 - 2007), during which
they focused on the role that organic matter, both growing and decaying,
plays on soil elevation in wetlands and the effect CO2 has on this process.

Coastal wetlands must build upward through the accumulation of mineral
and organic matter to maintain a constant elevation relative to water
levels; otherwise, they will drown and disappear.

Climate change, however, is causing acceleration in the rise of sea
level, which would seemingly put wetlands at risk of excessive flooding.

"Our findings show that elevated CO2 stimulates plant productivity,
particularly below ground, thereby boosting marsh surface elevation,"
said Adam Langley, the paper's lead author. Patrick Megonigal, the
paper's corresponding author, added "We found that by stimulating root
growth, thus raising a marsh's soil elevation, elevated CO2 may also
increase the capacity for coastal wetlands to tolerate relative rises in
sea level."

Both scientists are ecologists at the Smithsonian Environmental Research
Center in Edgewater, Md.

These findings bear particular importance given the threat of
accelerating sea-level rise to coastal wetlands worldwide. Some evidence
suggests that only a two-millimeter increase in the rate of sea-level
rise will threaten and possibly eliminate large portions of mid-Atlantic
marshes.

And the loss of these wetlands threatens critical services that the
ecosystems provide, such as supporting commercially important fisheries,
providing wildlife habitat, improving water quality and buffering human
populations from oceanic forces.

Determining soil-surface elevation change is important for two reasons.
First, the loss in soil elevation relative to local sea level may
provide an early indication of the collapse of a tidal wetland.

Second, tracking elevation changes in marsh soils through time, along
with measurements of plant productivity and other environmental
variables, allow scientists to identify specific mechanisms critical to
the persistence of tidal wetlands under accelerating sea-level rise.

To examine how CO2 may interact with other factors that will accompany
sea-level rise, the authors also manipulated CO2, salinity and flooding
in a companion greenhouse study.

The team of scientists from the Smithsonian Institution and the U.S.
Geological Survey added CO2 gas to a tidal marsh at the Smithsonian
Environmental Research Center. The gas flowed continuously from the
bottom upward through the top of large (two-meter diameter) cylinders
surrounding marsh plots.

Half of the plots also received added soil nitrogen, simulating
increasing water pollution, which tended to diminish the positive
effects of elevated CO2 on marsh surface elevation. Changes in elevation
were measured with an instrument developed by the U.S. Geological Survey
that can detect changes in elevation as little as one millimeter.

According to Langley, "Elevated CO2 doubled the short-term rate of
elevation gain in our marsh. Our next step is to determine whether this
will continue in the long-term and in the face of actual sea-level rise
and other climatic changes."

Though marshes appear to benefit from CO2 in the short-term, the
scientists stress that increasing CO2 levels will continue to warm the
Earth, melt glaciers and expand ocean water, thus accelerating sea-level
rise. Ultimately, rapidly rising seas could outstrip the positive
effects of CO2 on the marshes that they have observed.

"Wetlands are some of the most specialized and valuable ecosystems in
the world, not only to wildlife but humans as well," Megonigal said.

"The sooner we can understand the effect global warming is having on
them, the better we will be equipped to save them."

/*** NOTICE: In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, this
material is distributed, without profit, for research and educational
purposes only. ***/
//


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 1 01:42:29 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2009 07:42:29 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Looking after local interests in protected areas
Message-ID: <49D22BD5.3090704@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://www.scidev.net/en/policy-briefs/looking-after-local-interests-in-protected-areas.html

Looking after local interests in protected areas
Source: NCCR North-South
27 March 2009 | EN

Local communities ? like this one in the Amazon rainforest ? should be included
in conservation
Flickr/helixblue
This policy brief, published by the research network NCCR North-South, looks at
how involving local people in the management of protected areas can help
conserve biological diversity.

While donors, civil society organisations and researchers increasingly recognise
the value of such "participatory conservation" in achieving ecological goals,
the authors find that in reality, local people are rarely included in managing
protected areas.

Drawing on case studies from across Africa, Asia and Latin America, they argue
that incentives at both the household and community levels are essential for
sustainable development, saying that if local people see an economic or
political benefit from conserving protected areas, they are more likely to
support management projects.

Such benefits could include providing basic social services such as constructing
trails or improving access to drinking water, support for income generating
activities like goat-keeping, revenues from tourism and capacity building to
strengthen land rights.

Yet, the authors find that the benefits from current participatory conservation
projects are low. In Africa in particular, the political gains of living in or
close to a protected area are low and existing management practices mean that
local people may be evicted, lose land or suffer crop damage.

Working more effectively with local communities means understanding their
interests in protected areas, say the authors. This means giving local
stakeholders a strong institutional framework for addressing their needs,
collaborating with them from the outset in establishing protected areas, and
empowering them to manage protected areas themselves.

Link to full article from NCCR North-South [2.13MB]
http://www.nccr-north-south.unibe.ch/publications/Infosystem/On-line%20Dokumente/Upload/Policy_Online_1.pdf

This policy brief was prepared by Tobias Haller from the University of Zurich
and Marc Galvin from The Graduate Institute in Geneva, Switzerland.




From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 1 01:55:40 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2009 07:55:40 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Greenpeace: Forests don't belong in carbon market [2
items and link to report]
Message-ID: <49D22EEC.7050404@coombs.anu.edu.au>

The report is available at:
http://www.greenpeace.org/raw/content/usa/press-center/reports4/redd-and-the-effort-to-limit-g.pdf


http://www.forbes.com/feeds/ap/2009/03/30/ap6230516.html

Associated Press
Greenpeace: Forests don't belong in carbon market
By VANESSA GERA , 03.30.09, 02:34 PM EDT


Environmental group Greenpeace on Monday criticized plans by some countries to
tackle global warming by letting polluting industries in wealthy nations offset
carbon emissions by replanting tropical forests.

Greenpeace said that the idea is deeply flawed and may worsen global warming by
allowing polluters to spew out more greenhouse gases and detract from efforts to
promote new clean technologies in countries like China and India.

In a report released on the sidelines of U.N. climate talks in Bonn, Greenpeace
said that "including forest protection measures in carbon markets would ...
derail global efforts to tackle global warming."

"Cheap forest credits sound attractive but a closer examination shows they are a
dangerous option that won't save the forests or stop runaway climate change,"
said Roman Czebiniak, a forest expert with Greenpeace. "Of the many options for
forest financing currently on the table, this one ranks as the worst."

Delegates from 175 countries are meeting in Bonn through April 8 for the latest
round of talks aimed at crafting an ambitious global treaty that would bring
both rich and developing countries on board to fight global warming.

The deal, expected to be sealed this December in Copenhagen, would replace the
Kyoto Protocol, which expires in 2012. While Kyoto deals narrowly with cutting
polluting emissions, negotiators are looking at how they can broaden a
Copenhagen deal to include other issues.

Forests are seen as key because living trees, which contain carbon, absorb
carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, compensating for some of the pollution
caused by cars and factories. But when cut or burned, trees release their carbon
back into the atmosphere. Not only is a powerful absorber of pollution lost, but
the released carbon contributes further to global warming.

http://www.greenpeace.org/usa/news/the-economics-of-forests-and-c

The Economics of Forests and Carbon Markets
March 30, 2009Print

BONN, Germany ? Greenpeace has released a report concluding that the inclusion
of forest protection measures in international carbon markets would devalue the
price of carbon as much as 75%, effectively neutering efforts to tackle global
warming. If we are to avoid the worst effects of global warming, we must keep
the rise in the global temperature below 2? Celsius. Achieving this goal is
contingent on establishing a strong and stable carbon price, which will in turn
help drive the development of renewable energy technologies worldwide. The
devaluation of carbon credits that would result from the inclusion of relatively
abundant forest credits would discourage such investments, according to the report.

Aerial view of the rainforest in the Amazon, photographed during a flight from
Cuiaba to Alta Floresta in the Brazilian Amazon. The Amazon rainforest is one of
the most bio-diverse regions on Earth. More than 5,000 tree species are found
here. Deforestation is a huge threat to these forests as farmers clear land to
give way to soy fields, cattle farming, and large infrastructure projects.
Ancient forest protection is crucial to preserving biodiversity and the global
climate. ? Greenpeace / Daniel Beltr?

The need to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in
developing countries (known as REDD) has become an increasingly important part
of the agenda for the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change
(UNFCCC) discussions to be held in Copenhagen in December 2009. REDD is an
attractive option because it can quickly reduce greenhouse gas emissions in a
cost-effective manner, while also protecting biodiversity and the rights of
local and indigenous peoples who rely on the world?s tropical forests for their
livelihood.

The Greenpeace report, ?REDD and the effort to limit global warming to 2?C?
(summary here), finds that developed countries should make additional ?tropical
deforestation commitments? in order to finance the protection of forests.
Deforestation is responsible for some 20% of global greenhouse gas emissions,
according to the report, which was released at the United Nations climate
meetings in Bonn, Germany on March 30th. The report warns that the inclusion of
forest credits in international carbon markets could lead to developing
countries like Brazil, China, and India losing billions of dollars a year for
investment in renewable energy technologies.

Key findings of the report

Including forest offset credits in the carbon markets would crash the price of
carbon up to 75% under currently stated reduction targets and 70% for the
reduction target most consistent with the 2?C goal (40% below 1990 emissions
levels by 2020). If a lower potential supply of REDD credits is assumed, the
price of carbon would still fall by 60%.
Under either scenario, REDD credits would significantly reduce investments in
clean and renewable technologies in both developed and developing countries. In
delaying such investments, REDD credits could cause a ?lock in? effect, keeping
high-carbon technologies and infrastructures in place for many years to come.
The sunken costs associated with carbon-intensive economies could increase the
overall costs of mitigation.
Including REDD credits in the carbon markets would reduce investments in clean
technologies in developing countries, such as China, India, and Brazil, as there
would be less demand for credits generated by emission reduction policies in
energy and industry sectors. For example, China alone would lose an estimated
$10-100 billion per year in clean energy and technology investments.
By integrating forest credits in carbon markets, developed countries could
significantly overpay for reducing emissions from deforestation, due to the
difference between the costs of REDD to developing countries and the
international price of carbon. This could come at the expense of additional
mitigation opportunities in developing countries.

Greenpeace conclusions and recommendations

World leaders must find a way to provide significant and reliable financing for
REDD in addition to making deep emissions reductions in industrialized countries
and making ambitious renewable energy and energy efficiency investments in
developing countries. Among available financing options, the direct inclusion of
forest offset credits in the carbon markets carries the greatest risks to both
the climate and the forests. REDD credits could depress and cause major
fluctuations to the price of carbon, thereby preventing the investments in clean
and renewable technologies needed to keep global temperature rise well below 2?C.

Carbon markets must provide a strong and stable price of carbon to drive the
development of clean and renewable technologies and should therefore remain
focused on the more easily quantifiable and comparable fossil fuel emissions. A
separate mechanism is needed to deal with the complexities and risks associated
with REDD.

A successful REDD mechanism cannot be based on the inclusion of REDD offset
credits in the carbon markets but should rather have the following characteristics:
Contain the goal of ending gross deforestation and associated emissions in all
countries by 2020, and achieve zero deforestation in priority areas (such as the
Amazon, the Congo Basin, and in Indonesia and the Archipelagos) by 2015.
Require national-level reductions in forest emissions in order to avoid the
problem of leakage (i.e. deforestation shifting from one area to another), which
would inevitably result from project-based (i.e. ?subnational?) approaches.
Allow for the broad participation of countries with tropical forests.
Benefit biodiversity protection consistent with international conventions and
objectives to avoid perverse incentives and outcomes.
Fully respect the rights of indigenous peoples and local communities and provide
a forum where their issues may be raised.
Ensure that benefits are equitably shared among and within countries.
Provide for independent monitoring and verification of activities and results.

Greenpeace has put forward its own proposal for a hybrid market-linked fund
mechanism that would meet these requirements, avoid the problems associated with
market-offset mechanisms for REDD, and become part of the next phase of the
Kyoto Protocol. To learn more about the Greenpeace Forests for Climate (TDERM)
approach, please see our "Forests for Climate" report.



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 1 02:30:05 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2009 08:30:05 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Nine new species discovered in Can Gio mangrove forest
Message-ID: <49D236FD.5010404@gmail.com>

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/tech/2009/03/839342/

Nine new species discovered in Can Gio mangrove forest
17:25' 31/03/2009 (GMT+7)

VietNamNet Bridge ? Scientists from the Tropical Biology Institute have
discovered nine new species of amphibians-reptiles in the Can Gio mangrove
forest in HCM City.

The nine new species include: water toad, green racophorus, black gecko, grey
salamander, and five new species of snakes.

However, they announced that they didn?t see lilac crocodile and two species of
snakes, which lived in the forest in the past.

The discovery is the result of a scientific research project conducted from
September 2006 to March 2008 by Nguyen Ngoc Sang and his co-workers from the
Tropical Biology Institute.

Scientists conducted five surveys, each survey lasting seven days, in Can Gio.
The surveys show that three species of snakes, which were present in the forest
in the past, are not there anymore.

Before the Vietnam War, Can Gio belonged to the southern province of Dong Nai
and it was a mangrove forest which had abundant floral and fauna species. The
war turned this area into a dead land.

In 1979, HCM City launched a campaign to re-grow Can Gio forest. On January 21,
2001, this forest was recognised by UNESCO?s Human and Biosphere Program as the
first biosphere reserve of Vietnam.

Vinh Giang


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 1 02:45:19 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2009 08:45:19 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Forests liberally sacrificed for timber, farmland
Message-ID: <49D23A8F.4040200@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://thanhniennews.com/features/?catid=10&newsid=47525

Last Updated: Tuesday, March 31, 2009 09:36:16 Vietnam (GMT+07)

Forests liberally sacrificed for timber, farmland

The remains of a nghien tree in Hao Nghia Commune forest in Bac Kan Province.
Deep inside the Hao Nghia forest, the sounds of nature are absent.

No bird chirps, no insect buzzes, not even the sound of wind rustling the leaves
can be heard.

The sounds of the forest are completely drowned in the roaring and buzzing of
electric saws that are felling huge nghien trees that flourish in more than 400
hectares of limestone forest in Na Ri District?s Hao Nghia Commune in the
northern province of Bac Kan.

The forest is considered the province?s treasure because of the nghien trees,
whose timber is hard, heavy and fairly worm-resistant. It is suitable for making
tools, vehicles, ships and furniture.

Scientifically known as Burretiodendron hsienmu, this species is also found in
China, where it is called xianmu. In China, over-felling of both young and large
xianmu trees have pushed it to the edge of extinction.

Guided by a Nung ethnic minority resident, Thanh Nien found four fresh stumps in
an area less than 0.05 hectares, each measuring more than a meter in diameter.
The guide, Lam Truong Ngang, estimates that the biggest tree, would have weighed
more than 30 cubic meters before felling.

At least 100 nghien trees in the forest have been chopped down in the past two
months, says Nung, who has lived in the area for about 40 years.

Nguyen Ba Ngai, acting director of the provincial Department of Agriculture and
Rural Development, admits ?the forest of Hao Nghia Commune is being devastated.
?The price of nghien timber chopping-blocks sold to China has surged almost
double over the past two weeks.?

A block 20 centimeters thick and around 50 centimeters in diameter can sell for
VND200,000 (US$11) inside the forest and VND350,000 ($20) when brought to the
main street.

?It?s hard to protect the forest then,? Ngai says ruefully.

Locals say illegal logging in the forest became rampant last November after the
department allotted the Agriculture and Forestry Development Investment Company
56 hectares to gather burnt, spoilt and dry wood left behind by the loggers.

More locals have become loggers since then, fearful of losing the timber pie to
the company under Vietnam Timber and Forest Products Association.
Quite a few people have lost their protective spirit, saying authorities have
made it easy for the company to destroy the forest.

Ngai rejects this. ?Our supervisors can guarantee that the company doesn?t abuse
the permit,? he says.

Last February, Na Ri District administration appointed a team of six officials
of the Hao Nghia Commune to take turns to oversee 100 workers and 20 electric
saws deployed by the company at all times.

The supervisors were supposed to work independently, but they have received
VND4.5 million ($254) a month from the company from November to February. Head
of the team, Hoang Khai Chien, who is also chairman of the commune?s People?s
Committee, says he did this work only on the weekends.

He adds that the team only signed written receipts for being paid as a ?kind of
salary for supervision.?

No labor contract exists between the parties, yet Ngai says: ?There?s no mystery
here.

?The supervisors cannot work for no payment, and they?re not allowed to get paid
from the state budget.?

The team has given the company a clean chit while the provincial Forest
Management agency recently found more than four cubic meters of nghien timber in
the company area and more than 38 cubic meters just outside, all newly felled.
Farmland invasion

In the Central Highlands province of Dak Lak, many hectares of forests have
been, and are being cleared for use as farmland for growing cash crops like
coffee, cashews and pepper.

The impacts of forest loss have been obvious - severe droughts, floods and the
loss of groundwater.

Droughts every year for the past 12 years have caused losses of more than VND8
trillion ($451.6 million) for local farmers, while floods in the same period
have killed 127 people, damaged houses, orchards and fields worth some VND1.4
trillion ($79 million), according to the provincial agency responsible for
disaster mitigation and flood and storm prevention.

Yet the flow of immigrants is unchecked, and they continue to replace forests
with farmland.

Nguyen Dai Nguong, director of the provincial weather bureau, says immigrants
first destroy the forests for farmland, which are in turn damaged by droughts
and floods caused by deforestation.

The rapid loss of forests over the past 10 years has loosened the soil and
caused rainwater to flow straight into the rivers and lakes instead of
recharging the groundwater, he says. This also robs the area of its topsoil,
which can have disastrous implications for agriculture in the long run.
Le Cuoc of the provincial Forest Management agency says the coverage of forests
in Dak Lak has dropped to 45.8 percent from 70 percent 20 years ago.

Districts that grow a lot of coffee are also the ones that have small coverage
of forests, Cuoc says. Coffee has taken over more than 170,000 hectares of
forestland.

The province?s capital city Buon Ma Thuot used to be surrounded with thousands
of hectares of forests. ?Wild animals wandered into the city sometimes,? he says.

But now, the city only has 551 hectares left, covering 1.5 percent of the area.
Of these, less than a tenth is natural forest.

Reported by Vu An ? Tran Ngoc Quyen


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 1 02:52:31 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2009 08:52:31 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] =?utf-8?q?Forest_Conversion_News_No=2E_22_-_March_20?=
=?utf-8?q?09_=5BWWF=E2=80=99s_newsletter_on_forest_conversion_focusing_on?=
=?utf-8?q?_the_expansion_of_palm_oil_and_soy=5D?=
Message-ID: <49D23C3F.7040105@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://www.panda.org/about_our_earth/all_publications/?uNewsID=160941

Forest Conversion News No. 22 - March 2009

Download

* Forest Conversion News No. 22 - March 2009 [pdf, 828 KB]
http://assets.panda.org/downloads/wwf_forest_conversion_news_march2009.pdf

31 Mar 2009
FEATURE: Production of sustainable palm oil swells
INTERVIEW: Liantiong Gan, Musim Mas
NEWS: Illegal logging and human and tiger deaths
EVENTS
PUBLICATIONS
MEDIA REVIEW


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 1 10:49:44 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2009 16:49:44 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] =?utf-8?q?Sugar_as_biofuel_in_the_Philippines_may_no?=
=?utf-8?q?t_be_as_=E2=80=9Csweet=E2=80=9D_as_promised?=
Message-ID: <49D2AC18.7010206@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://www.researchsea.com/html/article.php/aid/4087/cid/4?


Article Released Tue-31st-March-2009 09:29 GMT

Contact: Florante A. Cruz Institution: University of the Philippines Los Ba?os



Sugar as biofuel in the Philippines may not be as ?sweet? as promised

Sugarcane conversion into biofuel is cost-effective with petroleum fuel when oil
prices are high; it reduces greenhouse gas emissions, and diversifies energy
sources. Ethanol production from sugarcane may look good at the outset but do
these rewards true to its form?

In an article published in the Philippine Agricultural Scientist, UPLB economist
Prof. U-Primo E. Rodriguez and Dr. Liborio Cabanilla, dean of the College of
Economics and Management, noted that using sugarcane as source of energy may
have adverse effects. Both examined the potential implications of using sugar as
biofuel feedstock, particularly on the country?s agriculture and food security.

Sugar is an important commodity in the Philippines, a major input in food
processing industries. In 2007, the Department of Agriculture reported that by
2001 about 8.5 M metric tons of sugarcane will be needed to fulfill the mandated
blending of gasoline with 10% ethanol. This represents around 37% of the total
sugarcane produced in the country in 2005.

Using a Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model, the researchers found that
there would be several implications to the agricultural and food processing
sectors if sugar is to be used for biofuel production.

General implications

?Devoting sugarcane as biofuel feedstock would probably raise the average
domestic prices of agricultural, fishery and forest products, which in turn will
make production costs higher and therefore increase prices of food products in
the market,? Prof. Rodriguez stated.

They estimated that while value added and employment will grow in the
agriculture, fishery and forestry sector, it will be the opposite for the food
processing sector.

All in all, this would affect people?s spending behavior. Consumption is
projected to fall by 0.18%. Prof. Rodriguez also added that agricultural,
fishery, forest and food products export will decline.

Specific impacts to the sugar industry

According to the research?s simulation, there are significant impacts which
would greatly affect the sugar industry. First would be the increase of about
18.5% of sugar prices due to the stimulating demand for sugarcane. This would
induce significant increases in the value added and employment in the sugar
industry.

The big expansion of the sugar industry, however, will just be the only reason
for the general expansion of the agriculture, fishery and forestry sector.
Rodriguez explained that the expanding sugar industry will affect industries
such as corn, livestock and poultry, probably due to the possible allocation of
resources to sugar planting.

Simulation results indicate also that some economic activities such as sugar
milling, petroleum refining and mining will contract.

More analysis needed

While the research results showed that sugar for biofuel will have adverse
effects on the economy, Prof. Rodriguez recommended more in-depth studies should
be pursued to get a better informed assessment. He further added that economists
should also focus on the other dimensions of economic development and
environmental impact.

?Although our CGE model have provided sound economic frameworks for analysis, a
more rigorous economic evaluation of the food vs. fuel issue would definitely
need other studies using complementary analytical and quantitative tools,? Prof.
Rodriguez concluded.


For reference:

Prof. U-Primo E. Rodriguez
College of Economics and Management
University of the Philippines Los Ba?os
Telephone: 049 536 2505
Telefax: 536 3641
Email: uprime at gmail.com

Associated links

http://rdenews.uplb.edu.ph
Email


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 1 13:08:01 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2009 19:08:01 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Fwd: 2nd World Congress of Agroforestry: Early Bird
Registration Now Open
Message-ID: <49D2CC81.6030804@coombs.anu.edu.au>



Subject: 2nd World Congress of Agroforestry: Early Bird Registration Now Open
Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2009 10:50:07 -0500
From: Kimwaki, Jacinta (ICRAF) <j.kimwaki at cgiar.org>
Reply-To: Kimwaki, Jacinta (ICRAF) <j.kimwaki at cgiar.org>
To: Biodiversity Info Mailing List <biodiv-l at lists.iisd.ca>

The Congress Secretariat is pleased to announce that registration is open for
WCA2009. Participants who register by 30 April 2009- Early Bird Registration-
will enjoy a reduced rate.
The 2 nd World Congress of Agroforestry promises to be the premier event for
2009 ? a platform to share global knowledge and experience on the opportunities
that will leverage agroforestry science and development as a sustainable land
use system worldwide. The Congress will serve as a forum for researchers,
educators, practitioners and policy makers to share ideas and solutions that
will impact positively on rural livelihoods, food security and the global
environment.
Register online at www.worldagroforestry.org/wca2009 by 30 April 2009 and save
$50 on the registration fee.
We look forward to seeing you in Nairobi , Kenya !
World Congress of Agroforestry - WCA2009, 23 rd - 28 th August 2009
www.worldagroforestry.org/wca2009 |
Email: wca2009 at cgiar.org




From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 1 14:45:10 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2009 20:45:10 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Manila,
16-17 June 2009: High-Level Dialogue on Climate Change in the Asia
and Pacific - A Development Challenge
Message-ID: <49D2E346.2020700@coombs.anu.edu.au>



Subject: High-Level Dialogue on Climate Change in the Asia and Pacific
- A Development Challenge
Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2009 13:40:38 +0800
From: edelmundo at adb.org
Reply-To: edelmundo at adb.org
To: Climate Change Info Mailing List <climate-l at lists.iisd.ca>


Two months from now, on 16-17 June 2009, the High-Level Dialogue on
Climate Change in the Asia and Pacific - A Development Challengewill be held in
conjunction with the 4th Asia Clean Energy Forum 2009 on 18-19 June 2009, at the
Asian Development Bank Headquarters, Manila.

The Asian Development Bank is pleased to invite you to be a part of it.
Register now!

The Asian Development Bank is organizing the Dialogue with The Energy
and Resources Institute (TERI). It will feature global and regional leaders who
will share the latest thinking on various aspects of climate change. Sessions on
the thematic streams will allow participants to focus on their specific fields
of interest.

Dr. R.K. Pachauri, Director-General of TERI, Chair of the
Intergovernmental Panel on the Climate Change (IPCC), recipient of the Nobel
Peace Prize in 2007, will lead the dialogue.

United Nations Secretary- General Ban Ki-moon who will participate via
video; Speakers include HE Hideki Minamikawa, Director-General, Global
Environment, Ministry of Environment, Japan; and Mr. Chad O. Holliday, Chairman
and CEO of DuPont, USA are among the more than 700 participants drawn from the
business community, civil society, governments, development agencies, and
academia expected to attend the event..

The focus of the Dialogue will be on disseminating proven results and
strategies at the intersection policy, finance, and implementation. It will
foster awareness and knowledge of emerging trends and issues in climate change
that face the Asia and Pacific region. The Dialogue will also provide a venue
for an exchange of knowledge on policies, technologies, partnerships, and other
measures that can help the region tackle these challenges. It will promote more
effective regional cooperation and will strengthen regional and global
partnerships among development leaders, experts, and practitioners. The program
for the Dialogue is attached to this invitation.

To join, on-line registration is a requirement. Consequently, should
you wish to attend the 4th Asia Clean Energy Forum 2009 right after the closing
of the Dialogue, please reflect it in the registration form. The event page is
posted on the ADB website at the following URL:
http://www.adb.org/documents/events/2009/high-level-dialogue/default.asp.

Elizabeth del Mundo
Senior Project Assistant, RSOD-SI
Asian Development Bank
Tel (632) 632 6788
Fax (632) 636 2375


--
Vern Weitzel (Mr.) BSc, BA, MA, M Env Man & Dev <vern at coombs.anu.edu.au>
<vern.weitzel at gmail.com> <vernweitzel at mac.com>

ANU/AVSL eMail Lists: http://coombs.anu.edu.au/~vern/forum.html
NGO Centre eMail Lists: http://ngocentre.org.vn/mailman/listinfo

Address during 2009: 2724 NE 24th St, Renton WA 98056 USA phone: (425) 228-4513
Ha Noi home/office address: 1st stairwell, apartment 504-505, block A4 Giang Vo,
Ba Dinh, Ha Noi [off Ngoc Khanh Street, opposite Van Phuc Compound]
home phone: +84 4 3846-1751 Skype: vernweitzel
IF I DO NOT RESPOND IN A REASONABLE TIME, PLEASE RESEND YOUR MESSAGE.


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 1 14:45:59 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2009 20:45:59 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] New paper on REDD and wetlands
Message-ID: <49D2E377.6060202@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Subject: New paper on REDD and wetlands
Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2009 08:26:14 -0500
From: Anna Karklina <anna.karklina at field.org.uk>
Reply-To: Anna Karklina <anna.karklina at field.org.uk>
To: Climate Change Info Mailing List <climate-l at lists.iisd.ca>

A new background paper entitled 'Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and
Forest Degradation in developing countries (REDD) - the link with wetlands'
prepared for FIELD by consultant Dave Pritchard is available at
www.field.org.uk. The paper summarises the importance of wetlands in relation to
climate change and examines their potential role in relation to REDD and various
international conventions.

FIELD would welcome comments at field at field.org.uk. The author can be contacted
directly at dep at dendros.org.uk.

Kind regards,
FIELD team
www.field.org.uk



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Thu Apr 2 00:37:19 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Wed, 01 Apr 2009 06:37:19 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Bali, Indonesia,
28-29 May 2009: The 8th Meeting of the Asia Forest Partnership and
AFP Dialogue: REDD and Combating Illegal Logging
Message-ID: <49D36E0F.3050104@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Subject: The 8th Meeting of the Asia Forest Partnership and AFP Dialogue: REDD
and Combating Illegal Logging
Date: Wed, 01 Apr 2009 02:04:27 -0500
From: b.kristanty at cgiar.org
Reply-To: b.kristanty at cgiar.org
To: Forest Policy Info Mailing List <forests-l at lists.iisd.ca>

The 8th Meeting of the Asia Forest Partnership and AFP Dialogue: REDD and
Combating Illegal Logging.
Bali, Indonesia, 28-29 May 2009


Projects to test new mechanisms for reducing emissions from deforestation and
forest degradation (REDD) are cropping up worldwide. But in many countries that
are planning to implement such mechanisms and cannot control illegal logging,
REDD plans in practice could falter.

The Asia Forest Partnership (AFP) Dialogue 2009 will examine links between
mechanisms to compensate countries for reducing deforestation and forest
degradation, and efforts to combat illegal logging and the associated timber trade.

The two-day event will provide an opportunity for the many stakeholders in
tropical forests to share information, to establish partnerships and to propose
recommendations to policymakers.

Preliminary agenda:

? Welcoming speech by M.S. Kaban, Indonesia?s Minister of Forestry

? Opening and closing plenaries

? Subplenaries
?Actions to tackle illegal logging and associated trade: Implications for REDD
? REDD and forest governance: Exploiting the synergies

? Parallel working groups
? Governance and regional initiatives
? REDD, illegal logging and forest-dependent communities
? Economic and international implications

The outcomes of the dialogue will be shared with international processes related
to REDD, including the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change and the UN
Forum on Forests.

Have you registered?
We have already received many inquiries about AFP Dialogue 2009 and anticipate
another popular event, so please complete your online registration to secure
your attendance (http://www2.asiaforests.org/?option=com_oregist&task=register)

Cohosted by the Government of Indonesia in collaboration with the Governments of
Japan and Switzerland, CIFOR, WRI, IGES, DFID
For more information: AFP at cgiar.org | www2.asiaforests.org

- You are currently subscribed to forests-l as: vern at coombs.anu.edu.au
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--
Vern Weitzel (Mr.) BSc, BA, MA, M Env Man & Dev <vern at coombs.anu.edu.au>
<vern.weitzel at gmail.com> <vernweitzel at mac.com>

ANU/AVSL eMail Lists: http://coombs.anu.edu.au/~vern/forum.html
NGO Centre eMail Lists: http://ngocentre.org.vn/mailman/listinfo

Address during 2009: 2724 NE 24th St, Renton WA 98056 USA phone: (425) 228-4513
Ha Noi home/office address: 1st stairwell, apartment 504-505, block A4 Giang Vo,
Ba Dinh, Ha Noi [off Ngoc Khanh Street, opposite Van Phuc Compound]
home phone: +84 4 3846-1751 Skype: vernweitzel
IF I DO NOT RESPOND IN A REASONABLE TIME, PLEASE RESEND YOUR MESSAGE.


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Thu Apr 2 00:38:16 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Wed, 01 Apr 2009 06:38:16 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Study claims to tackle arsenic poisoning in Asia
Message-ID: <49D36E48.8050407@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Subject: [SEA-SPAN] Study claims to tackle arsenic poisoning in Asia
Date: Wed, 1 Apr 2009 09:22:22 +0700
From: user at sea-user.org
To: vern at coombs.anu.edu.au


Scientists find new solutions for the arsenic-poisoning crisis in Asia
By Chelsea Anne Young
Source: PhysORg.com, March 24th, 2009

Every day, more than 140 million people in southern Asia drink groundwater
contaminated with arsenic. Thousands of people in Bangladesh, Cambodia, India,
Myanmar and Vietnam die of cancer each year from chronic exposure to arsenic,
according to the World Health Organization. Some health experts call it the
biggest mass poisoning in history.

More than 15 years ago, scientists pinpointed the source of the contamination in
the Himalaya Mountains, where sediments containing naturally occurring arsenic
were carried downstream to heavily populated river basins below.

But one mystery remained: Instead of remaining chemically trapped in the river
sediments, arsenic was somehow working its way into the groundwater more than
100 feet below the surface. Solving that mystery could have significant
implications for policymakers trying to reverse the mass poisoning, said
Stanford University soil scientist Scott Fendorf.

"How does the arsenic go from being in the sediment loads, in solids, into the
drinking water?" said Fendorf, a professor of environmental Earth system science
and a senior fellow at Stanford's Woods Institute for the Environment.

To find out, he launched a field study in Asia in 2004 with two Stanford
colleagues: Chris Francis, an assistant professor of geological and
environmental sciences, and Karen Seto, now at Yale University. The initial
study was funded with a two-year Woods Institute Environmental Venture Projects
grant. Five years later, the research team appears to have solved the arsenic
mystery and is working with policymakers and government officials to prevent the
health crisis from escalating.

"The real thing is, how do we help the people who are there?" Fendorf said. "But
first, we have to understand the coupling of hydrology



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Thu Apr 2 01:45:12 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Wed, 01 Apr 2009 07:45:12 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Is Wasting Energy Uncivilized? -- April 1,
Energy Wasting Day!
Message-ID: <49D37DF8.7090401@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://greeninc.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/03/31/is-wasting-energy-uncivilized/

March 31, 2009, 8:15 AM
Is Wasting Energy Uncivilized?
By JAMES KANTER

[Please check out the humorous videos on this site.]

Above: an ?advertisement? reminding consumers that Wednesday (April Fool?s Day,
as it happens), is Energy Wasting Day. The message? Turn up the thermostat, cool
your buns near the open refrigerator door, and otherwise be profligate and
self-centered with your energy consumption. ?Remember to do your bit!? the
voiceover commands.

The spoofed television campaign is paid for by a consumer action organization
called Together, which is itself run by The Climate Group, a global nonprofit
organization based in Britain that seeks to combat global warming.

The video was first released on April Fools? Day last year, and it shows a plump
man switching on all of the burners on his gas stove to warm himself up. He
leaves on lights and computers, and uses a tumble dryer for just one article of
clothing: his underwear.

We also see the fellow revving up his large S.U.V., running over a globe and,
once he gets to work at a power station, slapping a female colleague?s rear end,
smashing compact fluorescent light bulbs and recklessly ? delightedly ? boosting
the power supply up to maximum.


In an accompanying music video, seen here to the right, the same actor is seen
cavorting with a group of women pole-dancing around patio heaters, riding a gas
guzzling motorbike, and advocating other ways to waste energy.

The message the campaigners are sending is abundantly clear: Energy profligacy
is a form of boorishness and self-indulgence no longer acceptable at home, in
the community or the workplace.

We ask readers: Is this political correctness gone astray, or do you think
likening energy waste to sexism and other loutish behavior is fair and, perhaps
more importantly, effective?


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Thu Apr 2 02:24:06 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Wed, 01 Apr 2009 08:24:06 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Save the Mekong: Our River Feeds Millions
Message-ID: <49D38716.9020809@gmail.com>

Subject: Save the Mekong
Date: Wed, 1 Apr 2009 02:08:43 -0700 (PDT)
From: dien nguyen <dienuc at yahoo.com.au>

From: ERI - Victoria Wangai [mailto:victoria at earthrights.org] On Behalf Of ERI -
Paul Donowitz
Sent: Monday, March 30, 2009 9:53 AM

Save the Mekong: Our River Feeds Millions

March 27, 2009

Dear ERI Supporters:

The mighty Mekong River presently provides food, life and inspiration to
millions of people in mainland Southeast Asia. But threats to the Mekong River
are mounting and we need your help.

The governments of Cambodia, Laos, and Thailand are planning to build 11 big
dams on the river's mainstream. If built, these dams would destroy the river's
rich fisheries, placing at risk the livelihoods and food security of millions of
people.

Please take action today to help protect the Mekong River.

The Save the Mekong coalition is a new network formed of local and international
groups and ordinary people who all share a concern about the future of the
Mekong River. The Save the Mekong coalition is working to protect the river, its
resources and people's livelihoods, and is calling for better ways to meet
energy and water needs.

Please support this new coalition by signing the online petition today to urge
the region's Prime Ministers to keep the Mekong flowing freely.

For further information, visit www.savethemekong.org or email

mekong at savethemekong.org. To spread the word, you can also add us to your
Facebook page.

Thank you for helping to protect the Mekong River.

[If you have difficulties accessing the online petition website, visit
http://tinyurl.com/SavetheMekongPostcard to see the petition message. If you
would like to add your name, then email your details (Name, City/ Province,
Country, an optional personal message) to mekong at savethemekong.org.]

________________________________________________________________________________________________
Bill Hayton <bill.hayton at bbc.co.uk>

What about the 15 dams that China is building on the Mekong and its tributaries?
Petitions probably less effective there though...

Bill Hayton


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Thu Apr 2 03:22:37 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Wed, 01 Apr 2009 09:22:37 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] OVERFISHING THREATENING STOCKS OF SEA CUMBERS,
WARNS UN REPORT
Message-ID: <49D394CD.4060907@gmail.com>

Subject: OVERFISHING THREATENING STOCKS OF SEA CUMBERS, WARNS UN REPORT
Date: Wed, 1 Apr 2009 12:00:06 -0400
From: UNNews <UNNews at un.org>
To: <news4 at secint00.un.org>

OVERFISHING THREATENING STOCKS OF SEA CUMBERS, WARNS UN REPORT
New York, Apr 1 2009 12:00PM
Stocks of sea cucumbers, found on the ocean bed worldwide and a staple in diets
across Asia, are increasingly in trouble from overfishing, according to a new
United Nations report released today.

Sea cucumbers, known as b?che-de-mer in French, have long been a popular
ingredient in Asian cuisine and are fast gaining recognition among European
chefs, helping countries like Indonesia, Papua New Guinea and the Philippines
export large quantities to China and other markets.

Asia and the Pacific are the top sea cucumber producing regions, generating some
20,000 to 40,000 tons per year. However, Ecuador?s Galapagos Islands, the
Seychelles in the Indian Ocean and Newfoundland in Canada are also hotspots for
the undersea animal.

?The fast pace of development of sea cucumber fisheries to supply growing
international demand is placing most fisheries and many sea cucumber species at
risk,? <"http://www.fao.org/news/story/en/item/11225/icode/">said the UN Food
and Agriculture Organization (FAO) study.

"The Sea Cucumbers: a global review of fisheries and trade" report warned that
sea cumber stocks are under intense fishing pressure throughout the world,
depleting most high value commercial species.

The <"http://www.fao.org/">FAO report underscored the need for the development
of sea cumber management plans specific to local circumstances, including
measures which establish catch quotas and minimum size limits, ban fishing
during breeding seasons, and improve the monitoring of stocks.

Limiting overfishing is difficult, however, as effective management plans for
sea cucumber fisheries are uncommon, noted the report, despite the substantial
contribution they make to the export economies of many coastal regions.

The FAO report also identified other threats to sea cucumber populations, such
as global warming, habitat destruction and illegal fishing.
________________

For more details go to UN News Centre at http://www.un.org/news




From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 3 00:34:54 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 02 Apr 2009 06:34:54 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] One more lizard species discovered in Vietnam
Message-ID: <49D4BEFE.70904@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/tech/2009/04/839754/

One more lizard species discovered in Vietnam
17:25' 02/04/2009 (GMT+7)

VietNamNet Bridge ? Scientist Ngo Van Tri from the HCM City Tropical Biology
Institute on April 2 told VietNamNet that one more species of lizard had been
discovered at Nui Chua National Park in the central province of Ninh Thuan.


The new species of lizard is named AaronBauer ? Dixonius aaronbaueri
sp.n.Ng?&Ziegler, 2009.

The new species of lizard was discovered by Ngo Van Tri and Dr. Thomas Ziegler
from the Cologne Zoo, Germany. The discovery was published in a German
scientific magazine named ?Fauno System and Evolution? dated March 17, 2009.

This species of lizard is named AaronBauer ? Dixonius aaronbaueri
sp.n.Ng?&Ziegler, 2009, after Professor Aaron Bauer from Villanova University,
Pennsylvania, the US, who is called the ?King of lizards?.

This is the smallest species of lizard discovered so far. Its maximum length is
3.86cm and it has an orange colour. This species of lizard has feet cleaved in two.

There are only five species of lizards which have feet cleaved in two, including
four in Vietnam and one in Thailand. This species of lizard is being threatened
by a tourism development project at Nui Chua National Park.

Mai Loan



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 3 01:09:38 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 02 Apr 2009 07:09:38 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Resident projects threaten wetlands
Message-ID: <49D4C722.3020202@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/tech/2009/04/839791/

Resident projects threaten wetlands
19:51' 02/04/2009 (GMT+7)

VietNamNet Bridge ? A wetlands area in southern coastal Kien Giang Province that
is a feeding ground for red-headed cranes is again in danger of being damaged,
following years of efforts to protect the area by international and local
organisations.

Six local households have been digging canals and building embankments, invading
the proposed nature reserve, to make way for shrimp breeding ponds.

Although the local commune?s People?s Committee has successfully stopped the
invasive actions of residents, the late handling of the current affair has
caused serious damage to the site, according to Tran Triet, director of the
International Crane Foundation?s Southeast Asia Programme.

The wetlands, which contains the co bang grass (Lepironia articulata), is
located in Phu My Commune in Kien Giang Province, which borders Cambodia.

The grass grows in an area that acts as a shelter and feeding habitat for rare
red-headed cranes.

A project to protect the area has won an environmental protection award from
UN-HABITAT in 2006, as well as a finalist for the 2007 Equator Prize sponsored
by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).

Triet, who is also a biology professor at HCM City University, said it had taken
many years to call on foreign sponsors and persuade the province to supply land
to carry out the project.

"Thousands of dollars were invested to preserve the wetlands and protect the
feeding habitats for the cranes, and if not, it would have all been lost," he
added. Triet said canals would be filled in so that cranes could migrate to find
food in the dry season at the wetlands.

Ha Tri Cao, a project co-ordinator, said canals had been built by residents for
shrimp breeding two years ago when the preservation project began. Provincial
authorities approved IUCN?s proposal to stop canal construction at that time.

Recently, six families have built embankments of 5,200 metres in length and
dozens of small criss-crossing canals.

Lam Tien Dung, deputy chairman of Kien Luong District?s People?s Committee, said
the committee had asked authorities of the commune to suspend the construction.

They were also asked to work with the IUCN project?s managing board to recover
the status of the wetlands before filling in holes that had been dug.

Local residents have been informed and asked not to destroy the wetlands, he said.

Representatives of IUCN in Viet Nam on Monday investigated the site and
committed to sponsor the project until 2012, providing that the project?s
managing board and local authorities help control the construction.

If the wetlands were destroyed, international organisations would cease helping
the project, said Triet.

The project aims to preserve 2,000ha of wetlands. It has trained the community?s
Khmer ethnic minority to make high-quality handicraft products such as handbags,
hats, and storage bins from grass.

VietNamNet/Viet Nam News


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 3 01:15:40 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 02 Apr 2009 07:15:40 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Mangro forest welcomes new amphibian-reptile residents
Message-ID: <49D4C88C.3030306@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://english.vovnews.vn/Home/Mangro-forest-welcomes-new-amphibianreptile-residents/20094/103137.vov

Updated : 8:58 AM, 04/02/2009
Mangro forest welcomes new amphibian-reptile residents

Scientists have found the presence for the first time of nine new species of
amphibian-reptile in Ho Chi Minh City?s Can Gio mangrove forest.
This was the result of a research project on amphibian-reptile biodiversity
developments in the Can Gio Mangrove Biosphere Reserve carried out between
September 2006 and March 2008, said the project?s director Nguyen Ngoc Sang.

The species include water toad, green bullfrog, grey salamander and several
species of snakes.

The research also showed that several species, including large-belt snake,
lilac-coloured crocodile, no longer live in the area.

VNA/VOVNews


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 3 01:18:06 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 02 Apr 2009 07:18:06 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Seminar strives to bolster corporate conscience
Message-ID: <49D4C91E.3030001@gmail.com>


http://english.vovnews.vn/Home/Seminar-strives-to-bolster-corporate-conscience/20094/103138.vov

Updated : 8:45 AM, 04/02/2009
Seminar strives to bolster corporate conscience

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and communications campaigns topped the
agenda of a seminar held by the Vietnam Chamber of Commerce and Industry (VCCI)
and the UN Development Programme in Hanoi on April 1.

The seminar aims to seek ways to boost cooperation in this field between the
VCCI and UNDP, and accelerate the awareness of CRS in local businesses.

VCCI Vice Chairman Doan Duy Khuong remarked that by promoting CRS, enterprises
will not only contribute to the country?s socio-economic and cultural
development, but also improve their prestige, brands and image in the eyes of
consumers, providers, distributors and investors.

It will also encourage the working spirit of workers, thereby increasing
productivity, Khuong stressed.

Nguyen Quang Vinh, Deputy Director of the VCCI?s Office for Business Sustainable
Development, said the Global Compact Network in Vietnam (GCVN) was organised to
facilitate cooperation and dialogues between the domestic business community and
boost the implementation of the 10 principles of the UN Compact Network.

Besides connecting local enterprises, GCVN also serves as a forum for UN
agencies, business associations, NGOs and trade unions to share experiences in
fostering CRS and better business practices.

VNA/VOVNews


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 3 01:31:26 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 02 Apr 2009 07:31:26 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Illegal sand exploitation devastates farmland
Message-ID: <49D4CC3E.5050002@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://thanhniennews.com/features/?catid=10&newsid=47567

Last Updated: Wednesday, April 1, 2009 10:17:34 Vietnam (GMT+07)

Illegal sand exploitation devastates farmland

A crane loads sand illegally dredged from Dau Tieng Lake in Dong Nai Province on
to a truck Virtually overnight, some paddy fields on the Dong Nai River have
collapsed recently.
It is not some cataclysmic event like an earthquake that has caused it, but the
illegal activity of sand dredging in Dong Nai Province that continues unabated
five years after a government ban.
The Dong Nai River originates in the Central Highlands and flows for more than
437 kilometers through the provinces of Lam Dong, Dak Nong, Binh Phuoc, Dong
Nai, Binh Duong, Ho Chi Minh City, Long An and Tien Giang.
But it is the sand exploitation in Dong Nai Province, one of the fastest areas
in the country to industrialize, that has seriously eroded many areas on its
banks, including public, farming and residential land.
Provincial police have busted four cases since early this year and seized 27
dredging vessels, but the illegal exploitation is apparently beyond the control
of local authorities.


A portion of the Dong Nai River bank in Binh Loi Commune has eroded due to the
illegal activity of sand dredging that has continued unabated for five years in
Dong Nai Province
Thanh Nien reporters last week found many sections of the river bank eroded to
dangerous levels.
?A bamboo hedge collapsed into the river some days ago,? said Dao Thi Bong of
Binh Loi Commune in Vinh Cuu District. ?I don?t know when the erosion will stop.
?There used to be a path on the river bank some 15 meters from my land. But it
has disappeared to erosion and locals now have to walk through my garden.?
Her neighbor, Nguyen Ngoc Dinh, said he has lost some hundred square meters of
land so far to erosion.
?The situation has become slightly better recently after the district police
began patrolling more regularly,? he said. ?Last week, I reported illegal
dredging to the police, but they could only manage to fire some warning shots in
the air to scare them away.?
Nguyen Van Son, chief of police in Binh Loi Commune, admitted that illegal sand
dredging was happening, but done more secretly.
?Waterway traffic police last week detected two illegal dredgers but they sank
their boats and fled to avoid being caught,? he said.
Nguyen Van Tot from the province?s Nhon Trach District said dozens of dredgers
often worked at night to evade detection and capture.
The illegal dredging is also common on the Dau Tieng Lake, which is fed by the
Dong Nai River, threatening local irrigation works.
A dredger said his team could dredge 20 cubic meters of sand from the lake
everyday for a remuneration of VND10,000 (US$0.56) per cubic meter.
The owner of a nearby caf? said the pirate dredgers run construction material
sales depots near the site to cover up their exploitation because it is legal to
store sand in such places.
A local resident said up to 100 trucks carrying sand from the site leave between
4 a.m. and 9 p.m. everyday.
Nguyen Trong Thanh, director of the Dau Tieng Irrigation Work Management, said
the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development had banned sand exploitation
from the lake in 2005, but the activity still continued.
Vo Van Chanh, deputy director of Dong Nai Department of Natural Resources and
Environment, also said the illegal sand dredging has been ?complicated? and
difficult to control.
All concerned authorities have been mobilized to deal with the issue but they
have not been able to stop illegal dredging yet, he said.
He said the district?s people committees have been asked to intensify patrols on
the river as a preventive measure.
Clay exploitation
The loss of farmland to illegal dredging is not confined to Dong Nai,
unfortunately. The Central Highlands province of Dak Lak has seen its farmland
shrink after people began digging up their fields to exploit it for clay to make
bricks.
Erosion caused by illegal sand dredging is also threatening irrigation works in
the province.
The Dak Lak Department of Natural Resources and Environment has announced that
84.5 percent of entities and individuals that are exploiting minerals don?t have
permits.
Sand and clay are major resources being illegally exploited, besides stone,
peat, lead, zinc and granite.
The department says only two companies have been licensed to dredge sand, but at
least eight other entities and 58 individuals are illegally exploiting around
500,000 cubic meters a year.
Only three companies are licensed to exploit clay, but nine others and 178
individuals engage in the activity, averaging 320,000 cubic meters a year.
Duong Dinh Hoanh, head of the department?s mineral management office, said
illegal sand dredging was common in the Krong Ana and Krong No rivers.
He said this had caused erosion of river banks and changed the river?s currents,
while clay exploitation on paddy fields has reduced farmland in the province.
Tran Dinh Chien, chairman of Ea Bong Commune?s People?s Committee in Krong Ana
District, said there were 40 brick producers in the commune and 80 percent of
rice paddies had clay.
Residents have exploited clay to sell to brick producers, saying they were
renovating their farms, he said.
Hoanh said this activity has damaged the fields because they would become deeper
and unfit for rice cultivation.
In January, the Dak Lak People?s Committee instructed district authorities to
strictly manage mineral exploitation and take stiff measures against violations.
However, district authorities have failed to report to the committee on action
taken thus far. The deadline for submitting the report was February 28.
Reported by Thanh Nien staff


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 3 02:28:02 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 02 Apr 2009 08:28:02 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Climate change will hit China hard, says UK scientist
Message-ID: <49D4D982.6080602@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/china/2009-04/02/content_7642477.htm

Climate change will hit China hard, says UK scientist
By Liang Qiwen (China Daily)
Updated: 2009-04-02 09:53


GUANGZHOU: Hundreds of millions of Chinese people are likely to face extreme
climate change and shortages of water, food and energy in the next few decades
unless the emission of carbon dioxide and other polluting chemicals is checked,
the UK's chief scientific adviser said in Guangzhou yesterday.

John Beddington, engaged in research of global climate for decades, was
concerned about the impact of global warming on the world, especially China, in
a seminar, attended by dozens of leading climate scientists based in South China.

"China will be hit hard by climate change, as temperature is predicted to rise
above the global average," Beddington said.

"The worst effects may be avoided by keeping the global temperature rise below
two degrees Celsius."

A rise higher than 2 degrees increases the risk of a decline in global food
production and is likely to have a major impact on water resources.

An additional 1 to 2 billion people, many in China, would be faced with water
shortages, partly due to loss of mountain glaciers and the water they provide
when melted in summer, he said.

According to his study, temperatures in China could rise by about 2 degrees
above pre-industrial levels by 2050, and 4 degrees or more by the end of the
century.
The impact of climate change was evident in the blizzards and flood in China
last year, and the frequent droughts in Guangdong province, he added.

Beddington, who met representatives of the China Academy of Sciences in Beijing
on Monday, is seeking cooperation with environmental protection institutes in
Guangzhou to fight global warming.

"The UK is very mature in clean power technologies, such as marine power and
wind power," Beddington said, hoping enterprises in South China could do the same.

Many non-governmental organizations (NGOs) engaged in environmental protection
in Guangzhou are trying hard to build a closer network to help introduce
overseas environmental protection technologies.

"We will build a website and open seminars once every three months in the future
with almost 1,000 other NGOs and representatives of local enterprises in need of
clean technologies," said Wang Yazhou, environment academy manager of t


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 3 03:33:44 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 02 Apr 2009 09:33:44 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] =?utf-8?q?Rethinking_investments_in_natural_resource?=
=?utf-8?q?s=3A_China=E2=80=99s_emerging_role_in_the_Mekong_region?=
Message-ID: <49D4E8E8.8090206@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://www.panda.org/about_our_earth/all_publications/?uNewsID=161281

Rethinking investments in natural resources: China?s emerging role in the Mekong
region

Download

Rethinking Investments in natural resources: China?s emerging role in the Mekong
region [pdf, 938 KB]
http://assets.panda.org/downloads/china_study_final.pdf
China study executive summary [pdf, 168 KB]
http://assets.panda.org/downloads/china_study_executive_summary.pdf

Rethinking Investments in natural resources: China?s emerging role in the Mekong
region


This report was written by Jeff Rutherford, Kate Lazarus and Shawn Kelley.

This scoping study is part of a research project entitled Understanding China as
an Actor in the Mekong Region, jointly implemented by the Heinrich B?ll
Stiftung, WWF and the International Institute for Sustainable Development. The
project aims to shed some light on China?s economic role in Vietnam, Lao PDR and
Cambodia as a basis for constructive dialogue between decision makers and other
stakeholders in China and the Mekong countries.

The research focus is on Chinese investments in natural resources ? in
particular in the mining, agribusiness and hydropower sectors ? while also
touching on issues related to trade and aid. In addition to the scoping study,
case studies in the three countries will provide a more indepth analysis of
China?s engagement in specific sectors. The project outputs will be available
at: www.boell-southeastasia.org, www.tradeknowledgenetwork.net and www.wwf.dk.

For more information, please contact:
Colin McQuistan
WWF Greater Mekong Regional Policy Coordinator
Greater Mekong Programme
Chulawich 1 Building, 5th Floor
Chulalongkorn University
Henri Dunant Road, Bangkok, 10330, Thailand

Email: colin.mcquistan at wwfgreatermekong.org


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 3 12:21:57 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 02 Apr 2009 18:21:57 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] PARTIES TO UN TREATY ON BIODIVERSITY MEET TO DRAFT
PLAN FOR ACCESS, BENEFIT SHARING
Message-ID: <49D564B5.5070309@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Subject: PARTIES TO UN TREATY ON BIODIVERSITY MEET TO DRAFT PLAN FOR ACCESS,
BENEFIT SHARING
Date: Thu, 2 Apr 2009 18:00:19 -0400
From: UNNews <UNNews at un.org>
To: <news4 at secint00.un.org>

PARTIES TO UN TREATY ON BIODIVERSITY MEET TO DRAFT PLAN FOR ACCESS, BENEFIT SHARING
New York, Apr 2 2009 6:00PM
Some 500 participants gathered in Paris today to begin talks aimed at finalizing
a pact which will allow international researchers and scientists access to plant
and animal genetic resources, in compliance with the United Nations Convention
on Biological Diversity (CBD).

The <"http://www.cbd.int/">CBD had a 2010 target date for achieving a
significant reduction in the rate of loss of the world?s plant and animal
species at the global, regional and national level, and is the international
framework for the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity and the
equitable sharing of its benefits.

The CBD, which is signed by 191 States, recognizes the sovereignty of nations
over their natural resources, and parties to the Convention have the authority
to determine physical access to genetic resources in areas within their
jurisdiction.

Parties also have the obligation to take appropriate measures to ensure the
sharing of benefits derived from the use of their genetic resources.

Access to these resources in exchange for the fair and equitable sharing of
benefits can contribute to further research and development with a positive
impact on human well-being through the use of genetic resources in
pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, agriculture among other sectors.

The seventh meeting of the Ad Hoc Open-ended Working Group on Access and
Benefit-sharing, which concludes on 8 April, is the first of three mandated by
the Conference of the Parties to the CBD to finalize the negotiation of the
international regime before their next meeting in October 2010 in Nagoya, Japan.
________________

For more details go to UN News Centre at http://www.un.org/news


From communication.env at fpt.vn Fri Apr 3 21:31:49 2009
From: communication.env at fpt.vn (ENV Communication)
Date: Fri, 3 Apr 2009 17:31:49 +0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Weekly Bulletin 309
Message-ID: <004d01c9b447$66110940$1101a8c0@tunganhyen>



E309 3 April 2009



Top News



Tay Ninh: Hunters caught in Ben Ra

On March 31st, 2009 rangers from Lo Go-Xa Mat National Park stopped two subjects illegally hunting wild animals in the Ben Ra area near the Vam Co Dong River. The rangers confiscated a king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) and the subjects are being held in temporary custody.

(Vietnamese version)

http://envietnam.org/E_News/E_309/VQG_Lo_Go_Xa_Mat_Thu_giu_ran_ho_mang_chua.html



Khanh Hoa: Rangers caught illegally transporting wildlife

Six rangers from the Khanh Hoa Provincial Forest Protection Department were recently caught using an official state car to illegally transport wildlife. All the wild animals, including two turtles and two bamboo rats, were confiscated for further investigation.

(Vietnamese version)

http://envietnam.org/E_News/E_309/Bat_xe_kiem_lam_van_chuyen_lau_DVHD.pdf



Ha Tinh: Factory closed down for polluting the river

A cassava starch processing factory, managed by the Taiwanese company Vedan, in the northern central province of Ha Tinh, has been shut down after inspectors found it was polluting the Rao Tro River.

(Vietnamese version)

http://envietnam.org/E_News/E_309/Tam_dinh_chi_hoat_dong_Vedan_Ha_Tinh.html

(English version)

http://envietnam.org/E_News/E_309/Inspectors_close_notorious_river_polluting_factory.html



Ho Chi Minh: Nine new species found in Can Gio mangrove forest

Scientists from the Tropical Biology Institute recently announced the discovery of nine new species of amphibians and reptiles including a species of water toad, a green racophorus species, a black gecko species, a grey salamander species, and five new species of snake were found in the Can Gio mangrove forest.

(Vietnamese version)

http://envietnam.org/E_News/E_309/Phat_hien_them_9_loai_o_rung_ngap_man_Can_Gio.html

(English version)

http://envietnam.org/E_News/E_309/Nine_new_species_found_in_Can_Gio_mangrove_forest.html



Quang Binh: Turtle released

On March 25th, 2009 the Quang Binh Environmental Police, in cooperation with the Quang Binh Fisheries Department, released a rare turtle of 10kg into the sea. The turtle had been caught by a fisherman off the Thua Thien-Hue coastline.

(Vietnamese version)

http://envietnam.org/E_News/E_309/Quang_Binh_Tha_rua_quy_ve_bien.pdf





Environmental Education Program



Environmental Education program for secondary school students living near Pu Huong Nature

Staff from Pu Huong Nature Reserve in Nghe An province, in cooperation with the management teams of three secondary schools have conducted an environmental education program for six grade students near the reserve. The program commenced in February 2009 and has gained a great support from the students and teachers. So far, Pu Huong staff have held 41 nature club meetings involving 300 students in three secondary schools. Through this program the students have gained a practical knowledge about the conservation of nature and the environment in Vietnam. Pu Huong is one of seven national parks and nature reserves that received a "Green Grant" as part of the ENV and Toyota Motor Vietnam program: "Go Green - for the Preservation of Nature".







Please note: Past bulletins can be found on ENV's website www.envietnam.org



Nguyen Thi My Dung
Communications officer
Education for Nature - Vietnam
No. 5 Ngo 192 Thai Thinh
PO Box 222
Dong Da district
Hanoi, Vietnam
Phone/fax: +84 4 3514-8850
E-mail: env at fpt.vn
www.envietnam.org (English)
www.thiennhien.org (Vietnamese)
www.savingvietnamswildlife.org (English wildlife trade website)


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From kevinysli at graduate.hku.hk Sat Apr 4 01:36:27 2009
From: kevinysli at graduate.hku.hk (Kevin Yuk-shing Li)
Date: Fri, 3 Apr 2009 22:36:27 +0800
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Cambodia - Community in shadow of KR dam
Message-ID: <A7BEB17FE1FD4455BF67F30E69ADA252@KevinLi>

Community in shadow of KR dam
Written by Thet Sambath
The Phnom Penh Post. Friday, 03 April 2009
Battambang province
http://www.phnompenhpost.com/index.php/2009040325195/National-news/Community-in-shadow-of-KR-dam.html

Built by 'April 17 people' - former city dwellers - the Battambang dam in
Chork Thom village is set for an ADB-funded rehabilitation, but residents
want compensation before relocating.

NAN Vey's house is solidly built of zinc sheets with a thatched roof and
stocked with groceries. It sits on the site of a former Khmer Rouge-era dam,
which collapsed in the late 1970s and has been used as rice fields for 30
years.

But now there is no water in the fields near his house, and his annual rice
crop, while reliable, is modest - the only water for irrigation is in a
nearby canal, whose depth varies between 1 and 3 metres.

To make ends meet, Nan Vey, 28, opened his small grocery store a few months
ago in his house on the dam in Chork Thom village, Battambang province. He
sells cakes, candy, sugar, oranges and spicy foods to families who farm the
land that was once the dam's basin.

The 500-hectare Chork dam is one of three in Battambang province that are
set to be rehabilitated with funding provided by the Asian Development Bank
(ADB) as part of a much-needed plan to improve the country's irrigation
systems.

But local authorities have rejected the idea of compensating the 180
families farming on the former dam, saying they were living on state land
and were not entitled to it. The ADB then said a compromise must be reached
to allow it to approve the funds. Negotiations between local authorities and
residents are ongoing.

Nan Vey has a 2-hectare rice paddy on the dam. While carrying water from the
dam home so his son could help to wash the groceries, Nan Vey told the Post
that he is aware of the rehabilitation program.

"When they start the rehabilitation, I will have to move my house and
grocery store, and I will build a new house somewhere else," he said.

"The government must give us a new rice field or compensation once the dam
is repaired. They said we can continue to farm on it, but how can we? It
will flood the fields."

Another local villager, Noy Nath, 43, was part of the forced labour gang
that built a canal for fish farming next to the dam in 1977. He said that,
when he looks at the dam, he feels sad because it reminds him of how they
had just rice gruel to eat while building it.

Despite the bad memories, Noy Nath supports the rehabilitation of the
historic dam. But he remains worried that its repair will leave people like
him - who farm inside the collapsed dam's basin - hungry again.

"It is a good idea to repair the dam for the farmers, but people whose land
is affected will end up with no rice to eat if they have no land to
cultivate," he said.

"If one gets benefit and another gets no benefit, then we will see more
disputes. Already with this dam the farmers argue about water - on one side
they need water, but the other side won't release water because that will
dry out their fields."

And when the rains come, he said, one side wants to release water, but the
other side doesn't want it because their fields will flood.

Another villager, Chum La, 38, insists that the families be given
alternative land in return.

"The government wants to develop this so people can have irrigation and grow
two rice crops a year, but hundreds of us will have nothing to eat if we
lose our rice fields," Chum La said.

"So if this development is going to lead to some people going hungry or
starving, they must provide compensation and new land somewhere else."

Ex-KR also in support
A former Khmer Rouge cadre who was part of the team overseeing the
construction of the Chork dam is in favour of the government rehabilitation
plan. The man, who requested anonymity, said prisoners and "April 17
people" - former city-dwellers - were used to construct it.

"I am happy that the government and the ADB are interested in rehabilitating
this dam," he said. "Even though life was hard and people died digging it,
it will be useful for the next generation to use. It should be repaired
because it was created by the force of the people in 1977."





From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 4 01:53:28 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Fri, 03 Apr 2009 07:53:28 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Report Calls for "Prosperity without Growth"
Message-ID: <49D622E8.6070401@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Download the report at:
http://www.sd-commission.org.uk/publications/downloads/prosperity_without_growth_report.pdf

Subject: News: Report Calls for "Prosperity without Growth"
Date: Fri, 3 Apr 2009 04:52:14 -0700
From: Yahoo Group <ashwani.vasishth at gmail.com>
Reply-To: envecolnews-owner at yahoogroups.com
To: Environmental Ecology News <envecolnews at yahoogroups.com>
CC: Sustainability Planning News <sustplan at yahoogroups.com>



[The report itself, Prosperity without Growth? - The transition to a
sustainable economy, can be accessed from:
http://www.sd-commission.org.uk/publications.php?id=914 ]

* * *

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/mar/30/g20-sustainable-development-commission

*Ahead of G20 summit, report says: promote sustainability over growth

* * Nick Fletcher
* The Guardian, Monday 30 March 2009

The pursuit of economic growth was one of the root causes of the
financial crisis, and governments should respond to the recession by
abandoning growth at all costs in favour of a more sustainable, greener
system, says a report out today.

Before this week's G20 summit, the Sustainable Development Commission,
an independent adviser to the government, says the developed world's
reliance on debt to fuel its relentless growth has created an unstable
system that has made individuals, families and communities vulnerable to
cycles of boom and bust. The benefits of growth have also been delivered
unequally, with a fifth of the world's population earning only 2% of
global income. Increased consumption also has disastrous environmental
consequences, including the degradation of some 60% of the world's
ecosystems.

According to the SDC, the global economy is almost five times larger
than it was 50 years ago, and if it continues to grow at the same rate
it would be 80 times larger by the end of the century.

"Faced with the current recession, it is understandable that many
leaders at the G20 summit will be anxious to restore business as usual,"
said Professor Tim Jackson, economics commissioner at the SDC. "But
governments really need to take a long, hard look at the effects of our
single-minded devotion to growth - effects which include the recession
itself.

"It may seem inopportune to be questioning growth while we are faced
with daily news of the effects of recession, but allegiance to growth is
the most dominant feature of an economic and political system that has
led us to the brink of disaster. Not to stand back now and question what
has happened would be to compound failure with failure: failure of
vision with failure of responsibility. Figuring out how to deliver
prosperity without growth is more essential now than ever."

The report - called Prosperity without growth? - calls on governments to
develop a sustainable economic system that does not rely on
ever-increasing consumption.

The SDC's proposals to achieve this include: improving financial and
fiscal prudence, as well as giving priority to investment in public
assets and infrastructure over private affluence; allowing individuals
to flourish by tackling inequality, sharing available work, improving
work-life balance and reversing the culture of consumerism; and
establishing ecological limits on economic activity.

The report concludes: "The clearest message from the financial crisis is
that our current model of economic success is fundamentally flawed. For
the advanced economies of the western world, prosperity without growth
is no longer a utopian dream. It is a financial and ecological necessity."

* * *

http://www.sd-commission.org.uk/pages/redefining-prosperity.html

*Redefining Prosperity

*Road scene with sign, Please find alternative routeThe economy is
geared, above all, to economic growth. Economic policy in the current
recession is all about returning to growth - but an economic crisis can
be an opportunity for some basic rethinking and restructuring.

Two objectives other than growth - sustainability and wellbeing - have
moved up the political and policy-making agenda in recent years,
challenging the overriding priority traditionally given to economic growth.

SDC's "Redefining Prosperity" project has looked into the connections
and conflicts between sustainability, growth, and wellbeing.

As part of a two year programme of work, we commissioned thinkpieces,
organised seminars, and invited feedback. This project has now resulted
in a major SDC report: 'Prosperity without growth?: the transition to a
sustainable economy' by Professor Tim Jackson, SDC's Economics
Commissioner. Prosperity without growth? analyses the relationship
between growth and the growing environmental crisis and 'social
recession'. In the last quarter of a century, while the global economy
has doubled, the increased in resource consumption has degraded an
estimated 60% of the world's ecosystems. The benefits of growth have
been distributed very unequally, with a fifth of the world's population
sharing just 2% of global income. Even in developed countries, huge gaps
remain in wealth and well-being between rich and poor.

While modernising production and reducing the impact of certain goods
and services have led to greater resource efficiency in recent decades,
our report finds that current aspirations for 'decoupling' environmental
impacts from economic growth are unrealistic. The report finds no
evidence as yet of decoupling taking place on anything like the scale or
speed which would be required to avoid increasing environmental devastation.

Prosperity without growth? proposes twelve steps towards a sustainable
economy and argues for a redefinition of "prosperity" in line with
evidence about what contributes to people's wellbeing.

SDC intends to generate discussion and debate on the challenges on the
issues that Prosperity without Growth? raises. We have sent the report
to the Prime Minister, government leaders in the devolved
administrations, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, and other government
ministers, as well as business and civil society leaders.

/*** NOTICE: In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, this
material is distributed, without profit, for research and educational
purposes only. ***/



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 4 01:56:56 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Fri, 03 Apr 2009 07:56:56 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Oxford: Conference announcement: 4 Degrees and Beyond,
28-30 September 2009, University of Oxfor
Message-ID: <49D623B8.10007@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Subject: Conference announcement: 4 Degrees and Beyond, 28-30 September 2009,
University of Oxford
Date: Wed, 01 Apr 2009 06:02:58 -0500
From: Maria Mansfield <events at eci.ox.ac.uk>
Reply-To: Maria Mansfield <events at eci.ox.ac.uk>
To: Climate Change Info Mailing List <climate-l at lists.iisd.ca>

The University of Oxford, the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research and the
UK Met Office announce the agenda-setting conference 4 Degress and Beyond:
Implications for people, ecosystems and the earth system. Despite 17 years of
political negotiations since the Rio Earth Summit, global greenhouse gas
emissions have continued to rise, which presents the global community with a
stark challenge: Either instigate an immediate and radical reversal in existing
emission trends or accept global temperature rises well beyond 4?C. The
conference will (1) assess the consequences of a change in global temperature
above 4?C for a range of systems and sectors and (2) explore the options that
are open for avoiding climate changes of this magnitude.

This is an open call for participants and for abstracts for presentations and
posters under the themes of: i) Agriculture, Water and Food Security ii)
Vulnerable People and Places iii) Ecosystems and Ecosystem Services iv) Earth
System Feedbacks and Thresholds, and v) Emissions Reductions. Places are limited
and the closing date for abstract submission is 1 May. Further information at
www.eci.ox.ac.uk/4degrees



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 4 01:58:47 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Fri, 03 Apr 2009 07:58:47 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Access and Benefit-Sharing of the Convention on
Biological Diversity-7 Meeting Opens at UNESCO
Message-ID: <49D62427.9000401@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Subject: ABS-7 Meeting Opens at UNESCO
Date: Thu, 2 Apr 2009 06:37:24 -0500
From: Langston James Goree VI <kimo at iisd.org>
Reply-To: Langston James Goree VI <kimo at iisd.org>
To: Biodiversity Info Mailing List <biodiv-l at lists.iisd.ca>

Seventh meeting of the /Ad Hoc /Open-ended
Working Group on Access and Benefit-Sharing of the Convention on Biological
Diversity*

*2 - 8 April 2009 | Paris, France*

http://www.iisd.ca/biodiv/abs7/pictures/2april/2aprilfullth/DSC09380full.jpg

*Bakary Kante*, UN Environment Programme (UNEP), *Ahmed Djoghlaf*, CBD
Executive Secretary, *Timothy Hodges* (Canada), ABS Working Group
Co-Chair, *Fernando Casas* (Colombia), ABS Working Group Co-Chair,
*Jochen Flasbarth*, German Ministry of Environment and COP9 President
and *Walter Erdelen*, Assistant Director-General for Natural Sciences,
UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)

http://www.iisd.ca/biodiv/abs7/images/generic/fondoder.jpg

http://www.iisd.ca/biodiv/abs7/images/generic/esq3.jpg

http://www.iisd.ca/biodiv/abs7/images/generic/fondoabajo.jpg

The seventh meeting of the /Ad Hoc /Open-ended Working Group on Access
and Benefit-sharing opened on 2 April 2009 at 10:00 am, at UNESCO
headquarters, in Paris, France. In a morning plenary, delegates heard
opening and regional statements, and reports from the intersessional
expert groups, and addressed organizational issues.


Opening the meeting, Working Group Co-Chair Timothy Hodges (Canada)
welcomed delegates, and underscored that the Working Group has 21 days
of negotiations left to discharge its mandate to finalize the
international regime and to submit an instrument/instruments for
consideration and adoption by CBD COP 10. Stating the time was limited
but sufficient for the task, he welcomed the specificity of COP Decision
IX/12 that sets out the basis for negotiations, milestones, a firm
deadline and precise goals.

logointegral_300dpi-tna.jpg

IISD Reporting Services coverage at
http://www.iisd.ca/biodiv/abs7/


----------------------------------------------------------------------
Langston James "Kimo" Goree VI
Director, IISD Reporting Services
International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) -- United
Nations Office
300 E 56th St. Apt. 11A - New York, NY 10022 USA
Direct Line: +1 973 273 5860 Email: kimo at iisd.org <mailto:kimo at iisd.org>
*Blog:** **http://www.kimogoree.com <http://www.kimogoree.com/> **Skype:
kimogoree
**Follow on Twitter: *http://twitter.com/kimogoree

Where*: New York*

Notice:This email and any attachments may contain information that is
personal, confidential, legally privileged
and/or copyright. No part of it should be reproduced, adapted or
communicated without the prior written consent of the author.**






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--
Vern Weitzel (Mr.) BSc, BA, MA, M Env Man & Dev <vern at coombs.anu.edu.au>
<vern.weitzel at gmail.com> <vernweitzel at mac.com>

ANU/AVSL eMail Lists: http://coombs.anu.edu.au/~vern/forum.html
NGO Centre eMail Lists: http://ngocentre.org.vn/mailman/listinfo

Address during 2009: 2724 NE 24th St, Renton WA 98056 USA phone: (425) 228-4513
Ha Noi home/office address: 1st stairwell, apartment 504-505, block A4 Giang Vo,
Ba Dinh, Ha Noi [off Ngoc Khanh Street, opposite Van Phuc Compound]
home phone: +84 4 3846-1751 Skype: vernweitzel
IF I DO NOT RESPOND IN A REASONABLE TIME, PLEASE RESEND YOUR MESSAGE.


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 4 02:04:25 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Fri, 03 Apr 2009 08:04:25 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] In Confronting Its Biggest Foe,
Green Movement Also Fights Itself
Message-ID: <49D62579.90206@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB123871211997284375.html

In Confronting Its Biggest Foe, Green Movement Also Fights Itself
By JEFFREY BALL


The modern environmental movement is having an identity crisis. Staring down its
biggest enemy yet, it's fiercely divided over how to beat it.

The global challenge of climate change is tougher than the localized problems
the green movement has spent decades fighting. To some environmentalists, it
requires chucking old orthodoxies and getting practical. To others, it demands
an old-style moral crusade.

The pragmatists have the upper hand. One sign is that the movement is moving
beyond small-scale backyard wind turbines and rooftop solar panels. It's calling
for technological change at industrial speed and scale -- sometimes to the
detriment of local ecologies.

Large solar-power installations, like this pilot plant in Lancaster, Calif., are
part of a growing rift among environmentalists.
In Europe, environmental groups are backing proposals for massive collections of
wind turbines off the continent's Atlantic coast that would amount to seaborne
power plants. In California, they're endorsing huge solar-panel installations on
farmland and in the desert. In Washington, they're lobbying for more spending to
develop "clean coal," resigned to the conclusion that scrubbing coal is more
plausible than killing it.

"There's a kind of reality check," says Stephan Singer, the Brussels-based
director of global energy policy for WWF, an environmental group also called the
World Wildlife Fund. The only clean-energy options likely to matter are "large,
centralized solutions," he says. "That's the way it is."

Karen Douglas feels the pressure from both sides of the divide. She has spent
her career as a green activist in California, and her success has helped move
her from outside agitator to inside policy maker. After California passed a law
curbing greenhouse-gas emissions, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger tapped Ms. Douglas
early last year to join the California Energy Commission, which has to help
figure out how to comply with the law. Recently, she was named chairman.

The commission is trying to figure out where big new solar-energy installations
and electric-transmission lines should go. The process is pitting locally
oriented environmentalists, whose priority still is to protect California's
wilderness, against globally oriented environmentalists whose focus is to get
big renewable-energy projects built. "I am in an interesting spot," she says.
"It's hard."

Mr. Singer of the WWF is in a similar fix. In Europe, the prospect of
large-scale renewable energy means the construction of hundreds of wind turbines
off the coast. His organization "strongly supports" that move, he says, despite
opposition from some local environmentalists who contend such installations
might harm birds or fish.

"We all grew up with this kind of mantra that small is beautiful," he says. But
that "is not a model for a highly modernized, global world."

Nothing underscores the green movement's soul-searching more than its conflicted
view of coal, which provides about half the world's electricity. Should society
pour billions of dollars into trying to perfect a way to turn coal into
electricity without emitting greenhouse gases? Or should it reject coal as
inalterably dirty and try to replace it entirely with renewable sources like the
wind and sun?

Late last year, the influential Natural Resources Defense Council helped sponsor
ads ridiculing coal-industry ads boasting about progress toward cleaning up
coal. "In reality, there's no such thing as clean coal," said a print version of
the ad.

But last month, the NRDC, along with the Environmental Defense Fund, another
prominent group, hosted workshops advocating more spending on clean-coal
research. The rationale: Coal will remain a crucial fuel for decades, so it
makes sense to try to clean it up.

"If NRDC had written all the ads by itself, we probably would have had a more
nuanced ad," says NRDC climate expert David Hawkins. "But it probably would have
been a nuanced ad that doesn't get noticed."

Industry claims that coal already is clean are "misleading," says Mr. Hawkins.
Still, the technology to generate electricity from coal and capture the
carbon-dioxide emissions "is both needed and feasible," he says. That was the
point of the workshops, he says: that government should implement policies to
deploy the technology.

Now, a backlash is building within the movement. Rather than push certain
technological fixes, critics say, environmentalists should simply push
government to slap industry with a tough cap on greenhouse gases -- and let
industry figure out how to meet the mandate.

"It's like we're pushing to invent a better cotton gin as a way to reduce
slaveholding instead of just banning slaveholding," says the Environmental
Defense Fund's John DeCicco. "The environmental movement has become insiders. Is
that actually to our benefit now? Or is that to our detriment?"

Write to Jeffrey Ball at jeffrey.ball at wsj.com


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 4 02:08:00 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Fri, 03 Apr 2009 08:08:00 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Green groups slam G20 "missed opportunity"
Message-ID: <49D62650.3080006@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://www.businessgreen.com/business-green/news/2239792/green-groups-slam-g20-missed

Green groups slam G20 "missed opportunity"

Vague language and limited low carbon commitments fail to impress green business
campaigners

James Murray, BusinessGreen, 03 Apr 2009

Green groups reacted with dismay last night to the historic economic rescue deal
brokered at the G20 Summit in London, branding it a "missed opportunity" to
secure meaningful action on climate change.

While business leaders and anti-poverty groups welcomed the G20's commitment to
provide an additional $1.1tr to the World Bank and IMF and introduce tighter
regulations on tax havens and hedge funds, green campaigners were left
disappointed by the final agreement's failure to deliver any specific
commitments to curb carbon emissions and invest in green jobs and technologies.

Environmental commitments were consigned to the last two paragraphs of the
lengthy communiqu? issued at the close of the summit and consisted only of vague
promises to create " sustainable economies".

The communiqu? stated that the goal of fiscal stimulus packages would be to
build "resilient, sustainable, and green recovery" and committed the G20 to "
the transition towards clean, innovative, resource efficient, low carbon
technologies and infrastructure".

It also offered renewed hope that an international deal on climate change will
be reached at the UN's Copenhagen Summit in December, stating that: "We reaffirm
our commitment to address the threat of irreversible climate change, based on
the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities, and to reach
agreement at the UN Climate Change conference in Copenhagen in December 2009."

Energy and climate change secretary Ed Miliband said that the deal marked the
first time all major countries have collectively committed to achieving a deal
at Copenhagen. "This provides an excellent platform for discussions at the
upcoming Major Economies Forum," he added. "These are good outcomes,
establishing the central role of climate change in economic policy even in the
midst of this financial and economic crisis."

But green groups said that the deal had not gone far enough to secure specific
commitments designed to accelerate the development of a low carbon economy.

Glen Tarman, chair of the Put People First coalition of trade unions and NGOs,
said that while the G20 had made progress on some critical issues, there were
also "missed opportunities, especially on building a green economy".

His comments were echoed by Friends of the Earth's executive director Andy
Atkins, who accused G20 leaders of "short-changing the planet".

"The economic system and the global environment are on a devastating collision
course - but despite pledging to build an inclusive, green and sustainable
recovery little has been done to change direction," he said. "The world must
seize the huge benefits of investing in green technologies and energy systems -
this will slash emissions and create millions of new jobs around the world."

UK diplomats had pushed for stronger environmental commitments to feature in the
final communiqu?, including a pledge to spend a large chunk of the $5tr in
global fiscal stimulus packages on low carbon projects. But the commitment was
ditched after opposition from a number of countries, reportedly led by China,
which is said to have objected to some of the proposed green language.

In related news, a global coalition of 124 institutional investors which
collectively manage approximately $6.5tr in assets, issued an open letter to
Barack Obama urging him to take a greater role in the UN's climate change
negotiations, the latest round of which have taken place this week in Bonn, Germany.

The European Institutional Investors Group on Climate Change (IIGCC), the
US-based Investor Network on Climate Risk (INCR), and the Investor Group on
Climate Change (IGCC) in Australia and New Zealand urged the president to push
for a deal built around binding emission reduction targets and an expansion of
the global carbon market.

"The new US administration has already shown its commitment to tackling climate
change on the domestic front, but now is the time to extend this leadership to
the international arena," said David Russell, co-head of responsible investment
at institutional investor USS. "Investors need to see strong policy commitments
on climate chang


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 4 03:12:40 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Fri, 03 Apr 2009 09:12:40 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Fwd: IUCN SSC e-bulletin March 2009
Message-ID: <49D63578.6020102@coombs.anu.edu.au>



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 4 11:25:47 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Fri, 03 Apr 2009 17:25:47 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] 01 National Technical Advisor (NTA) on Disaster Risk
Management
Message-ID: <49D6A90B.50002@gmail.com>

http://www.undp.org.vn/Detail/Get-Involved/UNDP-Opportunities/UNDP-Opportunities-Details/?contentId=2969&languageId=1

01 National Technical Advisor (NTA) on Disaster Risk Management
Publish Date: 02-Apr-2009

The UNDP project on ?Strengthening national capacities for institutional
development and implementation of Climate Change Adaptation and DRM measures in
Viet Nam? is one of the main projects to support the achievement of the outputs
under Outcome 5 of the One Plan for 2006-2010. The project aims address capacity
gaps for comprehensive CCA and DRM in Viet Nam through support to institutional
development and capacity building for concerned central GoV agencies, training
institutions and local GoV and communities in three pilot provinces, namely Binh
Thuan, Can Tho and Cao Bang.

Job Description (attached):

National Technical Advisor (NTA) on Disaster Risk Management

All interested Vietnamese applicants shall have to submit either electronic or
paper copy of Curriculum Vitae and Letter of Interest to:

Mr. Nguyen Thanh Tung, Project Manager
Department of Dyke Management and Flood, Storm Control
A4 building, No2 Ngoc Ha Str., Ba Dinh, Hanoi
E-mail: tungnt at ccfsc.org.vn

Applicants will only be contacted if invited for interview.

Deadline for submissions: Wednesday 04:30 PM | 15-Apr-2009
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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 4 11:34:35 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Fri, 03 Apr 2009 17:34:35 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] National key laboratory system -- in need of sci-tech
breakthrough
Message-ID: <49D6AB1B.1040906@gmail.com>

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/tech/2009/04/840045/

National key laboratory system -- in need of sci-tech breakthrough
07:21' 04/04/2009 (GMT+7)

Deputy Minister of Science and Technology Nguyen Quan visited a national key
laboratory.

VietNamNet Bridge ? Vietnam has invested more than VND1.2 trillion ($70.6
million) in 19 key laboratories, but some labs say they lack a suitable
operating mechanism while some others say they don?t have qualified human
resources. Because of these shortages, some key laboratories work ineffectively.

According to the Ministry of Science and Technology, the state installed the
most modern equipment in these laboratories so these national laboratories need
to have sci-tech breakthroughs.

In 2001, the Ministry of Science and Technology, the Ministry of Planning and
Investment, and the Ministry of Finance issued regulations to choose the
developer of national key laboratories. The scheme to build 19 key labs was
worked out.

These labs are designed to serve six fields of basic science: biotechnology,
information technology, material technology, mechanics-automation,
petrochemistry and infrastructure. Of 19 key labs, 14 are based at ministries, 3
at businesses, and 2 at institutes. According to the Ministry of Science and
Technology, the total investment for the 17 first labs is more than VND1.120
trillion ($65.88 million).

However, only two labs had been built by 2004, 3 more in 2005, and 12 more by
2008. Experts have said that this sluggishness has affected research activities.

Even when these labs are put into operation, they work ineffectively. According
to labs? managers, there are two reasons: lack of funds for their operation and
lack of staff. Some qualified scientists have left key labs because of low
salary. These labs, which have modern equipment, don?t have money to conduct
research activities. In short, investment in these labs is not a waste, but
results have yet to match investment.

Breakthrough and dynamic needed

The Ministry of Science and Technology said that the above problems arise from
this being a very new field and the lack of concern of ministries and sectors.
Some labs haven?t worked out their orientations.

The ministry said that the state has equipped the labs with modern machinery and
equipment and also allocated some kinds of funding for them; however, the state
can?t subsidise the operations of these labs forever, after providing them with
modern facilities. Some labs are working well, for example the biotechnology,
gene, petrochemistry labs. Labs should be dynamic and combine life with
scientific research.

However, scientists say that besides their efforts, the state and the Ministry
of Science and Technology need to have clear policies to attract talents to work
for key labs.

The three goals of key laboratories: creating new, creative,
up-to-international-standard scientific research works, which are made public in
prestigious international magazines; creating products and inventions which are
protected by intellectual property agencies, which can be commercialised and
contribute to improve the country?s sci-tech level; forming a contingent of
qualified scientists, who can perform national sci-tech missions at
internationals standards.

So far, 17 key laboratories have trained 56 doctors, published 640 scientific
articles, including 30 in international magazines, 22 works registered for patents.

VietNamNet/LD




From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 4 11:45:39 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Fri, 03 Apr 2009 17:45:39 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Inspectors close notorious river polluting factory
Message-ID: <49D6ADB3.7000005@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://vietnamplus.vn/moi-truong-en/200904026335439094

Inspectors close notorious river polluting factory
02-04-2009 | 15:59:03

A cassava starch processing factory, run by Taiwanese company Vedan in the
north-central province of Ha Tinh, has been shut down after inspectors found it
was polluting the Rao Tro river.

Inspections on April 1 found Vedan was discharging untreated wastewater directly
into the local river.

Inspectors say the factory was causing severe environmental pollution because it
has not built a proper wastewater treatment system; there were leaks in one of
two wastewater storage pools pouring into Rao Tro river, diesel oil in cassava
drying facilities were leaking out into the river; a mixture of rainwater and
wastewater from over 50 tonnes of cassava waste gathered in outdoor storage
areas was flowing into a drain leading to the river.

Phan Thang Long, deputy director of the province?s Department of Natural
Resources and Environment, said the factory has been asked to close down until
it corrects these four violations.

Truong Vinh Chu, director of the factory, has admitted to the charges and
committed to install the factory?s wastewater treatment systems before July.

The Taiwanese-invested factory plans to officially begin operating in November,
with a capacity of 800 tonnes of cassava starch per day.

Vedan has already gained notoriety as a river polluter. Its MSG-plant in the
southern province of Dong Nai was recently found using underground pipes to dump
untreated wastewater into the Thi Vai river for more than 15 years./.


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 4 11:47:02 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Fri, 03 Apr 2009 17:47:02 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Vietnam to announce climate change scenario in April
Message-ID: <49D6AE06.2090107@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://vietnamplus.vn/moi-truong-en/200903167934228368

Vietnam to announce climate change scenario in April
16-03-2009 | 22:04:05


ietnam will publish its official climate change scenario in April, an official
of the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment (MoNRE) has announced.

Addressing an ASEAN seminar on climate change co-held by the MoNRE and the Japan
International Cooperation Agency (JICA) in Hanoi on March 16, Deputy Minister
Nguyen Xuan Cuong said the scenario will serve as a basis for ministries,
agencies and localities to build up their own plans of action.

Cuong also said that the scenario would be updated periodically from 2010 to 2100.

JICA Chief Representative in Vietnam, Tsuno Motonori, said Vietnam joined
Japan?s partnership programme on climate change in February and will be entitled
to financial support from the programme?s 10 billion USD fund dedicated to
climate change, including 2 billion USD in non-refundable aid for projects using
clean energy.

The seminar, which gathered scientists and managers from China, Japan, the UK
and Southeast Asian countries, aimed to raise public awareness of climate change.

The participants focused their discussions on building up climate change
scenarios, drafting a plan for the whole Southeast Asian region to adapt to
climate change, and searching for donations from other countries and
international organisations./.



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 4 13:30:13 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Fri, 03 Apr 2009 19:30:13 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] China pays deer price for condor protection
Message-ID: <49D6C635.6040008@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://www.enn.com/wildlife/article/39580

rom: Reuters
Published April 3, 2009 10:36 AM
China pays deer price for condor protection

BEIJING (Reuters) - Chinese conservationists are in a fix over endangered
condors eating large numbers of a protected species of deer in a reserve in the
north of the country, state media said on Friday.
More than 100 young spotted deer have been eaten by the condors so far this
spring at the Luanhe River National Nature Reserve in Hebei province, near
Beijing, the official Xinhua news agency said, becoming an "unanticipated" part
of the food chain.

Nationally, the condor is considered far more endangered than the deer.
"The raptors are growing in number and threatening to catch larger animals, like
elk, in the reserve," it quoted wildlife official Zhou Changhong as saying.
Article continues
ShareThis



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 4 13:31:55 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Fri, 03 Apr 2009 19:31:55 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] First Accurate Test For Arsenic In Soil Developed
Message-ID: <49D6C69B.5040102@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090401183822.htm

First Accurate Test For Arsenic In Soil Developed

ScienceDaily (Apr. 3, 2009) ? If you have a cat or dog who likes to hide under
the deck or children who play on equipment made with pressure-treated wood,
you?ll be glad to hear that analytical chemist Julian Tyson and colleagues at
the University of Massachusetts Amherst recently developed the first-ever
accurate test for arsenic compounds in soil, promising a significantly improved
environmental and health impact assessment. The method holds some promise for
detecting naturally occurring high arsenic levels in Asian rice, as well.

In North America, arsenic is found most commonly under decks and near structures
such as playground gyms made of pressure-treated wood, which is impregnated with
heavy metals. The squeezed-in chromium, copper and arsenic make wood
weather-resistant and durable but they also slowly leach out into the
environment, mainly soil. The potential health impact, called by some an
?environmental time bomb,? has been difficult to assess in an objective,
quantitative way until now, according to Tyson and his graduate student
co-author Khalid Al-Assaf, because the key arsenic compounds stick so tightly to
iron oxides that they couldn?t be isolated and measured separately.

?It?s been very hard to know if this source of contamination was staying put,
evaporating into the air or getting into the groundwater,? Tyson explains.
Several laboratories have long sought a soil test for arsenic, but his research
team is the first to develop a procedure for isolating all the compounds of
interest, including the mono- and dimethylated species in soil and accurately
measuring them.

Their paper describing the new technique is the cover story for the April 4
issue of the Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry published by the British
Royal Society of Chemistry, now available online. With the new procedure,
chemists can now help to answer questions about whether arsenic compounds are
getting into drinking water supplies, being taken up by plants, and whether soil
bacteria are involved in the production of methylated compounds.

It?s already known that arsenic is easily ingested by children who touch
pressure-treated wood play equipment and then put their hands in their mouths,
and it?s brought into homes on pets that get into dirt under pressure-treated
wood decks. Tyson says earlier attempts to trace arsenic movement through the
environment by sampling dog toenails were not conclusive.

The chemist adds that because some bacteria in soil are able to convert arsenic
to volatile products, and iron oxides can bind it tightly, the residue in the
soil may not travel very far, so ?we probably shouldn?t be unduly alarmed.
However, to be prudent you don?t want to see children eating it, either. Our new
method will help to determine how much can be considered bioavailable near these
sources.?
The new method calls for scientists to extract arsenic compounds with sodium
hydroxide and phosphoric acid, separate them by chromatography, convert them to
volatile hydrides and measure them by the light emitted from a high-temperature
inductively-coupled plasma (atomic emission spectroscopy).

Arsenic is found in high concentrations in chicken manure from factory farms.
Interestingly, another source of surface-soil arsenic in the United States is
Civil War-era cemeteries. At that time, so many casualties could occur in a
short period that bodies had to wait for burial. In the interim, corpses were
preserved in arsenic-laden embalming fluid until individual graves could be dug.
Overall, there is little evidence that surface arsenic ends up in our
groundwater, but ?the jury is still out? on this point, Tyson adds.

Elsewhere in the world, notably Southeast Asia, high arsenic levels occur
naturally in soil and groundwater, according to the chemist. Unfortunately,
because rice is ?an accumulator? plant species, millions of people in
Bangladesh, China and India face the risk of toxic contamination in their food.
Tyson and colleagues? method for isolating the arsenic compounds from soils may
be adaptable to determine arsenic concentrations in batches of rice, he says, to
improve food safety.

Further, as one of the world?s leading research groups with expertise in arsenic
but also in the mineral selenium, Tyson?s UMass Amherst analytical chemistry
team is collaborating with researchers in Bangladesh to explore preliminary
evidence that the mineral might mitigate arsenic poisoning in at-risk
populations if taken as a dietary supplement.

At UMass Amherst, Tyson runs the ?arsenic project? in which first-year
undergraduates get an early, authentic research experience with some aspect of
the environmental and analytical chemistry of arsenic. Here, ?they get to see
how science is really done,? he says. The chemist hopes students find their
study so exciting they ?get hooked,? seek out further research experience as
undergraduates and seriously consider graduate study.

Adapted from materials provided by University of Massachusetts Amherst.


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 4 22:49:51 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Sat, 04 Apr 2009 04:49:51 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] New scientific paper reveals the impact of climate
change on whales dolphins and porpoises
Message-ID: <49D7495F.9090201@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://www.panda.org/about_our_earth/all_publications/?uNewsID=161342

New scientific paper reveals the impact of climate change on whales dolphins and
porpoises

Humpback Whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) feeding (fluke). Cape Cod,
Massachussets, USA
? WWF-Canon / William W. ROSSITER
02 Apr 2009

In the week when 4000 towns and cities across 88 countries turned off their
lights to call for stronger action to combat climate change, a new scientific
paper published in the Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the UK
takes a collective look at what is currently known about how climate change may
affect or is already affecting whales, dolphins and porpoises (collectively know
as cetaceans) and how this issue may be best addressed. The paper was written by
WWF and the Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society (WDCS).

There is unequivocal evidence that climate change is affecting the oceans but
just how it impacts cetaceans and what conservationists, scientists and
governments should do about it remain critical questions.

What we know
Climate change could have an impact on several factors that cetaceans depend
upon for survival including:

? Ocean temperature
? Habitat availability
? Changes in sea-ice distribution
? Prey availability

These factors in turn can be expected to impact feeding and breeding and
survivorship.

Some cetacean species and populations are likely to be especially vulnerable to
these predicted climate related changes, including those with a limited habitat
range, or those for which sea ice provides an important habitat for the cetacean
and/or that of their prey.

Other factors impacting cetaceans such as bycatch, unsustainable hunting,
chemical and noise pollution and oil and gas development are even further
compounded by the different threats posed by climate change, which adds undue
pressure to already vulnerable species. At least a quarter of the world?s
cetaceans were recently confirmed as endangered and the situation may be worse
as the status of many others remains unclear.

What can be done?
If conservation programs for cetaceans are to succeed in the face of climate
change, decision makers must be swift to react to emerging developments that are
a result of climate change; focus on reducing other pressures on populations
where possible; and, be more responsive as new information becomes available.
For example, if cetaceans change their distributions and establish new critical
habitat areas, conservation and management efforts will have to move with them.

Conservation programs should also shift to not only focus all work on critically
endangered species, but also pay attention to ensuring that other species and
populations remain robust and resilient to the changes that are predicted.

There is a need for large scale and long-term work to better understand the
impending risks posed to cetaceans by climate change and leadership from
appropriate international bodies will be crucial. However, such bodies will need
to prioritize these endeavors and allocate adequate funding.

The paper was written by WWF and the Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society (WDCS).

For the full paper click here:
http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayIssue?jid=MBI&volumeId=89&issueId=01&iid=4249964



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 4 23:02:06 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Sat, 04 Apr 2009 05:02:06 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] ENV/Health: pollution threatens health
Message-ID: <49D74C3E.3080205@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Subject: [vnnews-l] ENV/Health: pollution threatens health
Date: Sat, 4 Apr 2009 00:19:39 -0700 (PDT)
From: Stephen Denney <sdenney at OCF.Berkeley.EDU>
sent to vnnews-l by Stephen Denney <sdenney at OCF.Berkeley.EDU>

http://www.hc2d.co.uk/content.php?contentId=10861

Vietnam pollution threatens health
3rd April 2009

As Vietnam's economy has boomed in recent decades, so too have pollution
levels in its major cities, with experts concerned that air pollution
could pose a major public health concern.

"Environmental pollution in Vietnam is a real problem," said Tuong Lai,
former dean of Vietnam's Social Science Institute.

"It's not just foreign visitors who have complained about our dust
pollution - people in our country are also very dissatisfied with it," he
said.

A study conducted by employment consultants ORC Worldwide put economic
boomtowns Ho Chi Minh City and Hanoi on a list of the 20 worst cities in
the world in which to live and work, for environmental reasons.

Air pollution was cited as a key factor for both Ho Chi Minh City, which
was the ninth worst place to live, and Hanoi, which was ranked 11th worst.
A 2008 environmental report by the World Bank ranked the two cities as the
worst in Vietnam for pollution, while an environmental study by 400
international scientists in the same year said Hanoi and Saigon were the
worst-ranked cities for dust pollution in the whole of Asia.
Expert warning

And experts at a Southeast Asia air pollution seminar hosted by the
Industrial Institute of Asia warned that air pollution in Vietnam had
reached dangerous levels.

In 2007, Vietnam started to publish results of its own surveys, with an
Environmental Protection Bureau report officially recognizing in 2007 that
dust pollution was a serious problem in Vietnam.

Vietnamese residents of the worst-ranked cities were well aware of the
heath effects, and of the effect on tourism revenues.

"The atmosphere in this country is now seriously polluted, yet the
government has not found any solutions," one Hanoi resident said.
"The air pollution in Saigon and Hanoi has annoyed not only the people in
the country, but also the Vietnamese who come back to Vietnam as
visitors," he said.

"It has disappointed so many foreign tourists, too."

Thousands of deaths

Health authorities say that thousands of cases of death or illness have
been confirmed as having been caused by atmospheric pollution with carbon
monoxide, sulfur dioxide, benzene, and fine particulates (dust).

In 2007 the World Health Organisation (WHO) reported that an average of
16,000 deaths a year in Vietnam are now caused by air pollution, with
thousands of people now confirmed to be suffering from pulmonary disease.
Environmental studies blame fuel emissions from public transportation and
industrial pollution from factories.

Pressure is now growing on Hanoi from international as well as domestic
environment specialists to step up controls on industrial pollution and
clarify the responsibilities of the various government agencies involved
in environmental protection.

Calls are emerging in domestic media for the government to enforce a
switch to cleaner fuels, and to punish or penalise anyone causing
environment pollution.

"Pollution greatly affects the health of our people," Tuong Lai said.
"Therefore the government must make multiple efforts to make a healthy
living environment for the people who crowd such big cities as Saigon [Ho
Chi Minh City] and Hanoi," he added.

Original reporting by RFA's Vietnamese service. Vietnamese service
director: Diem Nguyen. Executive producer: Susan Lavery. Written for the
web in English by Luisetta Mudie. Edited by Sarah Jackson-Han.



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sun Apr 5 12:08:32 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Sat, 04 Apr 2009 19:08:32 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] IUCN: G20 must follow through on green promises
Message-ID: <49D812A0.1020605@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://cms.iucn.org/news_events/?uNewsID=2982

G20 must follow through on green promises

03 April 2009 | News - News story

The G20, meeting yesterday in London, agreed with what IUCN and many others have
been saying: the economic recovery must be inclusive, green and sustainable.
While long in sentiment, however, their green promises were very short in
detail. The environment cannot be a footnote; it must be at the very heart of
the recovery plan.

One dinner and one day is not much time for the leaders of the world?s largest
economies to make decisions.

And they are to be commended for reaching agreement on a wide range of specific
actions to shore up financial markets, enhance macroeconomic stability, promote
investment, boost trade and maintain development aid targets.

But according to IUCN, much more needs to be done. Our natural infrastructure is
fundamental to efforts to rebuild our economic infrastructure and this must be
reflected in recovery plans.

?There is no doubt that the G20 has used the right words, but look closely and
you see a business-as-usual approach,? says IUCN Deputy Director General Dr
William Jackson. ?Economic growth, financial markets, jobs and nature do not
exist in isolation. Without prosperous natural environments, there is no hope
for prosperous economies, societies and people. And the details in the overall
G20 plan do not reflect this.?

On climate change

The G20 promised to ?make the transition towards clean, innovative, resource
efficient, low carbon technologies and infrastructure?.

G20 leaders also reaffirmed their commitment to address the looming threat of
irreversible climate change and promised to reach agreement at the UN Climate
Change negotiations in Copenhagen this December.

IUCN looks forward to continue working with G20 governments over the next eight
months to make this statement a reality.

?G20 leaders have now forecast an agreement in Copenhagen,? said IUCN?s Chief
Scientist, Jeffrey McNeely. ?But only a comprehensive deal, particularly on
stabilizing atmospheric greenhouse gas levels to less than 350 parts per
million, will avoid the looming catastrophe of irreversible climate change.?

On development

The commitment of G20 leaders to achieving the Millennium Development Goals,
maintaining development aid targets and supporting sub-Saharan Africa in
particular is welcomed.

IUCN urges governments and development banks to ensure that stimulus packages
for poor countries include clear priorities for sustainable natural resource use.

Investment must go into tackling the loss of biodiversity, restoring degraded
lands and seas and protecting the services that nature provides such as clean
drinking water and fertile soil.

?Governments and development banks must ensure they invest in the right things,
with clear priorities and criteria,? adds Dr Jackson. ?To achieve sustainable
recovery and growth, investing in natural environments, as well as the people
who manage and depend on them, is non-negotiable.?



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Mon Apr 6 01:01:00 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Sun, 05 Apr 2009 08:01:00 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Consultancy opportunities -MRCs/BDP Programme - part 1
of 2
Message-ID: <49D8C7AC.5010903@gmail.com>

Sorry, I could not find the attached PDF on the web. Second PDF in following
message. Vern

Subject: [Lancang-Mekong] Consultancy opportunities -MRCs/BDP Programme
Date: Sun, 5 Apr 2009 14:06:54 +0700
From: Suparerk Janprasart <suparerk at mrcmekong.org>
Reply-To: Suparerk at mrcmekong.org

Dear Colleagues,

The Mekong River Commission Secretariat (MRCS), Basin Development Plan
Programme (BDP) has currently reached one of the most critical stages of
its programme development on the cumulative impact assessment of water
resources development scenarios in the Mekong Basin. The programme is
seeking qualified international and riparian candidates who are
passionate about poverty reduction and participatory basin planning to
fill in the following short-term consultant positions.


1. International Water Resources Planner

2. International Economist

3. International Environmentalist

4. International Social Scientist

5. International Fisheries Specialists (2 positions)

6. International Hydropower Specialist

7. International Irrigation Specialist

8. International River Geo-morphologist

9. Riparian Economist

10. Riparian Environmentalist

11. Riparian Social Scientists ? Rural Livelihood Specialists (2
positions)

12. Riparian Nutritionist

13. Riparian Agronomist

14. Riparian GIS Analyst (2 positions)


Applicants can apply as a team, individual and/or a representative from
organization or firm. Please send your application as soon as possible
to email: mrcs at mrcmekong.org <mailto:mrcs at mrcmekong.org> ? subject:
Application to BDP scenario assessment consultancy/position XXXX.

The application must include a cover letter outlining clearly how the
candidate meets the requirements of the position. In addition to the
cover letter, the applicant should include his/her CV, three reference
contacts and financial expectation. The title of the consultancy must be
indicated in the application letter. The applicants can opt to apply
more than one position.

Please find the attached files for further details. Nevertheless, if you
have any queries, please do not hesitate to contact the BDP Programme at
Phoumin at mrcmekong.org <mailto:Phoumin at mrcmekong.org> and
Suparerk at mrcmekong.org <mailto:Suparerk at mrcmekong.org>.

For more information about the Basin Development Plan Programme please
visit http://www.mrcmekong.org/programmes/bdp.htm.

We would highly appreciate if you could kindly help us circulate this
advertisement to your network, other colleagues and potential candidates.

Thank you so much and we look forward to hearing from you soon.

Very best regards,

Mekong River Commission Secretariat, Basin Development Plan Programme

Vientiane, Lao PDR




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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Mon Apr 6 01:02:47 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Sun, 05 Apr 2009 08:02:47 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Consultancy opportunities -MRCs/BDP Programme - part 2
of 2
Message-ID: <49D8C817.3060809@gmail.com>

The attached PDF is the explanatory document. V

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: [Lancang-Mekong] Consultancy opportunities -MRCs/BDP Programme
Date: Sun, 5 Apr 2009 14:06:54 +0700
From: Suparerk Janprasart <suparerk at mrcmekong.org>
Reply-To: Suparerk at mrcmekong.org

Dear Colleagues,

The Mekong River Commission Secretariat (MRCS), Basin Development Plan
Programme (BDP) has currently reached one of the most critical stages of
its programme development on the cumulative impact assessment of water
resources development scenarios in the Mekong Basin. The programme is
seeking qualified international and riparian candidates who are
passionate about poverty reduction and participatory basin planning to
fill in the following short-term consultant positions.

1. International Water Resources Planner

2. International Economist

3. International Environmentalist

4. International Social Scientist

5. International Fisheries Specialists (2 positions)

6. International Hydropower Specialist

7. International Irrigation Specialist

8. International River Geo-morphologist

9. Riparian Economist

10. Riparian Environmentalist

11. Riparian Social Scientists ? Rural Livelihood Specialists (2
positions)

12. Riparian Nutritionist

13. Riparian Agronomist

14. Riparian GIS Analyst (2 positions)

Applicants can apply as a team, individual and/or a representative from
organization or firm. Please send your application as soon as possible
to email: mrcs at mrcmekong.org <mailto:mrcs at mrcmekong.org> ? subject:
Application to BDP scenario assessment consultancy/position XXXX.

The application must include a cover letter outlining clearly how the
candidate meets the requirements of the position. In addition to the
cover letter, the applicant should include his/her CV, three reference
contacts and financial expectation. The title of the consultancy must be
indicated in the application letter. The applicants can opt to apply
more than one position.

Please find the attached files for further details. Nevertheless, if you
have any queries, please do not hesitate to contact the BDP Programme at
Phoumin at mrcmekong.org <mailto:Phoumin at mrcmekong.org> and
Suparerk at mrcmekong.org <mailto:Suparerk at mrcmekong.org>.

For more information about the Basin Development Plan Programme please
visit http://www.mrcmekong.org/programmes/bdp.htm.

We would highly appreciate if you could kindly help us circulate this
advertisement to your network, other colleagues and potential candidates.


Thank you so much and we look forward to hearing from you soon.


Very best regards,



Mekong River Commission Secretariat, Basin Development Plan Programme

Vientiane, Lao PDR


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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Mon Apr 6 21:19:03 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Mon, 06 Apr 2009 04:19:03 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] UNDP: 01 international-level consultant and 01
national consultant for carrying out a final evaluation of the Con Dao
Project
Message-ID: <49D9E527.7080703@gmail.com>



01 international-level consultant and 01 national consultant for carrying out a
final evaluation of the Con Dao Project

Publish Date: 06-Apr-2009

The 3-year project ?Coastal and Marine Biodiversity Conservation and Sustainable
Use in the Con Dao Island Region? (2006 ? 2009) has the objective of conserving
the globally significant biodiversity and ecological processes of the Con Dao
islands region.

The final evaluation will assess the relevance, performance and success of the
project. The evaluation looks at early signs of potential impact and
sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development
and the achievement of global environmental goals. The evaluation will also
identify/document lessons learned and make recommendations that might improve
design and implementation of other UNDP/GEF projects.

To undertake this task, the Project is looking for one international-level
consultant and one national consultant.

Attached: Terms of reference (for both International-level consultant and
National consultant)

Interested consultants are invited to submit a letter indicating their interest
and qualifications for this position and a recent CV to the address below
(please submit letter and CV in English language):

Ms. Nguyen Thi Thu Huyen
Sustainable Development Cluster,
UNDP Vietnam
25-29 Phan Boi Chau Street, Ha Noi
Fax: 84-4-39422267
Email: registry.vn at undp.org

Deadline for submissions: Monday 05:00 PM | 20-Apr-2009
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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Mon Apr 6 21:29:16 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Mon, 06 Apr 2009 04:29:16 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Lumberjacks attack forest rangers in Quang Nam
Message-ID: <49D9E78C.4070605@gmail.com>

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/social/2009/04/840389/

Lumberjacks attack forest rangers in Quang Nam
17:49' 06/04/2009 (GMT+7)

VietNamNet Bridge - Over 30 illegal lumberjacks allegedly attacked six forest
rangers to take back seized timber in Ha Nha Hamlet, Dai Loc District, Quang Nam
Province yesterday.


The seized timber

At 3 am yesterday, the Forest Management Team 2 found more than 30 illegal
lumberjacks using four motorboats, pulling 10 rafts of timber, along the Ha Nha
section of Vu Gia River.

Six forest rangers immediately gave chase and forced the lumberjacks to stop
their rafts.

While the forest rangers were using their boats to tow the third raft to the
riverside, some lumberjacks jumped into their boats and used sticks, canes,
knives and scimitars to threaten them. Other lumberjacks cut the rope and waded
the rafts of timber back into the midstream of the river.

Despite one forest ranger firing warning shots, Le Van Lan, 19, resident of Dai
Nghia Commune, crashed his boat into one of the rangers? boats, causing severe
damage.

The illegal lumberjacks ran away when they spotted the police arriving. Only Le
Van Lan was arrested.

Three rafts with more than 10 cubic meters of precious timber were rescued. A
large volume of timber was pushed by the lumberjacks into the river and was
swept away.

In the afternoon, the Team coordinated with Dai Loc police to crane nearly 20
cubic meters of timber from Vu Gia?s banks.

The investigation continues.

VietNamNet/SGGP


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Tue Apr 7 02:19:36 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Mon, 06 Apr 2009 09:19:36 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Put agriculture at heart of climate talks,
says report [from International Food Policy Research Institute
(IFPRI)]
Message-ID: <49DA2B98.4060909@gmail.com>

http://www.scidev.net/en/news/put-agriculture-at-heart-of-climate-talks-says-rep.html

Put agriculture at heart of climate talks, says report
Aisling Irwin
1 April 2009 | EN | ??

IFPRI estimates that the global yield of rain-fed maize will decline by 17 per
cent by 2050
Flickr/john.duffell

A campaign to drive agriculture to the forefront of climate change negotiations
took a step forward yesterday with the launch of a document by food policy experts.

Agriculture will be "dramatically" affected by climate change, says the paper,
published by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). It could
also become a potent brake on climate change if the right research and policies
are implemented.

But its role has yet to be championed in the build-up to the UN Framework
Convention on Climate Change negotiations to take place in Copenhagen in
December, says the paper 'Agriculture and Climate Change: An Agenda for
Negotiation in Copenhagen'.

Speaking at the launch of the document in Washington, United States, yesterday
(31 March), IFPRI leaders said that agriculture had not featured prominently in
the Kyoto Protocol ? the current international climate change agreement ?
because of the "sparse" knowledge at the time about its relationship with
climate change.

"We are at the point where the negotiations are going to put in place new
mechanisms for the next five to 15 years and it's critical that agriculture be
included this time around," said Gerald Nelson, senior research fellow at IFPRI.

Mark Rosegrant, director of the Environment and Production Technology Division
of IFPRI, said that the effect of climate change on agriculture was "uncertain
and variable around the world. But one thing is very clear: that the poor and
developing countries are more vulnerable."

Developing countries have less rainfall, are more dependent on agriculture and
face greater obstacles to adaptation, he said.

IFPRI has made provisional estimates that the global yield of rain-fed maize
will decline by 17 per cent and the yield of irrigated rice will drop by a fifth
by 2050 as a result of climate change. Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia will be
the worst hit, according to the new data.

But the way agriculture will suffer as a result of climate change is only half
of the story, the report argues. Its role in influencing climate change is also
being ignored, despite the "huge potential to cost-effectively mitigate
greenhouse gases through changes in agricultural technologies and management
practices".

Agriculture contributes about 14 per cent of annual greenhouse gas emissions.
But by changing the types of crops grown, reducing land tillage and switching
from annual to perennial crops ? as well as changing crop genetics and improving
the management of irrigation and fertiliser use ? greenhouse gas emissions could
be cut.

The document calls for more research on the interactions between climate change
and agriculture.

Link to the full report
http://www.ifpri.org/2020/focus/focus16/Focus16_01.pdf


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Tue Apr 7 12:13:41 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Mon, 06 Apr 2009 19:13:41 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] A new Chinese approach at Copenhagen
Message-ID: <49DAB6D5.2090407@gmail.com>

Subject: A new Chinese approach at Copenhagen
Date: Mon, 06 Apr 2009 09:56:49 -0500
From: Sam Geall <sam.geall at chinadialogue.net>
Reply-To: Sam Geall <sam.geall at chinadialogue.net>
To: Climate Change Info Mailing List <climate-l at lists.iisd.ca>


I am pleased to invite you to read a three-part opinion article on
chinadialogue.net about China's climate-change policy -- by leading Chinese
economist Hu Angang.

The current classification of nations as either "developed" or "developing",
writes Hu, does not reflect reality and is preventing a fair agreement being
reached climate change. Instead, Hu proposes two new principles. First, nations
should be assigned to one of four categories according to their Human
Development Index (HDI) ranking. Second, major greenhouse-gas emitters should be
made to bear greater responsibility for emissions reduction. He then calculates
the emissions reductions China should make and proposes a ?road map? for use
within China.

Read the full article here:

http://www.chinadialogue.net/article/show/single/en/2892-A-new-approach-at-Copenhagen-1-

http://www.chinadialogue.net/article/show/single/en/2895-A-new-approach-at-Copenhagen-2-

http://www.chinadialogue.net/article/show/single/en/2898-A-new-approach-at-Copenhagen-3-

For more information please contact sam.geall at chinadialogue.net

Regards,

Sam Geall
Deputy Editor
http://www.chinadialogue.net



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Tue Apr 7 12:22:26 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Mon, 06 Apr 2009 19:22:26 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Governing Clean Development
Message-ID: <49DAB8E2.2050700@gmail.com>

Subject: Governing Clean Development
Date: Fri, 03 Apr 2009 11:00:04 -0500
From: Newell Peter Prof (DEV) <p.newell at uea.ac.uk>
Reply-To: Newell Peter Prof (DEV) <p.newell at uea.ac.uk>
To: Climate Change Info Mailing List <climate-l at lists.iisd.ca>

Dear Colleagues

We are delighted to announce the release of the first paper in a new working
paper series on The Governance of Clean Development. A copy of 'Governing Clean
Development: A Framework for Analysis' is attached.

The series is part of an ESRC (Economic and Social Research Council) Climate
Change Leadership fellowship on this theme. Further details are available at
www.clean-development.com

Submissions to the working paper series are welcome from academics and
practitioners working in this area.


Professor Peter Newell
School of International Development
University of East Anglia
Norwich
NR4 7TJ
Tel: (01603) 593724
Fax: (01603) 451999
E-Mail: P.Newell at uea.ac.uk
http://www.uea.ac.uk/dev/newell

ESRC Climate Change Leadership Fellow
www.clean-development.com


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--
Vern Weitzel (Mr.) BSc, BA, MA, M Env Man & Dev <vern at coombs.anu.edu.au>
<vern.weitzel at gmail.com> <vernweitzel at mac.com>

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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Tue Apr 7 12:52:55 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Mon, 06 Apr 2009 19:52:55 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] News: CO2-induced Plant Growth May Mitigate Climate
Change Somewhat
Message-ID: <49DAC007.7030803@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Subject: News: CO2-induced Plant Growth May Mitigate Climate Change
Somewhat
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2009 11:21:57 -0700
From: Yahoo Group <ashwani.vasishth at gmail.com>
Reply-To: envecolnews-owner at yahoogroups.com
To: Environmental Ecology News <envecolnews at yahoogroups.com>



http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/environment/article6036529.ece

April 5, 2009

*Plants buy Earth more time as CO2 makes them grow
*Jonathan Leake, Environment Editor

TREES and plants are growing bigger and faster in response to the
billions of tons of carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere by
humans, scientists have found.

The increased growth has been discovered in a variety of flora, ranging
from tropical rainforests to British sugar beet crops.

It means they are soaking up at least some of the CO2 that would
otherwise be accelerating the rate of climate change. It also suggests
the potential for higher crop yields.

Some researchers believe the phenomenon is strong enough to buy humanity
some extra years in which to try to reverse the growth of greenhouse gas
emissions. However, few dispute that this will provide anything more
than a temporary reprieve.

"There is no doubt that the enrichment of the air with CO2 is increasing
plant growth rates in many areas," said Professor Martin Parry, head of
plant science at Rothamsted Research, Britain's leading crop institute.
"The problem is that humans are releasing so much that plants can remove
only a fraction of it."CO2 Plants survive by extracting CO2 from the air
and using sunlight to convert it into proteins and sugars.

Since 1750 the concentration in the air has risen from of CO2 278 parts
per million (ppm) to more than 380ppm, making it easier for plants to
acquire the CO2 needed for rapid growth.

One of the most convincing confirmations of this trend, recently
published in the science journal Nature, came from a team at Leeds
University.

Simon Lewis, a fellow of the Royal Society, led the study that measured
the girth of 70,000 trees across 10 African countries and compared them
with similar records made four decades ago.

"On average, the trees were getting bigger faster," Lewis said. He found
that each hectare of African forest was trapping an extra 0.6 tons of
CO2 a year compared with the 1960s.

If this is replicated across the world's tropical rainforests they would
be removing nearly 5 billion tons of CO2 a year from the atmosphere.
Humans, however, generate about 50 billion tons of the gas each year.

Scientists have been looking for a similar impact on crop yields and
have carried out experiments where plants growing in the open are
exposed to extra CO2 released upwind of the site.

The experiments generally suggest that raised CO2 levels, similar to
those predicted for the middle of this century, would boost the yields
of main-stream crops, such as maize, rice and soy, by about 13%. Some
niche crops, such as lavender, would similarly benefit.

In one study conducted at Rothamsted, Mikhail Semenov, a researcher,
found that sugar beet exposed to increased CO2 could boost yields from
11 tons a hectare to 15 tons by 2080.

Researchers in Germany recently discovered that wheat grown in similar
conditions would produce up to 16% more grain.

However, scientists have warned against drawing false comfort from such
findings. They point out that although levels will boost plant growth,
other factors asso-rising CO2 ciated with climate change, such as rising
temperatures and drought, are likely to have a negative effect.

Semenov said: "Global warming will increase the frequency and magnitude
of extreme weather events which may have a significant impact on crop
productivity."

Steve Long, a British professor of crop sciences at the University of
Illinois, believes that even in tropical rainforests any increase in
tree size would be shortlived.

"There are other factors that , limit plant growth besides CO2 such as
shortages of potassium, phosphorus or nitrates," said Long.

"These forests will grow fast for a while but then run out of nutrients
and slow down again."

What research does confirm, however, is the importance of preserving the
world's remaining tropical forests.

This is because the forests and the soils the trees grow in have
accumulated billions of tons of carbon that would be released should
they be destroyed.

Lewis said: "Once a forest is cut down, the carbon it contains returns
to the atmosphere and it would take hundreds of years to recover the
carbon it once stored."

/*** NOTICE: In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, this
material is distributed, without profit, for research and educational
purposes only. ***/
//


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Tue Apr 7 13:38:39 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Mon, 06 Apr 2009 20:38:39 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] 10-Year Study Uncovers Toxic Aspects of disinfection
byproducts (DBPs)
Message-ID: <49DACABF.3040304@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://www.wwn-online.com/articles/71532/

10-Year Study Uncovers Toxic Aspects of DBPs
April 6, 2009

University of Illinois geneticist Michael Plewa said that disinfection
byproducts (DBPs) in water are the unintended consequence of water purification.

"The process of disinfecting water with chlorine and chloramines and other types
of disinfectants generates a class of compounds in the water that are called
disinfection byproducts. The disinfectant reacts with the organic material in
the water and generates hundreds of different compounds. Some of these are
toxic, some can cause birth defects, some are genotoxic, which damage DNA, and
some we know are also carcinogenic."

The 10-year study began with a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to
develop mammalian cell lines that would be used specifically to analyze the
ability of these compounds to kill cells, or cytotoxicity, and the ability of
these emerging disinfection byproducts to cause genomic DNA damage.

"Our lab has assembled the largest toxicological database on these emerging new
DBPs. And from them we've made two fundamental discoveries that hopefully will
aid the U.S. EPA in their regulatory decisions. The two discoveries are somewhat
surprising," Plewa said.

The first discovery involves iodine-containing DBPs. "You get iodine primarily
from sea water or underground aquifers that perhaps were associated with an
ancient sea bed at one time. If there is high bromine and iodine in that water,
when you disinfect these waters, you can generate the chemical conditions
necessary to produce DBPs that have iodine atoms attached. And these are much
more toxic and genotoxic than the regulated DBPs that currently EPA uses," he said.

Plewa said that the second discovery concerns nitrogen-containing DBPs.
"Disinfectant byproducts that have a nitrogen atom incorporated into the
structure are far more toxic and genotoxic, and some even carcinogenic, than
those DBPs that don't have nitrogen. And there are no nitrogen-containing DBPs
that are currently regulated."

In addition to drinking water DBPs, Plewa said that swimming pools and hot tubs
are DBP reactors. "You've got all of this organic material called 'people' --
and people sweat and use sunscreen and wear cosmetics that come off in the
water. People may urinate in a public pool. Hair falls into the water and then
this water is chlorinated. But the water is recycled again and again so the
levels of DBPs can be tenfold higher than what you have in drinking water."


Plewa said that studies were showing higher levels of bladder cancer and asthma
in people who do a lot of swimming -- professional swimmers as well as athletic
swimmers. These individuals have greater and longer exposure to toxic chemicals
that are absorbed through the skin and inhaled.

"The big concern that we have is babies in public pools because young children
and especially babies are much more susceptible to DNA damage in agents because
their bodies are growing and they're replicating DNA like crazy," he said.

Some public pools have been closed because they have high levels of bacteria.
"Public pools keep a high level of chlorine in the water to keep bacteria and
pathogens down but very little work research is conducted on evaluating levels
of generated dangerous disinfection by-products.

"The idea is to keep the pools disinfected, keep them in compliance, just as
with drinking water but then use engineering techniques that reduce the levels
of these toxic byproducts." Plewa described another project he is working on as
a researcher with a National Science Foundation Center called WaterCAMPWS at the
University of Illinois. "We're working with engineers and chemists to develop
new technologies that will disinfect water, that will desalinate water, that
will remove pharmaceuticals from water but in so doing, don't generate
byproducts that are even more toxic than the things you're trying to remove."

Ironically, the DBPs that are regulated by EPA tend to be some of the least
toxic DBPs in Plewa's study. "We've found that the emerging DBPs are much more
genotoxic and much more cytotoxic. But I can't fault EPA because these data were
not present at the time and in fact the development of the database of over 70
DBPs has been done in concert with our colleagues at the federal EPA."

Plewa said that until new technologies are engineered to safely disinfect the
water in public pools, education is needed to encourage people to bathe or
shower before entering a public pool. "It's the organic material that gets in
the pool that is disinfected and then recirculated over and over again. That's
why we call swimming pools disinfectant byproduct reactors. But by public
education, by personal behavior, there should be ways that we can reduce the
levels of the dissolved organic material that should reduce the level of DBPs."

Plewa, along with a team of scientists received a U.S. EPA Science and
Technology award for their paper "Occurrence, genotoxicity and carcinogenicity
of regulated and emerging disinfection byproducts in drinking water: A review
and roadmap for research." It was published in the scientific journal Mutation
Research.


From alison at iucn.org.vn Tue Apr 7 18:32:01 2009
From: alison at iucn.org.vn (Alison Lapp)
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2009 15:32:01 +0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Conservation Today: IUCN Viet Nam eNewsletter
Message-ID: <IUCN_OFFICEQc32om1j00001788@iucn_office.iucn.org.vn>

Dear members, partners and friends,



The IUCN Viet Nam country office has carried its active engagement with
finding sustainable solutions to Viet Nam's environmental challenges into
the new year. We continue to build partnerships at the regional, national
and local levels that further our goal of creating environmentally friendly
systems that meet the needs of both people and nature. As always, we are
eager to share our recent activities with those who have played a part in
our successes. We invite you to follow the link below to the First Quarter
2009 edition of our eNewsletter, Conservation Today:



http://iucn.org/about/union/secretariat/offices/asia/asia_where_work/vietnam
/newsletter0309.cfm



Best,

Alison Lapp

Intern Communications Officer

IUCN, the International Union for Conservation of Nature
Viet Nam Country Office
IPO Box 60
44/4 Van Bao street
Hanoi, Viet Nam

Tel: +84 4 7261574/5 Ext. 150
Fax: +84 4 7261561
Email: <mailto:alison at iucn.org.vn> alison at iucn.org.vn
<http://www.iucn.org.vn/> <http://www.iucn.org.vn> http://www.iucn.org.vn





From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Tue Apr 7 23:38:38 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 07 Apr 2009 06:38:38 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] =?utf-8?q?connect2earth_now_links_young_people_direc?=
=?utf-8?q?tly_with_world=E2=80=99s_top_experts_to_debate?=
Message-ID: <49DB575E.10806@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://cms.iucn.org/news_events/?uNewsID=2972

connect2earth now links young people directly with world?s top experts to debate
green issues
06 April 2009 | News - Press Release

The popular online community connect2earth.org has launched a new service that
links young people directly with the world?s top environmental experts to talk
about headline-grabbing topics that they care about such as climate change, the
energy crisis, and species loss.


Community members can debate by posting text, images, audio, video and then
follow the discussion live as it plays out on the web or on their mobile phone.
connect2earth community members, together with a jury of green experts, will
then pick a winning contribution, giving the winner an opportunity to take even
more action.
The winner could snag a trip to be part of an official delegation to the United
Nations climate negotiations in Copenhagen later this year, or even get hands-on
experience in a real on-the-ground conservation project somewhere in the world.
?connect2earth lets you talk directly with people all over the world and some of
the world?s top experts. Participate in the community and you may even get to be
part of the global UN climate change negotiations, or take part in a real
conservation project!? says Skandar Keynes, star of Hollywood hits The
Chronicles of Narnia: ?The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe? and ?Prince Caspian?.
?connect2earth is a great way for young people to engage with environmentalists,
but also for us to learn from young people. They are the future of our planet
and they need a voice in the global debate ? in both the corridors of power and
on the ground,? says Julia Marton-Lef?vre, IUCN Director General.
More information: www.connect2earth.org


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Tue Apr 7 23:41:20 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 07 Apr 2009 06:41:20 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Indonesian palm oil industry takes step towards
sustainability
Message-ID: <49DB5800.8050503@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://www.panda.org/wwf_news/news/?uNewsID=161661

News Archive

Indonesian palm oil industry takes step towards sustainability

Palm oil (Sawi palm) plantation, harvest. Lampung, Sumatra, Indonesia. A major
Indonesian plantation company this month became the country?s first certified
maker of sustainable palm oil.
? WWF-Canon / Alain COMPOST
07 Apr 2009
Jakarta, Indonesia: A major Indonesian plantation company has become the
country?s first certified maker of sustainable palm oil as WWF simultaneously
collaborated with the Indonesian Department of Agriculture and others to hold a
first-time regional training workshop for small producers.

Musim Mas Group Plantations, is the first company in Indonesia to demonstrate
that some of its plantations comply with the Roundtable for Sustainable Palm Oil
(RSPO) Principles and Criteria, a set of standards that helps ensure that palm
oil is produced in a socially and environmentally responsible way. Indonesia is
the world?s biggest producer of palm oil.

The RSPO brings together oil palm growers, oil processors, food companies,
retailers, NGOs and investors to help ensure that no rainforest areas are
sacrificed for new oil palm plantations, that all plantations minimize their
environmental impacts and that basic rights of local peoples and plantation
workers are fully respected.

?Musim Mas hopes that its certification will encourage more Indonesian companies
to follow suit,? said Liantong Gan, head of Musim Mas? sustainability department.

Musim Mas? certification underscores the progress that WWF, and others, have
made in efforts to increase the number of palm oil producers that are operating
sustainably.

WWF works to ensure that oil palm expansion does not come at the expense of
forests by promoting its expansion onto degraded lands. It is also helping to
develop guidance for the small holders representing 40 per cent of Indonesia?s
palm oil growers.

"WWF is pleased to see progress in Indonesia, but there is much work to be done
before sustainable palm oil can be a mainstream reality," said Ian Kosasih,
Director of the Forest Programme at WWF Indonesia.

"WWF Indonesia will continue to cooperate with stakeholders to build the
capacity of farmers to implement the RSPO guidelines, promote the use of idle or
degraded land for oil palm expansion, and put pressure on those companies that
persist in converting natural forest for oil palm expansion," Kosasih said.

WWF helped organize the training for 21 training representatives from small
Indonesian palm oil plantations from West Sumatra, Riau, South Sumatra, Jambi,
and West of Kalimantan.

WWF held the training in collaboration with the Indonesian Smallholders Working
Group, the Department of Agriculture, the RSPO Indonesia Liaison Office, Sawit
Watch, and various certification bodies. The training stemmed from a memorandum
of understanding signed on Feb. 17 between the RSPO and the Indonesian
Department of Agriculture.

The objective was to educate trainers on the threats of oil palm plantations to
the region?s forests and local species, to motivate smallholders to comply with
the RSPO P & C, and to provide practical ways smallholders can comply with these
sustainability criteria, including mitigating the wildlife human conflict that
often occurs happens in oil palm plantations.

In addition, a syllabus and training modules were developed so that the
representatives could take them back to their operations for educational purposes.

The Indonesian Smallholders Working Group is planning to hold further trainings
in the five provinces represented at the March training, and follow them up with
audits.

As a founding member of the RSPO, WWF has worked since 2002 with a wide range of
stakeholders to ensure that the RSPO standards contain robust social and
environmental criteria, including a prohibition on the conversion of high
conservation value (HCV) areas.

The workshop and Musim Mas? certification come only months after the first
shipment of RSPO certified sustainable palm oil arrived in Europe from southeast
Asia.

Several European companies, including Unilever, Sainsbury?s and Albert Heijn,
have already made strong public commitments to buy certified sustainable palm oil.

The next RSPO Roundtable meeting and the 6th General Assembly of RSPO members
will be held in November 2009 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 8 00:12:02 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 07 Apr 2009 07:12:02 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Eco-Cities Now Lie Abandoned
Message-ID: <49DB5F32.7080804@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://e360.yale.edu/content/feature.msp?id=2138

06 APR 2009: REPORT
China?s Grand Plans for
Eco-Cities Now Lie Abandoned

Mostly conceived by international architects, China?s eco-cities were intended
to be models of green urban design. But the planning was done with little
awareness of how local people lived, and the much-touted projects have largely
been scrapped.

by christina larson

If all had gone as planned, ?the world?s first eco-city,? as press releases
billed it back in 2005, would now be well on its way to completion. The
visionary project called for a grassy island near the crowded metropolis of
Shanghai to be transformed from a marshy backwater into a gleaming community of
energy-efficient buildings housing 50,000 people. Waste was to have been
recycled as fuel and the waterfronts were to be lined with sleek
micro-windmills. The original timetable called for the first phase of
construction to be completed by the Shanghai Expo in 2010, enabling the city to
showcase its commitment to building a green future. Within 30 years, the planned
community, Dongtan, would grow to accommodate half a million people.



Arup
An artist's rendering of Dongtan, near Shanghai.
Today, almost nothing has been built. Some residents have been moved off the
island, many of them becoming cab drivers in bustling Shanghai. Although the
project was widely publicized internationally, most locals knew little about it.
The political leaders who championed the project were ousted in a corruption
scandal, and their successors have allowed construction permits to lapse.

Meanwhile local environmentalists and academics have recently spoken out against
the project in the Chinese press, noting that the planned construction site
happened to be located on the last extant wetlands outside Shanghai, home to
rare migratory birds. A farmer with fields near the project site told a reporter
in 2007 that he hadn?t been informed, let alone consulted, about intentions to
transform the area. What you will see if you visit the site today, according to
Paul French, a Shanghai-based partner in research publisher Access Asia, is that
?no construction has occurred there ? indeed it's gone backwards as a visitor
center previously built is now shut.?


Yale Environment 360
Highly touted eco-cities in Dongtan and Huangbaiyu have run into trouble.
Dongtan and other highly touted eco-cities across China were meant to be models
of sustainable design for the future. Instead they?ve become models of bold
visions that mostly stayed on the drawing boards ? or collapsed from shoddy
implementation. More often than not, these vaunted eco-cities have been designed
by big-name foreign architectural and engineering firms who plunged into the
projects with little understanding of Chinese politics, culture, and economics ?
and with little feel for the needs of local residents whom the utopian
communities were designed to serve.

?What I have always found amazing about these eco-towns is how seemingly easy it
is for people to, first, tout these as a sign of China?s commitment to the
environment and then, second, be surprised when things fail,? writes Richard
Brubaker, founder and managing director of China Strategic Development Partners.

Shannon May, a Ph.D. candidate in anthropology at the University of California,
Berkeley who has studied the troubled eco-city of Huangbaiyu, wrote in comments
posted on The Christian Science Monitor?s Web site, ?While such highly lauded
projects garner fame and money for the foreign firms, and promotions for the
local government officials, they leave the population they were supposed to
serve behind.?

The Huangbaiyu project sought to transform a small village in northeast China?s
Liaoning province into a more energy-efficient community. Part of the vision was
to use special hay and pressed-earth bricks for construction. Unfortunately, of
the first 42 homes completed in 2006, only a handful were built with the custom
bricks. As the magazine Ethical Corporation has reported, cost overruns made the
homes unaffordable to many villagers. In other instances, although homes were
available, the farmers refused to live in them, complaining that the new yards
weren?t large enough to raise animals and sustain a livelihood.

Some of the homes in Huangbaiyu were built with garages, although villagers
don?t have cars. Among the problems besetting the project were ?technical
inexperience, faulty materials, lack of oversight, and poor communication,? says
May, who has studied the site. Oddly, some of the homes were built with garages,
although villagers don?t have cars.

While disappointing, these results shouldn?t be surprising. In China, hype comes
easy, as foreigners dearly want to believe that anything is possible in this
booming country. Initial expectations often aren?t well grounded, and people
make easy pronouncements with little familiarity of how things work in China.

In the cases of Dongtan and Huangbaiyu, the stumbling blocks encountered were
not inevitable, and lessons for the future can be gleaned in examining the
projects? fate.

Some of the problems are common to high-profile, visionary projects across
China. Richard ?Tad? Ferris, a Washington, D.C., lawyer for the firm Holland &
Knights, explains that there exists in China, especially in Chinese law, an
?aspirational culture? rather than a ?compliance culture? ? meaning that
implementation and oversight of regulations and plans frequently fall short of
reality. Anyone who has ever walked down the streets of Beijing, where sidewalks
slabs with raised bumps for blind pedestrians suddenly veer into open manhole
covers, knows that paths paved with progressive intentions can be strewn with peril.

But there?s another side of the story. The most highly publicized eco-cities,
including Dongtan and Huangbaiyu, drew upon expertise from some of the most
vaunted international architectural and design firms. The vision for an eco-city
on the outskirts of Shanghai was first hatched by the international consulting
firm McKinsey & Company. The well-regarded UK-based design, engineering,
planning, and business consulting firm, Arup, designed what its Web site
describes as the ?master plan? for Dongtan. In 2005, British Prime Minister Tony
Blair even hailed collaboration on Dongtan as a sign of strong U.K.-China relations.

And William McDonough ? a U.S. architect, author of Cradle to Cradle, and a
celebrated figure in the American green architecture movement ? worked on the
design of Huangbaiyu, as well as ?conceptual plans? for other eco-projects
across China.

As Wen Bo, a Beijing-based environmentalist and co-director of Pacific
Environment?s China programs, observes: ?I know that some very experienced
international firms, including a U.K.-based construction company and the
American architecture firm of William McDonough, were involved in planning; it
seems to me that they should share some of the responsibility for any problems
encountered.?

China has become a laboratory for new technology and global talent seeking to
realize their futuristic visions.Like it or not, China has become a workshop for
the world, a laboratory for new technology and global talent seeking to realize
their futuristic visions. Foreign architects have designed many of Beijing?s
most famous architectural landmarks, including the Olympic ?Bird's Nest,?
?Aquacube,? and CCTV towers. This international spotlight helps explain both the
high hopes ? and, in this case, great disappointment ? connected with these
eco-cities. As Wen tellingly notes, these particular projects were always much
better known outside China than inside.

The sentiments voiced by McDonough several years ago typified the grand
aspirations of the eco-city planners. In a slideshow presentation now available
on YouTube, he said, ?I will finish by showing you a new city we?re designing
for the Chinese government. We?re doing 12 cities for China right now, based on
Cradle to Cradle, as templates. Our assignment is to develop protocols for the
housing of 400 million people in 12 years ??

Today, with increasingly critical coverage of eco-cities in the press,
McDonough?s architecture and community design firm, William McDonough +
Partners, is downplaying its involvement in China. According to Kira Gould, the
firm?s director of communications, ?While we have in the past done some very
limited conceptual planning work in China, we are not doing any community
design/planning work there at this time.?

Even after problems came to light, Arup continued to promote its involvement in
the Dongtan eco-city, although the language of recent press releases and public
statements is carefully worded to leave unclear whether the project has been
built. A spokesperson from Arup was not available for comment.

So why did these plans not come to fruition?

In the case of Dongtan, as Paul French explains in a podcast posted on the
Ethical Corporation web site, one problem was a feud over who would actually
fund the project. ?Both sides ? Arup, on one side, who call themselves the
?master builders? of the project ? and Shanghai Industrial Investment
Corporation (the Chinese government arm that owns the land) ?thought the other
was going to pay for it. So Arup thought they were brought in on a project that
they would then be able to design, the Chinese would build it, and pay them a
large amount of money. The Chinese thought that Arup was going to build the
project and that they would get themselves a free eco-city.?

A second stumbling block has been the highly politicized nature of the project.
When former Shanghai Communist Party chief Chen Liangyu, a well-known backer of
the project, was sentenced in 2008 to 18 years in prison for bribery and abuse
of power, the process stalled. According to Peggy Liu, chairperson of the Joint
U.S.-China Cooperation on Clean Energy, ?Dongtan got stuck mainly due to the
transition of Shanghai mayors.?

In the case of Huangbaiyu, a lack of understanding of local needs presented
problems. So, too, did a lack of sound oversight: no one effectively ensured
that plans on paper were consistently translated into projects on the ground.
The small plots and mix-up with the eco-bricks are telling examples of the
confusion in construction.

Lately, there is more enthusiasm in China for better green building codes than
for designing new cities.In order for a green community to succeed, it not only
has to limit carbon emissions but actually be livable ? and adapted to local
circumstances. Without extensive consultation with local people, it?s a
challenge for foreign planners, even with the best of intentions, to understand
what is required to transplant a farmer who grew up plowing fields into a city
dweller. (One of McDonough?s blueprints, for another planned eco-city in
Liuzhou, called for farmers to use rooftop fields, connected by tiny bridges.
Whether or not it?s a workable ecological solution, one wonders how well recent
transplants from the countryside would tolerate vertiginous crisscrossing
between buildings.) This is one reason Brubaker stresses the need for more
community consultation and a ?locally guided process.?

Other, less-publicized approaches to building eco-cities are now underway in
China that so far seem to be making more progress. A partnership between the
Singapore government and the local government to build an eco-city near Tianjin
looks more promising, in part because money is coming from both sources and the
project is expected to earn not only global kudos but money, making a greater
level of supervision and follow-through more likely.

On the whole, within China, there has lately been more enthusiasm for expanding
green building codes than building new cities from scratch. ?Enforceable green
building codes, with the designers? and planners' willingness to follow them, is
very important,? says Wen Bo. ?Such grand eco-city plans themselves are not
eco-friendly.?

POSTED ON 06 APR 2009 IN SUSTAINABILITY ASIA


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 8 00:43:04 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 07 Apr 2009 07:43:04 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] CV of RUNIA MOWLA [community development,
gender equality, voluntarism, reproductive health and rights
Message-ID: <49DB6678.6040104@gmail.com>

Subject: Request
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2009 02:55:25 -0700 (PDT)
From: Ghulam Kibria <kibly77 at yahoo.com>



RUNIA MOWLA

HOUSE NO- 1/ E/ 4/ 1, (3RD FLOOR) ROAD- 7/A (NEW),
14 (OLD), WEST DHANMONDII, DHAKA-1209, BANGLADESH
0088-02-8123806 (RES.) CELL: 0088-01726058070
E-mail: mowlarunia at yahoo.com; mowlarunia at gmail.com

Areas of Expertise

? Social & Community development
? Gender/WID (Women in Development) and Gender and Development (GAD)
? Reproductive health & rights
? Informed choice and Volunteerism
? Project management, planning and partnership,
? Participatory Training-Extension
? Research & Development (R & D)
? Community gender based Fresh water & coastal rural Aquaculture/Fisheries

Professional skills (Key Experiences)

? Experienced in Program/Project administration/management (Social &
Community Development, Gender/WID (Women in Development), Gender and
Development (GAD), Informed choice and Volunteerism, male involvement in
Sexual and Reproductive health, Community empowerment, mass education;
gender based violence issues;) and strategic planning and program development
and financial management including budget preparation and financial control.
? Experienced in policy analysis and advocacy with human rights based activities,
Reproductive Health & Reproductive Rights, Gender Based Violence (GBV),
social & community development, participatory planning and implementation,
? Also have the strength in excellent communication, collaboration and
coordination skills for correspondence with NGOs & INGOs (National &
International), academic institutions, training institutions, in- country UN/ and
donor agencies;
? Efficiently managed partner NGOs through monitoring & evaluation (M & E),
and qualitative research work, institutional capacity building, communication &
networking, individual capacity building through designing of
training/orientation and trainings and their facilitation;
? Developed training & teaching materials (Handout, leaflet etc), produce training
module, a variety of media and communication material/message focused on
creating awareness of gender prejudice and gaps, gender Flipchart (a training tool)
including some gender and social issues like early marriage, Dowry, marriage
Registration, Birth Registration, co sharing of housework, equal share of food in
_________________________________________________
CV of RUNIA MOWLA, updated on 20 March, 2009

respect of sex, women franchise, knowledge of general hygiene, maternity health
care, etc for the fisher folk of the project area under the DANIDA/GOB-Fresh
water and Coastal Fisheries program and NICARE, The British Council in
Bangladesh.
? Prepared of project performance report/project completion reports as per the
LOG frame; familiarity with reporting requirements of USAID and
printing/publications techniques, developed case studies/write-ups, lessons
learned and best practices on project activities.


Years of experience

13 years in development organizations: (4 years International NGO, 7 years in
National
NGO, 01 year in National and International Educational Institute and 01 year in
various
development organization/project)

Language proficiency

Language Reading Writing Speaking
Bengali
(Mother tongue) Excellent Excellent Excellent
English Excellent Excellent Excellent
French (Level
1& 2) Basic Basic Basic

Computer literacy

MS Word, Power-point, SPSS, Bijoy 2000, MS excel, Microsoft Access and website
navigation

Nationality, Date of Birth and Passport number

Bangladeshi, 1 July 1972
O 1527157 (International)

Country Travelled

India, Japan, Malaysia, Nepal, Thailand

Education

Masters of Science (M.Sc), Gender and Development Studies
Asian Institute of Technology(AIT)
Bangkok, THAILAND

Major Subjects/Courses:
Introduction to Gender and Development; Gender Technology and Economic
Development; Society Technology and Health; Householders, Women and Sustainable
Agriculture; Culture, Knowledge and Gender Relations; Gender Analysis in Field
August 2001
_________________________________________________
CV of RUNIA MOWLA, updated on 20 March, 2009


Methods; New Technologies, Industrialization and Gender; Developing Urban Asia:
Shifting Gender Patterns, Market and Media; Research Design and Method; Gender
Responsive Development Planning; Gender in Enterprise Management; Gender and
Natural Resources Management.
Thesis Title: ?Integrating Girl?s Empowerment into Secondary School Curriculum:
Formative Evaluation of Centre for Mass Education in Science (CMES), Dhaka,
Bangladesh?.

Masters of Social Science (M.S.S), Political Science
University of Dhaka
Dhaka, BANGLADESH

Major Subjects/Courses:
Modern Political Thoughts; Political Development and Social Change; African
Politics;
Political Development in Bangladesh; Statistics.

December 1996
Bachelors of Social Science (B.S.S), (Honours) Political Science
University of Dhaka
Dhaka, BANGLADESH

Major Subjects/Courses:
Political Theory and Thought; Comparative Politics; International Politics;
History of
Politics in Bangladesh; Public Administration.
Subsidiary courses:
Sociology and Economics

November 1995
Bachelor of Education (B.Ed)
Teachers Training College
Dhaka, BANGLADESH

Major Subjects/Courses:
History of Education; Educational Psychology; Education and National Development;
Educational Evaluation and Guidance; Principles of Education and English

November 1998


Professional Experience

EngenderHealth, Bangladesh Country Office (BCO)


?Coordinator (Gender& Informed Choice)? 16 October 2005 to
31 January 2009 (3
years 3 months)

Responsibilities:
Identify and analyze issues related to right and informed choice and voluntary
decision making in the FP/ RH context in Bangladesh, ensuring volunteerism,
gender equality and equity in reproductive health services with special attention
towards BCO current programs and the national level. Assist the Program Specialist
_________________________________________________
CV of RUNIA MOWLA, updated on 20 March, 2009
3

(Contractual Compliance, Coordination and M & E) to monitor compliance of BCO
and partners? programs with contractual provision and donor?s requirements in
terms of ensuring human rights, informed choice and voluntarism, gender equality
and equity in reproductive health program implementation, and suggest
recommendations. Conduct training /orientation for BCO staff and project staff and
beneficiaries to sensitize about gender and men engage issues and incorporate the
issues into different Training manual and project activities. Collaborate with
other
BCO staff members, as appropriate, in inform choice, right based and gender
responsive programming and integration of gender and male involvement issues in
different program activities and training curricula and manual.
Selected achievements: Successful institutional capacity building on Gender issues,
introduction and integration of gender and male involvement issues led new project
design and implementation on Male Friendly Services (MFS) at one sub district to
encourage and increase male access to Family Planning/RH services and support
their partners? RH decision especially in connection with acceptance of LAPM
and dealing with maternal health issues. Successfully completion of the project
with positive results and co author of the report on lessons learned of MFS
project.

EngenderHealth, Bangladesh Country Office (BCO)

?Assistant Coordinator? 01 July to 15
October 2005 (4
months)

Responsibilities: Coordinate the research project related activities, which is
being
implemented By EngenderHealth, Communicate with the Government field level
officials or EH staff on field trip, as necessary, Assist in all kinds of
assessment,
research and monitoring/evaluation activities of EngenderHealth BCO.
Selected achievements:
Successful coordination of a research activity with ICDDRB


Asian Institute of Technology (AIT), Bangkok, Thailand


?Research Associate? in Integrated Watershed
Development and Management (IWDM) Program

01 December, 2003
to 31 December
2004(13 months)

Responsibilities: Located in Bangkok. Reported to Dr. Michael A. Zoebisch,
Associate Professor, Coordinator to Integrated Watershed Development and
Management Program (IWDM), Field of Agricultural Systems, School of
Environment, Resources and Development, Asian Institute of Technology (AIT).
Selected achievements: Produced synthesis copy of the entire master thesis of
2001-2002, and 2004 in the field of Integrated Watershed Development and
Management (IWDM) Program in AIT for preparing a Monograph on these.
_________________________________________________
CV of RUNIA MOWLA, updated on 20 March, 2009
4


Institute of Media Communication & Training, Dhaka, Bangladesh

?Advocacy/ Gender Officer? June 01, 2003 to
November 30, 2003 (6
months)
Responsibilities: Contribute and facilitated the development of strategic and
operational plan for the program unit Conducted training on communication and
presentation skill using modern participatory teaching/ learning methods, material
and message Identify the areas for training on specific gender and social issues.
Selected achievements: Coordinated the training team to produce training module,
a variety of media and communication material/message focused on creating
awareness of gender prejudice and gaps.

Northern Ireland Health and Social Services (NICARE, The British Council),
Bangladesh

?Field Facilitator? October 01, 2002
to October 30,
2002 (1 month)
Responsibilities: Worked with key people to develop public private partnership
(PPP) health services, using a capacity building approach, in a given area by:
Facilitated supervisory and monitoring activities of Union MOHFW management
staff of three health scheme at Union level, facilitated to prepare the Action
Plan of
each Scheme.
Selected achievements: Conducted training for the Government staff, physicians,
health workers, Family Welfare Volunteers and other staff of British Council on
general and reproductive health problems and its social consequences.

Patuakhali Barguna Aquaculture Extension Project (PBAEP)/ (GOB/DANIDA),
DANIDA Technical Assistance (DTA)

'Women Development Officer' (Junior Consultant) March 19, 2002 to July
4, 2002 (5 months)

Responsibilities: Developed a Gender Flipchart (a training tool) including some
gender and social issues like early marriage, Dowry, marriage Registration, Birth
Registration, co sharing of housework, equal share of food in respect of sex, women
franchise, knowledge of general hygiene, maternity health care, etc for the
fisheries
farmer groups of the project area.
Selected achievements: Supervised and promote gender equity and recommend on
gender analysis to its policies and programs Disseminated some other idea about
income generating activities using 'Time Use' of rural women would be time and
labour saving for women in particular and stayed at least 10 days and 4 nights
(every
month) with the farmer family to be familiar with the life of rural folk.

_________________________________________________
CV of RUNIA MOWLA, updated on 20 March, 2009
5

Bangladesh Mahila Parishad
(A leading National Women Organisation), the Economic and Social Council
(ECOSOC) of the United Nations

?Active Member? (Training, Research sub-committee) 1992 to 1999 (7 years)
Responsibilities: Organized meetings, training programs, workshops and
discussions on gender and other social issues (including CRC and CEDAW) at sub-
committee and central level. Trainings are provided mainly for Adolescent girls,
member of the organization and elected women representative of local government
and assisted in organisation of all national and international events (women's day,
children day, etc), emergency relief management activities.
Selected achievements: Involved in mass literacy campaign and activities among
slum children through Primary Education Program of Bangladesh Mahila Parishad.
Worked for rehabilitating the disadvantaged women through Women Rehabilitation
Centre of Bangladesh Mahila Parishad, Accumulated data and analysis and
compiled them related to gender and women development issues and prepared
quarterly & annual report based on above matter.


Professional Training/Study Tour/Conference/Symposium/Workshop/Meeting

1. The 12th Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries
Economics and Trade (IIFET), 2004 (What are Responsible Fisheries?)
organized by Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology (TUMSAT),
Tokyo, Japan, 24 -31July, 2004 (8 days)
? Nominated as a Panel list member under the Special Session ?Emerging
Asian Fisheries and Aquaculture: Past, Present and the Future?

2. The International Conference on ?7th Asian Fisheries Forum (New
Dimensions and Challenges in Asian Fisheries in the 21st Century?, organized
by Asian Fisheries Society, USM, UPM & WorldFish Centre, Malaysia, 30
November- 4 December, 2004 (5 days)

3. Men Engage South Asia Regional Consultation Meeting, Men Engage a
Global Alliance: organized by EngenderHealth, Instituto Promundo, Save the
Children Sweden, Sahayog, the Family Violence Prevention Fund and the
International Planned Parenthood Federation, 30 January -2nd February- 2007 (4
days)

4. Regional strategic planning meeting on working with Men and boys for
prevention of Gender bases violence and Gender Equality, organized by
UNDP, ICRW, Save the Children - Sweden & Denmark10- 12 April 2008 (3
days)


_________________________________________________
CV of RUNIA MOWLA, updated on 20 March, 2009
6

List of referees and publications are attached (as Annexure I & II
respectively)








By submitting this application on this date, I certify that the statements made
by me in my
CV are true, complete, and correct to the best of my knowledge and belief. I
understand
that any false statements or any required information withheld from this resume may
provide grounds for withdrawal of any offer of appointment or dismissal if
appointment
has been accepted.















RUNIA MOWLA (Ms)


















_________________________________________________
CV of RUNIA MOWLA, updated on 20 March, 2009
7

Annexure I


Referees


1. Dr. Abu Jamil Faisel
Country Representative
ENGENDERHEALTH
Country Office, BANGLADESH
Concord Royal Court, House # 40
16 (New) Road # 27(old), Dhanmondi R/A
Dhaka 1209, BANGLADESH
Tel: 0088-02-8119234, 8119236
Res: 0088-02-8010204, 8020281
Fax: 0088-02 -8119235
Email: afaisel at engenderhealth.org

1. Dr. Barbara Earth
Assistant Professor
Gender and Development Studies
School of Environment, Resources and Development (SERD)
Asian Institute of Technology (AIT)
P.O. Box 4, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120, THAILAND
Tel: 662-524-5672/5668 (Off), 662-901-8163 (Res)
Fax: 662-524-6166
Email: barbarac at ait.ac.th











_________________________________________________
CV of RUNIA MOWLA, updated on 20 March, 2009
8

Annexure II

List of Publications (1-15)

Mowla, R. 2003. Reproductive health and rights of adolescent girls in
rural setting of Bangladesh: An Evaluation. Proceedings of the 11th
GASAT International Conference on Gender and Science and Technology
(GASAT 11), the Mauritius Institute of Education, The Mauritius Research
Council Le Reduit, MAURITIUS (6-11 July, 2003).

Kibria, M.G and Mowla, R. 2003. ?Sustainable aquaculture development
for poverty alleviation in northern uplands with emphasis on gender
roles: A Vietnam perspective?. Proceedings of the 11th GASAT
International Conference on Gender and Science and Technology (GASAT
11), The Mauritius Institute of Education, The Mauritius Research Council
Le Reduit, MAURITIUS (6-11 July, 2003).

Kibria, M.G., Anrooy, R.V. and Mowla, R. 2003. ?Poverty alleviation
through a sustainable aquaculture practices in northern uplands of
Vietnam?. Under the Aquaculture Development & Education. Paper
presented in the ASIAN PACIFIC AQUACULTURE 2003 Conference from
September 22 to 25, 2003, Bangkok, Thailand. Organized by NACA, FAO,
AIT, and AFS & SEAFDEC. Contact: Dr John Cooksey, Email:
worldaqua at aol.com

Few entries namely ?Development and Child Development?, Replication,
Expansion, Growth, Extension. 2003, Published In Md. Habibur Rahman
(ed) Compendium of Education (Shikkakosh). Swiss Agency for
Development and Cooperation (SDC), Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Md. Ghulam Kibria, Raymon Van Anrooy and Runia Mowla, 2004.
Women in Aquaculture: Success Story in Vietnam's Northern Uplands.
Published in the Community and Environment section of GAA's February
2004 Global Aquaculture Advocate (GAA) Magazine.

Md.Ghulam Kibria and Runia Mowla (2004).?Sustainable management of
pond aquaculture in oxbow lakes of Bangladesh with emphasis on
women involvement: a case study?.An abstract has been accepted for
poster sessions for the International Conference on ?Women in fisheries
and aquaculture: lesson from the past, current actions and dreams for the
future? Galicia, Spain (10-13 November, 2004).


_________________________________________________
CV of RUNIA MOWLA, updated on 20 March, 2009
9

Md.Ghulam Kibria and Runia Mowla (2004). ?Sustainable aquaculture
development for poverty alleviation in northern uplands of Vietnam
with women involvement?.A paper has been presented in Special session
in the IIFET 2004 Japan twelfth biennial international Conference (26-30
July, 2004). (Abstract available in Book of abstracts, p.182 and full paper
has been published in IIFET final proceedings under the Contributions of
Fisheries and Aquaculture to Society theme).

Md.Ghulam Kibria and Runia Mowla (2004). ?Diversified selective & non-
selective fishing gears and impacts on the inland waters of
Bangladesh?.A paper has been displayed in Poster session of the IIFET
2004 Japan twelfth biennial international Conference (26-30 July, 2004).
(Abstract available in Book of abstracts, p.199).

Runia Mowla, Md.Ghulam Kibria and Md. Enamul Kabir (2004).
?Community Based Fisheries Management in the coastal area of
Bangladesh with emphasis on gender? A paper has been presented in
special session of the IIFET 2004 Japan twelfth biennial international
Conference (26-30 July, 2004). (Abstract available in Book of abstracts,
p.178 and full paper has been published in IIFET final proceedings under
the Gender issues in Fisheries and Aquaculture theme).

Md. Ghulam Kibria and Runia Mowla 2004. Women Farm in
Bangladesh: Women as Partners, Revitalizing the Oxbow Lakes of
Bangladesh. Published in the Community and Environment section of
GAA?s August 2004 Global Aquaculture Advocate Magazine.

Runia Mowla and Md.Ghulam Kibria (2004). ?An integrated approach
on gender issues of fisheries project in coastal area of Bangladesh:
Problems and challenges?. A paper has been presented at the Global
Symposium on Gender and Fisheries in the Conference of 7th Asian
Fisheries Forum (New Dimensions and Challenges in Asian Fisheries in
the 21st Century, 30 November - 04 December, 2004) at Penang, Malaysia
organized by Asian Fisheries Society, USM, UPM & WorldFish Centre
(Abstract available in Book of abstracts, p.114).

Runia Mowla and Md.Ghulam Kibria (2004). ?Community based
Fisheries management in the coastal area of Bangladesh: A case study?.
A paper has been presented at the Global Symposium on Fisheries Co-
Management in the Conference of 7th Asian Fisheries Forum (New
Dimensions and Challenges in Asian Fisheries in the 21st Century, 30
November - 04 December, 2004) at Penang, Malaysia organized by Asian
Fisheries Society, USM, UPM & WorldFish Centre (Abstract available in
Book of abstracts, p.16).

_________________________________________________
CV of RUNIA MOWLA, updated on 20 March, 2009
10

_________________________________________________
CV of RUNIA MOWLA, updated on 20 March, 2009
11
Md.Ghulam Kibria, Mohammad R. Hasan and Runia Mowla ?Sustainable
aquaculture development in Oxbow lakes, Bangladesh ? emphasis on
women involvement? published in the Global Aquaculture Compendium,
CABI, UK, 2005

Runia Mowla and Md.Ghulam Kibria. ?The Patuakhali-Barguna
Aquaculture Extension Project: community-based fisheries
management and gender roles? published in the Global Aquaculture
Compendium, CABI, UK, 2005

Runia Mowla and Tawfique jahan, ?Promoting Male Friendly
Reproductive Health Services in Bangladesh: Result of a Pilot Effort?
published in the ACQUIRING KNOWLEDGE, USAID/the ACQUIRE
project/EngenderHealth, 2008.











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From mydung1988 at gmail.com Wed Apr 8 01:13:31 2009
From: mydung1988 at gmail.com (mydung1988)
Date: Tue, 07 Apr 2009 15:13:31 -0000
Subject: [enviro-vlc] mydung1988
Message-ID: <000f01c91032$59266ef0$0b734cd0$@com>

confirm 6b974f46a3857060a60c305cd2a987

1ffd87e92d





From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 8 02:07:36 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 07 Apr 2009 09:07:36 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] UN's State Of The World's Forests Reveals
Deforestation Is Speeding Up
Message-ID: <49DB7A48.6020105@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Download


The State of the World's Forests
http://www.fao.org/docrep/011/i0350e/i0350e00.htm

http://www.enn.com/ecosystems/article/39611

From: Angelique van Engelen, Global Warming is Real, More from this Affiliate

Published April 7, 2009 10:01 AM

UN's State Of The World's Forests Reveals Deforestation Is Speeding Up


Despite the alarming conclusions of the UN's latest State of the World's
Forests, the mainstream media has devoted surprisingly little attention to the
report. Snowed under by other news developments as it may have been, global
deforestation is by no means insignificant. It's taking place at shocking rates,
the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)'s bi-annual report reveals.
Despite people's awareness that forests are key to the survival of the planet
and the human race, deforestation rates are ever increasing. The expansion of
large palm oil and soy plantations has been the main reason why forests are
disappearing and the world's biodiversity resources are shrinking.

"The potential for large-scale commercial production of cellulosic biofuel will
have unprecedented impacts on the forest sector," the report indicates.

Illegal logging is also a real headache. Around 20% of the world's forests are
being illegally chopped down, a trend at its worst in Africa. The continent has
lost around four million hectares of forests annually between 2000 and 2005,
representing one-third of all global deforestation. Given the fact that Africa
only hosts 16% of the world's forests, this is a devastating rate. And growth in
Europe's need for wood (for use as biomass, among others) will likely stimulate
the practice.

The numbers for Asia and the Pacific, although seemingly positive, also tell
stories of reduced biodiversity resources. The continent's 2005 total forest
size of 734 million hectares was bigger than its 2000 level but the increase was
mainly due to China's reforestation plantations. Natural forests are still being
logged, only the practice is invisible!

All Latin American countries showed deterioration during 2000-2005 except
Uruguay and Chile, because of plantation programs similar to those in China.
The global financial crisis won't make matters any better either in the short
term. The FAO says that forests run the risk to be negatively impacted by the
global economic crisis because of reduced demand for wood and wood products
which in turn leads to investment in forest-based industries and, by dint of
investor rationale, forest management.

"A general concern is that some governments may dilute previously ambitious
green goals or defer key policy decisions related to climate change mitigation
and adaptation as they focus on reversing the economic downturn," the report
reveals.

Friends of the Earth International and the Global Forest Coalition, two activist
organizations, reacted to the report by calling on world governments to take
immediate action to halt the spread of biofuel plantations in former forests,
recognize the rights of indigenous peoples, ban illegal logging and related
trade, implement immediate deforestation moratoria, and support forest
management and restoration schemes. These are all items which Poznan failed to
settle.

Isaac Rojas, who heads up the Forest and Biodiversity Program of Friends of the
Earth International believes that plantations in rainforests destroy the lands
and livelihoods of local communities and indigenous peoples, biodiversity and
water resources. A big factor in all this is that plantations are monocultures
and do not store nearly as much carbon than the forests they replace.

Global Forest Coalition said that monoculture tree plantations, something the
FAO itself promotes, are also a major cause of rural depopulation and a further
shifting agricultural frontiers.

"They are causing the destruction of forests elsewhere," said Simone Lovera,
managing coordinator of the Global Forest Coalition.

The report's longer term economic angle is less negative because it predicts
that jobs in the forestry sector will grow. Investment in sustainable forest
management has the potential to create 10 million new green jobs.

"The dual challenges of economic turmoil and climate change are bringing the
management of forests to the forefront of global interest," observes the FAO.
The U.S, for instance is including forestry in its economic stimulus package.
Specific areas where jobs will be created are singled out as forest management
and agro-forestry, jobs to improve management of forest fires, development and
management of tracking trails, and the creation and maintenance of recreation sites.

It might take a lot longer before we see similar stimulus packages in the Third
World. At the moment, around one billion people around the globe are working in
forestry jobs related to averting climate change. Forests are estimated to host
70% of the world's biodiversity resources.

Under the Kyoto Protocol, countries which are host to rainforests have not been
given any incentives to abandon clearing forests. The practice of clearing rain
forests is a big contributor to carbon emissions, contributing around 20% of
global CO2 output. This could change if these emissions are included in a future
climate protocol but chances are very slim in the wake of the GOP14 talks in Poznan.

If carbon trading takes off, deforestation might even get worse because of the
demand for bioenergy. It makes clearing forests for agricultural land more
profitable. It will be very difficult to get people in the Third World who run
lucrative palm oil plantations to change their mind on this issue. One hectare
of a palm oil plantation yields nearly 6,000 liters of crude oil. At a price of
USD54 per barrel (2007 figures), this is competitive with oil.

The amount of palm oil that actually ends up in biodiesel production is still
small but as profitability is so attractive, farmers in Amazon and Congo basins
need real incentives to abandon plans to also start palm oil farming.

"In addition to a price on the carbon emissions from deforestation, other and
stronger protection measures will still be needed," said Martin Persson, a
Swedish researcher and expert in rainforests recently.

Persson carried out this study which shows that clearing tropical forests for
palm oil plantations will remain highly profitable even when faced with a price
on the carbon emissions arising from deforestation.

This article is reproduced with kind permission of the
Global Warming is Real.
For more news and articles, visit www.globalwarmingisreal.com.


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 8 02:26:02 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 07 Apr 2009 09:26:02 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Eliminating World Poverty: Building Our Common Future
Message-ID: <49DB7E9A.60407@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Subject: [EQ] Eliminating World Poverty: Building Our Common Future
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2009 10:44:59 -0400
From: Ruggiero, Mrs. Ana Lucia (WDC) <ruglucia at PAHO.ORG>
Reply-To: Equity, Health & Human Development <EQUIDAD at LISTSERV.PAHO.ORG>
To: EQUIDAD at LISTSERV.PAHO.ORG



*Eliminating World Poverty: Building Our Common Future*

*The Department for International Development (DFID), 2009***

Available online as PDF file [32p.] at:
http://www.dfid.gov.uk/securingourcommonfuture/conference-paper-eliminating-poverty.pdf


/This background paper for the DFID annual conference "Securing our
Common Future: A Conference on the Future of International Development"
(9-10 March 2009, London)/



??.According to the paper, the current global recession seriously
threatens the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals, and may
push more than 90 million people into poverty. Times are uncertain,
because the scale of the downturn is not yet known, and the impact could
be even more serious. Combined with other huge challenges already
happening, or on the horizon, including the demands of a growing
population and the onset of climate change, this is an important moment
to reaffirm our commitment to international development and to review
priorities?.?



Part one briefly reviews recent progress in developing countries. Part
two sets out the emerging challenges, both immediate and longer term.
Part three sets out a series of questions for consideration in priority
policy areas in response to the emerging challenges?.?



*Table of Contents*

*Executive Summary *

*Introduction *

*Part One: Recent Progress in Developing Countries *

*Part Two: The Challenges *

Food and Fuel Crises

Financial and Economic Crises

Poverty in Fragile and Conflict Affected Countries

Population and Urbanisation

Managing Climate and Resource Stress

The Challenge to Globalisation

Ensuring an International System Fit for Purpose

*Part Three: The Response *

Managing the Crisis and Re-establishing Growth

Fragile and Conflict Affected Countries

Climate Change

Ensuring System Wide Effectiveness

Overcoming Food Insecurity

The Millennium Development Goals

*Bibliography*



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 8 09:40:52 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 07 Apr 2009 16:40:52 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] =?utf-8?q?Endangered_Philippine_orchids_to_find_?=
=?utf-8?q?=E2=80=98home=E2=80=99_in_the_wild_again?=
Message-ID: <49DBE484.7030401@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://www.researchsea.com/html/article.php/aid/4107/cid/1/research/endangered_philippine_orchids_to_find____home____in_the_wild_again.html

Article Released Tue-7th-April-2009 06:57 GMT
Contact: Florante A. Cruz Institution: University of the Philippines Los Ba?os

Endangered Philippine orchids to find ?home? in the wild again

To help protect and conserve the country?s rich floral heritage, a project led
by Dr. Nestor Altoveros of UP Los Ba?os has embarked on the collection and
re-introduction of indigenous orchids in selected protected areas in the
Philippines.

The Philippines is home to more than 800 species of orchids, many of which are
being collected and traded worldwide. However, unabated collection of this
endemic flora has resulted to significant loss of natural orchids growing in the
wild. In 2005, 143 orchid species in the Philippines have been listed as
endangered by the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species of
Wild Flora and Fauna.

To help protect and conserve the country?s rich floral heritage, a project led
by Dr. Nestor Altoveros of UP Los Ba?os has embarked on the collection and
re-introduction of indigenous orchids in selected protected areas in the
Philippines.

Started in 2007 with funds from the Department of Science and Technology, the
project has already accumulated a large volume of seeds of indigenous orchids
all over the country. The seeds have been germinated and plantlets are
maintained and conserved in vitro.

Dr. Altoveros recently reported that his project team was able to collect in
2008 a total of 200 orchid genotypes, representing 22 genera, from 9 provinces.
Among the genotypes collected are three species included in the International
Union for Conservation of Nature?s Red List of Threatened Species: Amesiella
monticola, Phalaenopsis lindenii and Vanda javierae.

Forty-one (41) orchid species with 111 accessions are now being reared in vitro.
Of these, 73 accessions are in the rooting stage, the last stage before the
plants are potted out into community pots.

The project has continued transferring the cultures to partner organizations
which help facilitate the reintroduction of the orchids in the protected areas.
Cultures have been distributed to the Makiling Botanic Gardens at UP Los Ba?os,
Western Philippines University-Palawan, and the Department of
Agriculture-Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao in Cotabato City.

Dr. Altoveros, University Researcher of the National Plant Genetic Resources
Laboratory at the University of the Philippines Los Ba?os, said that additional
reintroduction sites have been identified in Palawan. The indigenous orchids
will also be brought to Palawan?s popular destinations such as the Palawan
Wildlife Rescue and Conservation Center, Saint Paul?s Subterranean River
National Park and El Nido Marine Reserve Park.


Associated links

http://rdenews.uplb.edu.ph

Funding information

Department of Science and Technology


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 8 22:51:33 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Wed, 08 Apr 2009 05:51:33 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Secretive U.N. board awards lucrative credits with few
rules barring conflicts
Message-ID: <49DC9DD5.3040502@coombs.anu.edu.au>


http://www.nytimes.com/cwire/2009/04/07/07climatewire-secretive-un-board-awards-lucrative-credits-10458.html

Secretive U.N. board awards lucrative credits with few rules barring conflicts

By NATHANIAL GRONEWOLD, ClimateWire
UNITED NATIONS -- An insider's account of the closed-door workings of the
heavily regulated system of the United Nations' greenhouse gas offset trading
program suggests that its secrecy could be covering serious abuses by board
members whose task is providing lucrative carbon credits to private developers.

While individuals selected to the Executive Board of the Clean Development
Mechanism are made to swear under oath that no conflicts of interest will get
between themselves and the companies they regulate, there are no rules or
criteria requiring members to recuse themselves from deliberations when a
conflict arises or is perceived.

For months, the board -- the most tangible result of the Kyoto Protocol -- has
been deadlocked over whether or not to establish a code of conduct for avoiding
conflicts because the vast majority of members stand opposed to such a move.
Asked for comment, the board's chairman insisted that the matter has not raised
concerns.

But one current member has asserted that many on the board are operating in a
highly unprofessional manner when reviewing carbon offset projects in developing
countries and awarding developers with Certified Emission Reductions (CERs), the
credits offset companies can sell to governments and into the European Union's
cap-and-trade program.

Among the concerns: Some CDM board members tend to aggressively promote projects
that benefit their home countries, or projects developed by companies from their
countries. Some board members derived from the private sector could also be
favoring applications submitted by their former employers.

There is no evidence of any direct corruption or illegal activities. But the
lack of outside scrutiny of the board's closed-door assessments of companies and
offset projects is resulting in a casual work atmosphere that is likely
encouraging other questionable practices, one member said.

"I have a real problem with the way we are operating in the board," the member
said on condition of anonymity. "To put it very bluntly, we have board members
that are very active in defending projects that come from their country or that
are hosted in their country, or where some companies have a particular interest in."

More seriously, in the recent past, one board member may have acted on behalf of
an offset project development firm with which the member had either an ongoing
business relationship or some other financial link. Other cases like this could
have arisen in the past, as the world of offset project experts is small and
board members are often recruited from private-sector CDM players or government
offices that negotiated the 1995 Kyoto Protocol agreement.

Allegation of bias in off-the-record proceedings

Several active board members did not respond to requests by E&E for
clarification or comment. But at least one official who has served on the board
in the past admitted to witnessing bias in the board's off-the-record proceedings.

"They have, of course, some political preferences because their specific
countries have an interest in this and that sector or technology," said Martin
Enderlin, who was a board member from 2001 to 2005 and is now director of
government and regulatory affairs at EcoSecurities, a CDM project developer.

"There could be also potential situations where you have conflicts of interest,
but it's probably a bit difficult to see what would be the right criteria to
define what is a conflict of interest," he said.

The board member expressing concerns over the way that body is currently
operating said the problem is primarily a result of the failure of governments
to provide any legal protections to shield board members from retribution by
companies with investments at stake. Although ostensibly a U.N. organization,
the board has no diplomatic immunity, and members are as vulnerable to
prosecution or lawsuits as anyone else.

This results in board members fearing that libel charges could be brought
against them in European courts if it were known that individual members made
certain comments against specific companies. The board has already faced the
threat of a suit at least once last year, when the Argentine power company Capex
SA hired a German law firm to help it sue the board for its rejection of Capex's
application for CERs.

"Because of that, we have to conduct our business in a very strange fashion,
which means under closed session and in a very untransparent manner," said the
board member. "Even if I think there is something fishy, or there is false
information, I can't say so openly."

CDM observers say the board is making headway in improving transparency and
helping outsiders to better understand how it reaches its final decisions. But
the mechanism's supporters say bolstering public confidence in the CDM is far
more important to its future, and a code of conduct could be an important step
toward that end.

An oath abjuring conflicts, but they remain undefined

Under existing rules of procedure, board members joining the body must swear
under oath, "I shall have no financial interest in any aspect of the Clean
Development Mechanism, including accreditation of operational entities,
registration of CDM project activities and/or the issuance of related Certified
Emission Reductions."

But board members and the CDM's secretariat admit that there are no explicit
rules or working practices to guard against conflicts of interest.

"There is no bright-line test for determining what constitutes a conflict of
interest in the context of the board's work, and the board has not determined
what factors should guide members and alternates in determining what constitutes
a conflict of interest or a perceived conflict of interest," said CDM spokesman
David Abbass. "Board members and alternates, therefore, are left to exercise
their own individual discretion for this determination."

A review of the recordings of several past public board meetings shows that a
handful of members are taking pains to publicly demonstrate that they are doing
all they can to avoid conflicts of interest, while the vast majority of board
members apparently disregard it as a matter of serious concern.

At the start of each public board meeting, members are asked to declare openly
whether they have any conflict of interest in the reviews of CER applications on
the agenda. Of the 20 individuals serving on the board, only five or six mostly
European members go into any detail at all, saying, for instance, that in the
past some conflicts did arise but that they recused themselves from discussing
those cases.

The rest of the members, who hail mainly from the developing world and big CDM
host countries China, India and Brazil, state simply, "I have no conflict of
interest." Akihiro Kuroki, the Japanese board member, usually announces that,
although his nation is a potential buyer of CERs, he personally has no conflict
of interest.

In the most recent board meetings, recorded on Webcast and open to public
viewing on the Internet, an atmosphere of tension is evident at the start when
members go around the room to make their conflict-of-interest declarations. The
code of conduct issue has apparently resulted in a rift within the CDM board.

A movement by a small number of Europeans to have the board finish and adopt a
code of conduct has been in the works for over a year now, but the board member
expressing dismay at the current situation said the matter is going nowhere, as
most are satisfied with the status quo.

But Enderlin, A Swiss national who also serves as the head of the newly minted
Project Developers Forum, said questions over conflicts and abuses in the CDM
board are exaggerated. While companies active in creating carbon offset projects
under the CDM have long called for greater transparency from the board, Enderlin
said a code of conduct is a low priority for project developers.

"Of course you have certain preferences for certain issues where certain
nationalities have interest, but talking about the majority of board members, I
would not think that they would try to really push for their personal or
national interests," he said.

Chairman: 'This issue has never raised any serious concern'

Lex de Jonge, a Dutch member of the board currently serving as its chairman,
also denied that the lack of a code of conduct, or rules detailing what
constitutes a conflict of interest and how members should act, has in any way
polluted the board's work.

"This issue has never raised any serious concern or seriously influenced any
decision, simply because all board decisions are taken by consensus or, if that
would not be possible, by a 75 percent majority," said de Jonge.

Opponents of the Clean Development Mechanism tend to be skeptical of carbon
offsets in general. Past negative reports involved accusations that the board
had awarded CERs to unworthy projects, resulting in no net benefit toward action
against climate change.

On the flip side, offset project development companies frequently complain that
the board is too stringent. It can take a year or more for a project to win CERs
to sell into the global carbon markets, and companies have long pressured the
board to streamline its processes and speed up the review period.

But since its inception, the CDM has spawned a flood of entrepreneurial zeal,
and it is largely given credit for better professionalizing and enhancing the
climate change industry, encouraging the growth of a new professional class of
experts in carbon emissions accounting, offset technology and project auditing
and verification.

To date, more than 4,200 offset projects are considered to be in the CDM
pipeline. The board has registered and awarded CERs to more than 1,500 projects,
and the huge backlog and workload facing the board could explain its relative
lack of attention toward procedural rules.

The Clean Development Mechanism is also the chief link between the developed and
developing worlds in international climate treaty negotiations. Those working to
make the board more transparent and professional say that actions like adopting
a code of conduct will help to better legitimize the CDM in the eyes of
skeptical individuals and governments, especially the U.S. government.

Should the United States link its future carbon market to the Kyoto Protocol
mechanism, and assuming the E.U. stays committed to it, the CDM would likely
emerge as a crucial link in an expanded global carbon market. In a recent
report, two Canadian climate change economists estimated that about 36 percent
of CDM projects involved technology transfers, a key demand of China and other
heavy developing world polluters.

But the CDM could cease to exist post-2012 if the continuing world economic
crisis sees companies turning away from it and if the gap between the developed
and developing worlds in ongoing negotiations shows no sign of closing.

Copyright 2009 E&E Publishing. All Rights Reserved.
For more news on energy and the environment, visit www.climatewire.net.


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 8 23:31:16 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Wed, 08 Apr 2009 06:31:16 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] MSG firm heads list of 1,
000 still polluting Thi Vai River
Message-ID: <49DCA724.3040003@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/tech/2009/04/840606/

MSG firm heads list of 1,000 still polluting Thi Vai River
22:16' 07/04/2009 (GMT+7)

VietNamNet Bridge ? Six months after being hauled up for releasing untreated
waste into the Thi Vai River, Taiwanese-invested monosodium glutamate maker
Vedan is at it again, dumping more waste water into the river, which is
struggling to recover its environmental health.

Dong Nai Province?s Department of Natural Resources and Environment said the
water dumped by Vedan, although now treated after the MSG maker set up a
treatment plant, did not fully meet environmental standards.

Besides Vedan, a thousand other factories and companies along the river continue
to dump their untreated waste water into the river.

It is a fact that after Vedan was fined for polluting the river, the water
quality improved. But there is a long way to go before the river recovers its
health.

"If all factories along the river stopped discharging waste water, the river
would need seven to 10 years to recover," Dr Le Huy Ba of the Industry
University?s Technology Science and Environmental Management Institute said.

"To get rid of all its pollution, we have to dredge the river bed," he added.

It is easy to see the black waste water from industrial zones, factories and
enterprises being dumped into the river, especially at Lo Ren drain which
carries waste water from the Nhon Trach Industrial Zone.

Different colours

The river is of different colours on different days depending on what kind of
waste water the factories dump. Most fish, crabs and shrimps cannot survive in
its polluted water that thousands of fishermen have had to seek other occupations.

Nearly 40km of the river is now seriously polluted, with a 15-km stretch unable
to sustain any life. Vedan is thought to be the main cause of this malaise,
releasing more than 5,000cu.m of untreated waste water and 1,500cu.m of
fermented molasses waste into the river every day.

To improve the situation, Le Van Binh, deputy director of Dong Nai?s
Environmental Techniques and Measurement Centre, called for stopping the
discharge of untreated waste water into the river by factories.

"If we are not able to better manage the quality of waste water, pollution will
increase," he warned.

Le Van Duc, deputy chief inspector of the province?s Natural Resource and
Environment Department, said: "Dong Nai is determined to punish all enterprises
that cause pollution but it is not easy to fine them." Authorities? hands used
to be tied because they had to inform the factories one week in advance to
inspect them, he explained.

"The most important thing is that the Department has only two inspectors and
they can?t inspect the thousands of enterprises in the province," he added.

VietNamNet/Viet Nam News


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 8 23:32:24 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Wed, 08 Apr 2009 06:32:24 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Finland helps localities cope with climate change
Message-ID: <49DCA768.8040106@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/tech/2009/04/840622/

Finland helps localities cope with climate change
23:44' 07/04/2009 (GMT+7)

VietNamNet Bridge ? The Finish Embassy in Hanoi on April 7 announced it will
finance two projects capitalised at 460,000 EUR to help correct and prevent
climate change in Vietnam.

The first project is aimed at improving capacity in dealing with climate change
within Vietnam ?s civic organisations and will be carried out by the Centre for
Sustainable Rural Development under the Union for Scientific and Technical
Associations; it will begin in April and continue for three years.

The second will assist local communities in the central province of Quang Tri in
adapting to the effects of climate change, and will be implemented from 2009
through 2010 in Trieu Phong and Hai Lang districts, the province?s most
disaster-prone areas.

The two projects will help mitigate the risk of natural disasters, assist in
researching agriculture, and improve the living conditions of local people while
integrating climate change issues into local development plans.

Vu Bich Hop, Director of the Centre for Sustainable Rural Development, said that
more than 200 staff members and management personnel from at least 50 NGOs, as
well as 1,000 local farmers, will participate and directly benefit from the
training.

The projects will also link Vietnamese organisations with international experts
and training opportunities on sustainable development and climate change, as
well as improve information sharing, coordination, and efforts against
environmental damage that results in climate change.

VietNamNet/VNA


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 8 23:33:38 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Wed, 08 Apr 2009 06:33:38 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Toshiba joins local firm for CDM project in Vietnam
Message-ID: <49DCA7B2.9020103@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/tech/2009/04/840753/

Toshiba joins local firm for CDM project in Vietnam
16:23' 08/04/2009 (GMT+7)

VietNamNet Bridge ? Toshiba Corporation has established a new company in Vietnam
in a venture with a local company to promote a clean development mechanism (CDM)
project, Toshiba Asia Pacific Pte. Ltd said in a statement on Monday.

The new company, Toshiba Clean Development Service (Vietnam) Co., Ltd., is
located in Tay Ninh Town of Tay Ninh Province, which is a joint venture between
Toshiba Corporation (51%) and the local partner Nguyen Vu Co., Ltd (49%). It has
aquired a CDM business licence from the Vietnamese authorities, and started
operation yesterday, promoting CDM-based business including the supply of biogas.

Accordingly, the new offshoot will use Toshiba's high concentration organic
wastewater treatment technology to recover biogas, a flammable mixture of
methane and carbon-dioxide gas resulting from bacterial decomposition of organic
matter, from wastewater discharged by starch factories in Vietnam.

It will then supply the recovered gas to the starch factories as fuel. The
project will meet the CDM requirement of cutting greenhouse gas emissions, and
also lower the fuel costs of the starch factories.

In fiscal year 2009, Toshiba Clean Development Service (Vietnam) will construct
a plant able to recover greenhouse gases equivalent to emissions of
approximately 70,000 tons of CO2 a year. Operations will start in January 2010.

In the future, Toshiba intends to expand the business to other companies that
discharge wastewater with high Concentration of organic matters, including
brewers and food processors. The goal in Vietnam is to recover biogas equivalent
to 500,000 tons of CO2, emissions a year.

Toshiba Asia Pacific Pte. Ltd. last month opened a representative office in HCMC
to promote Toshiba's business in the industrial, environmental and computer
control systems sectors.

This office will also be responsible for product planning, trading promotion and
market research in this market.

Toshiba recently organized an innovation seminar in the city in a bid to assert
its position as a leading innovator, environmentally-friendly firm. The seminar
looked into 13 scopes of Toshiba's business that are and will be operational in
Vietnam, including digital products, electronic devices and components, social
infrastructure systems, home appliances, automotive business, environmentally
conscious products, and new lighting systems.

VietNamNet/SGT


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 8 23:34:32 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Wed, 08 Apr 2009 06:34:32 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Officials tout Vietnam as potential market for CNG
Message-ID: <49DCA7E8.9050504@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/tech/2009/04/840725/

Officials tout Vietnam as potential market for CNG
14:29' 08/04/2009 (GMT+7)

VietNamNet Bridge ? Officials at a two-day forum beginning in HCMC on Monday
stressed that Vietnam is poised to become a strong consumer of compressed
natural gas (CNG) for the transport sector given the country?s availability of
natural gas and the urgent need to use the clean energy as a substitute for oil
products in the coming years.


CNG consumption in Vietnam would develop strongly in the future as the energy is
more environmental-friendly and cheaper than common petrol and diesel fuels used
by most of vehicles in Vietnam.

Bui Van Quyen, head of the southern office of the Ministry of Science and
Technology, told the first international forum of its type in Vietnam that
Vietnam has large methane natural gas reserves that can be turned CNG to supply
for natural gas vehicles (NGV).

The forum, named CNG-NGV Vietnam 2009 with the theme of ?the Green Road to
Vietnam,? is organized by All Events Group Pte. Ltd., Economic Development &
Commercial Promotion Corp. and VN Venture Ltd., attracting nearly 150 local and
foreign enterprises.

Quyen said that CNG consumption in Vietnam would develop strongly in the future
as the energy is more environmental-friendly and cheaper than common petrol and
diesel fuels used by most of vehicles in Vietnam.

As Vietnam looks to becoming an industrialized economy by 2020, the number of
vehicles will be increasing quickly to serve more than 85 million people. So the
market for natural gases will be big in big cities for buses and taxi cabs,
Quyen said.

He said that with the worsening air pollution caused by over one million
vehicles including buses in big cities, ?it is imperative to replace fossil fuel
with green fuel like CNG.?

CNG is less combustible than diesel oil since its burning temperature at 6,500
degree Celcius is three times higher than petrol.

Fuel costs for operating a CNG bus is some 50% less than operating a diesel bus,
while the CNG bus produces little pollution compared to a diesel bus.

Deputy Minister of Industry and Trade Nguyen Thanh Bien at the forum also
expressed his support for using CNG for vehicles rather than diesel and petrol
to save costs and reduce air pollution.

However, several experts while advocating for the use of CNG as an alternative
fuel suggested that the Government issue support policies to make the conversion
a reality.

Although authorities in big cites want to promote the new fuel for commuter
buses to save costs on fuel and reduce air pollution, most private vehicle
owners cannot afford the conversion or replacement of engines to use CNG, which
costs up to some US$25,000 each.

Although they know that switching to CNG in the long run would be more
economical and environmentally friendly, but the sum of US$25,000 for changing
engines for each vehicle is too costly, Quyen of Ministry of Science and
Technology said.

This can be made possible only if the Government gives some incentives such as
reducing import tax for equipment using the CNG technology and investing in
infrastructure like material supply stations, according to Quyen.

Until now, Vietnam has only a a facility to produce CNG. The facility was
inaugurated last year with an initial capacity of 30 million tons of material
gas per year in southern Ba Ria-Vung Tau Province.

According to PetroVietnam, the country boasts a natural gas reserve of over
2,000 billion cubic meters. PetroVietnam has a project to invest US$252 million
in 360 CNG stations at 360 bus stops across HCMC.

VietNamNet/SGT


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 8 23:35:24 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Wed, 08 Apr 2009 06:35:24 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] New species of snake unveiled in Cao Bang
Message-ID: <49DCA81C.8000805@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/tech/2009/04/840704/

New species of snake unveiled in Cao Bang
11:39' 08/04/2009 (GMT+7)

VietNamNet Bridge ? Russian and Vietnamese scientists have announced their
discovery of a new species of rattle-snake, which belongs to Protobothrops
family, in the Trung Khanh National Park in the northern province of Cao Bang.


The new species of rattle-snake.

The discovery was published in a Russian scientific magazine named ?Reptile and
Amphibians? in January 2009.

Nguyen Thien Tao, who is in charge of amphibians and reptiles of the Vietnam
Nature Museum, the co-author of the above discovery, said this is the fourth
species of rattle-snake of the Protobothrops family unveiled in Vietnam. The
three others are Protobothrops cornutus, P.jerdonii and P. mucrosquamatus.

The new species of rattle-snake is named Protobothrops trungkhanhensis Orlov,
Ryabov & Nguyen. This kind of snake is only 733mm in length, quite small
compared to other Protobothrops species, with small triangle-shaped head and
small scales.

This type of snake is an endemic species in Vietnam. Protobothrops
trungkhanhensis Orlov, Ryabov & Nguyen has been found in only the Trung Khanh
National Park in Cao Bang, Vietnam.

Thu Huong
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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 8 23:36:01 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Wed, 08 Apr 2009 06:36:01 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] HCM City to examine pollution-prone companies
Message-ID: <49DCA841.50504@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/tech/2009/04/840741/


HCM City to examine pollution-prone companies
15:07' 08/04/2009 (GMT+7)

The Hao Duong Leather Tanning JS Company was caught red-handed to discharge
waste water to the environment in October 2008.

VietNamNet Bridge ? The HCM City Department of Natural Resources and Environment
will join hands with the local Environment Police Agency to inspect all
businesses that are subject to cause pollution in the city.

Inspectors will check companies operating in the industries that can cause
pollution, such as chemical production, dying, textiles, food processing, steel
rolling, cement, and aluminum refining among others.

Big-scale enterprises, which discharge more than 100 cubic metres of waste water
per day, will be scrutinized first.

According to the HCM City People?s Council?s Economics and Budget Department,
environmental pollution in the city is getting serious. Water from many rivers
and canals like Thay Cai and An Ha in Cu Chi District, Ba Bup and Tran Quang Co
in Hoc Mon District have turned black and smell badly. All 55 canals and rivers
in Binh Chanh District are polluted.

The department said that canals are polluted because of waste water from
factories in the industrial and export processing zones of Tan Phu Trung, Le
Minh Xuan and Vinh Loc.

A report released by the HCM City People?s Committee in late-2008 also said that
HCM City is facing many sources of pollution, including waste from industrial
zones and factories.

Inspectors will visit enterprises without advanced notice.

HCM City presently has 141 pollution-causing enterprises which are located in
residential areas. Many of them have been requested to move to the suburbs but
they have not.

Enterprises that violated the law on the environment will be closed or punished
heavily if they are discovered to continue breaching the rules this time.

VietNamNet/DT


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 8 23:45:43 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Wed, 08 Apr 2009 06:45:43 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] =?utf-8?q?Hanoi=E2=80=99s_air_getting_fouler_too?=
Message-ID: <49DCAA87.3050204@gmail.com>

http://www.thanhniennews.com/healthy/?catid=8&newsid=47774

Last Updated: Wednesday, April 8, 2009 10:48:36 Vietnam (GMT+07)

Hanoi?s air getting fouler too

Sixty percent of readings from the latest tests of air quality in Hanoi?s
streets exceed the regulated levels for health and safety, the Hanoi People?s
Council said.

Worse still, 25 percent of readings are twice the safe level, according to the
council?s inspectorate.

The concentration of dust in many streets is estimated to average 0.5 mg per
cubic meter, as against the recommended upper limit of 0.3.

One of the reasons for the poor air quality is the city?s failure to assign
enough land for proper roads, experts from the Hanoi Department of Natural
Resources and Environment said.

Less than 7 percent of the city?s land is given over to transport, while the
proportion in developed nations is 20-25 percent.

Moreover, with 580 intersections and a traffic flow intensity of 1,800 to 3,600
vehicles per hour, the capital is facing problems like narrow streets and dirty
emissions from vehicles running below their design capacity, according to the
experts.

Last month, experts and officials warned about the worsening air pollution in Ho
Chi Minh City, where the dust concentration ranges from 0.37-0.68 milligrams per
cubic meter, or 1.5-2.5 times higher than the level deemed safe.
Source: SGGP


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Thu Apr 9 02:23:25 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Wed, 08 Apr 2009 09:23:25 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Study shows bioenergy benefits for rural poor
Message-ID: <49DCCF7D.9060109@coombs.anu.edu.au>


http://www.fao.org/news/story/en/item/11355/icode/

Study shows bioenergy benefits for rural poor

Small-Scale Bioenergy Initiatives:
Brief description and preliminary lessons on livelihood impacts
from case studies in Asia, Latin America and Africa
Download report: ftp://ftp.fao.org/docrep/fao/011/aj991e/aj991e.pdf



Small-scale projects scrutinised from jatropha electrification in Mali to animal
waste biogas in Vietnam


Cooking with biogas from animal and human waste in China
8 April 2009, Rome ? Bioenergy, when produced on a small-scale in local
communities, can play a significant role in rural development in poor countries,
according to a new report jointly published by FAO and the UK?s Department for
International Development (DFID).

The study, ?Small Scale Bioenergy Initiatives: Brief Description and Preliminary
Lessons on Livelihood Impacts from Case Studies in Latin America, Asia and
Africa,? covers 15 different ?start-up? bioenergy projects from 12 countries in
Latin America, Africa and Asia involving a diverse array of technologies.

?The furious debate around bioenergy has largely concerned liquid fuels used for
transport,? said Oliver Dubois, a bioenergy expert in FAO?s Natural Resources
Department.

?Yet more than 80 percent of bioenergy usage in the world involves other
sources, mainly wood, which are used for basic household cooking and heating in
poor areas of the world.?

Concern over the impact these transportation biofuels will have on the
environment, water resources and food security has obscured many of the positive
benefits for poor rural people.

The study shows quite clearly that there are a number of huge possible benefits
of using new technologies for biomass-based rural energy, some very basic,
others more sophisticated.

Biofuel benefits for poor

Some of the possible benefits of bioenergy highlighted in the study include:

-an increase in natural resource efficiency as energy can be created from waste
that would otherwise be burnt or left to rot is put to use

-the creation of useful by-products such as affordable fertilizer from biogas
production

-the possibility of simultaneously producing food and fuel through intercropping

-the creation of new financial capital with growth cycles by making use of
marginal land

?In all the cases covered, even those that sold on bioenergy products to a
wider market, the local community benefited from improved energy access both for
domestic and business use,? said Dubois.

Saving local resources

?Virtuous cycles are shown to develop within communities where people have
access to the energy services needed for development without money flowing out
of communities for fossil fuels or local natural resources used up?.

The study also shows how the use of bioenergy has often played a role in
partially insulating poor rural people from the vagaries of the fossil fuel
market used in times of an energy crisis, but then typically abandoned when the
oil price drops.

In none of the cases studied did bioenergy production appear to jeopardise food
security, either because the bioenergy is produced from crops not used for food
or grown on very small plots or stretches of unused land.

Involving local people

?These initiatives have adequately involved local people in decisions on the
bioenergy schemes, so if food security did suffer as a result they would have
done something about it,? said Dubois.

Although bioenergy initiatives face implementation challenges, these challenges
are similar to those of other production activities in rural areas such as
technological constraints and lack of investment capital, the study found.

The research for the study was carried out between September and November 2008
as a joint initiative between FAO and the PISCES Programme funded by DFID.


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Thu Apr 9 03:36:06 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Wed, 08 Apr 2009 10:36:06 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Nature: A World of Science in the Developing World
Message-ID: <49DCE086.3040905@gmail.com>

Subject: [EQ] A World of Science in the Developing World
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2009 11:51:19 -0400
From: Ruggiero, Mrs. Ana Lucia (WDC) <ruglucia at PAHO.ORG>
Reply-To: Equity, Health & Human Development <EQUIDAD at LISTSERV.PAHO.ORG>
To: EQUIDAD at LISTSERV.PAHO.ORG



*A World of Science in the Developing World*


*Website:

*http://www.nature.com/nature/supplements/collections/npgpublications/twas/index.html


??.The public and policy-makers are increasingly looking to the
scientific community to address critical global problems.

Finding solutions will require the collective insights and experience of
scientists, policy-makers, industry and non-governmental groups. /A
World of Science in the Developing World/ reflects the expertise of
members and associates of TWAS, the academy of sciences for the
developing world, and coincides with its twenty-fifth anniversary??


*Table of contents* - Free access


*First Words*-
Jacob Palis is president of TWAS, the academy of sciences for
the developing world, in Trieste, Italy. He also serves as
president of the Brazilian Academy of Sciences in Rio de
Janeiro, Brazil.
TWAS, the academy of sciences for the developing world ? Trieste
? Italy ?
Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.4a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.4a.pdf>


*From Philip Campbell, editor-in-chief of /Nature/ publications*
- . doi:10.1038/twas08.4b Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.4b.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.4b.pdf>


*Editor's Notes*- Ehsan Masood and Daniel Schaffer 5 .
doi:10.1038/twas08.5a Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.5a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.5a.pdf>


*Features*


*Worlds Apart Together* - Mohamed Hassan , 6-8 .
doi:10.1038/twas08.6a Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.6a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.6a.pdf>


*Losing Faculties* - Phillip Griffiths - , 9-11 .
doi:10.1038/twas08.9a Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.9a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.9a.pdf>


*Caution: Men at Work* - ?i?dem Ka?it?iba?i, , 12 .
doi:10.1038/twas08.12a Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.12a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.12a.pdf>


*Learn to Earn* - Calestous Juma, , 15-17 .
doi:10.1038/twas08.15a Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.15a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.15a.pdf>


*Joining the Fast Lane* - Ismail Serageldin, , 18-20 .
doi:10.1038/twas08.18a Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.18a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.18a.pdf>


*Pressure Points*


*Food Fault Lines* - Hans Herren, , 21 . doi:10.1038/twas08.21a
Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.21a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.21a.pdf>


*Home Sickness* - Thomas G. Egwang, , 22-23 .
doi:10.1038/twas08.22a Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.22a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.22a.pdf>


*Cold Shower* - Mohamed El-Ashry , 24 . doi:10.1038/twas08.24a
Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.24a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.24a.pdf>


*People Power* - Dilip Ahuja , 25 . doi:10.1038/twas08.25a Full
Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.25a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.25a.pdf>


*Pumping Renewables* - Jos? Goldemberg , 26-27 .
doi:10.1038/twas08.26a Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.26a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.26a.pdf>


*Warming Signs* - Mohan Munasinghe , 28-29 .
doi:10.1038/twas08.28a Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.28a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.28a.pdf>


*Let Deserts Be* - Farouk El-Baz , 30 . doi:10.1038/twas08.30?
Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.30a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.30a.pdf>


*Lost Diversity* - Abdul H. Zakri , 31 . doi:10.1038/twas08.31?
Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.31a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.31a.pdf>


*Urban Future* - Hans van Ginkel , 32-33 .
doi:10.1038/twas08.32a Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.32a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.32a.pdf>


*The Science of Influence* - Raghunath Mashelkar , 34 .
doi:10.1038/twas08.34a Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.34a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.34a.pdf>


*Frontiers*


*Space Landings* - Turner Isoun , 35 . doi:10.1038/twas08.35a
Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.35a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.35a.pdf>


*Nano Rising* - Bai Chunli Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.36a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.36a.pdf>


*Physics Now* - Reza Mansouri Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.38a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.38a.pdf>


*Water Woes* - Akissa Bahri Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.39a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.39a.pdf>


*Bio-Revolution* - Indira Nath Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.40a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.40a.pdf>


*Back to Nature* - Iqbal Choudhary Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.41a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.41a.pdf>


*Do the Maths* - L? D?ng Tr?ng Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.42a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.42a.pdf>


*A Better Pill* - Mar?a G. Guzm?n Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.43a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.43a.pdf>


*Creative Accounting* - Partha Dasgupta , Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.44a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.44a.pdf>


*End Note- Basics Matter* - C. N. R. Rao Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.45a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.45a.pdf>


*Viewpoints*


*Money counts but merit and freedom count even more* - Ahmed
Zewail Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.11a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.11a.pdf>


*More than good enough to do world-class research* - Zohra Ben
Lakhdar-Akrout Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.14a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.14a.pdf>


*Air pollution is a global problem with local solutions* -
Mario Molina Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.19a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.19a.pdf>


*It is the knowledge (not digital) divide that matters* - Abdul
Waheed Khan Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.23a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.23a.pdf>


*Science is helping Rwanda give up the ghosts of the past* -
Romain Murenzi Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.27a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.27a.pdf>


*The green revolution is slowing. What next?* - Luis Rafael
Herrera-Estrella , 29 . doi:10.1038/twas08.29? Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.29a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.29a.pdf>


*International collaboration is part of science's DNA* - Martin
Rees , 31 . doi:10.1038/twas08.31b Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.31b.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.31b.pdf>


*Chemistry needs a new formula for success* - Atta-ur-Rahman ,
33 . doi:10.1038/twas08.33a Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.33a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.33a.pdf>


*Why poor countries need nuclear research capacity* - Ana Mari?
Cetto , 37 . doi:10.1038/twas08.37? Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.37a.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.37a.pdf>


*What others can ? and cannot ? learn from China* - Lu
Yongxiang , 38 . doi:10.1038/twas08.38b Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.38b.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.38b.pdf>


*Research is no luxury* - Berit Olsson, 42 .
doi:10.1038/twas08.42b Full Text
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/full/twas08.42b.html>
| PDF
<http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n1s/pdf/twas08.42b.pdf>


* * *

This message from the Pan American Health Organization, PAHO/WHO, is
part of an effort to disseminate
information Related to: Equity; Health inequality; Socioeconomic
inequality in health; Socioeconomic
health differentials; Gender; Violence; Poverty; Health Economics;
Health Legislation; Ethnicity; Ethics;
Information Technology - Virtual libraries; Research & Science issues.
[DD/ KMC Area]




From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 10 01:55:55 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 09 Apr 2009 08:55:55 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Project Officer in Cat Ba Langur Conservation Project
Message-ID: <49DE1A8B.3000503@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Subject: [opportunities] Project Officer in Cat Ba Langur Conservation Project
Date: Thu, 9 Apr 2009 13:59:04 +0700
From: Daniela Schrudde <daniela.schrudde at catbalangur.de>


The ?Cat Ba langur conservation project? (CBLCP), a collaboration between
M?nster Zoo (Germany), the Zoological Society for the Conservation of Species
and Populations ? ZGAP (Germany) and the Peoples? Committee of Hai Phong aims to
conserve the critically endangered Golden-headed Langur or Cat Ba Langur.

Project activities are focused on monitoring and managing of the langur
population, implementation of protection measures, capacity-building for staff
of the forest protec?tion agencies and local conservation groups, promotion of
public conser?vation awareness and sustainable forest management practices.


The CBLCP is now seeking Vietnamese national for the position of Project
Officer. The officer will work under direct supervision of the Project Manager /
deputy Project Manager and will cooperate with a Conservation Officer / assistant.



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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 10 04:52:36 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 09 Apr 2009 11:52:36 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Solar-powered cardboard cooker
Message-ID: <49DE43F4.8010505@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Please see the image! Super simple design. V


http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/966a21fa-13ae-11de-9e32-0000779fd2ac.html

Solar-powered cardboard cooker
Kyoto Energy Ltd., Kenya

Published: March 18 2009 11:55 | Last updated: March 18 2009 11:55
Kyoto Box is a cheap, solar-powered cardboard cooker for use in rural Africa,
estimated to prevent two tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions per family per year.

The $5 cooker uses the greenhouse effect to boil and bake. It consists of two
cardboard boxes, one inside the other, with an acrylic cover that lets the sun?s
power in and stops it escaping and doubles as a ?hob top?. A layer of straw or
newspaper between the boxes provides insulation, while black paint on the
interior and the foil on the exterior concentrate the heat still further.

The design is so simple that the Kyoto Box can be produced in existing cardboard
factories. It has just gone into production in a Nairobi factory that can
produce 2.5 million boxes a month. A more durable model is being made from
recycled plastic.

This fuel-less stove aims to address health problems in rural villages as well
as avoiding carbon dioxide emissions: it provides a source of clean boiled
water, cuts down on indoor smoke inhalation and reduces the need to gather firewood.

Sir Terry Leahy ?As well as reducing carbon emissions and deforestation, this
cheap and simple idea could save people in developing countries time and money?

?This is the simplest idea I could find,? says Jon B?hmer, inventor of Kyoto
Box. ?That is the philosophy behind it.? The Norwegian had already spent five
years developing a more high-tech solar concentrator, but explains: ?I wanted
people to look more closely at this very straightforward solution which was
?discovered? 240 years ago.?

Mr B?hmer envisions a network of women distributing thousands of the flat-pack
devices from the backs of lorries to families across Africa and the developing
world.

His hope is that the cooker will be eligible for carbon credits ? hence the name
Kyoto Box. The ?20-30 yearly profit per stove would be passed on to the users,
meaning the device pays for itself.

?It?s all about scaling it up,? sums up Mr B?hmer. ?There?s no point in creating
something that can only help a few million people. The needs are universal ?
everybody needs to cook.?

The author is Hannah Bullock, managing director of Green Futures

Copyright The Financial Times Limited 2009
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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 10 05:17:15 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 09 Apr 2009 12:17:15 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Duckweed: Tiny super-plant can clean up animal waste
and be used for ethanol production
Message-ID: <49DE49BB.8030607@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2009-04/ncsu-tsc040709.php

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman at ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Tiny super-plant can clean up animal waste and be used for ethanol production


Researchers at North Carolina State University have found that a tiny aquatic
plant can be used to clean up animal waste at industrial hog farms and
potentially be part of the answer for the global energy crisis. Their research
shows that growing duckweed on hog wastewater can produce five to six times more
starch per acre than corn, according to researcher Dr. Jay Cheng. This means
that ethanol production using duckweed could be "faster and cheaper than from
corn," says fellow researcher Dr. Anne-Marie Stomp.

"We can kill two birds ? biofuel production and wastewater treatment ? with one
stone ? duckweed," Cheng says. Starch from duckweed can be readily converted
into ethanol using the same facilities currently used for corn, Cheng adds.

Corn is currently the primary crop used for ethanol production in the United
States. However, its use has come under fire in recent years because of concerns
about the amount of energy used to grow corn and commodity price disruptions
resulting from competition for corn between ethanol manufacturers and the food
and feed industries. Duckweed presents an attractive, non-food alternative that
has the potential to produce significantly more ethanol feedstock per acre than
corn; exploit existing corn-based ethanol production processes for faster
scale-up; and turn pollutants into a fuel production system. The duckweed system
consists of shallow ponds that can be built on land unsuitable for conventional
crops, and is so efficient it generates water clean enough for re-use. The
technology can utilize any nutrient-rich wastewater, from livestock production
to municipal wastewater.


Click here for more information.





From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 10 05:25:02 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 09 Apr 2009 12:25:02 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] WWF Annual Review 2008
Message-ID: <49DE4B8E.6010509@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://www.panda.org/about_our_earth/all_publications/?uNewsID=161961

WWF Annual Review 2008

Download
WWF Annual Review 2008 [pdf, 1.14 MB]
http://assets.panda.org/downloads/wwf_ar08_final_singles.pdf

09 Apr 2009

Contents
Page 3 - Foreword
Page 5 - Conservation and climate change
Page 13 - Major donor activities
Page 14 - Partnerships with business
Page 16 - Income and expenditure
Page 19 - WWF International Board and Directors

James P Leape, Director General, WWF International:

"WWF is engaged on many fronts. We were one of the first to draw attention to
the likely impacts of climate change on biodiversity. Today, we are witnessing
their growing severity. From the Arctic to the Himalayas, from the Amazon Basin
to the Coral Triangle ( see pages 5 to 10 ), we are working with local partners
to limit the damage ? to safeguard some of the Earth?s richest biodiversity and
natural resources that support the livelihoods of millions of people. Our
experience in the field enables us to bring fresh evidence of the consequences
of climate change to international negotiations to control carbon emissions, its
main cause. We have been closely involved in the principal forum for
international cooperation, the UN climate treaty, since its earliest stages.
Through our local offices, we offer expert counsel to governments and muster
political support for action in every country whose engagement is critical in
securing a new global agreement. Business also has a key role to play. The
companies we call ?Climate Savers? ( see page 10) are setting a corporate
example, working with WWF to reduce emissions and to enlist the support of
suppliers, customers and others in their industry sector. We also help inform
the climate change debate and map out solutions through collaboration with other
business partners like Allianz and McKinsey & Company. Ultimately, decision
makers must listen to the public. In Earth Hour 2008, we mobilized more than 50
million people in 35 countries to turn out lights in a symbolic call for action
on climate change. Some of the world?s most famous landmarks went dark ? the
Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco, the Coliseum in Rome, the Opera House in
Sydney. This year, Earth Hour was observed in more than 80 countries and
thousands of cities, including Beijing, Cape Town, London, Los Angeles, Manila,
Moscow, Nairobi, Paris and Rio de Janeiro. The message is clear : the time for
debate is over. People everywhere recognize the urgent need for action. This
Annual Review summarizes WWF?s role in forging a new global deal on climate
change, critical to all our futures. We hope it inspires you to join us.


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 10 05:28:07 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 09 Apr 2009 12:28:07 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] IUCN: 3 new publications from the Strengthening Voices
for Better Choices project
Message-ID: <49DE4C47.6060605@coombs.anu.edu.au>





FORESTS

3 new publications from the Strengthening Voices for Better Choices project

09 April 2009

SVBC has issued three new publications on its forest governance work in Asia...


Improving Forest Governance in Knuckles, Sri Lanka: Dialogue and development for
better outcomes
http://cmsdata.iucn.org/downloads/improving_forest_governance_in_knuckles.pdf

Common understanding creates successful forest governance (Knuckles, Sri Lanka)
http://cmsdata.iucn.org/downloads/common_understanding_creates_successful_forest_governance.pdf

Changing International Markets For Timber Products: How Can Vietnam?s Forest
Industry Respond?
http://cmsdata.iucn.org/downloads/changing_international_markets_for_timber_products.pdf


From communication.env at fpt.vn Fri Apr 10 20:16:27 2009
From: communication.env at fpt.vn (ENV Communication)
Date: Fri, 10 Apr 2009 17:16:27 +0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Weekly Bulletin 310
Message-ID: <006201c9b9c5$6926dbe0$1101a8c0@tunganhyen>



E310 10 April 2009



Top News



Quang Nam: Langur transferred to national park

On April 7th, 2009 the Quang Nam Provincial Forest Protection Department transferred a grey-shanked douc langur (Pygathrix nemaeus cinerea) to the primate rescue centre at Cuc Phuong National Park. The langur was being illegally kept by a Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) project officer.

(Vietnamese version)

http://vietnamnet.vn/khoahoc/2009/04/840735/



Quang Nam: Over 200m3 of timber discovered being illegally transported on the Vu Gia River

On April 5th, 2009 mobile forest rangers in Dai Loc District confiscated 200m3 of timber from a boat that was being used to illegally transport it on the Vu Gia River. Two of the subjects have been remanded in temporary custody pending further investigation of the case.

(Vietnamese version)

http://envietnam.org/E_News/E_310/Quang_Nam_Phat_hien_go_tha_troi_song.html

(English version)

http://envietnam.org/E_News/E_310/Lumberjacks_attack_forest_rangers_in_Quang_Nam.html



Quang Ngai: Snakes released to the wild

On April 8th, 2009 the Forest Protection Department, in collaboration with the Environmental Police in Quang Ngai province, released 30kg of snakes to the wild. The snakes had been confiscated from a restaurant on the previous day.

(Vietnamese version)

http://envietnam.org/E_News/E_310/Quang_Ngai_Tha_ran_ve_voi_tu_nhien.html



Cao Bang: New species of snakes discovered in nature reserve

Russian and Vietnamese scientists recently announced their discovery of a new species of rattle snake, which belongs to Protobothrops family, in the Trung Khanh Nature Reserve in the northern province of Cao Bang. The discovery was published in the Russian scientific magazine; "Reptile and Amphibians," in January 2009.

(Vietnamese version)

http://envietnam.org/E_News/E_310/Phat_hien_loai_ran_moi_o_Cao_Bang.html

(English version)

http://envietnam.org/E_News/E_310/New_species_of_snake_unveiled_in_Cao_Bang.html



Hai Phong: Large whale found dead on beach

On April 6th, 2009 a ten-ton whale was found dead on a beach on Bach Long Vi Island. According to the local residents, this is the first time a dead large whale had been found on the island.

(Vietnamese version)

http://envietnam.org/E_News/E_310/Hai_Phong_Ca_voi_trang_chet_dat_vao_bo.pdf



Lam Dong: Wild tigers suspected of attacking cattle

Two wild tigers have reportedly appeared at a village in Cat Tien district during the past ten days. Local residents believe that the tigers have taken their goats, many of which have gone missing recently. The local authorities are working to determine the number of wild animals to put protection measures in place and also work out measures to ensure the safety of the residents.

(Vietnamese version)

http://envietnam.org/E_News/E_310/Nghi_cop_xuat_hien_o_Lam_Dong.html

(English version)

http://envietnam.org/E_News/E_310/Wild_tigers_attack_cattle_in_Lam_Dong.html



ENV's activities



Hanoi: Leopard cats saved from sale

An ENV field officer discovered three leopard cats being kept for sale at a pet shop on Lang Ha street. The information about the crime was immediately transferred to the National Environmental Police who quickly cooperated with Ha Noi FPD to seize the cats and arrest the violator. The three leopard cats were transferred to Soc Son Rescue Center where they are being looked after before being released back into the wild.








Please note: Past bulletins can be found on ENV's website www.envietnam.org



Nguyen Thi My Dung
Communications officer
Education for Nature - Vietnam
No. 5 Ngo 192 Thai Thinh
PO Box 222
Dong Da district
Hanoi, Vietnam
Phone/fax: +84 4 3514-8850
E-mail: env at fpt.vn
www.envietnam.org (English)
www.thiennhien.org (Vietnamese)
www.savingvietnamswildlife.org (English wildlife trade website)
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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 11 00:59:13 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Fri, 10 Apr 2009 07:59:13 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] News: Explaining Cooperative Behavior, Evolutionarily
Message-ID: <49DF5EC1.7090904@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Are there any sociobiologists in the audience? You like humans being
equated with yeast. ;-) Vern

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: News: Explaining Cooperative Behavior, Evolutionarily
Date: Fri, 10 Apr 2009 06:07:02 -0700
From: Yahoo Group <ashwani.vasishth at gmail.com>
Reply-To: envecolnews-owner at yahoogroups.com
To: Environmental Ecology News <envecolnews at yahoogroups.com>


http://www.terradaily.com/reports/Cooperative_Behavior_Meshes_With_Evolutionary_Theory_999.html

*Cooperative Behavior Meshes With Evolutionary Theory

*Illustration Omitted:
The yeast are playing what game theorists call a snowdrift game.
The name of the game comes from a situation in which two drivers are
trapped in cars behind a snowdrift. Each one can choose to get out and
clear a path or stay put. If one driver does not shovel, the other must.
The best option is to "cheat" by staying in the car while the other
driver shovels. However, the worst-case scenario occurs if both drivers
cheat and no one gets home. Therefore, the best strategy is always the
opposite of your opponent's strategy. Photo courtesy AFP.

by Staff Writers
Boston MA (SPX) Apr 08, 2009

One of the perplexing questions raised by evolutionary theory is how
cooperative behavior, which benefits other members of a species at a
cost to the individual, came to exist.

Cooperative behavior has puzzled biologists because if only the fittest
survive, genes for a behavior that benefits everybody in a population
should not last and cooperative behavior should die out, says Jeff Gore,
a Pappalardo postdoctoral fellow in MIT's Department of Physics.

Gore is part of a team of MIT researchers that has used game theory to
understand one solution yeast use to get around this problem. The team's
findings, published in the April 6 online edition of Nature, indicate
that if an individual can benefit even slightly by cooperating, it can
survive even when surrounded by individuals that don't cooperate.

In short, the study offers a concrete example of how cooperative
behaviors can be compatible with evolutionary theory.

Yeast may seem unlikely subjects for a study of cooperative behavior,
but in fact they are perfectly suited to such studies, says Gore. Unlike
humans, yeast have no emotions or thoughts that interfere with rational
decision-making; their actions are solely driven by their genetic
response to the environment.

"You can apply game theory to biological interactions and in some ways
it's more broadly applicable than it is in humans," says Gore, the
paper's lead author.

Game theory, traditionally employed by economists and military
strategists, uses mathematics to predict individuals' behavior in
certain situations.

Cooperators and cheaters
Working with MIT physics professor Alexander van Oudenaarden, also an
author of the paper, Gore developed an experimental setup involving
yeast sucrose metabolism.

Sucrose is not yeast's preferred food source, but they will metabolize
it if no glucose is available. To do so, they must secrete an enzyme
called invertase, which breaks sucrose into smaller sugars that the
yeast can absorb.

Much of that sugar diffuses away and is freely available to other yeast
cells in the environment. In this scenario, yeast that secrete invertase
are known as cooperators, while those that don't secrete invertase and
instead consume the simple sugars produced by others are called cheaters.

If all of these simple sugars diffused away, with no preferential access
to the yeast that produced it, then it would always be better to cheat,
and the cooperators would die out.

The researchers observed that cooperating yeast have preferential access
to approximately 1 percent of the sucrose they produce. That benefit
outweighs the cost of helping others, allowing them to successfully
compete against cheaters.

In addition, no matter the initial starting numbers of yeast in a given
population, the microbes always come into an equilibrium state, with
both cooperators and cheaters present. "It doesn't matter where you
start. You always end up with equilibrium," says Gore.

This suggests that the yeast are playing what game theorists call a
snowdrift game. The name of the game comes from a situation in which two
drivers are trapped in cars behind a snowdrift. Each one can choose to
get out and clear a path or stay put. If one driver does not shovel, the
other must.

The best option is to "cheat" by staying in the car while the other
driver shovels. However, the worst-case scenario occurs if both drivers
cheat and no one gets home. Therefore, the best strategy is always the
opposite of your opponent's strategy.

The same rules apply to the cheating and cooperating yeast: Like the
driver who grudgingly gets out and shovels so that both she and her
fellow motorist - snug inside his car - may continue on their journeys,
the yeast who cooperate do so because there is a slight benefit for
themselves.

However, when most of the yeast are cooperating, it becomes advantageous
for some individuals to cheat, and vice versa, which allows co-existence
between cheaters and cooperators to arise.

Studies have shown that in the wild, yeast carry different numbers of
copies of the invertase gene. This genetic diversity in the wild may be
similar to the long-term coexistence of cooperators and cheaters
observed in the laboratory, says Gore.

/*** NOTICE: In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, this
material is distributed, without profit, for research and educational
purposes only. ***/
//



From tuandbob at snip.net Sat Apr 11 03:04:42 2009
From: tuandbob at snip.net (R A Myers)
Date: Fri, 10 Apr 2009 13:04:42 -0400
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Cardboard Box Solar Cooker
Message-ID: <49DF7C2A.8020704@snip.net>

Vern,

Enjoyed yacking with you and Son last night.

I converted the cardboard box solar cooker article into a Portable
Document Format (.pdf) file so anyone can download and print it.

If you get any incoming from the Kyoto Energy folks, the same
information is available from Home Power magazine (numbers 7 and 9 if
senility has not set in) and Solar Cookers International (solarcookers.org)

Bob
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From halong14 at yahoo.com Sat Apr 11 12:41:25 2009
From: halong14 at yahoo.com (Tam Doan)
Date: Fri, 10 Apr 2009 19:41:25 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Cardboard Box Solar Cooker
Message-ID: <30688.45180.qm@web30601.mail.mud.yahoo.com>

Hi Vern and Bob,
?
have you made and used it yourself? I wil try to make it one fine day.
if you have then how practical is it for the rural Vietnamese?? Please send it to the apppropriate Viet organisations so they can try it out and then guide the Viet women union groups for them to guide the rural women. Yes, it is still the women who are in charge of the kitchen and the Viet women union knows they can rely on the women to look after the feeding for the families.
Many years ago I made a huge solar barbecue (half a sphere) size 1.2metre in diameter. Must say I was not successful in barbecueing sausages tho' others had. I also made shoe box size solar barbecues. Must say I was not successful in making the sausages cooked. Others said they had. aI used aluminium foil for both applications. Excuse for bad language that I am about to use. It was darned hard to make the foil flat while glueing it down onto to the cardboard base. So sunlight reflecting everywhere. That was the reason I was sure that caused my cookers not being able to concentrate heat. BUT if the material used that was so difficult to make it right even for a solar energy devotee like me (an ordinary womn who is a solar energy enthusiast) then the material and hence the method had to be questioned.
Look forward to hearing from you
Best wishes
Tam

--- On Fri, 10/4/09, R A Myers <tuandbob at snip.net> wrote:


From: R A Myers <tuandbob at snip.net>
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Cardboard Box Solar Cooker
To: "Vern" <enviro-vlc at anu.edu.au>
Received: Friday, 10 April, 2009, 6:04 PM


-----Inline Attachment Follows-----


enviro-vlc - Environment in Viet Nam and the Region
New address to post messages: enviro-vlc at anu.edu.au
New list Information Page (remember your password): http://mailman.anu.edu.au/mailman/listinfo/enviro-vlc
Maximum message size: 2.5 mb.

--


Vern,

Enjoyed yacking with you and Son last night.

I converted the cardboard box solar cooker article into a Portable Document Format (.pdf) file so anyone can download and print it.

If you get any incoming from the Kyoto Energy folks, the same information is available from Home Power magazine (numbers 7 and 9 if senility has not set in) and Solar Cookers International (solarcookers.org)

Bob

-----Inline Attachment Follows-----


_______________________________________________
enviro-vlc Environment in Viet Nam and the Region
Post message to list: enviro-vlc at anu.edu.au
List information page: http://mailman.anu.edu.au/mailman/listinfo/enviro-vlc
enviro-vlc List from the Australia Vietnam Science-Technology Link
contact: Vern Weitzel vern at coombs.anu.edu.au


The accuracy of information from media articles posted on this list
cannot be guaranteed and should be verified before use.



Enjoy a safer web experience. Upgrade to the new Internet Explorer 8 optimised for Yahoo!7. Get it now.

From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sun Apr 12 01:45:23 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Sat, 11 Apr 2009 08:45:23 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Poultry-powered plants pollute more than coal?
Message-ID: <49E0BB13.3050100@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://www.charlotteobserver.com/597/story/658117.html

Poultry-powered plants pollute more than coal?

Proposed plants in three N.C. counties could release toxic arsenic and
lung-damaging fine particles, state officials estimate.

By Bruce Henderson
bhenderson at charlotteobserver.com
Posted: Saturday, Apr. 11, 2009

The novelty of power plants that burn chicken droppings, mandated by North
Carolina's new renewable-energy law, has given way to irony: They might be
dirtier than the coal plants that environmentalists loathe.

A Pennsylvania company, Fibrowatt LLC, plans to build plants powered by poultry
litter, the birds' bedding material, in Montgomery, Surry and Sampson counties.
Fibrowatt says the plants will give growers a new market for the tons of waste
produced in one of the nation's biggest poultry states.

But the plants might also release comparatively large amounts of toxic arsenic,
lung-damaging fine particles and pollutants that form smog, according to
preliminary state estimates and the company's one operating plant, in Minnesota.

Those emissions worry doctors in the mountains of Surry County, who fear their
community's need for jobs will overshadow potential health risks.

?They're telling our people there's no risk,? said Elkin physician William
Blackley. ?All over the world people are trying to lower these emissions, and
yet somebody is proposing to build a plant that will emit enormous amounts in
our town, and they say it's not a problem.?

Fibrowatt and other plants that burn organic wastes, called biomass, pose a
larger question for North Carolina's energy future: Is air pollution an
acceptable trade-off for plants that don't contribute to global warming?

The Minnesota plant might emit more ozone-forming nitrogen oxides, carbon
monoxide and particles per unit of energy than Duke Energy's controversial
Cliffside coal-fired power plant, according to a comparison of their state permits.

Cliffside, however, will release millions of tons a year of the greenhouse gas
carbon dioxide, freeing the carbon that has been locked in coal for millennia.
Fibrowatt says its plants will be carbon-neutral because they recycle carbon, an
element already present in air, plants and soil.

Environmentalists challenge that claim, and are poised to pounce when the
company applies for state air permits.

?I've not been through any permitting process that was easy,? said Fibrowatt
vice president Terry Walmsley.

Arsenic emissions

Anticipating the plants, N.C. air officials modeled a hypothetical
poultry-powered plant. The results showed emissions of arsenic, which is part of
poultry feed, nearly three times the state standard.

The results might be unreliable, state officials say, because they weren't based
on a real plant. Arsenic also has a low standard because of its toxicity.

Walmsley says Fibrowatt's Minnesota plant has had no arsenic problems. But he
acknowledged a ?challenging startup? with the plant, which opened in 2007.

Minnesota's Pollution Control Agency said it has pending legal action against
Fibrowatt over its air emissions. The agency won't disclose details, but tests
last year revealed high emissions of fine particles, which the federal
government says increases the risks of heart and lung disease and premature death.

Poultry-litter plants would likely emit more nitrogen oxide, carbon monoxide and
particle pollution per megawatt than a coal-fired plant, said N.C. air-quality
official Donald van der Vaart. Wood, a major part of poultry litter, burns less
efficiently than coal.

?But will they be able to comply with our rules?? he said. ?Yeah, we think they
will.?

Walmsley said coal/poultry comparisons are unfair because of differences in the
size and fuel of the plants.

?This is a theoretical comparison. You can kind of jump to the wrong conclusions.?

Comparisons may be inevitable as North Carolina expands its use of renewable
sources such as the sun and wind. With the state's wealth of farms and forests,
biomass is the most abundant and available of the alternative fuels.

Biomass has good energy potential, said Michael Regan, an N.C.-based air-quality
specialist with the advocacy group Environmental Defense Fund. But he said state
regulators need to find ways to lower emissions of both greenhouse gases and
pollutants.

Regan doesn't like Fibrowatt's approach, which he said doesn't use the most
effective pollution controls.

?If the proposed facilities look like the Minnesota facility, then we would have
huge concerns,? he said.

Concerns in Surry

In the mountains of Surry County, where unemployment has climbed above 13
percent even as vineyards and wineries transform the local economy, some people
are worried about Fibrowatt.

County leaders have already rezoned the plant site near Elkin and offered $5
million in tax incentives. But critics say the officials are moving too fast and
answering too few questions about the $190 million plant.

Commissioners' Chairman Craig Hunter said county leaders have studied the plant
for nearly three years, visiting the Minnesota plant and similar plants in England.

Hunter says a ?handful of anti-business activists? don't want to listen to the
facts.

?We have answered their questions very thoroughly and completely,? he said by
e-mail. ?They did not like the answers from us and the numerous experts and they
have chosen to wage a smear campaign using scare-tactic propaganda to further
their cause.?

Blackley, the Elkin physician, said he's never before taken a stand on an
environmental issue. But company and county officials don't mention air
pollution at public meetings, he said.

After weeks of research, Blackley said he and seven colleagues are particularly
worried about dioxins. The compounds form during combustion and may cause cancer
and reproductive problems.

?We moved here 30 years ago because it was a safe, clean place, and that's being
threatened,? he said. ?None of the people who are going to be breathing this air
are going to be investors.?


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sun Apr 12 01:53:18 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Sat, 11 Apr 2009 08:53:18 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Opinion: Mining exploration in Vietnam: China's new
strategy of expansionism
Message-ID: <49E0BCEE.40108@gmail.com>

Date: Sat, 11 Apr 2009 22:33:58 +0700
From: Nguyen Mai <henmoc at gmail.com>

http://www.mercurynews.com/opinion/ci_12118220?nclick_check=1


Opinion: Mining exploration in Vietnam: China's new strategy of expansionism

Thi Lam
Posted: 04/10/2009 05:12:22 PM PDT
Updated: 04/10/2009 05:15:31 PM PDT

Not content with leaving its imprint in the Parcel Islands, Vietnam's northern
provinces and the Spratly Islands, China is now resorting to mineral exploration
in the country itself as a new strategy in its relentless expansionism.

In November 2007, Vietnam's Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung reportedly approved
China's large-scale project to mine aluminum ore, or bauxite, in the Central
Highlands in exchange for financial aid. The decision of the Communist Party
triggered a torrent of criticisms and objections from scientists, intellectuals
and military leaders.

The project's opponents voiced concerns about the disastrous effects of mining
on the environment, the uprooting of local ethnic Montagnards and, more
important, the de facto Chinese occupation of the strategic Central Highlands.
In an open letter to Dung, Gen. Vo Nguyen Giap, North Vietnam's famed war hero,
asked that the aluminum ore mining plan be postponed until international
scientists had a chance to study its impacts on the environment.

Despite the outcry, mining operations by China's Chalco Group began in 2008.
According to the Mineral Information Institute, bauxite is first processed into
aluminum oxide, which is then refined into aluminum by energy-intensive
electrolysis.

According to Nguyen Thuy Trang, a United Nations official in charge of a program
to protect the environment in Africa, bauxite conversion into aluminum oxide
generates two toxic chemicals
Advertisement

known as "red dust" and "red mud." Red dust inflames the lungs and can cause
cancer of the respiratory system. Red mud, an iron-rich residue, can harm the
reproductive system and cause birth defects.

It is estimated that the production of one ton of aluminum requires four tons of
bauxite and releases three tons of carcinogenic red mud. In the long run, toxic
chemicals would foul waterways in the Central Highlands and damage the flatland
ecology of the Mekong Delta.
Moreover, the destruction of forests and cropland to make room for the mining
operations and the establishment of camps and villages for the Chinese workers
would displace indigenous tribes, leading to the irreparable loss of their
culture and way of life.
The presence of Chinese workers and soldiers in the strategic Central Highlands
constitutes a serious threat to Vietnam's national security, critics say.

"We know that China has established a strong naval base in Hai Nam," wrote Gen.
Nguyen Tan Vinh, former Vietnam ambassador to Beijing, in a letter to the
members of the Politburo. "In the north of our country there is a strong naval
base, in our west there is a fully equipped army base, thus what will happen to
the independence, sovereignty for which we have traded millions of lives and a
lot of bones and blood?"

Vietnamese military leaders have every reason to be concerned. The Central
Highlands is geographically important. It is a natural gateway that would allow
Chinese forces, using a large pincers movement, to cut the country in half or to
threaten the southern part of the country.

In 1975, former President Nguyen Van Thieu's unfortunate decision to abandon
Pleiku and Kontum in the Central Highlands allowed North Vietnamese generals to
execute deep envelopments in the South, resulting in the quick collapse of ARVN
forces.

According to news reports, China's Chalco Group, which is mining bauxite in
Vietnam, reported heavy losses in 2008. The company said the losses were due to
earthquakes and snowstorms in China, the global economic crisis, and a drop in
prices for metallic products in the global market. The company said it expects
more losses in 2009.

Beijing does not appear to be dissuaded by financial setbacks in its mineral
exploration, however, as bauxite mining may be, after all, simply a cover for a
larger sinister scheme.



Thi Lam is the author of "The Twenty-Five Year Century: A South Vietnamese
General Remembers the Indochina War to the Fall of Saigon". He wrote this
article for New America Media.


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sun Apr 12 13:14:53 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Sat, 11 Apr 2009 20:14:53 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Fwd: BBC E-mail: Can dirty air shorten your life?
Message-ID: <49E15CAD.8090306@gmail.com>

Thanks Aaron,
This is a video story, VErn

Subject: BBC E-mail: Can dirty air shorten your life?
Date: Sun, 12 Apr 2009 04:04:33 +0100
From: Aaron Becker <forestmap3 at hotmail.com>

Aaron Becker saw this story on the BBC News website and thought you
should see it.



** Can dirty air shorten your life? **
Scientists say they determine how much polluted air can shorten expectancy.
< http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/em/fr/-/2/hi/health/7995521.stm >



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sun Apr 12 22:58:25 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Sun, 12 Apr 2009 05:58:25 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] ENV: Vietnam scientists clash with government over
bauxite project
Message-ID: <49E1E571.5030604@gmail.com>

Subject: [vnnews-l] ENV: Vietnam scientists clash with government over bauxite
project
Date: Sat, 11 Apr 2009 23:22:24 -0700 (PDT)
sent to vnnews-l by Stephen Denney <sdenney at OCF.Berkeley.EDU>




Vietnam scientists clash with government over bauxite project
Posted : Fri, 10 Apr 2009 07:23:59 GMT
Author : DPA
Category : Asia (World)
News Alerts by Email ( click here )
Asia World News | Home

Print this article email this article Comment on this article Follow
me on Twitter

Hanoi - Vietnamese scientists and actvists have called on the government
to cancel a massive bauxite mining plan in the country's Central Highlands
for environmental reasons, scientists confirmed Friday. The scientists
said the calls came at a seminar organized by Vietnam's Ministry of
Industry and Trade, its Federation of Technical and Science Associations,
and the state-owned Vietnam National Coal and Mineral Industries Group
(Vinacomin).

At the seminar in Hanoi on Thursday, many of the over 50 scientists in
attendance said that Vinacomin's plans for bauxite mining and processing
projects covering over 1,800 square kilometres in the mountainous Central
Highlands will cause irreversible environmental damage.

"The government should rethink the way it is implementing the technology,"
said Professor Pham Duy Hien, a former head of Vietnam's National Atomic
Energy Academy. "If they do it the way Vinacomin has suggested, it will
cause a major disaster for us later on."

Government officials said the mining of bauxite ore, that is used to
produce aluminum, was integral to the economic guidelines Vietnam's
Communist Party had laid out in its 2006 five-year plan.

"This project will bring significant benefits to the country as aluminum
becomes more popular as a material for construction and airplane and car
production," said Vinacomin chairman Doan Van Kien.

Vinacomin's plan envisions exploitation of 5.4 billion tons of bauxite ore
in six projects in the region until 2015.

Bauxite is generally mined in vast open pits. For each ton of aluminum
produced, approximately five tons of caustic slag are created, which can
degrade the environment without proper storage and revegetation.

The first two bauxite processing plants, already under construction, have
been contracted to the Chinese mining company Chalco. The involvement of
several thousand Chinese workers has led to nationalist opposition by some
Vietnamese bloggers, who have spread rumors that the projects may lead to
Chinese control over Vietnamese territory.

At the end of the conference, Deputy Prime Minister Hoang Trung Hai said
Vietnam would adapt the mining plan for ecological sensitivity, but
scepticism remains.

"I do not think the government will be willing to stop these projects,"
said historian and National Assembly member Duong Truong Quoc, who said he
found the government's presentation "unconvincing."

Vietnam's bauxite reserves are among the world's largest, with an
estimated 8 billion tons, concentrated in the country's Central Highlands
region.

Copyright, respective author or news agency



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Mon Apr 13 00:16:44 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Sun, 12 Apr 2009 07:16:44 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] VN moves to protect biodiversity
Message-ID: <49E1F7CC.70401@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/tech/2009/04/841035/

VN moves to protect biodiversity
20:18' 09/04/2009 (GMT+7)

It takes millions of years for species to evolve, but when extinct they are dead
forever

With less than three months to go until the day Viet Nam?s new Law on
Biodiversity comes into effect, Government officials and scientists across the
country are preparing the ground for change.


Staff of the H?Ra protective forest in Gia Lai Province cultivate a pine
seedling nursery.

The law, approved by the National Assembly in November 2008, was a great move
toward solid development, said Nguyen Dang Vang, Vice Chairman of the National
Assembly?s Science, Technology and Environment Committee.

"Biodiversity takes millions of years to develop. Once a species becomes
extinct, we can?t bring it back to life," Vang said.

"Viet Nam is one of a dozen countries in the United Nations with the highest
level of biodiversity," he noted.

Professor Djaja Djendoel Soejarto of University of Illinois at Chicago agreed.

He has collaborated with scientists at the Viet Nam Academy of Science and
Technology since 1994 in projects on flora in Cuc Phuong National Park.

"Many things are still not known about Viet Nam?s biodiversity," Soejarto said.

"For example, we still do not know all the plant species that are in the forests
and wild habitats in Viet Nam. Ongoing studies have also shown that new plant
and animal species still continue to be discovered in the forests here.

"Protecting Viet Nam?s biodiversity will allow scientists to study the country?s
biodiversity resources for many purposes that would benefit people," he said.

The right answer

One point in the new law is that "protecting biodiversity" should be interpreted
as "regulating the use of the biodiversity?," Soejarto said.

According to Vang, before the Law on Biodiversity, environmental protection was
all about prohibition.

"We used to prohibit everything that concerned valuable natural resources and
products, from private ownership to trading," Vang said.

"But prohibition was not the answer," he affirmed.

"For example, people breed around 4,000 bears for bear gall. It costs
approximately US$2 million to breed 80 bears. If the Government prohibit private
ownership of bears, we would have to take in all 4,000 bears, which would cost
approximately $100 million, which is too much for the Government to handle. And
that?s only bears," Vang said.

Now according to the new law, private ownership and use of valuable natural
resources are allowed, as long as they follow the regulations.

The objects and limits are stipulated clearly in the new law. There are
different ranges for freedom and prohibition.

For example, Binh Duong tigers now can be traded for zoology research or
viewing. Before, private consumption of crocodiles was prohibited, but under the
new law second generation crocodiles can be consumed when the number in the
group reaches 20,000. In 2007, in Ben Tre alone, 140,000 crocodiles were bred
which was enough to supply the whole Cuu Long (Mekong) Delta area and have
enough for export.

Tough nut

The drafting of the new law, according to Vang, was very hard work.

"The valuable natural resources are always the most expensive and sought-after.
Thus the more diverse the bio-system, the more people want to seek profit from
it," he said.

On the other hand, the habit of privately owning and consuming valuable natural
products was a hard-to-change negativity. Tiger bone glue, monkey glue and bear
gall were some of the most favoured products in the country, due to the belief
that they offer a cure for sickness.

"The more we stop people from consuming those products, the more they want
them," says Vang. "So prohibition is obviously not the best solution."

"We worked very hard on researching and studying to work out regulations that
would gradually change people?s negative habits without prohibition," he said.

But the most difficult part of the process, Vang said, was combining all the
different existing laws on natural resources to build the new law.

"There were many different laws regulating the use of natural resources. There
was Law on Forest Development and the Sea Law, etc. and so many different
agencies are responsible for one thing," he said.

"For example, there are 164 special forests in the country, which are managed by
the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development. But protecting the
biodiversity in these forests is the responsibility of the Ministry of Natural
Resources and Environment. That was very confusing," said Vang.

"Unifying the laws and re-assigning all the related agencies were really tough
tasks," he said.

The Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment is now the sole agency
responsible for the management and protection of the nation?s biodiversity,
according to the new law.

"When we have one unified and stable law on biodiversity, I believe that there
will be more big projects on natural products," said Le Xuan Canh, Director of
the Institute of Ecology and Biological Resources, under the Viet Nam Academy of
Science and Technology, and Professor Soejarto?s long-term collaborator on the
Viet Nam side.

"The unified management will bring about a better planning of maintaining and
developing our country?s biodiversity," he said.

"In summary," said Prof. Soejarto. "Well kept resources to help promote and
attract the interests of foreign scientists to come to Viet Nam to undertake
research to study the country?s biodiversity.

"The end result is co-operation among scientists of different nationalities and
expertise in the study of Viet Nam?s biodiversity."

VietNamNet/Viet Nam News


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Mon Apr 13 00:19:06 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Sun, 12 Apr 2009 07:19:06 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Sci-tech Policy Council established
Message-ID: <49E1F85A.5090101@coombs.anu.edu.au>



Sci-tech Policy Council established
17:56' 09/04/2009 (GMT+7)

Professor, Dr. Do Trung Ta, Chairman of the National Scientific and
Technological Policy Council.

VietNamNet Bridge ? The National Scientific and Technological Policy Council was
introduced in Hanoi on April 7. The council?s chief is Professor, Dr. Do Trung Ta.

The council is the advisory agency for the Prime Minister in terms of scientific
and technological development. The council is responsible to give advice to the
Prime Minister about policies, mechanisms, strategies, and programs to develop
science and technology.

At the first session, the council?s members contributed their opinions to the
draft regulations of the council and its operation program in 2009, the new
strategy on sci-tech to 2020, the policy to turn Vietnam into a strong country
in information technology, the policies for promoting sci-tech development.

Speaking at the meeting, Deputy Prime Minister Nguyen Thien Nhan asked the
council to send periodical reports to the Government about sci-tech and suggest
ideas to promote the development of science and technology.

Mai Loan



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Mon Apr 13 00:21:15 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Sun, 12 Apr 2009 07:21:15 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Strict checks on bauxite miners
Message-ID: <49E1F8DB.1080604@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/biz/2009/04/841241/

Strict checks on bauxite miners
20:05' 10/04/2009 (GMT+7)

VietNamNet Bridge ? Development of the bauxite exploitation and aluminium
production industry is a suitable policy which will become a driving force for
the socio-economic development of Tay Nguyen (Central Highlands).


Workers for the Central Highlands Minerals Exploitation Company load bauxite in
Dak Nong Province.

Deputy Prime Minister Hoang Trung Hai made the conclusion at a scientific
conference on the role of the bauxite exploitation and aluminium production
industry in the region?s development yesterday.

The official expressed his appreciation for participants? opinions and
contributions to scientific, economic and technical issues related to bauxite
exploitation projects in the world and in Tay Nguyen, as well as their opinions
on environmental and social factors, and the associated measures to diminish
damaging effects.

Hai affirmed, "The country has abundant bauxite resources and the potential to
develop the bauxite exploitation and aluminium production industry. However, we
cannot develop the sector at any cost but need to ensure sustainable
development, and to do so, we need strict and scientific management measures."

He asked for an adjustment in the planning of bauxite exploitation, exploration,
processing and use for the 2007-15 period to be more suitable with the country?s
situation and also for a strategic assessment report on environmental effects.

Authorities should co-operate with investors to conduct personnel training, give
priority to local ethnic people and take drastic measures to limit negative
effects on the region?s environment, culture and society, Hai said.

He stressed that bauxite exploitation projects would only succeed when they were
given support from local people and the whole country.

Concerns over environmental effects were reasonable, but in fact feasible
technical measures to solve the problems were completed. The thing left here was
to boost supervision and examination of the mitigation measures, he said.

Minimising pollution

Methods to minimise environmental pollution and adverse health effects as a
result of bauxite exploitation and aluminium production in the Central Highlands
were drawn out yesterday in a scientific conference.

The Viet Nam National Coal and Mineral Industries Group?s (Vinacomin) 5.4
billion tonne bauxite exploitation project set for implementation between 2007
and 2015 was targeting yearly aluminium production of 6.0-8.5 million tonnes,
said Nguyen Manh Quan, head of the Heavy Industry Department under the Ministry
of Industry and Trade.

Under the plan for the next phase to 2025, this figure would double, said Quan.

Developing bauxite exploitation and aluminium production in the Central
Highlands had been carefully studied and considered before implementation in
order to deem it consistent with the country?s development strategy, said Quan.

This project will bring significant benefit to the country as aluminium becomes
more popular as a material for construction and airplane and car production.
Demand for 35-40 million tonnes per year around the world is expected. Prices
should increase to US$2,800 per tonne by 2015, said Doan Van Kien, chairman of
Vinacomin?s executive board.

The project would help boost the socio-economic development in the Central
Highlands with construction of a railway to connect the area with the Binh Thuan
Port, said Quan.

Tens of thousands of jobs would be created for the two Central Highland
provinces of Lam Dong and Dak Nong, while infrastructure improved with
development of schools, hospitals, roads and entertainment, said Kien.

The project will span more than 1,600sq.km in Dak Nong Province and 206.5sq.km
in Lam Dong Province, covering 24.6 per cent and 2.1 per cent of the total area
of the provinces, respectively.

However, according to some scientists, the exploitation of 5.4 billion tonnes of
bauxite ore in the Central Highlands would cause environmental pollution and
threaten to destroy the local ethnic culture.

The aluminium production process would cause serious environmental pollution,
creating toxic waste in the form of red mud and air pollution, said Professor
Dao Cong Tien, former head of HCM City?s National Economics University.

Kien said this would not happen because modern, environmentally-friendly
technology for bauxite exploitation and aluminium production would be applied to
protect the land, forest and water.

For example, red mud would be discharged in liquid form and transferred to
reservoirs constructed with absorption-resistant materials. When the red mud
dried it could be used as construction material or for planting trees, said Kien.

According to PhD Nguyen Dinh Hoe of the Association of the Viet Nam Nature and
Environmental Protection, additional evaluation of the area and the final
location of reservoirs for the red mud deposits should be done to ensure that
there would be enough capacity for more than 90 million cu.m of the mud to be
discharged during project implementation.

Precautions should also be taken to ensure the dry mud would not disperse
throughout the area because it can cause skin diseases, said Hoe.

The project?s environmental protection plans call for trees in exploitation
areas to be pulled up from their roots and the topsoil reserved. After the
bauxite exploitation is complete, the land will be levelled and mixed with
organic fertiliser. The reserved topsoil and trees would be returned if the
current localities wished at that time, said Kien.

The land after the project would be returned to the users in the same condition
it had been in before the project, said Kien.

A centre for tree and forest protection would be soon established in the Central
Highlands.

Restoration of land after bauxite exploitation must be immediate. If not, a
large area of agricultural land would be subject to erosion, said Hoe.

According to the representative from the Dak Nong Province People?s Committee,
there have not been any negative environmental impacts to date as a result of
this project, and hundreds of good students have been sent for training in mine
and minerals exploitation and an infrastructure system developed.

The project is expected to contribute VND446.8 billion (US$25.53 million) to the
province?s budget each year.

Long-term negative impacts to agricultural production would be kept to a minimum
because only 5.2 per cent of the agricultural land would be used by the project
permanently. Moreover, the yield of coffee on land that contains bauxite is less
than on areas without, according to the representative.

According to Hoang Si Son, deputy chairman of Lam Dong Province People?s
Committee, environmental protection for the first phase of the project has
already been completed.

The project would contribute more than VND150 billion ($8.57 million) to the
province?s budget each year, said Son.

Sixteen thousand jobs had been created for local people who would be trained in
mine exploitation and aluminium production, said Son.

Although the cultural life of the local people would be affected, local
authorities would have the right guidance and activities to help locals preserve
their culture, said the two provincial leaders.

Local authorities should have responsibility for carefully preparing people for
the upcoming life changes and for protecting their culture, said PhD Le Ngoc
Thang, the general secretary of the Association of Ethnology and Anthropology.

VietNamNet/Viet Nam News


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Mon Apr 13 00:22:27 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Sun, 12 Apr 2009 07:22:27 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] New discovery of Yunnan mustached-toad in Vietnam
Message-ID: <49E1F923.3060005@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/tech/2009/04/841157/

New discovery of Yunnan mustached-toad in Vietnam
11:39' 10/04/2009 (GMT+7)

VietNamNet Bridge ? The Herpetology Notes, issue 2, 2009 announced the new
discovery of the Yunnan mustached-toad in Vietnam. The authors are reptile and
amphibian researchers of the American Museum of Natural History and the
Institute for Ecological and Biological Resources of Vietnam.

Yunnan mustached-toad.

This species of toad has scientific name as Leptobrachium promustache Rao,
Wilkinson & Zhang 2006, which was discovered in Dawei, Yunnan Province, China in
2006.

During a survey on the Hoang Lien Son Mountain in Van Ban district, the northern
mountainous province of Lao Cai in 2004, Vietnamese and American scientists
discovered this species of toad at the height of 1,300-1,400m above sea level.

They recorded the appearance of this species of toad in the area that is around
130km away from the site where they collected the first sample of the
mustached-toad, at the height of 700m lower than the first site.

Normally, the Yunnan mustached-toad lives at the height of 2,500m above sea
level in a tropical evergreen forest environment and they operate at night.


Gia Lai bongar.


Previously, a new species of snake was uncovered in Vietnam by researchers of
the Institute of Ecological and Biological Resources of Vietnam and the Cologne
Zoo in Germany. It is named Gia Lai bongar (Gia Lai Calamaria gialaiensis
Ziegler, Nguyen & Nguyen, 2008).

According to Nguyen Quang Truong from the Institute of Ecological and Biological
Resources, the standard sample of Gia Lai bongar was discovered in Kon Ka, in
the central highlands province of Gia Lai in 1999. Detailed descriptions of this
species are on Japan?s Current Herpetology Magazine, volume 27, issue 2.

This is the third bongar species discovered in Vietnam. This species lives at
the height of between 500-700m above sea level, in a tropical evergreen forest
environment and also operate at night.

Thu Huong



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Mon Apr 13 00:31:47 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Sun, 12 Apr 2009 07:31:47 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Bauxite industry to give impetus to Central Highlands
development
Message-ID: <49E1FB53.9030205@coombs.anu.edu.au>



http://vietnamplus.vn/home/xahoi-en/200904098217696464

Bauxite industry to give impetus to Central Highlands development
09-04-2009 | 22:30:00

The bauxite mining and alumina industry would create an impetus for
socio-economic development in the Central Highlands, said Deputy Prime Minister
Hoang Trung Hai at a conference held in Hanoi on April 9.

The Deputy PM said Vietnam has a rich bauxite resource and is potential for the
development of the bauxite mining and alumina industry, but won?t develop it at
any cost. He said the industrial development must be sustainable, requiring
strict and scientific management solutions.

The Deputy PM instructed to adjust the master plan on zoning off the bauxite
exploitation, processing and utilisation for the 2007-2015 period with a view
towards 2025, making it suitable to the new conditions and based on new data. He
also required a report on assessment of environmental impacts.

Due to Vietnam?s power shortage, the bauxite exploitation will initially serve
alumina production, but for a long-term view, plans for aluminum production
should be prepared, Hai said.

He asked relevant agencies to coordinate with investors in training personnel
for the industry, with priority given to ethnic minority locals, and to tighten
their management in order to minimise impacts on the natural environment,
culture and people?s life in the Central Highlands.

?The bauxite projects won?t reap real success and create an impetus for
development of the region and the whole country unless they get local as well as
national consensus,? Hai stressed.

Reports delivered at the conference thoroughly assessed the bauxite projects?
economic effectiveness and their impacts on the region?s environment, culture,
social life and security.

According to the Ministry of Industry and Trade, Vietnam?s bauxite reserve is
estimated at 5.4 billion tonnes, mainly located in the Central Highlands./.



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Mon Apr 13 01:06:39 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Sun, 12 Apr 2009 08:06:39 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Airborne Sulphates: Climate change 'own goal': Laws to
combat acid rain are DRIVING Arctic warming, claims NASA
Message-ID: <49E2037F.8060408@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1169007/Climate-change-goal-Laws-combat-acid-rain-DRIVING-Arctic-warming-claims-Nasa.html

Climate change 'own goal': Laws to combat acid rain are DRIVING Arctic warming,
claims Nasa

By CHER THORNHILL
Last updated at 7:16 PM on 10th April 2009

Comments (0)
Add to My Stories

It is widely recognised that humans are their own worst enemies when it comes to
global warming.

But the latest research from Nasa suggests laws created to preserve the
environment are causing much of the damage.

Legislation to improve air quality and cut acid rain has accounted for a
shocking half of Arctic warming over the past three decades, the space agency
reports.

Climate scientist Drew Shindell of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies
in New York found that declines in solid 'aerosol' particles brought in under
laws to improve air quality likely triggered 45 per cent of temperature rises.

Aerosols - including the man-made particles sulfates and soot - have a direct
impact on climate change by reflecting and absorbing the sun's radiation, Nasa
explains.

But laws brought in by the U.S. and European countries over the past three
decades have slashed emissions of sulfates, and with them atmospheric cooling.

The revelation shakes the theory that greenhouse gases, in particular carbon
dioxide, are the main problem in the fight to steady the planet's climate.

Shindell said: 'There's a tendency to think of aerosols as small players, but
they're not. Right now, in the mid-latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere and in
the Arctic, the impact of aerosols is just as strong as that of greenhouse gases.

'We will have very little leverage over climate in the next couple of decades if
we're just looking at carbon dioxide.

'If we want to stop the Arctic summer sea ice from melting completely over the
next few decades, we're much better off looking at aerosols and ozone.'

Enlarge
Wrong target: Arctic temperatures have shot up by 1.5C since clean air
regulations were introduced

Temperatures in the North Pole are of critical concern to climate enthusiasts.

Many believe that melting of the ice caps could lead to catastrophic rises in
sea level - even enough to rupture the Thames Barrier and flood the capital.

For the study, Shindell and colleagues modelled the effects of carbon dioxide,
ozone and aerosols on different regions of the Earth using an ocean-atmosphere
system.

They found that aerosols made an unprecedented contribution to warming, and that
the high latitudes affected corresponded to those that have witnessed the
greatest temperature rises since 1976.

Temperatures in the Arctic have climbed by 1.5C since the 1970s - far exceeding
the modest 0.35C increase in the Antarctic, where aerosols play a much smaller
role, Nasa claims.

Two types of aerosols affected - sulfates and black carbons - are believed to be
critical players in climate change, both of which are man-made.

Shindell said the findings make sense, explaining that the aerosols, most of
which are pumped out from the industrial regions of North America and Europe,
drift up and congregate in the Arctic.




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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Mon Apr 13 01:08:31 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Sun, 12 Apr 2009 08:08:31 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] More on sulphur ... Obama may fire pollution particles
into stratosphere to deflect sun's heat in desperate bid to tackle global
warming
Message-ID: <49E203EF.6040300@coombs.anu.edu.au>



http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1168637/Obama-pollution-particles-stratosphere-deflect-suns-heat-desperate-bid-tackle-global-warming.html

Obama may fire pollution particles into stratosphere to deflect sun's heat in
desperate bid to tackle global warming

By DAVID GARDNER
Last updated at 3:00 PM on 09th April 2009

Comments (1)
Add to My Stories
President Barack Obama is considering a radical plan to tackle global warming by
firing pollution particles into the stratosphere to deflect some of the sun?s heat.

The controversial experiment was touted yesterday as a possible last resort to
help cool the Earth?s air by the president?s new science advisor John Holdren.

?It?s got to be looked at. We don?t have the luxury of taking any approach off
the table,? said Mr Holdren, Director of the White House Office of Science and
Technology.


Sunscreen: Could its rays be deflected as a last resort to beat global warming?

Holdren, director of the White House Office of Science and Technology, outlined
the idea of shooting either sulphur dioxide particles, aluminium oxide dust or
specially designed aerosols into the stratosphere - the upper level of the
atmosphere between ten and 30 miles above the Earth's surface.

It is hoped that this would cool the planet by artificially reflecting sunlight
back into space before it can be absorbed.

Naval guns, rockets, high-flying aircraft and even hot air balloons have been
put forward as possible ways of firing the agent into the air.


Drastic action: Barack Obama wants to use technology to combat climate change

Mr Holdren admitted the scheme could have grave side effects and would not
completely solve all the problems from soaring greenhouse gas emissions.

But he said he had raised the idea with the Obama administration and added: 'We
might get desperate enough to want to use it.'

Mr Holdren insisted that dramatic action is needed to halt climate change which
he compared to being 'in a car with bad brakes driving towards a cliff in a fog'.

There has been widespread resistance in the scientific community to attempts to
deliberately modify the environment on such a large scale.

Opponents fear that tampering with the atmosphere's delicate balance could have
consequences that would be even worse than global warming.

But Mr Holdren suggested time could be running out. He outlined several 'tipping
points' involving climate change that may be fast approaching, such as the
complete loss of summer sea ice in the Arctic.

He said that once such milestones are reached it increases the chances of
'really intolerable consequences'.

Mr Holdren also proposed the option of developing 'artificial trees' that would
suck carbon dioxide - the chief human-produced greenhouse gas - out of the air
and store it.

The synthetic tree, described as looking like a goal post with Venetian blinds,
would draw carbon dioxide out of the air, as plants do during photosynthesis.

The idea seemed too costly at first, and is only on the drawing board, but Mr
Holdren said it was feasible.


From communication.env at fpt.vn Mon Apr 13 12:54:24 2009
From: communication.env at fpt.vn (ENV Communication)
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2009 09:54:24 +0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Weekly Bulletin 310
Message-ID: <00f101c9bbe3$2809a1e0$1101a8c0@tunganhyen>


E310 10 April 2009

Top News

Quang Nam: Langur transferred to national park
On April 7th, 2009 the Quang Nam Provincial Forest Protection Department transferred a grey-shanked douc langur (Pygathrix nemaeus cinerea) to the primate rescue centre at Cuc Phuong National Park. The langur was being illegally kept by a Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) project officer.
(Vietnamese version)
http://vietnamnet.vn/khoahoc/2009/04/840735/

Quang Nam: Over 200m3 of timber discovered being illegally transported on the Vu Gia River
On April 5th, 2009 mobile forest rangers in Dai Loc District confiscated 200m3 of timber from a boat that was being used to illegally transport it on the Vu Gia River. Two of the subjects have been remanded in temporary custody pending further investigation of the case.
(Vietnamese version)
http://envietnam.org/E_News/E_310/Quang_Nam_Phat_hien_go_tha_troi_song.html
(English version)
http://envietnam.org/E_News/E_310/Lumberjacks_attack_forest_rangers_in_Quang_Nam.html

Quang Ngai: Snakes released to the wild
On April 8th, 2009 the Forest Protection Department, in collaboration with the Environmental Police in Quang Ngai province, released 30kg of snakes to the wild. The snakes had been confiscated from a restaurant on the previous day.
(Vietnamese version)
http://envietnam.org/E_News/E_310/Quang_Ngai_Tha_ran_ve_voi_tu_nhien.html

Cao Bang: New species of snakes discovered in nature reserve
Russian and Vietnamese scientists recently announced their discovery of a new species of rattle snake, which belongs to Protobothrops family, in the Trung Khanh Nature Reserve in the northern province of Cao Bang. The discovery was published in the Russian scientific magazine; "Reptile and Amphibians," in January 2009.
(Vietnamese version)
http://envietnam.org/E_News/E_310/Phat_hien_loai_ran_moi_o_Cao_Bang.html
(English version)
http://envietnam.org/E_News/E_310/New_species_of_snake_unveiled_in_Cao_Bang.html

Hai Phong: Large whale found dead on beach
On April 6th, 2009 a ten-ton whale was found dead on a beach on Bach Long Vi Island. According to the local residents, this is the first time a dead large whale had been found on the island.
(Vietnamese version)
http://envietnam.org/E_News/E_310/Hai_Phong_Ca_voi_trang_chet_dat_vao_bo.pdf

Lam Dong: Wild tigers suspected of attacking cattle
Two wild tigers have reportedly appeared at a village in Cat Tien district during the past ten days. Local residents believe that the tigers have taken their goats, many of which have gone missing recently. The local authorities are working to determine the number of wild animals to put protection measures in place and also work out measures to ensure the safety of the residents.
(Vietnamese version)
http://envietnam.org/E_News/E_310/Nghi_cop_xuat_hien_o_Lam_Dong.html
(English version)
http://envietnam.org/E_News/E_310/Wild_tigers_attack_cattle_in_Lam_Dong.html
ENV's activities

Hanoi: Leopard cats saved from sale
An ENV field officer discovered three leopard cats being kept for sale at a pet shop on Lang Ha street. The information about the crime was immediately transferred to the National Environmental Police who quickly cooperated with Ha Noi FPD to seize the cats and arrest the violator. The three leopard cats were transferred to Soc Son Rescue Center where they are being looked after before being released back into the wild.


Please note: Past bulletins can be found on ENV's website www.envietnam.org

Nguyen Thi My Dung
Communications officer
Education for Nature - Vietnam
No. 5 Ngo 192 Thai Thinh
PO Box 222
Dong Da district
Hanoi, Vietnam
Phone/fax: +84 4 3514-8850
E-mail: env at fpt.vn
www.envietnam.org (English)
www.thiennhien.org (Vietnamese)
www.savingvietnamswildlife.org (English wildlife trade website)


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Mon Apr 13 23:41:01 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2009 06:41:01 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Consultancy opportunities -MRCs/BDP Programme
Message-ID: <49E340ED.90507@gmail.com>

Subject: Consultancy opportunities -MRCs/BDP Programme
Date: Sun, 12 Apr 2009 23:51:50 -0700 (PDT)
From: suparerk janprasart <janprasart at yahoo.com>
Reply-To: Water Issues Announcement List <water-l at lists.iisd.ca>
To: Water Issues Announcement List <water-l at lists.iisd.ca>

Dear Colleagues,

The Mekong River Commission Secretariat (MRCS), Basin Development Plan Programme
(BDP) has currently reached one of the most critical stages of its programme
implementation on the cumulative impact assessment of water resources
development scenarios in the Mekong Basin. The programme is seeking qualified
international and riparian candidates who are passionate about poverty reduction
and participatory basin planning to fill in the following short-term consultant
positions.

1. International Water Resources Planner
2. International Economist
3. International Environmentalist
4. International Social Scientist
5. International Fisheries Specialists (2 positions)
6. International Hydropower Specialist
7. International Irrigation Specialist
8. International River Geo-morphologist
9. Riparian Economist
10. Riparian Environmentalist
11. Riparian Social Scientists ? Rural Livelihood Specialists (2 positions)
12. Riparian Nutritionist
13. Riparian Agronomist
14. Riparian GIS Analyst (2 positions)


Applicants can apply as a team, individual and/or a representative from
organization or firm. Please send your application as soon as possible to email:
mrcs at mrcmekong.org ? subject: Application to BDP scenario assessment
consultancy/position XXXX.

The application must include a cover letter outlining clearly how the candidate
meets the requirements of the position. In addition to the cover letter, the
applicant should include his/her CV, three reference contacts and financial
expectation. The title of the consultancy must be indicated in the application
letter. The applicants can opt to apply more than one position.


Please visit http://www.mrcmekong.org/employment/consultant/BDP-Consultants.htm
for further details of the assignment and positions. Nevertheless, if you have
any queries, please do not hesitate to contact the BDP Programme at
Phoumin at mrcmekong.org, cc: to Suparerk at mrcmekong.org.

The deadline for the applictaion is April 30.

For more information about the Basin Development Plan Programme please visit
http://www.mrcmekong.org/programmes/bdp.htm.


We would highly appreciate if you could kindly help us circulate this
advertisement to your network, other colleagues and potential candidates.


Thank you so much and we look forward to hearing from you soon.



Very best regards,

Mekong River Commission Secretariat, Basin Development Plan Programme
Vientiane, Lao PDR



Suparerk Janprasart
Sociologist/Socio-economist
Basin Development Plan Programme
Mekong River Commission Secretariat
Vientiane, Lao PDR




From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Mon Apr 13 23:51:09 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2009 06:51:09 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Vacancy announcement - TRAFFIC Tiger Trade Programme
Manager [Malaysia]
Message-ID: <49E3434D.7020303@gmail.com>

Subject: Vacancy announcement - TRAFFIC Tiger Trade Programme Manager
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2009 15:42:57 +0200
From: <Melisch at wwf.de>
Reply-To: <Melisch at wwf.de>
To: Biodiversity Info Mailing List <biodiv-l at lists.iisd.ca>

TRAFFIC VACANCY ANNOUNCEMENT

TITLE: Tiger Trade Programme Manager

LOCATION: Petaling Jaya, Malaysia

REPORTS TO: Global Programme Co-ordinator, TRAFFIC International
Tiger Network Initiative Leader, WWF

CONTRACT: Fixed-term contract for two years with a possibility to
extend.

CLOSING DATE FOR APPLICATIONS: 8 May 2009


TRAFFIC and WWF are seeking a Tiger Trade Programme Manager to be based
in TRAFFIC's office in Petaling Jaya, Malaysia. The Tiger Trade
Programme Manager will co-ordinate the trade related efforts of the new
WWF Tiger Network Initiative and lead TRAFFIC's global efforts to
address trade threats to Tigers and other Asian Big Cat (ABC) species.
Initially, the position is for a fixed term of two years with a
possibility to extend.

http://www.traffic.org/job-opportunities/
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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Mon Apr 13 23:53:44 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2009 06:53:44 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] FIELD & IIED article on unfair [UNFCCC] negotiations
Message-ID: <49E343E8.1080100@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Subject: FIELD & IIED article on unfair negotiations
Date: Wed, 08 Apr 2009 10:13:31 -0500
From: Anna Karklina <anna.karklina at field.org.uk>
Reply-To: Anna Karklina <anna.karklina at field.org.uk>
To: Climate Change Info Mailing List <climate-l at lists.iisd.ca>

Dear Colleagues,

You may be interested in an article by Joy Hyvarinen, director of FIELD, and
Mike Shanahan, press officer at IIED, which highlights the difficulties faced by
vulnerable developing countries, such as small island states, in the UNFCCC
negotiations. The article is now available at
http://www.chinadialogue.net/article/show/single/en/2878-An-uneven-playing-field.

Kind regards,

FIELD
www.field.org.uk

An uneven playing field
Joy Hyvarinen
Mike Shanahan
March 30, 2009

Countries are meeting this week in Germany to help decide a new framework to
address climate change. But for the most vulnerable nations, write Joy Hyvarinen
and Mike Shanahan, the talks are far from fair.
?Delegates from the least developed countries and small island states must rush
between groups, often late at night, getting very little sleep compared with
larger delegations.?
With less than nine months to meet the December 2009 deadline for a new global
framework to tackle climate change, this week?s gathering in Bonn, Germany, of
parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) will be a
critical negotiating session.

And while all right-thinking people agree that a new deal must be fair and
equitable, the negotiations themselves are anything but. The talks risk focusing
too much on reducing greenhouse-gas emissions, without paying adequate attention
to the urgent need for vulnerable nations to adapt to inevitable climate-change
impacts. If the rich world does not address these disparities, the negotiations
could result in a broken deal that adds to the burden of the world?s poorest and
most vulnerable people.

The current rules under the Kyoto Protocol commit a number of industrialised
countries ? but not the United States, which has not ratified the protocol ? to
reduce their greenhouse-gas emissions by set amounts by 2012, when the targets
expire. Countries urgently need to agree replacement rules by the end of
December, or there will not be enough time to enact them by 2012. The last thing
a climate-constrained world needs is a period without any nation having binding
commitments to reduce their emissions.

High on the agenda at Bonn will be new targets for both the developed countries
and what might be the first binding targets for rapidly developing large
countries, such as China and Brazil. But a certain level of climate change is
already ?hard wired? into the system, meaning that some impacts will be
inevitable even if all greenhouse-gas emissions were halted today. So we need to
adapt.

In fact, impacts are already being felt in the form of harsher and less
predictable weather, melting ice caps, coral bleaching and rising sea levels.
While we will all be forced to adapt to the impacts of climate change, it is
often those least responsible for them ? the least developed nations and small
island states ? that are the most vulnerable. But the international
negotiations, which revolve around the competing power agendas of nations, are
unfair to those vulnerable states.

Size matters ? the big players are the rich, powerful states ? but is not the
only factor that comes into play in the conference room. Technical and legal
expertise, as well as knowing how to play the negotiating game, can have a
decisive role in determining outcomes. This means that most developing countries
are on the back foot from the outset. They lack the resources and personnel they
need to stand toe-to-toe with the big players.

At the last big climate conference in Poznan, Poland, the US delegation numbered
over 80 representatives, while the small Pacific island state Kiribati, where
climate change is a survival issue today, had only three and Congo had just two.

This matters because the negotiations usually break up quickly into many small
groups to thrash out difficult issues. Delegates from the least developed
countries and small island states must rush between groups, often late at night,
getting very little sleep compared with larger delegations. And so they lose
out. Such nations also have minimal capacity or time for crucial preparation,
but it can take months of analysis to understand complex issues and their
implications.

Meanwhile, the delegations from wealthy industrialised nations meet in advance
to prepare their negotiating positions ? and fallback strategies ? bolstered by
technical, scientific and legal advisers. Although some of the small island
states have managed to punch far above their weight by having some exceptionally
good negotiators, most of the vulnerable countries cannot claim that advantage.

A climate-change conference may need climate policy specialists, highly
qualified scientists, legal advisers and experts in several other fields, such
as forestry and agriculture, but most countries simply do not have the skilled
staff or the resources needed. This can result in developing countries missing
opportunities to influence decisions that could help alleviate poverty, such as
the design of incentives for rainforest nations to avoid deforestation and
forest degradation, which account for about 17% of anthropogenic greenhouse-gas
emissions.

Equally, the deal that governments will be negotiating must include a robust and
effective long-term plan for helping vulnerable nations to adapt to climate
change. But there is a risk that the focus will instead be on mitigation because
emissions, and any attempts to impose binding targets to reduce them, are the
major concerns of the larger, more powerful states.

Despite their size and limited capacity to negotiate against much larger
delegations, the Alliance of Small Island States (AOSIS) has succeeded in making
its voice heard and has been a leader in promoting the moral dimensions of
climate change. Likewise, the formation of a Least Developed Countries group
that works together with a common negotiating stance has bolstered the weak
starting point of these countries.

But the disparities in negotiating power remain. And while UN treaties have
dedicated funds to support the participation of developing countries in the
negotiations, these are voluntary and underfunded. The Least Developed Countries
and the Alliance of Small Island States will need support from other nations to
ensure that the deal strikes a fair balance between mitigation and adaptation
concerns.

Some would say that the current situation is fair and that it is only to be
expected that large rich nations have more say. Others would argue that to reach
global solutions, which work for all states, international negotiations need to
be based on a truly common agenda. Whatever the viewpoint, the playing field is
not a level one.


Joy Hyvarinen is director of the Foundation for International Environmental Law
and Development

Mike Shanahan is press officer at the International Institute for Environment
and Development

Homepage image from Piotr Fajfer / Oxfam International


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Mon Apr 13 23:54:35 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2009 06:54:35 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] International courses on Landscape Approaches and
Forest Governance
Message-ID: <49E3441B.7090300@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Subject: International courses on Landscape Approaches and Forest Governance
Date: Tue, 07 Apr 2009 09:03:13 -0500
From: cora.vanoosten at wur.nl
Reply-To: cora.vanoosten at wur.nl
To: Forest Policy Info Mailing List <forests-l at lists.iisd.ca>

Dear Forest-I readers,

As done so in previous years, Wageningen International, in close collaboration
with RECOFTC and CIFOR, organises two courses that might be of interest to you:

1) - Landscape functions and people: applying strategic planning approaches for
good natural resource governance; and

2) - Governance for forest, nature and people: managing mulit-stakeholder
learning in sector programmes and policy processes.

for more information see the attached document or contact Cora van Oosten of
Wageningen International: cora.vanoosten at wur.nl, info.wi at wur.nl

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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Tue Apr 14 00:07:51 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2009 07:07:51 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] REGISTRATION OPEN: World Bank Symposium on "Cities and
Climate Change"
Message-ID: <49E34737.6040608@coombs.anu.edu.au>



-------- Original Message --------
Subject: REGISTRATION OPEN: World Bank Symposium on "Cities and Climate Change"
Date: Tue, 07 Apr 2009 15:38:58 -0500
From: Perinaz Bhada <pbhada at worldbank.org>
Reply-To: Perinaz Bhada <pbhada at worldbank.org>
To: Climate Change Info Mailing List <climate-l at lists.iisd.ca>

Registration is now OPEN for the

5th Urban Research Symposium
on
Cities and Climate Change: Responding to an Urgent Agenda

June 28-30, 2009
(with side events on June 27 and July 1)
Marseille, France

Please visit www.urs2009.net to register.

Please note that there are limited vacancies for hotels at that time of the
year, so register early!

Early bird registration (200 Euros) is available for participants until May 30,
after which registration will be 400 Euros.

Student registration is 100 Euros (150 Euros after May 30).



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Tue Apr 14 00:09:13 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2009 07:09:13 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Report: Climate Change and Human Development
Message-ID: <49E34789.4090001@coombs.anu.edu.au>



Subject: Climate Change and Human Development
Date: Thu, 9 Apr 2009 12:04:37 -0400
From: David Hodas <drhodas at gmail.com>
Reply-To: David Hodas <drhodas at gmail.com>



You may be interested in a recently published article, entitled "Designing A
Global Post-Kyoto Climate Change Protocol That Advances Human Development.?
This article explains why policy makers should seriously consider a new
structure for a post-Kyoto Protocol on climate change and suggests a framework
for a new climate change protocol. The article critiques the Kyoto Protocol
model insofar as it allocated emissions reduction entitlements to some countries
but not to others. The article shows how the Kyoto Protocol, by imposing
emission reduction obligations on only the developed countries and leaving
developing countries without emission reduction and/or avoidance obligations,
actually impairs the sustainable development prospects of the least developed
nations. The article proposes that a post-Kyoto regime that would equitably
assign real, common, but differentiated responsibilities to all nations of the
world under a global cap on GHG concentrations. The article suggests a formula
for equitable allocation of GHG emission rights which would be based the Human
Development Index, the efficiency of energy use; historical and present per
capita and total emissions; and projected future per capita and total emissions.
A more detailed abstract is available athttp://ssrn.com/abstract=1162770 , where
you can also download the article itself.

Professor David R. Hodas Widener University School of Law 4601 Concord Pike
Wilmington DE 19803-0474 302 477 2186 (tel) 302 477 2257 (fax) drhodas at widener.edu



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Tue Apr 14 00:16:14 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2009 07:16:14 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] ANNOUNCEMENT: TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES Wageningen
International
Message-ID: <49E3492E.2030904@gmail.com>

Repeating this with more information...

Subject: [INCL English] Indonesian Nature Conservation newsLetter 12-13a
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2009 16:56:24 +0700
From: [INCL English] <incl.contact at gmail.com>


ANNOUNCEMENT: TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES Wageningen International

In the second half of 2009, Wageningen International will once again be
offering a number of annual courses for which you can still apply:

* Leadership and adaptive management: supporting decentralised
forest and nature management for rural development :
http://www.cdic. wur.nl/UK/ newsagenda/
agenda/Leadershipandadaptiveman agement.htm

<http://www.cdic.%20wur.nl/UK/%20newsagenda/Leadership_and_adaptive_%20man%20agement.htm>
, 28 September - 6 November

* Landscape functions and people: applying strategic planning
approaches for good natural resource governance: http://www.cdic.
wur.nl/UK/ newsagenda/ agenda/Landscapefunctions_ and_people.htm
<http://www.cdic.%20wur.nl/UK/%20newsagenda/> , 26 October - 6 November

Our courses combine the latest developments in a specific field or
sector with the opportunity to exchange knowledge and experiences with
professionals from all over the world. The courses are job-oriented,
interactive and experience based. Our trainers use a variety of formats:
lectures, case studies, group discussions and assignments, and field
study. Participants develop a Personal Action Plan, in which they
integrate all course topics and relate them to the reality of the
participants' working situations.

For more information on these courses and online application, please
visit our website, http://www.cdic. wur.nl/UK/ Courses/Overview
+Courses+ 2009/,
<http://www.cdic.%20wur.nl/UK/%20Courses/Overview%20+Courses+%202009/>and
click on the course of your interest.


Funding

For these courses there are scholarships available through the
Netherlands Fellowship Programme (NFP) for nationals from selected
countries.

The NFP scholarship covers the following costs:

* Tuition fees
* Travel costs
* Full-board accommodation
* Health insurance
* Allowance for personal expenses

For more information on NFP: Netherlands Fellowship Programmes
http://www.nuffic. nl/international -students/ scholarships/
asia-africa- la tin-america- and-eastern- europe/the- netherlands-
fellowship- programmes/ the netherlands- fellowship- programmes
<http://www.nuffic.%20nl/international%20-students/%20scholarships/%20asia-africa-%20la%20tin-america-%20and-eastern-%20europe/the-%20netherlands-%20fellowship-%20programmes/%20theneteherlands-fellowship-%20programmes>

List of eligible countries (for regional courses the number of eligible
countires is limited to the countries in the region):

Afghanistan, Albania, Armenia, Autonomous Palestinian Territories,
Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burundi, Bolivia, Bosnia-Hercegovina, Brazil,
Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cape Verde, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba,
DR. Congo, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Georgia,
Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea-Bissau, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Ivory
Coast, Jordan, Kenya, Kosovo, Macedonia, Mali, Moldova, Mongolia,
Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru,
Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Surinam,
Tanzania, Thailand, Uganda, Vietnam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

*THE DEADLINE FOR APPLICATION IS 1 JUNE 2009.*

For other possible sources of funding:
http://www.cdic. wur.nl/UK/ Courses/Fellowsh ips/
<http://www.cdic.%20wur.nl/UK/%20Courses/Fellowsh%20ips/>

Feel free to pass on this information to colleagues in your network and
others who you feel will be interested. If you have any questions or
would like more information, please do not hesitate to contact us again.

Ms. Felicia van der Does

Communications Officer
Present: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesdays & Thursday
Wageningen UR, Wageningen International
P.O.Box 88, 6700 AB, Wageningen
The Netherlands
Tel.: +31 (0)317 486 859
Fax.: +31 (0)317486 801
E-mail personal: felicia.vanderdoes@ wur.nl
<mailto:felicia.vanderdoes@%20wur.nl>
Website: www.wi.wur.nl <http://www.wi.%20wur.nl/>
Subscribe here <http://www.cdic. wur.nl/UK/ E-newsletters/
<http://www.cdic.%20wur.nl/UK/%20E-newsletters/>> to our e-newsletter
and keep up to date on our courses and capacity development programm
[ I DO NOT RESPOND IN A REASONABLE TIME, PLEASE RESEND YOUR MESSAGE.


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Tue Apr 14 00:18:11 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2009 07:18:11 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] RELEASE: Rainforest Alliance Accredited For Voluntary
Carbon Standard (VCS)
Message-ID: <49E349A3.6090102@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Subject: [INCL English] Indonesian Nature Conservation newsLetter 12-13a
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2009 16:56:24 +0700
From: [INCL English] <incl.contact at gmail.com>


RELEASE: Rainforest Alliance Accredited For Voluntary Carbon Standard (VCS)

Source: Rainforest Alliance - March 30, 2009
New York

The need to reduce greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, particularly
those emitted when lands are deforested, has prompted the growth of
carbon forestry programs worldwide. Independent, third-party evaluation
of forestry projects is crucial to ensuring their credibility. To this
end, the Rainforest Alliance has received accreditation from the
American National Standards Institute (ANSI) to ISO 14065:2007, the
international standard for greenhouse gas validation and verification
bodies and a necessary requirement for approval to the Voluntary Carbon
Standard (VCS). The Rainforest Alliance is now the first Forest
Stewardship Council (FSC)-certifier to be fully accredited under this
standard as a forestry verifier to the VCS.

Though reducing emissions is a first priority, individuals and
organizations can ?offset?? emissions that they cannot eliminate by
purchasing credits from projects that take greenhouse gases out of the
atmosphere or prevent their emission. Planting of trees, managing
existing forests more responsibly and conserving forests that are in
danger of deforestation or degradation all contribute to carbon dioxide
sequestration. In coordination with its programs in sustainable
forestry, agriculture and tourism, the Rainforest Alliance, an
international conservation organization, audits farm and forest projects
that can demonstrate their ability to sequester significant volumes of
carbon.

For the past two years, the Rainforest Alliance has provided carbon
auditing services to FSC-certified, Rainforest Alliance Certified and
non-certified landowners against the standards of the Climate, Community
and Biodiversity Alliance, Plan Vivo and the Chicago Climate Exchange
(CCX). With ANSI?s positive accreditation decision, the Rainforest
Alliance will now be able to verify VCS forestry and agroforestry projects.

?The VCS is emerging as the leading standard for voluntary verification
of climate mitigation projects,?? said Jeff Hayward, climate initiative
manager for the Rainforest Alliance. ?Being the first FSC-certifier
with formal accreditation to the VCS enables the Rainforest Alliance to
offer a wider range of responsible forestry and climate verification to
ground-breaking carbon projects globally.??

The Rainforest Alliance has validated and verified forest carbon
projects in Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, England, Chile, Argentina,
Brazil, Venezuela and Indonesia, and is currently working with projects
in over 20 countries.

For more information on the Rainforest Alliance, visit
www.rainforest-alliance.org

Contact Info: Abby Ray, 646-452-1939, aray at ra.org <mailto:aray at ra.org>
Website : Rainforest Alliance


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Tue Apr 14 00:19:40 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2009 07:19:40 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] IUCN: World Conservation magazine - Life support:
Human health and the environment
Message-ID: <49E349FC.2090003@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Subject: World Conservation magazine - Life support: Human health and
the environment
Date: Wed, 08 Apr 2009 16:35:54 -0400
From: Taffeta Gray <tgray at iucnus.org>
Reply-To: Taffeta Gray <tgray at iucnus.org>
To: Climate Change Info Mailing List <climate-l at lists.iisd.ca>




*Life support*

This issue of/ //World Conservation/ explores the many ways our health
challenges are linked to the environment and the profound impact we are
having on the planet.

Experts describe how communicating the human health message can boost
support for conservation and engage new partners. Topics include the
sustainable use of medicinal plants, addressing the increasing spread of
disease caused by climate change, and the importance of nature to our
spiritual and mental health.

? Read or download the full* *issue at www.iucn.org/worldconservation
<http://www.iucn.org/worldconservation> (also available in French and
Spanish).

? Order a free* printed copy* of this issue or request a free* **regular
subscription* to the magazine by writing to worldconservation at iucn.org
<mailto:worldconservation at iucn.org>.

The next issue, to be published in September 2009, will be on climate
change. */ /*

*/In this /**/issue/*

New drugs from nature
<http://www.iucn.org/resources/world_conservation/2009_issue1/?2990/Losing-it>

Transboundary conservation and disease
<http://www.iucn.org/resources/world_conservation/2009_issue1/?2991/Beyond-borders>

Saving lives, saving money
<http://www.iucn.org/resources/world_conservation/2009_issue1/?2992/Saving-lives-saving-money>

Engaging new partners for conservation
<http://www.iucn.org/resources/world_conservation/2009_issue1/?2993/Reaching-out>

Road to recovery
<http://www.iucn.org/resources/world_conservation/2009_issue1/?2994/The-road-to-recovery>







From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Tue Apr 14 00:26:54 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2009 07:26:54 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] UNEP Finance Initiative's e-Learning Course on Climate
Change (6-28 June 09)
Message-ID: <49E34BAE.7070004@gmail.com>

Subject: UNEP Finance Initiative's e-Learning Course on Climate Change (6-28
June 09)
Date: Wed, 08 Apr 2009 08:34:51 -0500
From: UNEP Finance Initiative <yuki.yasui at unep.ch>
Reply-To: UNEP Finance Initiative <yuki.yasui at unep.ch>
To: Climate Change Info Mailing List <climate-l at lists.iisd.ca>

Registrations now open for the UNEP Finance Initiative's e-Learning Course on
Climate Change: Risks and Opportunities for the Finance Sector

From 8 to 26 June 2009, the United Nations Environment Programme's
Finance Initiative will be running e-Learning Course on Climate Change:
Risks and Opportunities for the Finance Sector. The course will enable
senior and mid-level executives in financial institutions to learn about
climate change and how it affects their industry in a flexible,
cost-effective and accessible e-learning training environment with
opportunities to network and interact with fellow participants and
expert tutors.

To find out more and to register visit: http://www2.unitar.org/unepfi



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Tue Apr 14 00:50:15 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2009 07:50:15 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Improving impact evaluation production and use
Message-ID: <49E35127.8010404@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Subject: [EQ] Improving impact evaluation production and use
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2009 08:22:19 -0400
From: Ruggiero, Mrs. Ana Lucia (WDC) <ruglucia at PAHO.ORG>
Reply-To: Equity, Health & Human Development <EQUIDAD at LISTSERV.PAHO.ORG>
To: EQUIDAD at LISTSERV.PAHO.ORG



*Improving impact evaluation production and use*


Nicola Jones, Harry Jones, Liesbet Steer and Ajoy Datta
*Working Paper:300* *March 2009 *- *ISBN: 978 0 85003 899 6*
*Overseas Development Institute


Available online PDF [87p.] at:
http://www.odi.org.uk/resources/odi-publications/working-papers/300-impact-evaluation-production-use.pdf



???The past five years have seen a proliferation of impact evaluations
(IEs) by development agencies across the globe. This report was
commissioned by the UK Department for International Development?s
(DFID?s) Evaluation Department to inform discussions on impact
evaluation production and use within the Network of Networks Impact
Evaluation Initiative (NONIE). It builds on an initial scoping study
prepared for DFID which made recommendations on improving IE production
and use, focusing on clustering, coordination, knowledge management,
capacity strengthening and communication and uptake. This the report
goes further by expanding both the literature review and the annotated
database of IEs, as well as honing in on specific dynamics of IE
production across sectors.



A focus on sector-specific histories and dynamics of impact IE
production, communication and use dynamics revealed a number of
important similarities and differences. Similarities included a growing
recognition of the need to approach IEs as part of a broader monitoring
and evaluation system; the importance of involving multiple stakeholders
in the evaluation process to promote uptake; and the utility of
exploring alternative methods to assess impact.



Key differences appeared to be starker and were found in a number of
areas. First, a longer history of IEs in health and agriculture/natural
resource management (NRM) sectors has meant these sectors have a broader
knowledge base from which to draw, although they diverge in the extent
to which this knowledge is actually used.

The paper concludes with policy implications regarding: strategic
coordination, funding, knowledge management, capacity strengthening
mechanisms and improving impact evaluation communication and uptake?..?





*Contents*

Executive summary

1. Introduction

2. Key issues in the relevance, production and use of impact evaluations

2.1 IE: Concepts, methods, nature of the knowledge produced

2.2 Supply and demand: Commissioning, production and delivery of IEs

2.3 Use and influence of IEs

3. Sectoral case studies

Case 1: Human and social development

Case 2: Agriculture and renewable natural resources

Case 3: Humanitarian aid

Case 4: Rural/urban development and infrastructure sector

Case 5: Impact evaluations of results-based aid

4. Comparing sector-specific experiences with impact evaluations

5. Conclusions and policy implications

References



Appendix 1: Impact evaluation database overview and findings

Appendix 2: Media coverage of impact evaluation findings

Appendix 3: Stepwise evaluation model

Appendix 4: Key informants





From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Tue Apr 14 01:33:10 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2009 08:33:10 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Nam Cat Tien home to largest gaur herd in Vietnam
Message-ID: <49E35B36.3030101@gmail.com>

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/tech/2009/04/841663/

Nam Cat Tien home to largest gaur herd in Vietnam
17:26' 13/04/2009 (GMT+7)

VietNamNet Bridge ? Managers of Nam Cat Tien National Park on April 10 said that
there are 19-22 herds of gaur (Bos gaurus), a total of 110-120 heads, living in
the park.

A gaur in the Saigon Zoo.

The above statistic is the result of a three-year project (2006-2009) to
preserve wild bulls in the park, which is located in the three provinces of Dong
Nai, Lam Dong and Binh Phuoc, funded by the French Agency for World Environment
Protection (FFEM), the French International Development Agency and the French
Embassy in Vietnam.

The project conducted various methods of surveying, including directly observing
45 sites where gaurs often go, collecting information from local people,
analyzing AND and biological samples of gaurs.

According to the project management board, the community of gaurs living in Nam
Cat Tien National Park is the most important one and protected the best in Vietnam.

The gaur is a large, dark-coated bovine animal of South Asia and Southeast Asia.
The gaur is the largest species of wild cattle.

In Vietnam, gaur is called min by ethnic minority people, meaning wild buffalo,
because they look like buffalo.

Vinh Giang


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Tue Apr 14 01:38:29 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2009 08:38:29 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] UNDP: 01 Monitoring and Evaluation Officer
[Partnership on Avian and Human Pandemic Influenza (PAHI)]
Message-ID: <49E35C75.5010702@gmail.com>


01 Monitoring and Evaluation Officer
Publish Date: 13-Apr-2009

Vietnam with support from international partners is currently implementing the
Vietnam?s Integrated National Operational Programme for Avian and Human
Influenza in 2006-2010 (a.k.a Green Book) with a total estimated cost of $250
million. To support overall coordination, a Partnership on Avian and Human
Pandemic Influenza (PAHI) has been established between the Government of
Vietnam, Donors, Non-Governmenta Organisations and other stakeholders. A
Secretariat Office has been established within the Ministry of Agriculture and
Rural Development (MARD), under joint supervision of MARD and the Ministry of
Health (MOH) to support the activities of the Partnership, which focus on
information sharing, policy dialogue, and joint monitoring of resources and
activities.

Term of Reference attached

Applications from qualified national candidates should be submitted to PAHI
Secretariat Office at mailing address:

PAHI Secretariat Office
Room 301, Building A8
Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development
10 Nguyen Cong Hoan Street, Ha Noi

or via email to pahi.htqt at mard.gov.vn or pahi.secretariat at gmail.com

Application must include an application letter in English, CV and copies of
relevant academic degree(s), indicating clearly ?Application for the position of
Monitoring and Evaluation Officer, PAHI Secretariat?

Deadline for submissions: Wednesday 05:00 PM | 29-Apr-2009


Partnership for Avian and Human Influenza (PAHI)
Room 301, Building A8, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development, 10 Nguyen
Cong Hoan, Ba Dinh, Ha Noi
Tel: (84 4) 37711 356 /357 - Fax: (84 4) 37711 362 - Email:
pahi.htqt at mard.gov.vn - Website: www.avianinfluenza.org.vn


Position and title of post: Monitoring and Evaluation Officer
Organisation and Unit: Secretariat of the Partnership for Avian and Human
Pandemic Influenza
(PAHI), MARD
Duty station: Hanoi, Viet Nam
Duration: 12 work months full time (April 2009 ? March 2010) with possibility of
extension

ROLE OF THE MONITORING AND EVALUATION OFFICER
? Focal point within PAHI Secretariat for finance and progress monitoring and
evaluation of the
Integrated National Operational Program on Avian and Human Influenza 2006-2010
(the Green
Book) including the implementation of major program reviews

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
1. Develop and maintain updated files on all AHI programme and project
activities in Viet Nam within the
scope of the Green Book, including national and international resource
allocations (integrated funding
matrix), activity plans, budgets, implementation timeframes, periodic progress
reports and monitoring
and evaluation reports.
2. Liaise closely with related Government departments in the Ministry of
Agriculture and Rural
Development, the Ministry of Health, the Ministry of Finance and other
ministries and national
organisations and international partners as needed to collect accurate
information on investments within
the scope of the Green Book
3. Consolidate individual funding commitments and allocations, activity plans
and budgets of national and
international Partners into an overall finance plan for AHI activities in Viet
Nam, based on the Green
Book, and prepare regular consolidated financial implementation reports against
this plan.
4. Contribute substantively to the finalisation and roll-out of the National
Avian and Human Influenza
Monitoring Framework, including follow-up to national partners and preparation
of periodic
consolidated monitoring reports based on the Framework once it is approved.
5. Contribute substantively to all steps and aspects of major reviews of the
Green Book, from planning
through to stakeholder meetings, data collection and analysis, report drafting,
workshops, presentation of
report contents, documentation of recommendations and dissemination of final
documents.
6. Undertake other related tasks as assigned by the Secretariat Manager and the
International Advisor.

WORKING RELATIONSHIP AND REPORTING LINES
The Monitoring and Evaluation Officer will report to and work under the
supervision of the Secretariat
Manager of the PAHI Secretariat.
S/he will work closely with the other staff and International Advisor of the
Secretariat, as well as the Focal
Points for the PAHI Secretariat assigned within the International Cooperation
Departments of the Ministry
of Agriculture and Rural Development and the Ministry of Health.

QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE
? University degree in economics, finance, public administration or a related
discipline.
? Minimum of 5 working years experience in monitoring and evaluation, development
administration, programme management, finance management or a related area.
? Extensive experience with Official Development Assistance (ODA) projects and
programmes,
particularly in the health or agriculture sectors. Experience with large
national programmes and/or
sector-wide programmes preferred.
? Working knowledge and experience with Government agencies are essential.
? Fluent written and spoken English.
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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Tue Apr 14 07:41:19 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2009 14:41:19 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] China Environment Forum April Meetings
Message-ID: <49E3B17F.5070305@gmail.com>

Subject: China Environment Forum April Meetings
Date: 13 Apr 2009 15:38:38 -0400
From: China Environment Forum <mail at wilsoncenter.org>
Reply-To: cef at wilsoncenter.org <cef at wilsoncenter.org>
To: vern.weitzel at gmail.com <vern.weitzel at gmail.com>



Dear China Environment Forum,

Our spring meeting extravaganza is continuing with double meetings in
April and May! As usual, all of the meetings are at the Wilson Center in
Washington, DC and they will all be webcast.

Our first April meeting is the launch of an exciting water security in
Asia report published by Asia Society (April 22). The second April
meeting on the 29^th will feature Edward Yau?Hong Kong?s Secretary of
the Environmental Protection Department?who will discuss new
partnerships between Hong Kong and Guangdong on clean energy and cleaner
production in the Pearl River Delta. This is a rare treat to have a
high-level official from Hong Kong, so hope many of you can attend! Full
invites for these two meetings are below and you can RSVP to
cef at wilsoncenter.org (remember to note your affiliation).

Please *Save the Dates* for two May meetings?*Promoting Sino-U.S.
Cooperation on Air Quality, Environmental Health, and Climate Change*
(May 12, 9:00-11:00 a.m.); and *Animal Investigators: Solving Illegal
Wildlife Crimes and Saving Endangered Species in Brazil and China* (May
20, 9:00-11:00 a.m.). Full information and RSVP links for these meetings
are online and will be emailed out soon.

**

*APRIL MEETINGS*

**

*Launch of the Asia Society Leadership Group on Water Security in Asia
Report*

*/Asia/**/?s Next Challenge: Securing the Region?s Water Future/*

*Date and Time:* April 22, 2009 (Wednesday); 9:00-11:00 a.m.

*Location: *Woodrow Wilson Center?s 6^th Floor Auditorium

*RSVP:* cef at wilsoncenter.org**

**

*Speakers:*

*Saleem Ali,* Visiting Fellow, Brookings Institution?s Doha Center;
Professor of Environmental Planning & Asian Studies, University of Vermont

*Suzanne DiMaggio,* Director, Asian Social Issues Program, Asia Society

*Geoff Dabelko, *Director, Environmental Change and Security Program,
Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

*Jennifer Turner,* Director, China Environment Forum, Woodrow Wilson
International Center for Scholars (moderator)

The global demand for fresh water is soaring as supply is becoming more
uncertain. Water-related problems are particularly acute in Asia?the
world?s most populous continent. As population growth and urbanization
rates in Asia continue to rise, stress on the region?s water resources
will intensify. Climate change is expected to worsen the situation.
Experts project that reduced access to fresh water will lead to a
cascading set of consequences, including impaired food production, the
loss of livelihood security, large-scale migration within and across
borders, and increased geopolitical tensions and instabilities. Over
time, these effects will have a profound impact on security throughout
the region.

The report of the Asia Society?s Leadership Group on Water Security in
Asia considers the security dimensions associated with decreased access
to a safe, stable supply of water in Asia and provides a forward-looking
agenda aimed at averting a water crisis in the region. Join us as
members of the Leadership Group on Water Security discuss the report?s
findings and recommendations.

*For more information on the report, please visit AsiaSociety.org/water*

This meeting is cosponsored by the* *Asia Society, Columbia Water
Center, Asia-Pacific Water Forum and the Woodrow Wilson Center

**

*Greening the Pearl River Delta*

*Speaker:* Edward Yau, Secretary for the Environment Department, Hong Kong

*Date and Time:* April 29, 2009 (Wednesday); 3:30-4:45 p.m.* *

*Location:* Woodrow Wilson Center?s 6^th Floor Moynihan Board Room

*RSVP: *CEF at wilsoncenter.org <mailto:CEF at wilsoncenter.org>

Guangdong Province is China?s economic powerhouse. Leading the country
in terms of exports and GDP has come at a cost?over the past several
years Guangdong Province has recorded its worst air pollution in decades
despite continued government promises to address the problem. Guangdong
also confronts serious water pollution due to poorly regulated
industries and a very low rate of municipal wastewater treatment. In
2006, slightly more than 40 percent (22 million) of Guangdong?s rural
population did not have access to safe drinking water. These poor air
and water quality trends represent serious threats to economic growth
and human health in Guangdong and in neighboring Hong Kong. Secretary
Yau will talk about Hong Kong?s engagement with Guangdong as part of the
Hong Kong government?s effort to improve the environment in the whole
Pearl River Delta (PRD). Guangdong and Hong Kong have agreed to build a
?green PRD quality living area.? Earlier this year, the National
Development and Reform Commission announced the development outline for
Guangdong (2008-2020), which sets out the green vision among other
aspects of development. Hong Kong is working with Guangdong on the
specific aspects of the use of clean energy, cleaner production and
circular economy, in addition to the traditional areas of co-operation
such as improving air quality and emissions reduction.

Cheers,

Jennifer and Linden

For the past year the China Environment Forum?s meetings, publications,
and outreach activities have been supported by the U.S. Agency for
International Development, Rockefeller Brothers Fund, The ENVIRON
Foundation, and Waters Corporation. /




From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Tue Apr 14 07:45:00 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2009 14:45:00 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] GreenZoom looking for a Communication Intern
Message-ID: <49E3B25C.7080003@gmail.com>

Subject: Fw: GreenZoom looking for a Communication Intern
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2009 10:29:05 -0700 (PDT)
From: GreenZoom <greenzoom_hn at yahoo.com>
Reply-To: greenzoom_hn at yahoo.com

Rgds/Thuy Duong
GreenZoom Coordinator


GZ communication Internship TERMS OF REFERENCE

The objectives of the agreement and the tasks of the 2nd party are to
work as Communication Intern for GreenZoom.

I. Main Responsibilities

? Draft monthly/quarterly communication plan;

? Writing and editing articles for GZ website;

? Developing, editing training and communication materials (e.g.
fact sheets, booklets, hand-outs, leaflets, presentations,
news-letters);

? Assist in keeping contact& working with media/sponsors;

? Involve in preparing logistic requirements for events, meetings,
training sessions;

? Assist in document translation if needed;

? Other responsibilities as may be assigned by the coordinating
Team.

II. Qualification, experience and skills:

? Fresh graduate or final year student with good command of
English;

? Strong communication skills; Strong process focus and attention
to detail;

? Good skills in MS Office software is essential;

? Self-motivated & hard-working;

? Ability to work individually & in a small team;

? Interested in cultural, social and sustainability issues.

III. Benefits

? Attend GZ training workshops and other training possibilities;

? Strengthen your knowledge and understanding of Green Zoom field
of working in Arts & Culture and Sustainable Development;

? Participate in GZ initiatives and gain experience and broaden
network with other organizations, groups and individuals;

? A small amount of stipend is paid for this position.


IV.Other Information

? Place of work: GreenZoom office: No 47 Thai Thinh 1, Dong Da,
Hanoi; and field trips as assigned.

? Stard working date: ASAP

REPORT TO: GreenZoom Coordinator and GZ Coordinating Team.

DELIVERABLES

The main deliverables include:

? Mid-term Report and final report of activities and outcomes;

? All reports will be submitted in English in digital format (using
standard Microsoft Words).

To Apply

Send a CV supported by a covering letter that shows how your
experience and skill-set suits the position, to arrive by 5 p.m,
Friday 24th April 2009, to (with subject Communication Intern
Application )

Nguyen Thuy Duong - GreenZoom coordinator

Email: greenzoom at greenzoom.org Website: www.greenzoom.org

-----------------------------------------------

About GreenZoom,

GreenZoom, founded in 2005, is an organisation working in the field of
Culture, Education and Sustainable Development. With the spirit of
?Sharing and Creating?, we strive for a progressive society in which
each individual has chance to foster their full potential and add
values to positive development of community.



Our Missions: We are committed towards a sustainable society, via:

? Preserve country?s traditional culture, promote the world
cultural understanding and diversity.

? Increase life?s quality and ensure environmental sustainability.

? Encourage active participation and individual?s confidence and
creativity.

? Promote sharing and connecting spirit in the community.

Our values:

? Sustainability: Sustainability is incorporated in the vision,
operation and human resource development of the organisation

? Creativity: Encourage creativity of each individual who acts as
positive change-agent in the organisation. Encourage creative ideas
from external and community?s contribution for the positive change
inside the organisation.

? Sharing: Promote sharing spirit among each person in the
organisation, encourage connecting with community to sustain a
trustworth relationship.

? Transparency: Our promise in operating the organisation in an
honest, open forward and reliable way.

? Professionalism: Aiming at perfection and professionalism in each
service for clients, partners and society.







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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Tue Apr 14 13:08:55 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2009 20:08:55 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] BirdLife International: Birds update of 2009 IUCN Red
List is coming
Message-ID: <49E3FE47.10600@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://cms.iucn.org/what/issues/?uNewsID=3004

Birds update of 2009 IUCN Red List is coming
14 April 2009 | News - News story

The latest birds update of the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species will be
released on May 14 by BirdLife International, the official IUCN Red List
Authority for birds.
The latest results will show that a number of species have deteriorated,
including the Sidamo Lark (Heteromirafra sidamoensis), which has moved from
Endangered to Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List.
Found only in south-central Ethiopia, its global range was previously estimated
at 760 km2 with a population size of almost 2,000 individuals. But studies in
2007-2008 by researchers from BirdLife, the University of Cambridge, Ethiopian
Wildlife and Natural History Society (BirdLife in Ethiopia) and University of
East Anglia show that available habitat covers just 35 km2. Density estimates
show a global population estimate of just 90-256 adults, all found on the Liben
plain.
This information was recently published as a paper in the journal Animal
Conservation. If the Sidamo Lark were to go to extinct, it would have the
dubious honour of being the first known bird extinction for mainland Africa.
The lark is adapted to Ethiopia's rangeland ? the savanna of native grasses that
traditionally covered large parts of East Africa but is now rapidly
disappearing. In areas where the Liben plain has been overgrown by bush,
converted into farmland or destroyed by overgrazing, the team rarely found
Sidamo Larks.
?If the situation doesn?t improve soon, this species could disappear in as
little as four years,? says Kiragu Mwangi, one of BirdLife?s team members.
The Sidamo Lark seems to be dependent on grassland 5 to 15 centimetres tall.
Away from the Liben plain, there is no similar vegetation for over 200 km,
meaning the lark has nowhere else to go.
?It's effectively like living on an island, and that's where most extinctions
happen,? says Dr Claire Spottiswoode, from the University of Cambridge and lead
author of the paper.
To read the full birds update of the IUCN Red List on May 14, please visit
either www.iucn.org or www.birdlife.org.


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Tue Apr 14 22:31:11 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2009 05:31:11 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Leaders debate sustainability vs. profitability in
bauxite mining
Message-ID: <49E4820F.4010606@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Subject: [vnnews-l] ENV: Leaders debate sustainability vs. profitability in
bauxite mining
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2009 00:12:45 -0700 (PDT)
sent to vnnews-l by Stephen Denney <sdenney at OCF.Berkeley.EDU>

http://www.thanhniennews.com/business/?catid=2&newsid=47893

Last Updated: Friday, April 10, 2009 16:35:02 Vietnam (GMT+07)

Leaders debate sustainability vs. profitability in bauxite mining


Construction at the Nhan Co aluminum factory in Dak Nong Province. Experts
and government officials debated the "sustainable" exploitation of bauxite
at a conference in Hanoi Thursday.
Officials at a conference in Hanoi Thursday debated whether or not a major
bauxite mining project in the Central Highlands could be both sustainable
and profitable.
Bauxite mining is essential to the economic development of the Central
Highlands and it can and will be carried out "sustainably," said Deputy
Prime Minister Hoang Trung Hai as he reaffirmed the government's official
position toward the practice.
Many experts at the conference said bauxite projects could destroy the
environment and cultural heritage of the region.
But Hai said the country would not consider exploiting the mineral by "any
means" and would readjust the projects in an effort to minimize the effect
to the environment.
In November 2007, the government authorized the Vietnam Coal and Mineral
Industry Group (Vinaconmin) to carry out a major bauxite project in Dak
Nong and other Central Highlands provinces.
At the conference, many experts called for the project to be carried out
only once comprehensive studies of its environmental impact were
completed.
But others were also worried about profits.
Nguyen Van Ban, former head of the Vinaconmin's Aluminum Committee, said
the profits from the Tan Rai project in Lam Dong Province and the Nhan Co
project in Dak Nong Province would likely be much lower than expected.
The export prices of aluminum were estimated at between US$310 and $362
per ton when the projects were initially planned. But those prices are
between $130 and $210 higher than the current prices on the world market,
said Ban.
Several experts said mining in the area must therefore be carried out on a
trial basis first.
"Vinaconmin should research and modify the scale, location and
environmental impacts of the projects based on sustainable development
regulations issued by the government," said Nguyen Dinh Hoe of the Vietnam
Association for Conservation of Nature and Environment.
"The corporation should take a trial step at Tan Rai and Nhan Co before
expanding the projects," he said.
Vinaconmin has yet to evaluate the full environmental impacts of the
project as stipulated in the Environment Law, said Hoe.
Le Van Cuong, former head of the Ministry of Public Security's Institute
for Strategy and Science, said the projects would not affect the security
issue. However, he said the project planners had failed to clarify what
was "sustainable" about the developments.
"I suggest carrying out the project at Tan Rai only," he said. "Other
projects would be developed based on the effectiveness of this one."
Pham Bich San, deputy general secretary of Vietnam Union of Science and
Technology Associations, also supported the idea of a trial step at Tan
Rai.
The world aluminum market was unstable and the preparation of
infrastructure and personnel had yet to be completed, he said.
However, Vinaconmin's chairman Doan Van Kien said the project had already
been evaluated by relevant authorities after some related disputes. He
said the project had been prepared over 10 years ago.
"We concluded that the project would be profitable," he said.
"After researching aluminum projects in Yunnan and Guangxi in China, we
can say that we could make much higher profits [at the projects in the
Central Highlands]," he said.
Source: TN, Agencies


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 15 01:26:29 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2009 08:26:29 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Study on EU Financial Support to Developing Countries
for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation
Message-ID: <49E4AB25.8070608@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Subject: Study on EU Financial Support to Developing Countries for
Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2009 12:28:18 +0200
From: Marc Pallemaerts <MPallemaerts at ieep.eu>
Reply-To: Marc Pallemaerts <MPallemaerts at ieep.eu>
To: Climate Change Info Mailing List <climate-l at lists.iisd.ca>


The Institute for European Environmental Policy (IEEP) recently carried
out an analysis of the extent to which the EU (and its then 15 Member
States) fulfilled the solemn promises made to developing countries in
the so-called 'Bonn Declaration' of 23 July 2001. Eight years ago, at
the UNFCCC Conference of the Parties (COP6bis) which paved the way for
the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol, the EU-15 together with five
other OECD donor countries (Canada, New Zealand, Norway, Iceland and
Switzerland) collectively made a 'strong political commitment' to raise
US$410 million a year from 2005 to help developing countries tackle
climate change and to review this pledge in 2008. These Annex II Parties
to the UNFCCC agreed to provide additional funds in a number of ways:
through contributions to the Global Environment Facility (GEF), through
other multilateral and bilateral aid channels (additional to 2001 ODA
levels), and through three new climate change funds established under
the Bonn/Marrakech agreements to provide financial assistance to
developing countries: the Special Climate Change Fund, the Least
Developing Countries Fund and the Kyoto Protocol Adaptation Fund.

IEEP undertook a detailed analysis of the levels of aid channelled
through these different options for each of the EU signatories to the
Bonn Declaration (EU-15). Results show that whilst the EU-15 may,
overall, have fulfilled their commitments under that declaration, the
data published by Member States is far from conclusive and the quality
of reporting does not allow full independent verification of the amount
of aid provided. Funds made available by the EU-15 through the GEF and
dedicated multilateral climate change funds alone (approximately US$160
million/year) amount to less than half of the funds needed to meet the
EU's share of the Bonn commitment (US$369 million/year). Apparently,
funding through bilateral channels accounts for most of the aid
provided, but such assistance is a lot harder to monitor and verify at
the international level. The lack of clarity and transparency in
official reporting to the UNFCCC makes it impossible to affirm that much
of the 'additional' aid actually provided since 2001 did not merely
consist of ?re-branded? aid money.

To download the IEEP study, presented at a conference in Brussels on 28
January 2009, click
_http://www.ieep.eu/publications/pdfs/2009/sds_paper_funding.pdf_

For further information contact:

Dr Marc Pallemaerts
Senior Fellow &
Head of the Environmental Governance Programme
Institute for European Environmental Policy (IEEP)
Quai au Foin 55
Hooikaai 55
1000 Brussels
BELGIUM
Direct Tel.: 32-(0)2-7387471
Fax: 32-(0)2-7324004
Email: mpallemaerts at ieep.eu
___________________________________________________________
IEEP is an independent not for profit institute dedicated to advancing
an environmentally sustainable Europe through policy analysis,
development and dissemination. IEEP undertakes work for external
sponsors in a range of policy areas. We also have our own research
programmes and produce the/ Manual of Environmental Policy: The EU and
Britain/ ___www.mep-online.com_ <http://www.mep-online.com/>. For
further information about IEEP, see our website at _http://www.ieep.eu_
<http://www.ieep.eu/> or contact any staff member.



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 15 01:34:27 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2009 08:34:27 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Seeing the Forest for the Trees: Shaping Financing to
Prevent Deforestation
Message-ID: <49E4AD03.3020606@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://solveclimate.com/blog/20090413/seeing-forest-trees-shaping-financing-prevent-deforestation

Seeing the Forest for the Trees: Shaping Financing to Prevent Deforestation

by Elizabeth Balkan - Apr 13th, 2009

The Waxman-Markey bill signals Washington?s intentions to pony up to fund
deforestation prevention as part of overall climate legislation. But will
climate scientists, C-15 negotiators, developing countries and environmental
groups agree on an international forest protection program that everyone,
including the trees, can live with?
Scientists and climate policy makers now agree that saving forests is one of the
most important things we can do to fight climate change. But that has not always
been the case.
When the Kyoto Protocol was formulated, only reforestation and afforestation ?
not deforestation prevention ? were deemed eligible carbon offsets. By stripping
forest conservation of any functional value, a perverse incentive structure
emerged: Cutting and replanting trees provided non-Annex 1 countries an optional
revenue stream, but keeping living trees standing did not.
As the next round of negotiations approaches, new scientific findings are
challenging the beliefs and motivations that led to the earlier exclusion of
forest conservation.
First, a study released last September challenged the assumption that old growth
forests cease sequestering carbon from the atmosphere once they reach a certain age.
Second, land use, land use change and the forestry sector now constitute
one-fifth of the world?s emissions. Because trees emit carbon once they are
felled, an increase in deforestation would mean even greater emissions.
Despite consensus on the importance of deforestation prevention, though, there
is little accord on how to achieve it.

The REDD initiative ? Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation ?
seeks to provide developing countries with a monetary incentive for preventing
deforestation. Since 2005, when it was first proposed by the governments of
Papua New Guinea and Costa Rica, REDD has become a key element of the UN
Framework Convention on Climate Change discussions.
"There is broad consensus now that the post-2012 agreement will include some
sort of incentives for tropical countries to reduce their deforestation," said
Steve Schwartzman, Environmental Defense Fund co-director. Already, the UN-REDD
policy board has approved $18 million to support pilot programs.
However, considerable controversy still surrounds REDD, with the latest debate
centered on the best financing mechanisms.
The U.S. climate legislation proposed by Reps. Henry Waxman and Ed Markey would
make REDD a key piece of its offsetting strategy. It would do this through three
major sources of funding: offsets, a supplemental pollution reduction program,
and strategic reserve auctions.
The bill also contains measures aimed at protecting groups who may become
vulnerable from deforestation prevention, namely by being expelled from their
land, and increasing awareness about the consequences of deforestation in
countries where it is the most rampant.
Despite the bill?s ambitious approach, not everyone is convinced that is the
best way forward. Critics in environmental groups, as well as EU leaders, have
expressed doubts about creating a market for tradable forest preservation credits.
In a report released in Bonn during the recent climate talks, Greenpeace argued
that market mechanisms would drive the cost of carbon down 75%. That could pose
a problem by encouraging more lucrative alternative land uses, such as palm oil
production, that would compromise both emissions reductions and deforestation
prevention strategies.
Timing is key, says Kim Carstensen, leader of the World Wildlife Foundation's
global climate initiative, who told AP, ?[t]he initial stages need to be funded
by public mechanisms, not tradable credits."
The European Commission, which has learned the hard way the difficulties in
implementing a successful carbon market, has said that funding forest
conservation by market mechanisms should not commence until 2020. Doing so
before then, the EC said in a 2008 report, would create ?serious imbalances
between supply and demand.?
In economics, one way to prevent an over supply of a good that drives its price
down is by issuing a quota. The Waxman-Markey draft legislation aims to do just
that (and prevent the U.S. from buying its way entirely out of emissions
reductions) by setting an annual offset ceiling of 2 billion tons. The bill also
calls for half of carbon reductions to come from domestic projects.
While no one knows with certainty what the future holds for Waxman-Markey, REDD
and international climate negotiations, investors are already positioning
themselves to benefit from monetized forest conservation.
Merrill Lynch led the way last December, investing $9 million in a deforestation
prevention project in Sumatra. The U.S. bank hopes its head start will yield
high returns if and when regulated carbon markets emerge.
In March, members from the financial industry and environmental conservation
community, held a first-ever forest financing-focused conference, co-sponsored
by the Financial Alliance for Sustainable Trade, the World Bank, Global Forest &
Trade Network (GFTN) of the WWF, the IFC and Citi Foundation. The summit's
objective was to understand "risks and opportunities of environmentally and
socially responsible finance in relation to small-scale production of forest and
other ?soft commodity? products."
With so much focus on preventing deforestation, let?s just hope key decision
makers can see the forest for the trees.

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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 15 01:36:07 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2009 08:36:07 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Rich-Poor Divide Still Stalls Climate Accord
Message-ID: <49E4AD67.9000906@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://dotearth.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/04/10/rich-poor-divide-still-stalls-climate-accord/?ref=energy-environment

April 10, 2009, 10:26 AM

Rich-Poor Divide Still Stalls Climate Accord

By ELISABETH ROSENTHAL

Yvo de Boer, the manager of climate talks for the United Nations, did his best
to find good news, but the reality in the halls was very different.

BONN, Germany ? Little concrete progress was achieved at the climate talks that
ended here this week, but the fault lines that will divide the world as its
attempts to negotiate a new climate treaty by the end of this year became
vividly clear in the corridors of the Maritim Hotel Conference Center.

A host of developing countries, from China to Bolivia to the Philippines, took
to the podium to insist that developed countries cut their emissions very
rapidly by far more than they had planned. Most said the appropriate figure
would be at least a 40 to 50 percent reductions compared to 1990 levels by 2020.

?The U.S. talks about ambitious targets and we would have liked to see a
reduction of at least 45 percent below 1990 levels by 2020 ?- we think it is
possible,? said Amjad Abdulla, the lead negotiator from the island nation Maldives.

South Africa?s plan must have had a number of industrialized countries
squirming: It proposed specific emissions reduction targets for 41
industrialized countries for the periods 2013-2017 and 2018-2022. For example:
the United States should drop 76 percent during that first period, Ireland by 79
percent, Australia by 82 percent.

The United States did not specify any target for itself at this meeting, which
saw the debut of the Obama administration in climate negotiations ( to
applause). But President Obama has previously only mentioned returning to 1990
levels by 2020. The European Union is committed to reductions of 20 percent by
that time, but has said it might go up to 30 percent.

Negotiators from developed countries tended to dismiss the steep emissions
reductions demanded by poorer nations as a negotiating strategy ? and also absurd.

But delegates from poorer countries were adamant and united on the issue,
aggressively collaring reporters in the hallways to say that huge reductions
were required, fast. They talked about the ?carbon debt? they were owed by the
industrialized world.

?Developed countries have over-consumed their share of the atmospheric space ?-
they ate the pizza and left us the crumbs,? said Ambassador Anjelica Navarro
Llano of Bolivia, hoarse because she had talked about the topic so much over the
12 days of the conference.

She added: ?Developed countries have a historical debt ? a historical
responsibility. The more they pay now they less they pay later.?


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 15 01:37:49 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2009 08:37:49 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] World will not meet 2C warming target,
climate change experts agree
Message-ID: <49E4ADCD.8010508@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2009/apr/14/global-warming-target-2c

World will not meet 2C warming target, climate change experts agree

Guardian poll reveals almost nine out of 10 climate experts do not believe
current political efforts will keep warming below 2C

David Adam, environment correspondent
The Guardian, Tuesday 14 April 2009


Water shortage will cause greater ruin than peak oil. Photograph: Pedro
Armestre/AFP/Getty Images

Almost nine out of 10 climate scientists do not believe political efforts to
restrict global warming to 2C will succeed, a Guardian poll reveals today. An
average rise of 4-5C by the end of this century is more likely, they say, given
soaring carbon emissions and political constraints.

Such a change would disrupt food and water supplies, exterminate thousands of
species of plants and animals and trigger massive sea level rises that would
swamp the homes of hundreds of millions of people.

The poll of those who follow global warming most closely exposes a widening gulf
between political rhetoric and scientific opinions on climate change. While
policymakers and campaigners focus on the 2C target, 86% of the experts told the
survey they did not think it would be achieved. A continued focus on an
unrealistic 2C rise, which the EU defines as dangerous, could even undermine
essential efforts to adapt to inevitable higher temperature rises in the coming
decades, they warned.

The survey follows a scientific conference last month in Copenhagen, where a
series of studies were presented that suggested global warming could strike
harder and faster than realised.

The Guardian contacted all 1,756 people who registered to attend the conference
and asked for their opinions on the likely course of global warming. Of 261
experts who responded, 200 were researchers in climate science and related
fields. The rest were drawn from industry or worked in areas such as economics
and social and political science.

The 261 respondents represented 26 countries and included dozens of senior
figures, including laboratory directors, heads of university departments and
authors of the 2007 report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
(IPCC).

The poll asked the experts whether the 2C target could still be achieved, and
whether they thought that it would be met: 60% of respondents argued that, in
theory, it was still technically and economically possible to meet the target,
which represents an average global warming of 2C since the industrial
revolution. The world has already warmed by about 0.8C since then, and another
0.5C or so is inevitable over coming decades given past greenhouse gas
emissions. But 39% said the 2C target was impossible.

The poll comes as UN negotiations to agree a new global treaty to regulate
carbon pollution gather pace in advance of a key meeting in Copenhagen in
December. Officials will try to agree a successor to the Kyoto protocol, the
first phase of which expires in 2012. The 2C target is unlikely to feature in a
new treaty, but most of the carbon cuts proposed for rich countries are based on
it. Bob Watson, chief scientist to Defra, told the Guardian last year that the
world needed to focus on the 2C target, but should also prepare for a possible
4C rise.

Asked what temperature rise was most likely, 84 of the 182 specialists (46%) who
answered the question said it would reach 3-4C by the end of the century; 47
(26%) suggested a rise of 2-3C, while a handful said 6C or more. While 24
experts predicted a catastrophic rise of 4-5C, just 18 thought it would stay at
2C or under.

Some of those surveyed who said the 2C target would be met confessed they did so
more out of hope rather than belief. "As a mother of young children I choose to
believe this, and work hard toward it," one said.

"This optimism is not primarily due to scientific facts, but to hope," said
another. Some said they thought geoengineering measures, such as seeding the
ocean with iron to encourage plankton growth, would help meet the target.

Many of the experts stressed that an inability to hit the 2C target did not mean
that efforts to tackle global warming should be abandoned, but that the emphasis
is now on damage limitation.


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 15 01:41:42 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2009 08:41:42 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] UK: Biomass energy 'could be harmful'
Message-ID: <49E4AEB6.1090301@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7997398.stm

Page last updated at 10:29 GMT, Tuesday, 14 April 2009 11:29 UK

Biomass energy 'could be harmful'


Poor practice can wipe out carbon savings, the report says
Biomass power - such as burning wood for energy - could do more harm than good
in the battle to reduce greenhouse gases, the Environment Agency warns.
Ploughing up pasture to plant energy crops could produce more CO2 by 2030 than
burning fossil fuels, if not done in a sustainable way, it said.
Its study found waste wood and MDF produced the lowest emissions, unlike willow,
poplar and oil seed rape.
The EA wants biomass companies to report all greenhouse gas emissions.
The agency is calling on the government to introduce mandatory reporting of
greenhouse gas emissions from publicly-subsidised biomass facilities, to help
work out if minimum standards need to be introduced.
Wood-burning stoves, boilers and even power stations are seen by many as
critical to Britain's renewable energy targets.
Biomass is considered low carbon as long as what is burnt is replaced by new
growth, and harvesting and transport do not use too much fuel.
'Role to play'
The EA's report reiterated the belief that biomass had the potential to play a
"major role" in producing low carbon, renewable energy to help meet future
energy needs and help cut greenhouse gas emissions.
But the report Biomass: Carbon Sink or Carbon Sinner also found that the
greenhouse gas emission savings from such fuels were currently highly variable.
At its best, biomass could produce as little as 27kg of CO2 (equivalent) per
megawatt hour - 98% less than coal, saving around two million tonnes of CO2
every year.

Biomass is a limited resource, and we must make sure it is not wasted on
inefficient generators
Tony Grayling
Environment Agency
However, the study also found that in some cases overall emissions could be
higher than those of fossil fuels.
This was particularly true where energy crops were planted on permanent
grassland, it said.
Tony Grayling, head of climate change and sustainable development at the
Environment Agency, said biomass could play a role in helping the UK meet its
renewable energy targets.
But he argued the credibility of biomass rested on tough sustainability criteria
and called on biomass projects to combine heat and power production.
"Biomass is a limited resource, and we must make sure it is not wasted on
inefficient generators that do not take advantage of the emissions savings to be
made from combined heat and power," he said.
"By 2030, biomass fuels will need to be produced using good practice simply to
keep up with the average carbon intensity of the electricity grid."
He added: "The government should ensure that good practice is rewarded and that
biomass production and use that does more harm than good to the environment does
not benefit from public support."


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 15 03:02:49 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2009 10:02:49 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Donate blood with top footballer of Vietnam
Message-ID: <49E4C1B9.70705@gmail.com>

Subject: Donate blood with top footballer of Vietnam
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2009 20:16:10 -0700 (PDT)
From: Que Nguyen <quemai01 at yahoo.com>
Reply-To: quemai01 at yahoo.com

(See attached)

*Donate Blood with Top Footballer of Vietnam *

To give the voluntary blood donation movement a big push, the top
footballer of Vietnam, Le Cong Vinh will address blood donors at a blood
donation event held from 8am till 12pm, Saturday 18 April, 2009, at J
Conference Hall, National Pediatrics Hospital, 17/879 ?? La Th?nh, ??ng
?a, H? N?i.


At the forthcoming blood donation event, Cong Vinh will share with those
attend the event his passion to help unfortunate children and sign
autography for those who donate blood on this occassion.


On the morning of March 6th 2009, Le Cong Vinh visited the children
receiving treatment at the Cancer Department, National Pediatrics
Hospital, as part of his voluntary activities with /Making Dreams Come
True Volunteer/ Group. There, he met many children who were in critical
need of blood. Pham Hoai Linh, a 4-years-old from Quang Ninh, admitted
to the hospital on April 2008 was suffering from side-effects of
haemorrhage due to chemotherapy. Linh needed instant blood transfusion
and was waiting for blood. Le Van Duc, a 8-year-old boy from Bac Giang
with a severe case of bone cancer, was advised to possibly restart
school if he received sufficient blood for two more treatment dosages of
chemotherapy. His mother said: ?He is very keen on learning. Each time
coming home from hospital, he insists on going to school, even for one
day. Duc has been suffering from sudden high fevers of up to 41oC with
bleeding eyes and noses. His rare blood group of AB makes it very
difficult to get enough blood for his treatment?.



/?Not only AB but also other blood groups are very rare!?/ ? Dr Do Thi
Minh Cam, director of Blood Transfusion Division, National Pediatrics
Hospital, worriedly shared with us. The hospital?s blood supply comes on
three main sources. One comes from the regular blood providers (this
source has decreased recently due to low compensation of VND 150,000
(less than 10 USD) per 250ml). The second source is from the Institute
for Hematology and Blood Transfusion. However, this source only meets 20
to 30% of blood demand from the children patients. Thirdly, the blood is
mobilized voluntarily. Meanwhile, blood transmission is done every day
for chronic blood-relating diseases such as blood cancer, marrow
defunctioning... A lot of patients from provinces come to hospitals. As
a result, only severe cases are prioritized for treatment. Hospital
staff and relatives of the patients have been asked to donate blood.
They support each other by exchanging the necessary blood groups for
their children.

According to Dr Do Thi Minh Cam, a healthy person can donate blood every
three months without impacts on their health. Indeed, this type of
activity can stimulate positively erythrocyte revitalization for blood.
Therefore, blood donation according to doctor instructions is not
harmful, and will bring positive changes to our bodies. In reality,
millions of people are donating blood on a regular basis and living a
healthy life.

The blood donation event will be organised by Making Dreams Come True
Volunteer Group, SJ Vietnam, Fan Club C?ng Vinh, Tu Liem Youth Club for
voluntary blood donation mobilisation, and National Pediatrics Hospital.
With the support from the media and volunteers, we hope to receive more
than 200 donors at this event.



To ensure good logistical support, if you wish to come and donate blood
at this event and meet the football hero Cong Vinh, please register
yourself with Mr. H? L??ng, head of Making Dream Come True Walking Blood
Bank, email: haluongnscc at yahoo.com <mailto:haluongnscc at yahoo.com>, phone
0904044428.



For further information, please contact Mr. Ha Luong or visit website:
www.chapcanhuocmo.com.vn <http://www.chapcanhuocmo.com.vn/>



Thank you for your kind support!



*/Que Nguyen/*

*/Leader ? Making Dreams Come True Volunteer Group/*


Le Cong Vinh is widely regarded as the best player Vietnamese football
has produced since Le Huynh Duc
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Le_Huynh_Duc>, the only Vietnamese player
to have played professional football overseas. At age 23, Vinh has won
three Vietnamese Golden Balls
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vietnamese_Golden_Ball> (2004, 2006,
2007), the highest award given by the Vietnam Football Federation
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vietnam_Football_Federation> to the best
footballer of the year. He and Le Huynh Duc
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Le_Huynh_Duc>, now retired, are the only
players who have won three. Vinh is number five on /Goal.com
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goal.com>'s/ Top Ten Most Promising
Youngster in Asian Football. In March 2009, he was given the Vietnamese
Bronze Ball 2008. Cong Vinh set off a wild celebration throughout
Vietnam as he headed home the tying goal in the last minute time to give
Vietnam the first ever ASEAN Football Championship
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ASEAN_Football_Championship> title.
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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 15 05:56:20 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2009 12:56:20 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Irrigation woes for farmers as demand hits Red River
Message-ID: <49E4EA64.9060707@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://vietnamnews.vnagency.com.vn/showarticle.php?num=02AGR140409

Irrigation woes for farmers as demand hits Red River

(14-04-2009)


The water level in the Hong River has fallen as demand has increased and
rainfall has decreased, causing severe water shortages for farmers wanting to
irrigate crops. ? VNS Photo Truong Vi
HA NOI ? Farmers wanting to irrigate vital winter-spring crops face severe water
shortages as the Hong (Red) River level falls during dry weather.

The river was running at 1.92m yesterday, said Dang Duy Hien, deputy head of the
irrigation office under the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development?s
Department of Irrigation and Water Management.

On average, the level was 2.85m during 2001-07, said Hien, who attributed the
level to the low rainfall of recent months.

Faced with shortages, many provinces had been taking more water from the river
than what was flowing into its upper reaches, he said.

Nguyen The Vinh, head of the water management office of the Me Linh Irrigation
Company, which manages the irrigation of more than 8,000ha of crops, said
farmers faced many difficulties as the river?s levels fell during past years.

The company used six pumps but failed to meet farmers? demands because the
machines were designed to operate at levels of 3.5-4m.

Ministry figures showed farmers with about 40,000ha of the 500,000ha of
winter-spring crops in the north faced water shortages. Ha Noi, Phu Tho and Ninh
Binh provinces were the hardest hits.

Nguyen Duy Hong, head of the farming office of the Ha Noi department of
agriculture and rural development, said many winter-spring crops had started to
blossom, so the shortage would greatly affect crop yields.

To ensure enough water, the ministry planned to work with Electricity of Viet
Nam to release water from lakes and reservoirs, including those in Tuyen Quang
and Hoa Binh provinces.

Hot spells

The shortage could intensify if Central Hydro-meteorological Forecasting Centre
predictions of hot spells and storms this summer eventuate.

The centre said the situation could be worse than the same period last year and
urged localities to act quickly to lessen the impact of any natural disasters.

The summer could have 10 hot spells, which may be longer and hotter, while there
would be more rain and storms, said the centre?s deputy director, Nguyen Lan Chau.

From late next month, rivers in the northern and central regions could have
small floods, which would peak in August and September.

The total forecast rainfall would be higher than previous years, especially in
the north, the Central Highlands and the south.

Ha Noi was unlikely to have floods like those experienced recently but they were
inevitable in some regions, she said. ? VNS



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 15 06:06:16 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2009 13:06:16 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Environment policemen trained to fight wildlife crime
Message-ID: <49E4ECB8.4000709@gmail.com>

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/tech/2009/04/841940/

Environment policemen trained to fight wildlife crime
20:39' 14/04/2009 (GMT+7)

VietNamNet Bridge ? Environment police officers from 28 provinces in the central
and southern regions are participating in a 3-day training course held by the
Wildlife Trade Monitoring Network (TRAFFIC) in the central province of Thanh Hoa.


In Vietnam, perhaps only zoos have rhinos.

The training course, opening on April 14, aims to sharpen environment police
officers? ability in combating wildlife-related crimes. The course is part of
the project named ?Changing behaviour, reducing consumption of wildlife products
in Hanoi?.

The first course was organised in Hanoi in June 2008 for 30 environment
policemen from 16 northern provinces.

Since the Environment Police Agency was established in 2007, environmental
police have helped prevent wildlife trafficking activities in Vietnam. They have
uncovered many big cases, for instance the smuggling of two tonnes of wild
animals in Hanoi in January 2009, the largest case detected so far in the capital.

The training course funded by TRAFFIC will provide environment police with
knowledge about the Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species
(CITES), which was approved by 175 countries to supervise wildlife trafficking
and smuggling, and updated information about the wildlife trafficking and the
smuggling situation in Vietnam and in the region.

The course will also provide police officers with related legal documents of
Vietnam about wildlife protection. Trainees will pay a visit to a tiger camp in
Thanh Hoa.

According to Nguyen Dao Ngoc Van, from TRAFFIC?s sub-Mekong region, officers who
were trained at last year?s course have become officials in charge of CITES at
provincial Environment Police Departments.

The second phase of the project to change behaviour and reduce the consumption
of wildlife products in Hanoi will focus on groups of consumers in Hanoi: state
employees and businessmen.
Vinh Giang
--
Vern Weitzel (Mr.) BSc, BA, MA, M Env Man & Dev <vern at coombs.anu.edu.au>
<vern.weitzel at gmail.com> <vernweitzel at mac.com>

ANU/AVSL eMail Lists: http://coombs.anu.edu.au/~vern/forum.html
NGO Centre eMail Lists: http://ngocentre.org.vn/mailman/listinfo

Address during 2009: 2724 NE 24th St, Renton WA 98056 USA
phone: (425) 228-4513 Mobile: (206) 3-9999-81
Ha Noi address: 1st stairwell, apartment 504-505, block A4 Giang Vo,
Ba Dinh, Ha Noi [off Ngoc Khanh Street, opposite Van Phuc Compound]
home phone: +84 4 3846-1751 Skype: vernweitzel
IF I DO NOT RESPOND IN A REASONABLE TIME, PLEASE RESEND YOUR MESSAGE.


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 15 06:14:42 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2009 13:14:42 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] =?utf-8?b?TG9ncyBzb2xkIOKAmGxlZ2FsbHnigJkgYXMgaG91?=
=?utf-8?q?se_frames_in_Quang_Binh?=
Message-ID: <49E4EEB2.8090804@gmail.com>

http://www.thanhniennews.com/society/?catid=3&newsid=48009

Last Updated: Tuesday, April 14, 2009 16:15:28 Vietnam (GMT+07)

Logs sold ?legally? as house frames in Quang Binh

A log being carried on a buffalo cart in Quang Binh Province?s Tuyen Hoa District


With lax controls of local authorities and some new tricks, illegal trading of
logs continues to flourish in the central province of Quang Binh.
Instead of selling fresh logs, which are more easily caught by park rangers, log
cabins are being built with their ?house frames? to be sold later.
A recent visit by this Thanh Nien reporter to Kim Hoa Commune, dubbed the
capital of illegal logging in the province?s Tuyen Hoa District, found that logs
were being carried out in the open from the forest.
Several logs were pulled by buffalo on a road not far from the commune center.
One of the people leading the animals said they were carrying logs to a nearby
sawing mill.
Near the Khe Deng Bridge in the commune was a path with tracks of logs being
pulled over.

A log cabin built in Quang Binh Province?s Tuyen Hoa District as a ruse for
selling illegally-felled logs as house-frames
In less than an hour, Thanh Nien found five buffaloes carrying logs on this
path. The smaller logs were dragged directly on the ground while bigger ones
were put on carts.
Each buffalo was led by one or two men and none of them showed any sign of
caution in the presence of strangers.
Some carried the logs to the sawing mill while others just headed home to make
the log cabins. Many such log cabins could be seen on the commune?s streets,
clearly built for the purpose of selling ?house frames.?
Most of them follow the three-compartment structure, with at least eight wooden
pillars of up to 5.5 meters in length and 35 centimeters in diameter supporting
the crossbeams inside the house.
A resident said he was selling the wooden frame of a house at between VND80
million (US$4,500) and VND100 million ($5,600).
He also showed around 20 cubic meters of logs in the backyard, offering them for
VND170 million ($9,600).
?We will have carpenters make a house frame from the logs within a week for
between VND10 million ($564) and VND15 million ($846),? he said. ?With an
approval to sell the house frame from the communal authorities, you can carry
them anywhere.?
He said his brother was also selling a house-frame nearby.
Another local, identified only as L., said he was selling a house frame for
VND200 million ($11,300).
?My house has eight big pillars and four smaller ones made from a rare wood that
no one is selling now,? he said. ?You just have to deposit and I will ask the
communal People?s Committee to approve the sale. The whole frame can be carried
by a five-ton truck.?
L. also said he was storing logs enough to make two similar houses, adding that
buyers could also buy these logs by asking the sellers to make house frames.
In nearby Thuan Hoa Commune, many wooden houses have been constructed for
similar sales.
At the commune?s Ba Tam neighborhood, around 20 houses have been constructed
recently and most of the owners are willing to sell the house frames. Outside
the houses are logs they store to make new houses as soon as one is sold.
Le Nam Giang, vice chairman of Tuyen Hoa District?s People?s Committee, admitted
that some residents were making log cabins only to sell the frame.
?We have been determined but have failed to control the illegal logging,? he said.
Ha Duc Truong, deputy head of the district?s park rangers, said it was illegal
to cut forest trees to make houses but they have failed to prevent it.
?The area is too large while we have limited personnel,? he said. ?We have
surveyed the number of residents storing logs illegally but are yet to take
measures against them.?
Vice Chairman of the Thuan Hoa Commune?s People?s Committee, Nguyen Thanh Binh,
also said it was difficult to control illegal logging.
?We can?t detect where they have taken the logs because we haven?t had regular
monitoring,? he said.
However, Thanh Nien found one ?house-frame? stored on the second floor of the
villa that belongs to the chairman of the communal People?s Committee.
Reported by Truong Quang Nam


From vernweitzel at mac.com Wed Apr 15 06:02:24 2009
From: vernweitzel at mac.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2009 13:02:24 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] 12 species of bat uncovered in Nui Chua National Park
Message-ID: <49E4EBD0.7080307@mac.com>

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/tech/2009/04/841654/

12 species of bat uncovered in Nui Chua National Park
17:17' 13/04/2009 (GMT+7)

VietNamNet Bridge ? Scientists of the programme for basic research of wildlife
in the semi-dry forest in Nui Chua National Park in Ninh Thuan province have
discovered 12 species of bat.


Rhinolophus affinis and Murina cyclotis bats.

With mist nets, scientists collected samples of 12 species of bat in this area.
This is the first research work about the distribution of bats in Nui Chua
National Park.

Among the 12 bat species, there is Lesser Short-nosed Fruit Bat (Cynopterus
brachyotis), which is listed in the Vietnam Red Book.

However, researching bats by mist net is not perfect because bat species which
have developed ultrasound locating system are not trapped by nets. It is hoped
that the diversity of bat species identified in Nui Chua National Park will
increase when scientists have more modern equipment to collect bat samples.

The program for basic research of wildlife in the semi-dry forest in Nui Chua
National Park was carried out from 2003-2006, chaired by professor Doan Canh
from the Tropical Biology Institute.

Chiroptera
Fruit bats - Pteropodidae

Greater Short-nosed Fruit Bat ? Cynopterus sphinx (Vahl, 1797).
Lesser Short-nosed Fruit Bat ? Cynopterus brachyotis (Miiller, 1838).
Ratanaworabhan's Fruit Bat ? Megaerops niphanae (Temminck, 1837).
Leschenault's Rousette fruit bat ? Rousettus leschenaulti (Desmarest, 1820).

Horseshoe bats ? Hipposideridae

Great Roundleaf Bat ? Hipposideros armiger (Horsfield, 1851).
Intermediat Roundleaf Bat ? Hipposideros larvatus (Horsfield, 1823).
Bicolored Roundleaf Bat ? Hipposideros bicolor (Temminck, 1834).

Horseshoe bats ? Rhinolophidae

Intermediat Horseshoe Bat ? Rhinolophus affinis (Horsfield, 1823).
Pearson's Horseshoe Bat ? Rhinolophus pearsoni (Horsfield, 1851).
Least Horseshoe Bat ? Rhinolophus pusillus (Temmincki, 1834).
Rhinolophinae horseshoe bats ? Rhinolophus sp.

Vesper bats ? Vespertilionidae

Round-eared tube-nosed bat ? Murina cyclotis (Dobson, 1872).


From vernweitzel at mac.com Wed Apr 15 06:05:15 2009
From: vernweitzel at mac.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2009 13:05:15 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] HCM City: Over 50% of enterprises pollute the
environment
Message-ID: <49E4EC7B.5080003@mac.com>

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/tech/2009/04/841893/

HCM City: Over 50% of enterprises pollute the environment
17:16' 14/04/2009 (GMT+7)

VietNamNet Bridge ? HCM City will not supply electricity to companies that
severely pollute the environment, said Ngo Anh Tuan, Deputy Head of the HCM City
Management Board of Industrial Zones and Export Processing Zones (Hepza), on
April 13.


Some plants in Le Minh Xuan Industrial Zone discharge untreated waste water to
Canal No. 8.


Tuan said this is the toughest form of punishment that HCM City authorities will
impose on polluters. He said many enterprises intentionally pollute the
environment, even after they are warned and fined. Without harsh measures, they
will not change.

The HCM City Department of Natural Resources and the Environment and the local
Environment Police Agency have cooperated to inspect more than 100 enterprises
in the city. More than 50% of them were found violating rules on the environment.

Popular violations include: keeping toxic waste in unsecured conditions; having
no waste water treatment systems or having under-standard systems; having
exhaust treatment systems but not operating them continuously.

The HCM City Department of Natural Resources and the Environment said that
enterprises that have treated waste water which has quality five times worse
than standard will not be supplied with water and electricity. Enterprises with
treated waste water which has quality ten times below standard will be closed.
Machinery and equipment that discharge waste will be seized.

Hepza?s Deputy Head Ngo Anh Tuan confirmed that many companies intentionally
violate environmental rules. In Tan Phu Industrial Zone, 9 of 34 inspected
enterprises didn?t have their waste water discharge systems connected to the
zone?s waste water treatment factory, though the deadline for this task was
February 28.

Hepza asked the local authorities to cut off their power until these companies
connected the systems.

?Power cut is a strong solution, even stronger than forcing enterprises to
temporarily close their factories. If they are closed temporarily, they can
operate clandestinely. Without power, they cannot do anything. The HCM City
People?s Committee has approved this measure,? Tuan said.

He said five of 26 enterprises have gotten off of the black list of polluters
issued in October 2008.

V. Giang



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 15 09:54:21 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2009 16:54:21 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Environment policemen trained to fight wildlife
crime]
Message-ID: <49E5222D.8000700@gmail.com>

Hi Matt, I don't know. Maybe someone on the lists is better informed.
I'm posting to networks - sorry, hope that's ok with you. Vern

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Re: [wildtrade] Environment policemen trained to fight wildlife crime
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2009 15:07:07 -0700 (PDT)
From: Matt Wills - Wildlife At Risk <zooman_73 at yahoo.com.au>
To: vern.weitzel at gmail.com
Vern,

I would be extremely interested in getting some of the FPD guys from HCMC and Cu
Chi districts that we work with on the training course.

How long will it run?
Can i get these guys on it?

I seriously think that they could benefit from this type of training. We are
pretty much solely dealing with these issues in the south.

Regards

Matt

Matt Wills


Manager
Cu Chi Wildlife Rescue Centre (CCWRC)
Wildlife At Risk (WAR)
VIET NAM


Cell no: (+84)168 565 1521
Skype: zooman_73
Website: www.wildifeatrisk.org


Wildlife At Risk is dedicated to protecting the biodiversity of Vietnam by
combating the illegal wildlife trade, raising environmental awareness and
promoting the conservation of endangered species and their habitats.



----- Original Message ----
From: Vern Weitzel <vern.weitzel at gmail.com>
To: [wildlife trade interest group] <wildtrade at ngocentre.org.vn>; [enviro-vlc
discussion group] <enviro-vlc at anu.edu.au>
Sent: Wednesday, 15 April, 2009 6:06:16 AM
Subject: [wildtrade] Environment policemen trained to fight wildlife crime

Sent to Wildlife Trade Working Group List - wildtrade.
Do not CC: to others on this list - send a separate message to them.
Avoid sending attachments but if necessary keep them small (1.5 mb maximum).



http://english.vietnamnet.vn/tech/2009/04/841940/

Environment policemen trained to fight wildlife crime
20:39' 14/04/2009 (GMT+7)

VietNamNet Bridge ? Environment police officers from 28 provinces in the central
and southern regions are participating in a 3-day training course held by the
Wildlife Trade Monitoring Network (TRAFFIC) in the central province of Thanh Hoa.


In Vietnam, perhaps only zoos have rhinos.

The training course, opening on April 14, aims to sharpen environment police
officers? ability in combating wildlife-related crimes. The course is part of
the project named ?Changing behaviour, reducing consumption of wildlife products
in Hanoi?.

The first course was organised in Hanoi in June 2008 for 30 environment
policemen from 16 northern provinces.

Since the Environment Police Agency was established in 2007, environmental
police have helped prevent wildlife trafficking activities in Vietnam. They have
uncovered many big cases, for instance the smuggling of two tonnes of wild
animals in Hanoi in January 2009, the largest case detected so far in the capital.

The training course funded by TRAFFIC will provide environment police with
knowledge about the Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species
(CITES), which was approved by 175 countries to supervise wildlife trafficking
and smuggling, and updated information about the wildlife trafficking and the
smuggling situation in Vietnam and in the region.

The course will also provide police officers with related legal documents of
Vietnam about wildlife protection. Trainees will pay a visit to a tiger camp in
Thanh Hoa.

According to Nguyen Dao Ngoc Van, from TRAFFIC?s sub-Mekong region, officers who
were trained at last year?s course have become officials in charge of CITES at
provincial Environment Police Departments.

The second phase of the project to change behaviour and reduce the consumption
of wildlife products in Hanoi will focus on groups of consumers in Hanoi: state
employees and businessmen.
Vinh Giang
-- Vern Weitzel (Mr.) BSc, BA, MA, M Env Man & Dev <vern at coombs.anu.edu.au>
<vern.weitzel at gmail.com> <vernweitzel at mac.com>

ANU/AVSL eMail Lists: http://coombs.anu.edu.au/~vern/forum.html
NGO Centre eMail Lists: http://ngocentre.org.vn/mailman/listinfo

Address during 2009: 2724 NE 24th St, Renton WA 98056 USA
phone: (425) 228-4513 Mobile: (206) 3-9999-81
Ha Noi address: 1st stairwell, apartment 504-505, block A4 Giang Vo,
Ba Dinh, Ha Noi [off Ngoc Khanh Street, opposite Van Phuc Compound]
home phone: +84 4 3846-1751 Skype: vernweitzel
IF I DO NOT RESPOND IN A REASONABLE TIME, PLEASE RESEND YOUR MESSAGE.
_______________________________________________
Wildlife Trade Working Group wildtrade list
Address to post message: wildtrade at ngocentre.org.vn
Moderators: Scott Roberton &lt;owstons at fpt.vn&gt; and
Vern Weitzel &lt;vern at coombs.anu.edu.au&gt;
List information page: http://ngocentre.org.vn/mailman/listinfo/wildtrade
Working Group Page: http://www.ngocentre.org.vn/Default.asp?page=wildlife_trade
Interest Group Home page:
http://www.ngocentre.org.vn/Default.asp?page=wildlife_trade
NGO Centre lists: http://mailman.ngocentre.org.vn/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo
Other lists: http://coombs.anu.edu.au/~vern/forum.html


The accuracy of information from media articles posted on this list
cannot be guaranteed and should be verified before use.


Enjoy a safer web experience. Upgrade to the new Internet Explorer 8
optimised for Yahoo!7. Get it now.


--
Vern Weitzel (Mr.) BSc, BA, MA, M Env Man & Dev <vern at coombs.anu.edu.au>
<vern.weitzel at gmail.com> <vernweitzel at mac.com>

ANU/AVSL eMail Lists: http://coombs.anu.edu.au/~vern/forum.html
NGO Centre eMail Lists: http://ngocentre.org.vn/mailman/listinfo

Address during 2009: 2724 NE 24th St, Renton WA 98056 USA
phone: (425) 228-4513 Mobile: (206) 3-9999-81
Ha Noi address: 1st stairwell, apartment 504-505, block A4 Giang Vo,
Ba Dinh, Ha Noi [off Ngoc Khanh Street, opposite Van Phuc Compound]
home phone: +84 4 3846-1751 Skype: vernweitzel
IF I DO NOT RESPOND IN A REASONABLE TIME, PLEASE RESEND YOUR MESSAGE.


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Thu Apr 16 02:21:54 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2009 09:21:54 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] New Climate Briefings from IIED on REDD and Adaptation
Funding
Message-ID: <49E609A2.9060907@gmail.com>

Subject: New Climate Briefings from IIED on REDD and Adaptation Funding
Date: Tue, 14 Apr 2009 16:09:58 +0100
From: Vanessa Mcleod-Kourie <vanessa.Mcleod-Kourie at iied.org>
Reply-To: Vanessa Mcleod-Kourie <vanessa.Mcleod-Kourie at iied.org>
To: Climate Change Info Mailing List <climate-l at lists.iisd.ca>



IIED is pleased to announce the latest *CLIMATE* related briefings from
the International Institute for Environment and Development
(IIED). These publications can be downloaded along with over 4,000 other
resources, from our website www.iied.org/pubs <http://www.iied.org/pubs>.

*Financing REDD: how government funds can work with the carbon market*
Deforestation accounts for roughly 17 per cent of global greenhouse gas
emissions. So it is no surprise that in the runup to the December 2009
climate talks in Copenhagen, REDD ? reduced emissions from deforestation
and degradation ? is emerging as a strategy with big potential for
mitigating climate impacts. With REDD, local communities can be rewarded
for conserving their forests, so the approach works for poverty
alleviation as well as emissions reduction. Evidence is showing that
REDD is simple and workable. Funding is an altogether more complex
issue, however. Looking at the roles of market and government, is a
combined approach to financing REDD feasible?
*Download:* http://www.iied.org/pubs/display.php?o=17053IIED
**
*National adaptation funding: ways forward for the poorest countries*
Rising sea levels, shifting rainfall and other impacts of climate change
present a huge risk to some of the world?s poorest countries. Faced with
such challenges, many LDCs or Least Developed Countries have found
themselves juggling the need to adapt to climate impacts with other
essential concerns. In 2001, LDCs began to develop National Adaptation
Programmes of Action or NAPAs to identify their most urgent and
immediate adaptation needs. Since then, 39 of them have gone through
this rigorous process, but only a handful of the projects they
identified have been submitted for funding. Even fewer have been
accepted for
implementation. To avoid wasting the massive investment in NAPAs so far,
it is key for richer nations to give NAPAs the fiscal and institutional
support they need.
*Download:* http://www.iied.org/pubs/display.php?o=17054IIED
**
*Seeing REDD in the Amazon: a win for people, trees and climate*
Tucked away in a tangle of Brazilian rainforest, a quiet revolution is
unfolding. In Amazonas, the country?s biggest state, people are using an
approach called REDD to conserve their forests in return for credit.
This project?s success has huge implications for reducing deforestation,
cutting emissions and eradicating poverty, and its time has definitely
come. Between 1990 and 2005, over a million square kilometres of forest
were lost in the tropics. Half that was in the Amazon. Deforestation
accounts for over 17 per cent of global greenhouse gas emissions, so a
curb on felling is key to successfully mitigating climate change. But
the Amazon is prey to unsustainable development, and the costs of
inaction and laissez-faire are higher than those of stopping
deforestation. REDD is the most promising solution yet for this volatile
mix of issues.
*Download:* http://www.iied.org/pubs/display.php?o=17052IIED
**
Vanessa Mcleod-Kourie
Publications & Marketing Manager
International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED)

3 Endsleigh Street
London
WC1H 0DD
tel: + 44 (0)20 7872 7346
fax: + 44 (0)20 7388 2826
www.iied.org <http://www.iied.org/>
______________________________________________

Keep up to date with all latest research and resources
http://www.iied.org/pubs/newsletters.html.

P *Save paper, please dont print this email unless you really have to!*




From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Thu Apr 16 03:01:33 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2009 10:01:33 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] UNEP: Powering a Global Green New Deal
Message-ID: <49E612ED.4000505@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://www.unep.org/Documents.Multilingual/Default.asp?DocumentID=579&ArticleID=6124&l=en

Powering a Global Green New Deal

Business for the Environment Summit brings together hundreds of key business
leaders to discuss green solutions

Paris, 15 April 2009 - More than 700 leaders from business, civil society,
international organizations and government are set to meet at the Business for
the Environment Global Summit in Paris on 22-23 April to discuss ways of
powering green growth around the globe.

The event, now in its third year, is the world's leading international
conference for business-driven action for the environment. As the world
struggles with a deep economic recession, the conference will highlight the
green solutions that can turn crisis into opportunity.

Achim Steiner, UN Under-Secretary-General and Executive Director of UNEP, said:
"Today's crises are a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to make a transition to a
low carbon, resource efficient society. Business has a key role to play in this
transformational process, and the B4E summit is a crucial opportunity to bring
together key decision-makers to sharpen and discuss their role in delivering a
Green Economy."

Participants to B4E will include the Chief Executives of Suzlon, Suntech,
Alcatel-Lucent and Siemens France, as well as the seven inspirational laureates
of the 2009 UNEP Champions of the Earth awards, who will be announced in an
award ceremony on 22 April.

With a focus on a new, green economy driven by leadership, technology and
innovation, the summit will bring together participants from more than 30
countries to make the connection between the environment and global economic
recovery.

Delegates will learn how to identify and manage the challenges posed by climate
change, and explore the many opportunities of investing in a green economy.

The two-day conference will feature sessions on the Green Economy Initiative,
innovation and technology, policy, resource efficiency, the extractives
industry, and the global water crisis among other key topics.

The event is also held in conjunction with the UNEP Champions of the Earth 2009
awards presentation on 22 April, which is also Earth Day. The seven laureates -
all of whom are inspirational environmental leaders - are the living proof that
amid today's environmental and economic crises lay unprecedented opportunities
for innovative solutions, fresh approaches and dynamic leadership, from policy
action to grassroots initiatives.

The Business for the Environment conference comes on the heels of the UNEP
Global Green New Deal Policy Brief, which advises policymakers on the key areas
where investment is required in order to power sustainable economic recovery.

The Policy Brief argues that investing just one per cent of global GDP, or
around $750 billion, into five key sectors could be the key to realizing a
Global Green New Deal that in turn can set the stage for a Green Economy The
five sectors, from renewable energy to freshwaters, could in conjunction with
other measures play an important role in reviving the global economy and
boosting employment while accelerating the fight against climate change,
environmental degradation and poverty.

Notes to Editors:

The Business for the Environment Summit is co-hosted by the United Nations
Environment Programme and the UN Global Compact. The event is organized by UNEP
and Global Initiatives, and supported by leading international organizations
including MEDEF (the French Employers Confederation), the AFP Foundation, WWF,
Greenpeace, Business for Social Responsibility and many others.

In the margins of the summit, a Media Seminar, co-organised with the AFP
Foundation on 21 April, will be the opportunity for journalists to learn more
about climate change, the Global Green New Deal and how the environment can feed
into global economic recovery. The seminar will feature Pavan Sukhdev, UNEP
Project Leader on The Green Economy, as well as participants from the B4E Summit.

KEY DATES:

21 April: Media Seminar at the Centre d'Accueil de la Presse Etrang?re, Grand
Palais, Cours la Reine, Perron Alexandre III, Paris

22-23 April: Business for the Environment Global Summit at the Palais des Congr?s

22 April: UNEP Champions of the Earth Awards Ceremony, Intercontinental Le Grand
Hotel, 2 rue Scribe (By invitation only - please advise us if you are interested
in attending)

PRESS CONFERENCES:

22 April - 4.15pm: Announcement of the laureates of the UNEP Champions of the
Earth Awards, Palais Des Congr?s, Level 3 Media Room, Room 341

23 April - 6pm: Closing press conference to announce the outcome of the Summit,
Palais Des Congr?s

KEY PARTICIPANTS WILL INCLUDE:

Achim Steiner, Executive Director, United Nations Environment Programme
H.R.H Prince El Hassan bin Talal, Crown Prince, Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan
Juan Elvira Quesada,Mexican Minister for the Environment and Natural Resources
Georg Kell, Executive Director, UN Global Compact
Yann Arthus-Bertrand, Photographer and chairman of GoodPlanet.org
Ben Verwaayen, CEO, Alcatel-Lucent
Tulsi Tanti, Chairman & Managing Director, Suzlon Energy
Shi Zhengrong, Chairman & CEO, Suntech Power Holding
James Leape, Director General, WWF International
Pascal Husting, Executive Director, Greenpeace France
Kevin Conrad, Executive Director for the Coalition for Rainforest Nations
Nathalie Kosciusko-Morizet, Minister of State to the Prime Minister on the
Digital Economy & Strategic Studies, France
Philippe Carli, Chairman and CEO, Siemens France
Graeme Sweeney, Executive Vice President, Future Fuels & CO2, Shell
International Petroleum
Anders Wijkman, Member of the European Parliament
Philippe Huet, Senior Executive Vice President, Strategy and Coordination,
Electricit? de France SA
Joost Martens, Director General, Consumers International
Steffen Frankenberg, VP Corporate Development, Deutsche Post WorldNet
Pavan Sukhdev, Project Leader on the Green Economy, UNEP
Aron Cramer, President & CEO, Business for Social Responsibility
Jean-Pierre Clamadieu, Chairman, Sustainable Development Commission, MEDEF
Neil Hawkins, Sc.D., Vice President & Chief Sustainability Strategist, Dow
John Gaffney, Executive Vice President, First Solar

For more information, and to request interviews, go to www.b4esummit.com

To register as a journalist for B4E and the media seminar, please visit:

http://www.b4esummit.com/newsroom.html#AccreditationAndRegistration

The UNEP Green Economy initiative is at: http://www.unep.org/greeneconomy/

The UNEP Global Green New Deal Policy Brief is at:
http://www.unep.org/pdf/A_Global_Green_New_Deal_Policy_Brief.pdf

For more information please contact:

Nick Nuttall, UNEP Spokesperson, at tel: +254 20 762 3084, mobile: +254 733
632755, or e-mail: nick.nuttall at unep.org; or Anne-France White, Associate
Information Officer, at tel: +254 20 762 3088, Mobile: +254 (0)728 600 494, or
e-mail: anne-france.white at unep.org

Full Release







From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Thu Apr 16 03:12:35 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2009 10:12:35 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] New club promotes youth environmental activism
Message-ID: <49E61583.1000404@gmail.com>

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/tech/2009/04/842136/

New club promotes youth environmental activism
19:04' 15/04/2009 (GMT+7)

VietNamNet Bridge - Toyota Motor Viet Nam (TMV) has opened the Go Green Club in
HCM City with the aimof expanding its environmental protection work among young
people.

Around 100 volunteers participated in the opening ceremony. They will also take
part in training courses to upgrade skills in social and environmental activism.

The club?s first "Hi! My Name Is Go Green" campaign will be organised at three
big universities and colleges in HCM City to introduce the club and promote
environmental protection among the student community.

The northern Go Green Club was set up in Ha Noi last August. The club
implemented many programmes in the first eight months, including "Hi! My Name Is
Go Green", "Eco Bag" and "A Day Without Motorbike". At present, it has 500
volunteers.

"With a good organi-sation and a clear vision for development, I strongly
believe that the Go Green Club will be a place for volunteers and the younger
generation to take action for a greener and cleaner Viet Nam," said Do Quoc Anh,
director of the Ministry of Education and Training?s branch office in HCM City.

The club is a part of the Go Green programme co-ordinated by the TMV, the Viet
Nam Environmental Protection Agency and Ministry of Education and Training (MOET).

It has three main aims: real activities to protect the environment, education to
increase environmental awareness and promoting sustainable development.

Go Green carried out a pilot project to have generators operating on diesel oil
switch to using biogas in farms in the central region; expand a biological
village model at national parks and nature reserves. The project has also taken
preparatory steps to set up a "green company" model at the TMV.

A mini TV series sending a message of environmental protection to the younger
generation aired on VTV1.

The website: www.gogreen.com.vn carries updated information about the programme
and also hosts an online forum for citizens to discuss environmental issues.

The first phase of the Go Green Club programme will last until 2011.

VietNamNet/VNS


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Thu Apr 16 03:15:37 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2009 10:15:37 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] =?utf-8?q?Rising_sea_levels_erode_Vietnam=E2=80=99s_?=
=?utf-8?q?coastal_areas?=
Message-ID: <49E61639.6080800@gmail.com>

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/tech/2009/04/842112/

Rising sea levels erode Vietnam?s coastal areas
18:00' 15/04/2009 (GMT+7)

VietNamNet Bridge - The coastal northern province of Nam Dinh has suffered
extensive damage from erosion as a result of climate change and rising sea levels.

Within the past 10 years, the marine dyke in Hai Trieu commune, Hai Hau
district, has broken twice, allowing seawater to flood the commune?s fields.
When the water receded, the vegetables were already ruined by the salty water
and the foundations of people?s houses were weakened.

But even this was not the worst happening as sea waves continued to encroach on
the coastal areas.

?My garden had a total area of 1800m2 before 1987. The overflow of seawater
has eroded and salted the garden and has made it shrink by more than a half,?
said Bui Thi Hoa, a 57-year-old woman in Hai Trieu commune.

?Now, the garden is not large enough for cultivation to feed our family. We have
turned to living mainly by making salt, which earns us only VND7 million ($438)
per year,? Ms Hoa said.

Last year, the vegetables planted in her garden died due to the heavily salted
land. This year, her garden was treated to remove the salt but there was a drop
in vegetable prices. Now, the poor woman puts her hopes in some beds of millet
that she has sown.

The case of Ms Hoa is typical of many households along the beach of Nam Dinh
province, whose gardens have becoming increasingly smaller and can accommodate
only a modest amount of vegetables and bulbs. Many residents have been forced to
relocate to new places deep inland. What?s left of old churches, schools, and
villages destroyed by sea waves can be seen along the beach of Nam Dinh.

Statistics by the Institute of Marine Geology and Geophysics show an annual rise
of 2.15mm in sea level in Nam Dinh, pushing the coastline 10m inwards. Nam
Dinh?s own figures indicate that a total of 180ha of land in Hai Trieu commune
has been submerged.

?The sea has continuously encroached inland since 1996,? said Bui Van Dung,
chairman of the communal people?s committee. ?Meanwhile, our dyke, which was not
reinforced with concrete, is showing cracks under heavy rains and waves.?

The erosion of Nam Dinh beach is blamed on the increased force of the waves and
rising sea levels. To make matters worse, the mangrove forests, which helped
prevent the strong waves breaking on the shore and eroding the arable land, have
been destroyed and turned into ponds to raise shrimps for export.

VietNamNet/VOV


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Thu Apr 16 03:18:09 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2009 10:18:09 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Norway helps build Green One UN House in Vietnam
Message-ID: <49E616D1.6030007@gmail.com>

http://vietnamplus.vn/moi-truong-en/200904155184880321

Norway helps build Green One UN House in Vietnam
15-04-2009 | 18:00:00

The Norwegian government has pledged 1.8 million USD toward the building of the
Green One UN House in Vietnam.

The grant agreement was signed in Hanoi on Apr. 15 between the visiting
Norwegian State Secretary for International Development, Hakon Gulbrandsen, and
Setsuko Yamazaki, Country Director of the UN Development Programme in Vietnam.

?This grant aims to support the UN reform and the aid effectiveness agenda in
Vietnam and at the same time to support a demonstration model for green
buildings in Vietnam,? said State Secretary Hakon.

As a tripartite undertaking between the UN, the Government of Vietnam and
donors, the office building is expected to enable the UN in Vietnam to use
energy and water more efficiently, thus minimizing the ecological footprint of
the UN in Vietnam.

According to the Norwegian Embassy in Hanoi, the building will allow co-location
of UN staff who are currently scattered in 10 different locations throughout Hanoi.

Norway is among the first donors strongly supporting the ?Green One UN House?
idea, along with the UK, Ireland, Finland, Australia and New Zealand. From the
beginning, the country granted 200,000 USD towards the eco-design of the building.

Its latest grant increased the total pledges by donors to more than 50 percent
of the total retrofit cost which is estimated at 8.5 million USD.

The Vietnamese Government is contributing a high value land site and is likely
to offer the premises on a rent-free basis for a minimum of ten years.

The Norwegian State Secretary is on a working visit to Vietnam from Apr. 15-16,
during which he will meet with Minister of Natural Resources and Environment
Pham Khoi Nguyen, Vice Minister of Planning and Investment Cao Viet Sinh and
other officials.

He will also visit the Mekong Delta to learn more about the challenges of
climate change in this vulnerable region.-Enditem



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Thu Apr 16 10:24:25 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2009 17:24:25 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] CLIMATE CHANGE POSES CHALLENGES,
OFFERS ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITIES, SAYS BAN
Message-ID: <49E67AB9.2020607@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Subject: CLIMATE CHANGE POSES CHALLENGES, OFFERS ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITIES, SAYS BAN
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2009 19:00:02 -0400
From: UNNews <UNNews at un.org>
To: <news4 at secint00.un.org>

CLIMATE CHANGE POSES CHALLENGES, OFFERS ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITIES, SAYS BAN
New York, Apr 15 2009 7:00PM
The twin financial and climate catastrophes have been cause for nervousness
worldwide, but Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has stressed that the challenges
also open the door for new economic opportunities in the face of the global
recession.

?The good news is that we can tackle both at once, as solutions to the climate
crisis can catalyze the green growth that is the foundation of long-term
economic prosperity,? Mr. Ban, who has deemed 2009 the ?year of climate change,?
<"http://www.un.org/sg/articleFull.asp?TID=101&Type=Op-Ed">wrote in the
<I>Korean Herald</I>.

If countries must implement green stimulus packages to pull themselves out of
economic turmoil and nations reach agreement on a new global climate change
agreement at this December?s UN conference in Copenhagen, ?the world has its
best chance in decades to make serious progress on both the climate and economic
fronts,? he added.

According to scientists, the pace of global warming is accelerating, with the
window for action on climate change closing ever faster, the Secretary-General
pointed out. Experts have noted that high rates of greenhouse gas emissions are
resulting in the world reaching the high end of case scenarios delineated in the
2007 report by the Nobel Prize-winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
(<"http://www.google.com/search?q=IPCC&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-US&ie=utf8&oe=utf8">IPCC),
the definitive standard for climate science.

?Unfortunately, time is not on our side,? he cautioned. ?The clock is ticking
and cannot be turned back.?

In his piece, Mr. Ban pressed nations to do their utmost to ensure that the
upcoming climate talks in Denmark, which he said will be a ?watershed moment in
history,? are given top priority so that negotiations on a success pact to the
<"http://unfccc.int/kyoto_protocol/items/2830.php">Kyoto Protocol, whose
commitment period ends in 2012, can be concluded.

The agreement reached ?must be ambitious, fair and effective in reducing
emissions while assisting countries as they adapt to the inevitable effects of
climate change,? he said.

The first round of negotiations for 2009 wrapped up last week in Bonn, Germany.

To ensure that all nations are on board, the Secretary-General said that five
key political issues must first be resolved: industrialized nations must set
ambitious emissions reduction targets; major developing countries must identify
what mitigation steps they plan to pursue in the future; solving the issue of
finance; an accountable means to distribute these funds must be set up; and
vulnerable countries must be supported in protecting lives and livelihoods.

?By sealing a deal, we can power green growth today and protect our planet for
our children and their children to come,? he said.

Mr. Ban said he disagreed with the view held by some that the global economic
downturn is a reason to curtail efforts to tackle climate change.

?To the contrary, it represents an unprecedented opportunity to redirect
government stimulus packages into green energy options and to fundamentally
retool our global economy so that long-run, sustainable growth is accessible for
all,? he stated.

His native Republic of Korea (ROK) has blazed a trail to a greener, lower-carbon
future, he said, with investments in mass transit, energy conservation, forest
restoration and water resource management, among others.

The country is also an example for others on actions necessary to reduce
emissions, the Secretary-General said. ?As a power emerging economy, the
Republic of Korea can serve as a bridge between industrialized and developing
countries by setting ambitious emission reduction goals for itself.?
________________

For more details go to UN News Centre at http://www.un.org/news


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Thu Apr 16 23:43:46 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2009 06:43:46 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] New warning over 'catastrophic' sea level rise,
scientists claim
Message-ID: <49E73612.8040700@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Letter in Nature (full text for subscribers) and tables (free) are available
at: http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v458/n7240/full/nature07933.html


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/environment/climatechange/5159086/New-warning-over-catastrophic-sea-level-rise-scientists-claim.html

New warning over 'catastrophic' sea level rise, scientists claim

Sea levels could rise by a "catastrophic" 10 feet by the end of the century ?
putting millions of people at risk of flooding with coastal cities such as
London, New York, Tokyo and Calcutta submerged, according to a new study.

By Richard Alleyne, Science Correspondent
Last Updated: 6:19PM BST 15 Apr 2009

The findings confirm the potential that continuing rapid ice loss could cause
disastrous sea-level rise by 2100
The melting of the vast ice sheets in Antarctica and Greenland caused water to
pour into the world's oceans at an alarming rate at the end of the last period
of global warming, the study shows.

Analysis of fossilised coral reefs off the Gulf of Mexico found many died during
this time ? known to climatologists as an "interglacial" ? and were replaced by
new reefs on higher ground.

This happened over a long-term ecological timescale and was caused by a rapid
jump in sea level of between 6.5ft and 9.8ft (two to three metres) that occurred
around 121,000 years ago, say the researchers.

The findings published in Nature raise concerns that current climate change
could yield similar quick ice loss and disastrous sea-level rise in the near future.

Dr Paul Blanchon, a marine scientist of the National University of Mexico in
Cancun, said his study shows there was a spell of swift melting during the
warmest part of the last interglacial.

With growing evidence for contributions from the Antarctic and Greenland ice
sheets to sea-level rise, the findings confirm the potential that continuing
rapid ice loss could cause disastrous sea-level rise by 2100.

Dr Blanchon said this is also bad news for modern coral reefs which are already
suffering because of human activity.

He said: "Knowing the rate at which sea level reached its high-stand during the
last interglacial period is fundamental in assessing if such rapid ice-loss
processes could lead to future catastrophic sea-level rise.

"The best direct record of sea level during this high-stand comes from
well-dated fossil reefs in stable areas.

"Here we present a complete reef-crest sequence for the last interglacial
high-stand from the stable north-east Yucatan peninsula in Mexico.

"The abrupt demise of the lower-reef crest allows us to infer that this occurred
on an ecological timescale and was triggered by a two-to-three metre jump in sea
level.

"We constrain this jump to have occurred 121,000 years ago and conclude it
supports an episode of ice-sheet instability during the terminal phase of the
last interglacial period."

The prediction is not as high as those from some scientists who have warned sea
levels may rise as much as 16 feet (five metres) by the end of the century.
But a rise of even a metre could have major implications for low-lying countries
whose economies are not geared up to build sophisticated sea defence systems,
such as Bangladesh.


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Thu Apr 16 23:45:37 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2009 06:45:37 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] =?utf-8?q?Debating_the_Climate_Benefits_of_=E2=80=98?=
=?utf-8?q?Biochar=E2=80=99?=
Message-ID: <49E73681.4030302@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://greeninc.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/04/15/debating-the-climate-benefits-of-biochar/

April 15, 2009, 9:40 AM

Debating the Climate Benefits of ?Biochar?

By JAMES KANTER

Reuters

Malcolm Turnbull, the leader of the Liberal Party in Australia, likes biochar?s
prospects for addressing climate change. Critics of the material don?t.
What if carbon dioxide could be trapped in a solid and inert material that also
worked well as a fertilizer?

Such a material ? some call it charcoal, while others insist its correct name is
?biochar? ?
can be produced when organic matter like plant, food or animal waste is burned
in a low-oxygen environment.

The process also yields oils and some gases that can be used to produce energy.

Advocates for biochar say those emissions are sustainable, and that the material
provides additional greenhouse savings by capturing carbon dioxide. Malcolm
Turnbull, the leader of the Liberal Party in Australia and the country?s former
environment minister, for example, has said the process could be used to absorb
one-fifth of emissions in his country and raise agricultural productivity.

But some critics say the hype around biochar is undeserved, and that it is
mainly driven by financiers who are seeking to generate emissions-reduction
credits that can be bought and sold under the Kyoto climate treaty.


Those groups have released a ?declaration,? titled ?Biochar, a New Big Threat to
People, Land and Ecosystems,? which aims to block biochar producers from credits
they say would have questionable value for curbing global warming.

The campaigners warn that a boom in biochar could turn vast areas of land into
plantations, displacing small farmers and indigenous peoples. They also warn
that some companies creating biochar from discarded tires and factory waste may
not produce material that helps fertilize the earth as effectively as other
materials, and they say there is no conclusive proof that spreading charcoal on
the earth will lock up carbon over the long term.


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 17 00:03:56 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2009 07:03:56 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] MoFI: SUSTAINABLE LIVELIHOODS IN AND AROUND MARINE
PROTECTED AREAS
Message-ID: <49E73ACC.2010100@gmail.com>

Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2009 14:55:19 -0700
From: Nguyen Hoang Linh <nguyenhoanglinh at mofi.gov.vn>

Dear all,

Please find attach the TOR of LMPA Component on buoy installation in Cham
Islands MPA, Quang Nam Province.

We would like to invite all capable bidders to participate in the bid.

Kind regards,

Nguyen Hoanh Linh
LMPA Component

SUSTAINABLE LIVELIHOODS IN AND AROUND MARINE PROTECTED AREAS

INSTALLATION OF MARKER AND MOORING BUOYS FOR CHAM ISLAND MARINE
PROTECTED AREA, QUANG NAM PROVINCE

TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR BIDDERS

1. BACKGROUND

a) The LMPA Component

Under the Vietnam-Denmark Development Cooperation in the Environment,
the Ministry of Agricutlure and Rural Development (MARD) together with
support from DANIDA is implementing a ?Sustainable Livelihoods in and
around Marine Protected Areas (LMPA)?Component. The development
objective of the LMPA Component is to ensure that ?valuable habitats
and their associated biodiversity in Vietnam?s coastal and marine
waters are being protected and restored without compromising the
livelihood requirements of poor and vulnerable communities?.

The main purpose of the LMPA component is to help Vietnam to further
develop its network of MPAs based on a strong legal framework at
national level and to develop effective local management systems at
the provincial and local levels, in which sustainable livelihood needs
of local communities living in and around Marine Protected Areas
(MPAs) are fully recognized and supported.

b) Cham Island MPA

Cham Island MPA was established under the decision No. 88/2005/QD-UBND
of

Provincial People?s Committee of Quang Nam on 20th December 2005. The
objective of Cham Island MPA is to conserve marine biodiversity,
protect and exploit effectively ecosystems, natural resources,
environment and cultural ? historical values aiming at sustainable
development of Tan Hiep Commune, Hoi An, Quang Nam.

Cham Island MPA has an area of about 6,710ha including water surface
and islands.

Hon La is the largest island with an area of about 1,549 hectares
among eight islands of the Archipelago and is the only one that is
inhabited. There is one commune of Hoi An town named Tan Hiep,
comprising 4 villages with 2 major communities that are Bai Lang and
Bai Huong. Total population is about 2,584 people with 589 households
in which 80% of the population inhabits in Bai Lang.

According to the regulation, the marine protected area (MPA) is zoned
into the following functional zones: strictly protected zone (core
zone), rehabilitation zone and development zone. The strictly
protected zone is the zone that plays a significance role in terms of
protecting a rich biodiversity of corals and other marine life. This
zone shall be managed and protected strictly in order to minimize most
of the negative impacts that can occur. Therefore, the the Management
Board of Cham Islands Marine Protected Area has undertaken law
enforcement for any activity which may cause negative impacts to the
environment, especially fishing in the core zone areas.

The regulation for managing the marine protected area has been in
effect since (2005-2006). In the process of managing the marine
protected area, the Management Board of Cham Islands Marine Protected
Area has faced many difficulties in controlling activity violations in
the core zone areas. The main reason is that it is nearly impossible
to accurately identify the boundaries of the core zones, without a
physical boundary marker system. Therefore, a buoys system is really
needed to be placed for better management of the core zone.

A company (contractor) will be selected and contracted by the LMPA to
support Cham Island MPA in deploying marker and mooring buoys.

2. METHODOLOGY

The methodology for conducting the required activities and achieving
the desired outputs shall be as follows:

a) Training phase

- The contractor will take part in a training with instruction of a
professional international training team for buoy installation process
and thereafter together with the international team the contractor
will be responsible for the deployment of the buoys system in Cham
Island MPA, particularly in the initial period of the installation.

- The training phase is planned to be organized in Cham Island in
May, 2009.

b) Buoy deployment phase

- The contractor will send their competent and fully functional
team to Cham Island MPA to undertake the deployment of 120 buoys in
the selected sites surrounding the MPA.

- In cooperation with the international team develop a regular
maintenance plan for the mooring and marker buoys after installation
that will be implemented by the MPA staffs. The contractor shall
provide necessary consultancy for the MPA staffs to make sure that the
maintenance plan will be implemented effectively

- Prepare the final report and related data and information
concerning the buoys system and submit to LMPA and CLC MPA Management
Board.

- This phase in planned to begin right after the training phase.

The mission for deployment of buoys system in Cham Island MPA will be
under monitoring and supervision of Quang Nam Department of
Agriculture and Rural Development and Cham Island MPA Management Board
and LMPA Component.

3. OUTPUT

Provide a draft installation report including maps of buoys location
(using GPS), annual buoy maintenance program and other information
(included in one report), within 15 days of completion of the
deployment. This will include the details of sequence of activities
undertaken, issues raised, problems faced, solutions, and
recommendations. The final report shall be submitted one week after
receiving comments from LMPA and Cham Island MPA Management Board.

Besides, for future maintenance the contractor shall produce a
maintenance manual or guidance of specific technical instruction.

4. STAFF REQUIREMENTS TO BE PROVIDED BY THE CONTRACTOR

The team

Group 1: working under water

- One Master Diver - Instructor is preferable (at least Dive
Master Certificate with safety qualifications and well experienced
with professional diving and good skills of working underwater)
responsible for the installation of the buoys system and supervision
of diving team and safety (Team Leader)

- Three national divers (at least Advanced Open Water level) with
experience of mooring installation.

- Three divers who are Cham Island MPA staffs will participate in
the installation process. Those staffs will be strictly under the
supervision of the team leader.

Group 2: working on boat

- Boat captain and Mechanic

- One Hydraulic compressor operator and 01 assistant

Qualifications and responsibilities of the Team Leader

Minimum qualifications for the Team Leader

- Advanced Open Water Diver with safety qualifications

(Dive instructor preferable)

- A minimum of 10 years diving experiences

- Knowledge of MPAs with practical experience in Vietnam

- Excellent English writing and communication skills

- An ability to create a team spirit, stimulate team members to
work to deadlines in a timely fashion while strictly adhering to
safety requirements,

Responsibilities of the Team Leader:

The team leader will be responsible for safety during diving and as
follows

- Take overall responsibility for the completion of installation,
and for the quality and timely submission of reports and deliverables.

- Make sure the involvement and safety of MPA staffs during diving

- Work under the monitoring of MPA Management Board and LMPA

- Prepare all requested reports

- Oversee and allocate tasks for the team members

Qualifications and responsibilities of the national divers

Minimum qualifications for the national divers

- At least Advanced Open Water

- A minimum of 03 years diving experience

- English knowledge is an advantage

- Experience of buoy installation

Responsibilities of the national diver:

- Work under supervision of team leader

- Support the team leader in implementation and completion of the
installation of buoys

- Support team leader for report preparation

5. REPORT

The contractor will report to the LMPA component and the Cham Island
MPA Management Board.

6. RESPONSIBILITIES

The LMPA and contractor will agree and sign a contract.

The LMPA will be responsible for purchasing all needed equipments and
materials before starting deployment.

The contractor will be responsible for budgeting and paying all costs:
rate for team members, travel, boat hiring, accommodation, food and
other expenses incurred during the work. Costs that are not included
in the agreed budget will not be covered by the LMPA

7. SCHEDULE

Activity Due date

Submission of proposal and capability statements

05 May 2009

Selection of contractor

10 May 2009

Sign contract

Mid of May 2009

Training phase

Late May or Early June 2009

Installation phase

June-July 2009

Submission of outputs

August 2009

The date of training and installation phases will be determined based
on the arrival of equipments and the advance notice of LMPA

8. DUTY STATION

This mission will be conducted in Cham Island, Hoi An City, Quang Nam
Province

9. COPYRIGHT

All intellectual property and proprietary rights, including maps,
drawings, photographs, documents and other materials produced during
this consultancy will become the sole property of the LMPA, which will
have the sole right to publish the same in whole or in part to adapt
and use them as may seem desirable, and to authorize all translations
and quotations from them. The contractor will not publish or use nay
of these materials without permission from LMPA.

Template for Proposal

SUSTAINABLE LIVELIHOODS IN AND AROUND MARINE RPOTECTED AREAS

INSTALLATION OF MARKER AND MOORING BUOYS FOR CHAM ISLAND MARINE
PROTECTED AREA, QUANG NAM PROVINCE

1. Official letter to LMPA Component

2. Technical proposal

- Brief description of your company

- Any comments for the term of reference

- Your description of responses to the TOR

- Your proposed works for the mission

- Curriculum vitae of team leader and team members

3. Financial proposal

- An all-inclusive day rate for each team member (professional and
administrative)

- An all-inclusive amount for local travel and per-diems

- Other costs (breakdown in detail)

Evaluation will be based on the following criteria:

- Experience and capacity of the organization: 20 points

- An approach to address the TOR and detailed work plan: 30 points

- Qualifications of the team: 50 points

A maximum 30 points will be given to the lowest offer. Proposal
obtaining the highest point (both technical and financial) will be
selected.

4. Submission of technical and financial proposal

Your proposal should be submitted in sealed envelops before March 31,
2009 to the following address.

Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development

Sustainable Livelihoods in and around MPAs

10 Nguyen Cong Hoan Street, Ba Dinh District

Hanoi, Vietnam

Email: nguyenhoanglinh at mofi.gov.vn

All late submissions will be not considered

5. You are requested to hold your proposal valid for 120 days from
the deadline for submission.

6. A contract will be awarded in respect of the proposal which is
considered most responsive to the needs of LMPA.

7. If any question please feel free to contact with Mr. Nguyen
Hoang Linh by telephone +84 4 7714685 or the above provided email.

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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 17 00:29:06 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2009 07:29:06 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Lao PDR Vacancy International Ecotourism Advisor
Message-ID: <49E740B2.2060604@gmail.com>

Subject: Lao PDR Vacancy International Ecotourism Advisor
Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2009 17:15:10 +1000
From: Steve Noakes <steve at pacificasiatourism.org>


Vacancy Announcement for International Ecotourism Advisor

The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) seeks a suitably qualified
person for the position of Ecotourism Specialist to be based in
Viengthong District, Houaphan Province, northern Lao PDR where WCS is
working alongside Provincial and District authorities to manage the Nam Et

? Phou Louey National Protected Area (NPA). Ecotourism initiatives are
being developed for the NPA to generate income to ensure sustainable NPA
management and to raise awareness and local pride in the NPA and the
wildlife it supports, especially tigers. The successful applicant will
be responsible for providing technical advice on the development and
ongoing management of ecotourism initiatives centered on wildlife tours
in and around Nam Et ? Phou Louey NPA.


*Key Responsibilities and Duties: *

Advise the ecotourism team on the development and ongoing management of
sustainable tourism in and around Nam Et ? Phou Louey NPA

Work with a Lao national counterpart and a wide range of stakeholders to
implement an ecotourism business model for the NPA.

Provide guidance on the direction, design and implementation of
wildlife-based tourism on rivers and walking tracks in the NPA.

Oversee development of the NPA infrastructure for wildlife tours.

Assess the training needs and facilitate training of project staff and
local communties.

Investigate local product development options for marketing through the
NPA interpretive center

Liaise with tourism operators and district and provincial authorities

Promote NPA ecotourism activities with local and international
organizations

Research local and international experience in order to maximize
conservation outcomes

Ensure the development and timely update of website content, brochures
and publications

Oversee the management and maintenance of ecotourism related records and
databases

Seek funding sources for ecotourism development and meet donor obligations

*

Qualifications, Skills and Experience

**_ _*

*_Qualifications _*

An appropriate tertiary qualification plus extensive relevant experience
in sustainable tourism development

*_ _*

*_Desirable_*

Experience in the design and development of wildlife tours, preferably
in South East Asia

Sensitive protected area infrastructure development (e.g. tracks /
campsites)

Demonstrated ability to develop and facilitate training and capacity
building programs

Refined project management skills.

Ability to work with diverse groups and to convene, coordinate and
communicate across interests, organizations and sectors

Demonstrated experience in project management, grant writing, fiscal and
budget management

Interpretive material design and development

Working knowledge of Lao language or a commitment to learning Lao soon
after arrival

Remuneration is dependent on level of experience, starting at US$3,000
per month for 10 months with potential for additional contracts up to 3
years. The candidate would need to live in Viengthong ? a very remote
posting. WCS will provide housing and a work-based vehicle. Given the
remoteness of Viengthong with the absence of schools for kids or likely
jobs for partners, this position may be best suited for a single
individual who enjoys the outdoors.

Interested applicants please send cover letter and resume to: Dr. Arlyne
Johnson, Co-Director, Wildlife Conservation Society-Lao PDR (WCS) by
_May 1, 2009_. Applications can be sent or delivered to the WCS office
and the attention of:

Ms. Soumalie Sygnavong, Office Manager

Wildlife Conservation Society-Lao PDR, Box 6712, Vientiane, Lao PDR

Phone: +856 21 215400 Email: ssygnavong at wcs.org
<mailto:ssygnavong at wcs.org>

*For some extra background on the destination, you can also contact Dr
Paul Rogers, **paul at pacificasiatourism.org*
<mailto:paul at pacificasiatourism.org>

Steve Noakes
Director, Pacific Asia Tourism Pty Ltd
P.O. Box 7855, Gold Coast 9726, Australia
steve at pacificasiatourism.org <mailto:steve at pacificasiatourism.org>;
www.pacificasiatourism.org <http://www.pacificasiatourism.org>

Adjunct Professor, Griffith University, Australia
Director: www.ecolodgesindonesia.com <http://www.ecolodgesindonesia.com>
Founding Partner: www.oceaniatourismalliance.net
<http://www.oceaniatourismalliance.net>

MDGs in Asia Pacific: http://mdgasiapacific.org


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 17 00:26:12 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2009 07:26:12 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Unesco Hanoi Office : "Book and CDs donation Day" on
World Book and Copyright Day, 23 April 2009
Message-ID: <49E74004.2040202@gmail.com>

Subject: Unesco Hanoi Office : "Book and CDs donation Day" on World Book and
Copyright Day, 23 April 2009
Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2009 12:22:36 +0200
From: Nong Thi Thuy, Chi <ntt.chi at unesco.org>

------------------------------------------------------------------------

Books have been hugely important in human civilization as a bridge of
communicating information and ideas. By reading books, we develop and enhance
our general awareness, creativity and broaden our knowledge and cultural
horizons. To meet the needs of readers in reaching this goal, authors work hard
and creatively. To encourage this creativity and to motivate the writers, we
need to make sure that their intellectual property is protected - this is called
copyright. However, the concept of copyright is limited in many countries
including Viet Nam.

World Book and Copyright Day is celebrated annually on 23 April, proclaimed by
UNESCO to promote the pleasure of reading, as well as publishing and copyright
issues. This date was also the anniversary of the birth and death of prominent
authors such as William Shakespeare, the death of Inca Garcilaso de la Vega and
Josep Pla, the birth of Maurice Druon, Vladimir Nabokov, Manuel Mej?a Vallejo
and Halld?r Laxness. On this occasion, UNESCO will mobilize its network of
partners, including publishers, booksellers, schools, libraries, and relevant
cultural institutions. For this year, UNESCO suggests exploring the topic of the
paramount function of books in the development of quality education, as well as
the link between publishing and intellectual property rights.

In support of the International celebration, UNESCO Hanoi Office will organize
the "Book and CD Donation Day" to donate books, documents and CD on culture,
education, science, communication and information. UNESCO Hanoi Office invites
all parties concerned (authors, publishers, teachers, librarians, public and
private institutions, humanitarian NGOs and the mass media) to Unesco Hanoi
Office, 23 Cao Ba Quat from 9 a.m to 4 p.m on 23 April 2009.

List of book and CD:

International book and CD:
1. The Earth charter
2. EFA Planning guide Southeast and East Asia
3. Summary EFA Global Monitoring Report 2006 Literacy for life
4. Towards a learning society and education for all continuing education through
Community learning centers in Viet Nam
5. Dialogue among civilizations (2004)
6. Crafts in the classroom
7. World Heritage Map 2008- 2009
8. Media relations: a handbook for National Commissions and UNESCO's partners
9. A world of science
10. CD: Higher Education
Vietnamese book and CD:
1. Preserve museum collections
2. Preserve construction of transitional villages in Viet Nam
3. Preserve and display fabric
4. Education based human rights
5. UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development, 2005-2014
6. Education for all: Good experience
7. CD: Multimedia Training Kit

Please register by email in advance by 5 p.m Tuesday 21 April to:

Ms. Nong Thi Thuy Chi
Programme Assistant, Communication and Information
UNESCO Hanoi Office, 23 Cao Ba Quat, Hanoi
Email: ntt.chi at unesco.org
Tel: 04 37470375 ext 31
0977 90 57 58

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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 17 02:42:01 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2009 09:42:01 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] New Guide Aims to Improve Public Climate Literacy
Message-ID: <49E75FD9.4010705@gmail.com>

Subject: New Guide Aims to Improve Public Climate Literacy
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2009 07:16:17 -0400
From: Frank Niepold <frank.niepold at noaa.gov>

Image of the cover of the Climate Literacy booklet

Climate Literacy: The Essential Principles of Climate Science.

high resolution report (11.5 Mb):
http://downloads.climatescience.gov/Literacy/Climate%20Literacy%20Booklet%20Hi-Res.pdf

Low resolution report (2.4 Mb):
http://downloads.climatescience.gov/Literacy/Climate%20Literacy%20Booklet%20Low-Res.pdf


A guide is now available to help individuals of all ages understand how
climate influences them -- and how they influence climate. A product of
the U.S. Climate Change Science Program, it was compiled by an
interagency group led by NOAA.

"The Essential Principles of Climate Science" presents important
information for individuals and communities to understand Earth's
climate, impacts of climate change, and approaches for adapting and
mitigating change. Principles in the guide can serve as discussion
starters or launching points for scientific inquiry. The guide can also
serve educators who teach climate science as part of their science
curricula.

?As climate policy is being discussed, it is very important for the
citizens of our nation to have an appreciation for some of the
fundamental aspects of climate and climate change,? said Tom Karl,
director of NOAA?s National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, N.C., and
lead for NOAA's climate services. ?This guide is a first step for people
who want to know more about the essential principles of our climate
system, how to better discern scientifically credible information about
climate, and how to identify problems related to understanding climate
and climate change.?

?There is so much misinformation about climate. We want to provide an
easily readable document to help everyone make the most informed
decisions,? said Karl. ?Having one product endorsed by the nation?s top
federal science agencies, as well as leading science centers and
associations, makes this document an essential resource.?

The 17-page guide includes information on how people can help reduce
climate change and its impacts. It also defines important terms and
concepts used when talking about climate and approaches to adaptation
and mitigation. For print copies of the guide, e-mail NOAA Outreach
<outreach at noaa.gov> or call 301-713-1208.

NOAA, the National Science Teachers Association, and TERC, an
educational non-profit organization, are working with education leaders
to revise state standards using this framework. The materials also will
provide the basis for educator resources and professional development.

Development of the guide began at a workshop sponsored by the National
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the American
Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Multiple science
agencies, non-governmental organizations, and numerous individuals also
contributed through extensive review and comment periods. Discussion at
the National Science Foundation (NSF) and NOAA-sponsored Atmospheric
Sciences and Climate Literacy workshop contributed substantially to the
refinement of the document.

For further information regarding the Climate Literacy document, please
contact Frank Niepold at frank.niepold at noaa.gov . Please include
"Climate Literacy info" in the subject line.



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 17 02:43:05 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2009 09:43:05 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] New Version of Global Water Tool Out Now!
Message-ID: <49E76019.7060900@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Subject: New Version of Global Water Tool Out Now!
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2009 12:13:05 +0200
From: Eva Zabey <zabey at wbcsd.org>
Reply-To: Water Issues Announcement List <water-l at lists.iisd.ca>
To: Water Issues Announcement List <water-l at lists.iisd.ca>

New Version of Global Water Tool Out Now!


The WBCSD has updated its Global Water Tool with more recent water
datasets, due to its successful uptake since its launch in August 2007,
as well as the increasing media attention around managing corporate
water use.

The Global Water Tool is a free and easy-to-use tool for companies and
organizations to map their water use and assess risks relative to their
global operations and supply chains. The tool, which was developed by
CH2M HILL and an advisory board of 22 WBCSD member companies, aims to
help corporations better manage their water use. It is downloadable from
_www.wbcsd.org/web/watertool.htm_ <http://www.wbcsd.org/web/watertool.htm>.

The *Global Water Tool* allows companies to quickly and accurately
answer such key questions as:

* How many of our sites are in extremely water-scarce areas? Which
sites are at greatest risk? How will that look in the future?
* How many of our employees live in countries that lack access to
improved water and sanitation?
* How many of our suppliers are in water-scarce areas now? How many
will be in 2025?


The updates for the new version include more recent data from WHO and
UNICEF on access to water and sanitation, and from FAO AQUASTAT, such as
total renewable water resources per capita, dependency ratio, and
industrial water withdrawal as part of total. The version also includes
a more complete Frequently Asked Questions section, and users of the
original version can easily transfer their inventory into the new Excel
file.

*Learn more about the WBCSD Global Water Tool and access it at:*
_www.wbcsd.org/web/watertool.htm_ <http://www.wbcsd.org/web/watertool.htm>
Contact e-mail: _GlobalWaterTool at wbcsd.org_
<mailto:GlobalWaterTool at wbcsd.org>


*About the WBCSD*
The World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) is a
CEO-led global association of 200 companies dealing exclusively with
business and sustainable development (see _www.wbcsd.org_
<http://www.wbcsd.org>).

...................................................................................................
*Eva Zabey **l ** **Water Project and Ecosystems Focus Area*

World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD)
4, chemin de Conches l CH-1231 Conches- Geneva l Switzerland
*T: *(+41) 22 839 31 77 *I F: *(+41) 22 839 31 31 *I* *Email:
*_zabey at wbcsd.org_ *I *_www.wbcsd.org_ <http://www.wbcsd.org/>

*Map your water use! *Download our free Global Water Tool:
_http://www.wbcsd.org/web/watertool.htm_
*Assess your impact and dependence on ecosystems! *Use the Corporate Ecosystem
Services Review: _http://www.wbcsd.org/web/esr.htm_

*Watch the Future Leaders Team 2-minute video "Ecosystems in balance:
it's everybody's business": *_http://www.wbcsd.org/web/balance/_


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 17 03:01:01 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2009 10:01:01 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Global Carbon Mechanisms: a new report from the Carbon
Trust
Message-ID: <49E7644D.2070004@gmail.com>

Subject: Global Carbon Mechanisms: a new report from the Carbon Trust
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2009 15:03:16 +0100
From: Catherine Willan <Catherine.Willan at CarbonTrust.co.uk>
Reply-To: Catherine Willan <Catherine.Willan at CarbonTrust.co.uk>
To: Climate Change Info Mailing List <climate-l at lists.iisd.ca>


Dear colleague

Global carbon markets have succeeded in channelling billions of Euros
towards low-carbon investments through the CDM, Joint Implementation and
new Green Investment Schemes.



However, a new Carbon Trust report, *?Global Carbon Mechanisms: emerging
evidence and implications?*, highlights that many of these gains are at
risk unless governments act to restore the balance between supply and
demand for credits, and to heed the lessons learned from the mechanisms
in operation so far.



Download the report from:
http://www.carbontrust.co.uk/publications/publicationdetail.htm?productid=CTC748



Watch the video discussion from the report?s author, Professor Michael
Grubb (Chief Economist at the Carbon Trust, Chair of Climate Strategies
and member of the UK's Committee on Climate Change):

http://www.carbontrust.co.uk/climatechange/policy/Global-Carbon-Mechanisms.htm




We conclude that global carbon trading mechanisms do deserve to be a
central pillar in the response to climate change and have already
channelled investment into low carbon technologies at a scale that has
confounded initial scepticism.

But our analysis suggests a looming surplus of credit supply over demand
meaning that market forces alone will not sustain prices and future
investor confidence. Governments need to act if they wish to sustain
prices in the short-term. In the longer-term it is the responsibility
of international negotiators to consider the impact of their policy
decisions on the market balance.

In addition, reforms are needed to improve the mechanisms? environmental
integrity, through a greater understanding of additionality, and
performance, through more efficient procedures.

Even if these reforms are successfully implemented, and prices
sustained, we cannot expect the carbon markets to be a panacea for
climate change mitigation, as they are not suited to access all
potential abatement opportunities.


*The Carbon Trust ? Making Business Sense of Climate Change*

6th Floor, 5 New Street Square, London, EC4A 3BF

Tel: +44 (0) 800 085 2005

www.carbontrust.co.uk






From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 17 03:02:02 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2009 10:02:02 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Call for Applications: ICAP Summer School for Emerging
and Developing Countries
Message-ID: <49E7648A.7040109@gmail.com>

Subject: Call for Applications: ICAP Summer School for Emerging and
Developing Countries
Date: Wed, 15 Apr 2009 17:13:08 +0200
From: ICAP Summer School <summerschool at icapcarbonaction.com>
Reply-To: ICAP Summer School <summerschool at icapcarbonaction.com>
Organization: ICAP
To: Climate Change Info Mailing List <climate-l at lists.iisd.ca>

*ICAP Summer School for Emerging and Developing Countries *

*Berlin, 27 July -- 7 August 2009

*
*Overview*

>From 27 July to 7 August 2009, the International Carbon Action
Partnership will convene the first ICAP Summer School for emerging and
developing countries in Berlin, Germany. Addressed to policy makers and
stakeholders, it will convey an in-depth understanding of emissions
trading as an instrument to mitigate greenhouse gases, and build
capacity on the technical design and implementation of carbon trading
systems. Participants will have ample networking opportunities with each
other and with the teaching faculty, composed of representatives from
ICAP members and other recognized experts in the field. Use of
communication technologies will help promote active discussions among
participants beyond the duration of the Summer School.

*Course Content*

The ICAP Summer School will introduce participants to the concept of
emissions trading as a policy instrument, and provide illustration by
way of case studies. The course will also cover emissions trading as a
feature of the international climate regime, drawing attention to the
stated objective of creating a global carbon market of linked domestic
and regional systems. Team-building activities are an important
component of the ICAP Summer School and will be fostered through
break-out sessions and frequent working groups. Each day will focus on a
different issue relevant to the introduction and operation of emissions
trading systems. A detailed program is available at
www.icapcarbonaction.com.

*Participation*

Participation is open to policy makers from emerging and developing
countries who are or will be involved in deciding on, designing and
implementing emissions trading systems, as well as other relevant
stakeholders from the non-governmental, academic and private sectors. Up
to half of the participants will consist of representatives from the
respective governments, which are invited to propose suitable
candidates. Participants will be selected based on defined criteria that
take into account a balanced mixture of professional backgrounds and
regions. Final confirmation of participants will rest with ICAP.
Applications are requested by *31 May 2009*. Detailed application
instructions are available at www.icapcarbonaction.com.

*Logistical Arrangements*

The Summer School will be carried out from 27 July to 7 August 2009 in
Berlin, Germany. Located at the heart of Europe, Berlin is a major
center of culture, politics, and scientific research, and is home to
world-renowned universities, museums, and cultural institutions.
Accommodation, catering and local transportation during the Summer
School will be covered for all participants by the organizers. Travel
expenses can be reimbursed on the basis of individual and demonstrated
need. Further details will be made available on the ICAP website and in
the letter of acceptance.


*Contact*

eMail: summerschool at icapcarbonaction.com

Web: www.icapcarbonaction.com
You are currently subscribed to climate-l as: vern.weitzel at gmail.com
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Go to your membership options <https://lists.iisd.ca/read/?forum=climate-l>.
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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 17 03:06:40 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2009 10:06:40 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] CV of Mr Dang Hoang Ha: Msc of Agriculture Ecology
Message-ID: <49E765A0.9080609@gmail.com>

Thanks Ha. I am posting your message and attached CV to
several email lists. Responses should be to:
Dang Hoang Ha <danghoangha at snu.ac.kr>
Best, Vern

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Dear Mr Vern,
Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2009 23:54:18 +0900 (KST)
From: Dang Hoang Ha <danghoangha at snu.ac.kr>
Reply-To: Dang Hoang Ha <danghoangha at snu.ac.kr>

the first of all I would like to introduce myself with you.

My name is Dang Hoang Ha, i am a master of Agriculture, my major is
ecology and plant science, biotechnology. i was study in Seoul National
University of Korea. i just graduated last month so i looking for a job.
I want to work for an NGO

Isend to you my CV then you can understand me more and clearly.
If have some things unclear please do not hesitae send my your question.
waiting your answer

best regard

Dang Hoang Ha
Crop Ecology Lab
Plant and Biotechnology department
College of Agriculture and Life Science
Seoul National University,
Seoul - South Korea.
cellphone: 00 82 10 8694 8555
tel/fax: 00 82 2880 4556
cell in Vietnam 0084 16 87 62 67 68
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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 17 04:29:09 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2009 11:29:09 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Spam 'produces 17m tons of CO2'
Message-ID: <49E778F5.9010503@gmail.com>

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/8001749.stm

Spam 'produces 17m tons of CO2'


The report may be downloaded at:
http://resources.mcafee.com/content/NACarbonFootprintSpam


Percentage of green house gas emissions per spam message

A study into spam has blamed it for the production of more than 33bn
kilowatt-hours of energy every year, enough to power more than 2.4m homes.
The Carbon Footprint of e-mail Spam report estimated that 62 trillion spam
emails are sent globally every year.

This amounted to emissions of more than 17 million tons of CO2, the research by
climate consultants ICF International and anti-virus firm McAfee found.

Searching for legitimate e-mails and deleting spam used some 80% of energy.
The study found that the average business user generates 131kg of CO2 every
year, of which 22% is related to spam.

Unwanted traffic

ICF say that spam filtering would reduce unwanted spam by 75%, the equivalent to
taking 2.3 million cars off the road.

However, the ICF goes on to say that while spam filtering is effective in
reducing energy waste, fighting it at the source is far better.

The report highlights the case of McColo , a US web hosting firm that had ties
to spammers. The day after it was taken offline by its two internet service
providers, global spam volume fell by 70%.

Although the respite was only temporary, McAfee said the "day without spam
amounted to talking 2.2 million cars off the road" and that tackling spam should
be part of the campaign to reduce carbon emissions.

Richi Jennings - an independent spam analyst who helped produce the report -
told the BBC that the figures were based on the extra energy use spent dealing
with spam.

"The PC on our desks uses more power when they do work, so the numbers are based
on the additional work they use when dealing with spam," he said.

The Spam Report follows only a few days after Symantec's bi-annual Internet
Security Threat report, which found that spam had increased by 192%, with bot
networks responsible for approximately 90% of all spam e-mail.

Mr Jennings said that while McAfee and Symantec had different ways of measuring
spam, he was in total agreement with the bot network figure.

"Our report was based on mail that spammers attempt to send, including ones that
are blocked by an ISP at source. Symantec only measures spam that is
successfully sent.

"The vast majority of spam is sent via botnets. We've got Conficker building a
fantastic network and you can bet your bottom dollar that it will wind up being
used to send spam.

"There is speculation that the botnet Conficker is building up is owned and run
by the owners of another active botnet - Waledac, itself probably connected to
the classic Storm botnet - and the theory is that the owners are keeping their
powder dry at the moment and will activate it once Waledac goes down."



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 17 07:02:51 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2009 14:02:51 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Ban calls for unified strategies on health, environment,
food and energy
Message-ID: <49E79CFB.9040403@gmail.com>

http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=30489&Cr=climate+change&Cr1=

Ban calls for unified strategies on health, environment, food and energy


Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant?s 4th block in the Ukraine.
16 April 2009 ? Health, environment, food and energy policies can no longer be
separated, but must be approached together in a manner bringing about real
benefits in all four areas, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said today.
?We have done this successfully in the architecture of new cities,? Mr. Ban told
the 18th International Conference on Health and Environment, which is meeting in
New York to mark 23 years since the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in Ukraine.

?We should do the same as we tackle the inter-related challenges of climate
change, public health, food security and growing energy demand,? he said.

The 1986 Chernobyl tragedy, he said, showed the strong relationship between
energy policy and health imposing what the Secretary-General called ?a terrible
long-term health burden.?

In the three countries surrounding the incident?s epicentre, more than 5,000
additional thyroid cancers in children can be attributed to radiation from
Chernobyl, he noted.

Nuclear power is again in the headlines, he noted, with the threat of climate
change and the search for low-carbon energy sources. ?It is clear that viable
alternatives to fossil fuels are needed ? and soon,? he said.

However, Mr. Ban stressed that all alternatives must be weighed carefully, from
science to public health and safety, taking into account the full range of
benefits and risks involved.

Chernobyl led to revised safety standards in nuclear power plants and showed
that nuclear emergencies require the highest level of coordination among a wide
range of agencies and actors, he said.

Other alternative sources of energy need equal scrutiny, the Secretary-General
maintained. ?Biofuels, for example, which seemed so attractive at first, may
have important negative consequences, such as diminished food security, since
land given over to biofuels is land taken out of food production,? he said.


From kevinysli at graduate.hku.hk Fri Apr 17 08:54:06 2009
From: kevinysli at graduate.hku.hk (Kevin Yuk-shing Li)
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2009 06:54:06 +0800
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Government accepts blame for slow compensation in
power project
Message-ID: <53984F6A103F4E7ABEEE78694F1B98FA@KevinLi>

Resettlement progress slows at dam project
Source: Saigon Giai Phong newspaper (Saigon Liberation Daily). 15 April
2009.
http://www.saigon-gpdaily.com.vn/National/2009/4/70025/

National Assembly Chairman Nguyen Phu Trong emphasized the social
consequences
of resettling people to make way for the Son La Hydroelectric Plant to NA's
Standing Committee that met in Hanoi yesterday.

Re-settlement of the displaced residents was an important, complex task that
would change the lives of thousands of people, he said.

Many of the participants attending the first day of the Standing Committee's
19th session echoed the chairman's sentiments as they reviewed the
assembly's Resettlement Supervisory Group's report.

The report says re-settlement of people in northern Son La, Dien Bien and
Lai
Chau provinces is still behind schedule and this will add pressure for the
remainder of the mountain project's life.

It will also affect the lives of the people.

The report says 12,500 or 62 percent of households have been resettled.

More than 5,000 ha of arable land has been allocated to 4,000 of these
households but this was only about 40 percent of the amount scheduled, said
Resettlement Supervisory Group chairman Ksor Phuoc.

The progress of public works such as roads, water, electric and schools in
the
re-settlement zones was slow, he said.

It meant that children had to travel to their former schools far from their
new
houses.

Most of the displaced understood their loss had been much greater than the
State's compensation, he said.

But they were willing to sacrifice their own interest for the country's
electricity. Now they were insecure because they had not seen any plants to
ensure future production.

The Supervisory Groups report says most of the displaced live from State
compensation.

It says hundreds of households have been resettled in new zones for two
years
but are still not sure of what to produce or how to do business.

Their new residences did not match their lifestyle and there were no help
for
them to develop farming and raise livestock.
The report says that although the policies to support displaced people were
well implemented, they have not met people's expectations.

The assessment of property compensation has been slow.

Compensation was confined to tangible property with income, work and
cultural
life not taken into account.

Post-resettlement

Many of the deputies agreed with the supervisory group's view that helping
people adapt to a new environment, new production methods and customs cannot
be
achieved in a few years.

They also agreed with the Supervisory Group's proposal for post-resettlement
policies with the priority to the building of infrastructure for production
and
people's daily life.

The group suggested the need for employment polices and vocational training
for
farm laborers shifting from agriculture to other occupations.

The construction of resettlement zones must also preserve the cultural
identity
of minority people.

Economic Committee Chairman Ha Van Hien said the foremost task was to make
people fully understand the State's policies.

The task of the policymakers was to scrutinize their policies and make the
appropriate changes.

National Assembly Vice Chairwoman Tong Thi Phong emphasized the role of
Communist Party chapters and local officials to promote the process.

Deputy Prime Minister and Son La Project Steering Committee Chairman Hoang
Trung Hai said the re-settlement of 19,000 households would be finished to
deadline, July 2010.

The Government would ensure enough capital and remove any policy obstacles,
he
said.

The Government had asked all local authorities to examine and ensure all
displaced people received compensation.

The Son La hydro-power plant is Vietnam's major electricity project with a
capacity of 2,400MW.

Lawmakers also heard reports on a draft ordinance that would assign costs
and
fees in civil litigation and administrative actions, before calling on the
drafting committee to do further work on the proposed legislation.

Source: VNS


Government accepts blame for slow compensation in power project
Source: Than Nien News (Youth newspaper). 15 April 2009.
http://www.thanhniennews.com/politics/?catid=1&newsid=48054

The government on Tuesday admitted it was to blame for slow financial
compensation to residents displaced by the Son La Hydroelectric Plant
project,
which started construction in 2005 in three northwestern provinces.

The funds had been made available but their disbursement by local
authorities
had been slowed down due to procedural issues, according to the VietNamNet
news
website, which quoted Deputy Prime Minister Hoang Trung Hai's report to the
National Assembly's (NA) Standing Committee.

"The provincial authorities should examine this issue and ensure there
wouldn't be any cases in which residents must wait years before they are
compensated," he said.

The deputy prime minister addressed the 19th session of the NA's Standing
Committee that opened in Hanoi Tuesday, discussing the results of an
investigation by a supervisory team into the site clearance and the
resettlement of displaced residents in connection with the Son La
Hydroelectric
Plant project.

In February, the supervisory team found only 62 percent of 20,000 residents
displaced by the project had been resettled. Resettlement of all residents
is
scheduled for completion in July of next year.

Tran The Vuong of the Standing Committee said the team should have
identified
responsible individuals in its report on the lax financial management of the
project.

The supervisory team told the session that nearly 40 percent of resettled
households have received farmland. Meanwhile, residents' greatest worry was
that there was no more arable land to distribute, or that they would receive
land with poor soil.

"Most of the [resettled] residents were worried as they were unaware of the
cultivation guidelines for the next few years," said Ksor Phuoc, chairman of
the assembly's Ethnic Council and head of the supervisory team.

He also expressed concern regarding residents who were staying in temporary
resettlement areas in Dien Bien Province's Muong Lay Town, as they would
soon
face the flood season and they had not yet been transferred to their
permanent
resettlement areas.

The US$2.6 billion Son La Hydroelectric Plant began construction in 2005,
and
will create the largest reservoir in the country, which will cover parts of
Son
La, Lai Chau and Dien Bien provinces.

Reported by Xuan Toan




From communication.env at fpt.vn Fri Apr 17 21:00:29 2009
From: communication.env at fpt.vn (ENV Communication)
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2009 18:00:29 +0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Weekly Bulletin 311
Message-ID: <007d01c9bf4b$b9189c20$1101a8c0@tunganhyen>

Dear all,

Please see the file attached

Regards,
------------------------------------------------------
Nguyen Thi My Dung
Communications Officer
Education for Nature-Vietnam (ENV)
Tel: 84 4 3 5148850
Email: communication.env at fpt.vn
Skype: communicationenv
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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 17 23:06:24 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2009 06:06:24 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Workshop Announcement: Revision of PEFC's
International Chain of Custody Standard
Message-ID: <49E87ED0.6080006@coombs.anu.edu.au>

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Workshop Announcement: Revision of PEFC's International Chain
of Custody Standard
Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2009 17:14:22 +0200
From: Thorsten Arndt <Thorsten.Arndt at pefc.org>
Reply-To: Thorsten Arndt <Thorsten.Arndt at pefc.org>
To: Forest Policy Info Mailing List <forests-l at lists.iisd.ca>



PEFC ? the Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification schemes
- is the world's largest forest certification system, providing
customers and consumers with the choice to purchase responsibly by
choosing third-party certified wood from well-managed forests.



Its International Chain of Custody allows companies to identify and
control their sources of PEFC certified material and assures customers
that they meet PEFC's strict requirements for non PEFC-certified
material. Since 2004, more than 5000 companies have achieved PEFC Chain
of Custody certification against the current standard, and their
insights, knowledge and best practices are valuable input into the
revision process.



The revision is part of PEFC's commitment to continuous improvement and
aims at ensuring that the needs and expectations of businesses,
consumers and other stakeholders are incorporated while the robustness
of the delivery of claims is maintained.

PEFC International, in collaboration with PEFC France and PEFC Germany,
is organising two workshops to offer participants the unique opportunity
to share experiences, develop a deeper understanding of the Chain of
Custody and help shape the criteria of the revised Chain of Custody
Standard, scheduled to take effect in 2010.



*PARIS WORKSHOP*

This workshop aims specifically at stakeholders from France, Italy,
Spain, Portugal and the UK; participants from other countries are also
welcome.



Date: 13th May 2009
Time: 09:30 - 16:30
Location: Paris, France



Further information & registration form:
http://www.pefc.org/internet/resources/5_1184_2006_file.2353.pdf



*HANOVER WORKSHOP*

* *

This workshop aims specifically at stakeholders from Scandinavia, the
Benelux countries, Austria, Switzerland, Czech Republic, Poland and
Germany; participants from other countries are also welcome.**



Date: 22nd May 2009
Time: 09:30 - 16:30
Location: Hanover, Germany



Further information & registration form:
http://www.pefc.org/internet/resources/5_1184_2010_file.2355.pdf





Thorsten Arndt
Head of Communications

PEFC International
World Trade Centre 1
10 route de L'A?roport
CH-1215 Gen?ve
Switzerland
www.pefc.org <http://www.pefc.org/>
t.arndt at pefc.org <mailto:t.arndt at pefc.org>
Tel: +41 (0)22 799 45 40
Fax: +41 (0)22 799 45 50
_
POSTAL ADDRESS:_
PEFC Council
Case Postale 636
CH-1215 Gen?ve 15
Switzerland

The contents of this email and any attachments are confidential and
intended for the use of the addressee. The contents may not be
disclosed, copied or distributed, without the consent of PEFC Council.
If you are not the intended recipient please notify the sender by return
email that you have received it in error, and delete the message
immediately.

The statements and opinions expressed in this message are those of the
author and do not necessarily reflect those of the organisation.

While PEFC council makes every effort to ensure that this message is
virus free, by virus checking all outgoing emails, it cannot guarantee
that this is the case and cannot accept any responsibility for damage
caused by a virus or alteration by a third party during transmission
over public networks, which may not be 100 percent secure.


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 17 23:18:39 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2009 06:18:39 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] GHG Management Institute - Introduction to Carbon
Markets
Message-ID: <49E881AF.3020907@gmail.com>

Subject: GHG Management Institute - Introduction to Carbon Markets
Date: Thu, 16 Apr 2009 22:53:21 -0500
From: Tim Stumhofer <tim.stumhofer at ghginstitute.org>
Reply-To: Tim Stumhofer <tim.stumhofer at ghginstitute.org>
To: Climate Change Info Mailing List <climate-l at lists.iisd.ca>

Dear friends and colleagues:

The Greenhouse Gas Management Institute is pleased to announce the opening of
its latest course: "Introduction to Carbon Markets"

Jointly developed in partnership with Point Carbon, the world?s leading carbon
market information provider, Introduction to Carbon Markets provides a
comprehensive overview of global carbon markets from origins as a policy
response to address climate change to specific details on established and
emerging trading programs.

Utilizing its interactive e-learning system, the Institute is able to make this
leading carbon market training available to learners across the globe, including
Africa, Latin America and Asia. Financial aid and full scholarships are
available to eligible applicants.

Course lessons provide key background on climate change policy as well as
examine the market design elements that permit greenhouse gas emissions to be
openly traded as global commodity. With curriculum that builds from political
and practical challenges and fundamental market dynamics to consider more
complex and topical issues, such as regional trading programs, international
linkages and the voluntary market, Introduction to Carbon Markets equips
learners with a breadth of knowledge to understand this fast-growing marketplace.

For more information on Introduction to Carbon Markets and other Institute
courses, please refer to the attached course list, visit our website at
www.ghginstitute.org or send an email to info at ghginstitute.org

----------
The Greenhouse Gas Management Institute, a registered nonprofit organization,
trains, certifies and networks a global community of experts that account, audit
and manage GHG emissions based on world-class training and professional
standards. The Institute educates individuals and organizations, from beginners
to certified professionals, on all aspects of climate change. Co-founded by
ClimateCHECK and the GHG Experts Network, the Institute works with the World
Resources Institute, the World Bank, the UNFCCC, the Carbon Disclosure Project,
the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, Point Carbon and other leading experts
on training and programs utilizing innovative internet tools to ensure that
market mechanisms and policy responses to climate change are effective and
credible. For more information go to: www.ghginstitute.org
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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 17 23:24:15 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2009 06:24:15 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] New Study Warns that Forests are at Risk of Becoming
Net Sources of Carbon Instead of Net Sinks
Message-ID: <49E882FF.4030909@coombs.anu.edu.au>



-------- Original Message --------
Subject: New Study Warns that Forests are at Risk of Becoming Net Sources of
Carbon Instead of Net Sinks
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2009 03:54:11 -0500
From: Alexander Buck <buck at iufro.org>
Reply-To: Alexander Buck <buck at iufro.org>
To: Climate Change Info Mailing List <climate-l at lists.iisd.ca>

We are pleased to announce that the first ever compiled global assessment report
on ?Adaptation of Forests and People to Climate Change? will be published
officially at the next session of the United Nations Forum on Forests (UNFF),
during the following side event:

Making Forests Fit For Change ? IUFRO-Led Activities at the Science-Policy Interface

Wednesday, 22 April
13:15 to 14:45 hours
Conference Room 2 (CR-2)
UN Headquarters, New York City

The report is the first product of the Global Forest Expert Panels of the
Collaborative Partnership on Forests (CPF) and presents the state-of-knowledge
about the impacts of climate change on forests and people and options for
adaptation. One of the key messages that emerged from this assessment is that
the carbon-regulating services of forests are at risk of being lost entirely
unless current carbon emissions are reduced substantially; this would result in
the release of huge quantities of carbon to the atmosphere, exacerbating climate
change.

The report as well as a policy brief (available in all UN languages) can be
downloaded at:
http://www.iufro.org/science/gfep/

Information for the press is available at:
http://www.iufro.org/science/gfep/media-information/

For further information, please, contact:
Alexander Buck, IUFRO
Mobile +43-664-1426852
Email: buck(at)iufro.org

About IUFRO and the CPF

The International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO) is the only
world-wide organization devoted to forest research and related sciences. Its
members are research institutions, universities, and individual scientists as
well as decision-making authorities and other stakeholders with a focus on
forests and trees. For further information, please visit: www.iufro.org.

The Collaborative Partnership on Forests (CPF) is a voluntary arrangement among
14 international organizations and secretariats with substantial programmes on
forests. Its mission is to promote the management, conservation and sustainable
development of all types of forest and strengthen long-term political commitment
to this end. For further information, please visit:
http://www.fao.org/forestry/cpf/en/.



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 18 00:37:52 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2009 07:37:52 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Asia: Water Fight
Message-ID: <49E89440.3060907@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1891640,00.html


Water Fight
By BRYAN WALSH Thursday, Apr. 16, 2009

Image: A boy sits in a pile of algae as his friend runs at a beach in Qingdao,
Shandong province in China
Nir Elias / Reuters


The Songhua river in northeastern China doesn't have the history of the Mekong,
the spirituality of the Ganges or the sheer power of the Yangtze. But in
November 2005, this 1,200-mile (2,000 km) waterway made headlines when a
chemical plant in the Chinese city of Jilin spilled massive amounts of the toxic
chemical benzene, creating a 50-mile (80 km) noxious slick. The chemicals oozed
toward the sea, and Chinese cities that drank from the Songhua were forced to
cut off supplies, leaving millions to fend for themselves. As the slick passed
over the border to the Russian city of Khabarovsk, a problem that began in a
single Chinese chemical plant suddenly became an international incident between
two powerful nations with a history of bad blood.

The Songhua incident is a reminder that in Asia, a region of the world where
water is often scarce and often polluted, managing that indispensable resource
is vital. Asia is already the world's driest inhabited continent per capita, and
as its population, urbanization and dirty industrialization grow ? and global
warming dries out the region ? clean water will only become more precious. As a
just-released report by the Asia Society argues, water will become the key to
regional security in the 21st century ? and Asia isn't ready. "This is a
fundamental resource that we need to survive," says Suzanne DiMaggio, director
of the Asia Society's Social Issues Program and the report's director. "The
emerging picture on water is very worrisome."

That doesn't mean we should expect Asian nations to immediately start shooting
wars over access to the Mekong or the Yalu ? though all bets are off if climate
change leads to the loss of the Himalayan glaciers whose seasonal melt provides
water for billions in Asia. In fact, the history of cross-border water disputes
has been surprisingly conciliatory so far. India and Pakistan have fought three
wars and currently point nuclear weapons at each other, yet the Indus Waters
Treaty ? which divvies up the two countries' trans-boundary waterways, overseen
by a joint commission ? has survived for decades. And even though nations can be
quite possessive over water (India and Bangladesh have skirmished repeatedly
over the shared Mahananda River), they trade it all the time in other forms like
rice and grain that require millions of gallons to grow.

There's no guarantee the current uneasy comity will continue. "We can't use
history as our guide for water planning anymore," says Saleem Ali, a visiting
fellow at the Brookings Doha Center in Qatar and a co-author of the report.
Demographic growth ? the continent's population is expected to grow by nearly
500 million people over the next 10 years ? combined with climate change will
likely mean that far more Asians will be tapping shrinking sources of water.
Water wouldn't be a sole trigger for war but rather a "threat multiplier" ? a
factor that worsens the social instability that can lead to conflict. That can
happen even inside a country ? one of the most violent protests in recent
Chinese history occurred in April 2005, when over 30,000 villagers in Zhejiang
province clashed with police over water pollution from a local chemical plant.

Fortunately, even a drier, more crowded world should still have enough water to
meet its needs, provided the supply is regulated well on both national and
international levels. That can include stiffer regulations against industrial
pollution (plus policies that ensure dirty water is employed for nonvital uses
like landscaping) and more efficient agricultural practices, such as drip
irrigation, that would cut down on the enormous amount of water wasted in
farming. More rational pricing of water, even in poor nations, can help reduce
misuse on the farms and in the cities.

But Asia falls short. Beyond rich nations like Japan and Singapore, which have
invested heavily in water quality, water management is still abysmal; according
to the U.N., half of the 24 Asian and Australian eco-regions are severely or
moderately affected by pollution, and conditions are expected to get worse. Asia
lacks the strong regional institutions necessary to promote better water
policies across borders and head off potential resource conflicts. "We have to
go beyond existing networks," says Ali, who notes that no global treaty is
currently in place on water. "What we have now isn't enough."

The hope is that, properly managed, water could actually help knit Asia
together. More than any other resource, water must be shared. Rivers don't
respect borders, and those downstream are dependent on the good behavior of
those upstream ? as the residents of Khabarovsk learned in 2005. Asian nations
will need to come together on water ? or they'll go thirsty alone.


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 18 00:45:26 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2009 07:45:26 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Feature: World's Cleanest Countries
Message-ID: <49E89606.7060701@coombs.anu.edu.au>

The Environmental Performance Index (EPI) is at (requires Flash):
http://epi.yale.edu/Home

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Feature: World's Cleanest Countries
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2009 07:24:00 -0700
From: Yahoo Group <ashwani.vasishth at gmail.com>
Reply-To: envecolnews-owner at yahoogroups.com
To: International Development News <intldevelopmentnews at yahoogroups.com>
CC: Environmental Ecology News <envecolnews at yahoogroups.com>

http://www.forbes.com/2009/04/15/worlds-cleanest-countries-business-energy-clean-countries.html

The World's Cleanest Countries

Andy Stone, 04.15.09, 12:00 PM EDT
Europe, led by Switzerland, leads the way as the U.S. falls.

The declining health of Mother Earth has drawn growing attention over
the last two decades, with countries coming together to fight a range of
environmental threats, from declining fishing stocks to global warming.

Witness the Kyoto Protocol, the first widely adopted set of
environmental protection guidelines, which emerged during the 1990s and
took effect in 2005. Kyoto led to the development of the first
large-scale emissions trading market, Europe's Greenhouse Gas Emission
Trading Scheme, which puts caps on carbon dioxide pollution. A similar
carbon market, the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, began operating
at the start of this year in 10 Eastern U.S. states.

In spite of nearly universal support for a cleaner globe (the U.S. was
one of only a few countries that failed to adopt Kyoto), it's mainly the
rich nations that enjoy pristine environments, according to the
Environmental Performance Index (EPI). Columbia University's Center for
International Earth Science Information Network and Yale University's
Center for Environmental Law and Policy developed the index to highlight
the cleanest countries, and give laggards the opportunity to benchmark
efforts to improve their own environments and the health of their citizens.

Switzerland tops the list with an overall EPI score of 95.5 out of 100,
while European countries account for 14 of the top 20 environmental
performers. Europe has the infrastructure to provide clean drinking
water and treat waste water, lowering the likelihood that Europeans will
suffer from waterborne disease. Europe scores consistently well in EPI's
environmental health ranking, which measures the effects of pollution on
human health.

A second broad measure, ecosystem vitality, measures the health of
fisheries, the amount of greenhouse gases a country pumps into the air
and how well it preserves the diversity of its plants and animals. On
this measure, the performance of developed countries diverges.
Scandinavia, with its low population and vast open spaces, enjoys
pristine forests and relatively little air pollution.

The U.S., once a leader in environmental protection, has failed to keep
pace. "Starting 25 years ago, the United States started to fall behind
in relative terms. Before that time, Europe always had dirtier air and
drinking water," says Mark Levy, associate director of Columbia
University's earth science center.

Then-President George H. W. Bush signed the last significant American
air quality legislation in 1990, an amendment to the Clean Air Act. The
U.S. scores a meager 63.5 on the ecosystem vitality scale, vs. an
average score of 74.2 for the world's richest nations. The U.S.' overall
EPI score is 81, putting it in 39th place on the list.

/*** NOTICE: In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, this
material is distributed, without profit, for research and educational
purposes only. ***/


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 18 00:51:29 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2009 07:51:29 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Changed email for Tilo Nadler and EPRC?
Message-ID: <49E89771.1010004@gmail.com>

Tilo's email messages appear to be bouncing. Does anyone have
updated contact information? Please respond to the list or me.
Vern


--
Vern Weitzel (Mr.) BSc, BA, MA, M Env Man & Dev <vern at coombs.anu.edu.au>
<vern.weitzel at gmail.com> <vernweitzel at mac.com>

ANU/AVSL eMail Lists: http://coombs.anu.edu.au/~vern/forum.html
NGO Centre eMail Lists: http://ngocentre.org.vn/mailman/listinfo

Address during 2009: 2724 NE 24th St, Renton WA 98056 USA
phone: (425) 228-4513 Mobile: (206) 3-9999-81
Ha Noi address: 1st stairwell, apartment 504-505, block A4 Giang Vo,
Ba Dinh, Ha Noi [off Ngoc Khanh Street, opposite Van Phuc Compound]
home phone: +84 4 3846-1751 Skype: vernweitzel
IF I DO NOT RESPOND IN A REASONABLE TIME, PLEASE RESEND YOUR MESSAGE.


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 18 01:04:52 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2009 08:04:52 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Global Warming: Cuts in Greenhouse Gas Emissions Would
Save Arctic Ice, Reduce Sea Level Rise
Message-ID: <49E89A94.3030704@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://www.ucar.edu/news/releases/2009/greenhousecuts.jsp#mediaterms

Global Warming: Cuts in Greenhouse Gas Emissions Would Save Arctic Ice, Reduce
Sea Level Rise

April 14, 2009

BOULDER?The threat of global warming can still be greatly diminished if nations
cut emissions of heat-trapping greenhouse gases by 70 percent this century,
according to a new analysis. While global temperatures would rise, the most
dangerous potential aspects of climate change, including massive losses of
Arctic sea ice and permafrost and significant sea level rise, could be partially
avoided.

The study, led by scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research
(NCAR), will be published next week in Geophysical Research Letters. It was
funded by the Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation, NCAR's
sponsor.

"This research indicates that we can no longer avoid significant warming during
this century," says NCAR scientist Warren Washington, the lead author. "But if
the world were to implement this level of emission cuts, we could stabilize the
threat of climate change and avoid catastrophe."


Warren Washington. (?UCAR, photo by Carlye Calvin.) [ENLARGE] News media terms
of use*
Avoiding dangerous climate change

Average global temperatures have warmed by close to 1 degree Celsius (almost 1.8
degrees Fahrenheit) since the pre-industrial era. Much of the warming is due to
human-produced emissions of greenhouse gases, predominantly carbon dioxide. This
heat-trapping gas has increased from a pre-industrial level of about 284 parts
per million (ppm) in the atmosphere to more than 380 ppm today.

With research showing that additional warming of about 1 degree C (1.8 degrees
F) may be the threshold for dangerous climate change, the European Union has
called for dramatic cuts in emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse
gases. The U.S. Congress is also debating the issue.

To examine the impact of such cuts on the world's climate, Washington and his
colleagues ran a series of global supercomputer studies with the NCAR-based
Community Climate System Model. They assumed that carbon dioxide levels could be
held to 450 ppm at the end of this century. That figure comes from the U.S.
Climate Change Science Program, which has cited 450 ppm as an attainable target
if the world quickly adapts conservation practices and new green technologies to
cut emissions dramatically. In contrast, emissions are now on track to reach
about 750 ppm by 2100 if unchecked.

The team's results showed that if carbon dioxide were held to 450 ppm, global
temperatures would increase by 0.6 degrees C (about 1 degree F) above current
readings by the end of the century. In contrast, the study showed that
temperatures would rise by almost four times that amount, to 2.2 degrees C (4
degrees F) above current readings, if emissions were allowed to continue on
their present course.



New computer simulations show the extent that average air temperatures at
Earth's surface could warm by 2080-2099 compared to 1980-1999, if (top)
greenhouse gases emissions continue to climb at current rates, or if (bottom)
society cuts emissions by 70 percent. In the latter case, temperatures rise by
less than 2?C (3.6?F) across nearly all of Earth's populated areas. However,
unchecked emissions could lead to warming of 3?C (5.4?F) or more across parts of
Europe, Asia, North America, and Australia. (Graphic courtesy Geophysical
Research Letters, modified by UCAR.) [ENLARGE] News media terms of use*
Holding carbon dioxide levels to 450 ppm would have other impacts, according to
the climate modeling study:

Sea level rise due to thermal expansion as water temperatures warmed would be 14
centimeters (about 5.5 inches) instead of 22 centimeters (8.7 inches).
Significant additional sea level rise would be expected in either scenario from
melting ice sheets and glaciers.

Arctic ice in the summertime would shrink by about a quarter in volume and
stabilize by 2100, as opposed to shrinking at least three-quarters and
continuing to melt. Some research has suggested the summertime ice will
disappear altogether this century if emissions continue on their current trajectory.

Arctic warming would be reduced by almost half, helping preserve fisheries and
populations of sea birds and Arctic mammals in such regions as the northern
Bering Sea.

Significant regional changes in precipitation, including decreased precipitation
in the U.S. Southwest and an increase in the U.S. Northeast and Canada, would be
cut in half if emissions were kept to 450 ppm.

The climate system would stabilize by about 2100, instead of continuing to warm.
The research team used supercomputer simulations to compare a business-as-usual
scenario to one with dramatic cuts in carbon dioxide emissions beginning in
about a decade. The authors stressed that they were not studying how such cuts
could be achieved nor advocating a particular policy.

"Our goal is to provide policymakers with appropriate research so they can make
informed decisions," Washington says. "This study provides some hope that we can
avoid the worst impacts of climate change--if society can cut emissions
substantially over the next several decades and continue major cuts through the
century."


About the article

Title: "How Much Climate Change Can Be Avoided by Mitigation?"

Authors: Warren Washington, Reto Knutti, Gerald Meehl, Haiyan Teng, Claudia
Tebaldi, David Lawrence, Lawrence Buja, Gary Strand

Publication: Geophysical Research Letters
http://www.agu.org/journals/gl/


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 18 01:26:20 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2009 08:26:20 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] UNDP: 01 Monitoring and Impact Evaluation System
Developer (Code D1)
Message-ID: <49E89F9C.3020807@gmail.com>

01 Monitoring and Impact Evaluation System Developer (Code D1)
Publish Date: 16-Apr-2009

Project PIMS 2031 CC FSP Vietnam: Energy Efficient Public Lighting (VEEPL) is a
joint effort of the Global Environment Facility (GEF)/United Nations Development
Programme (UNDP) and Vietnamese counterparts, aiming at encouraging application
of the energy efficient Public Lighting in Vietnam by all sectors, and through
that contributing to the reduction of Green House Gas (GHG) emission.

The project is seeking for 01 Monitoring and Impact Evaluation System Developer
(Code D1) to support develop tool to estimate the project impact in terms of
amount of energy saved and avoided CO2 emission through energy saving activities
supported by the Project.

Term of Reference (D1) attached.

All the national qualified and interested candidates are invited to send an
application letter, CV (English and Vietnamese versions) and relevant
certificates/degrees to address below.

"Vietnam: Energy Efficient Public Lighting" Project Management Unit
Vietnamese Academy of Science and Technology
Room 203, 2nd Floor, Building B1, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet St., Cau Giay Dist., Hanoi
Tel: (04) 3791 3792
Fax: (04) 3791 3793
Email: veepl at ims.vast.ac.vn

Deadline for submissions: Friday 05:00 PM | 24-Apr-2009


TERMS OF REFERENCE (D.1)


Title: Monitoring and Impact Evaluation System Developer
Duty Station: Hanoi with domestic travel as required
Duration: 6 months, tentatively starting from May, 2009
Supervisor: Project Manager

BACKGROUND

The Vietnam Energy Efficient Public Lighting (VEEPL) project is a joint effort
of the Global
Environment Facility (GEF) and Vietnamese counterpart agencies. The project aims
to encourage
widespread adoption of energy efficient practices among providers of public
lighting in Vietnam,
thereby contributing to cost savings, improved performance and the reduction of
Green House Gas
(GHG) emissions by the public sector.

The project will contribute to reduced pollution through the effective
implementation of a
carefully chosen and integrated mix of project components by relevant central
government
agencies, local governments, institutions, and practitioners in the lighting
industry and the
private sector.

It is estimated that by end of the VEEPL project in 2010, GHG emissions will
have been reduced
by a cumulative amount of 171.2 ktons. During the project implementation, the
expected annual
direct GHG emissions reduction will be from 0.2 ktons by end 2006 to 70.3 ktons
by end 2010.
The energy savings (and GHG emission reduction) in public lighting will be
derived from the
installation of EEPL equipment (EE lamps, high efficiency luminaries, automatic
light efficiency
control systems) in cities and town. The annual energy consumption, energy saved
in public
lighting and the GHG emission reduction can be calculated owing to the developed
model of
calculation and data/information on the installation of EEPL equipment provided
by the
provincial PL companies and relevant agencies to the project subcontractors and
partners.

A Public Lighting Database Facility (PLDF) and National Public Lighting
Information Centre
(PLIC) have been established with the support of VEEPL to collect, manage,
process and
disseminate data and information related with lighting in public sector. These
facilities have
been collecting data related with current state of lighting schemes and
technologies used,
installation of EE lighting projects, development of new lighting technologies,
and various types
of supporting information related with lighting in public places. The database
developed by
PLDF and PLIC is anticipated to be made available to various stakeholders of
VEEPL through
internet.

The Project Management Unit (PMU) of VEEPL is now seeking the service of a
qualified
services provider with substantial skills and experience for developing a user
friendly monitoring
and evaluation (M&E) tool, based on the methodology and calculation approach
used by current
evaluation model in MS Excel form, using the data and information provided by
PLDF and PLIC
to estimate impacts of VEEPL project in the form of energy savings and
greenhouse gas
reductions.




PURPOSE OF CONTRACT

The purpose of this contract is to review the existing data management and
processing system
used by PLDC and the existing calculation model and subsequently develop a user
friendly
software application as an integrated query-based monitoring and evaluation
system to estimate
impacts of a project in the area of climate change. The proposed M&E system
will be accessible
through internet and intranet, and will integrate the existing data management
system used by
PLDF to ensure instantaneous update of the M&E reports when PLDF data is updated.

SCOPE OF WORK

The specific tasks of the Subcontractor will be as follows:
? Work with PMU and prepare a detailed work plan for the whole contract duration.
? Review the current data management system used by PLDF to maintain and process
data
on public lighting.
? Review the current impact estimation/calculation model in MS Excel form.
? Develop a system design for user-friendly software application as monitoring and
evaluation system from the existing calculation model together with its intended
outputs
and reports, for review by PMU and other VEEPL stakeholders.
? Develop a final system design of monitoring and evaluation system. Ensure
that the
M&E system is query based, i.e. M&E reports are generated by user defined
parameters.
? Develop a user friendly software tool based on existing calculation model as
monitoring
and evaluation system integrated with data management system used by PLDF and PLIC
to estimate query-based impacts of VEEPL project e.g. for a specific quarter, for a
particular year, cumulative for a given period, all by project as a whole or
segregated as
impact by each segment within the project etc.
? Develop data entry interface for PLDF to update data over the internet.
? Develop reporting templates for M&E reports for approval by the PMU.
? The M&E application should be accessible and useable by multiple users over
internet
and intranet.
? Provide necessary training to PLDF, PLIC and PMU staff on using the M&E system.
? Provide technical assistance on trouble shooting of the M&E system for 1 year.

DELIVERABLES

1. A detailed work plan, together with methodology, review/assessment and quality
assurance process for the whole contract duration.
2. Conceptual design of the proposed M&E software application on the basis of
existing
calculation model together with its intended outputs and reports, for review by PMU
and other VEEPL stakeholders.
3. A final system design of monitoring and evaluation system, with query based
report
generation.
4. A user friendly software application as monitoring and evaluation system,
that is
accessible through internet and intranet and uses data and information provided by
PLDF and PLIC to calculate and produce estimates of impacts of VEEPL project in the
form of query based reports.
5. Data entry interfaces for updating data over the internet.
6. Reporting templates for M&E reports.
7. An easy to understand instruction manual for users with little or no IT
knowledge or
expertise to guide efficient use of the system.
8. Satisfactory feedback from the participating staff of PLDF, PLIC and PMU on
training
related with use of the M&E system.


OVERALL QUALITY REQUIREMENT FOR THE ASSIGNMENT

Some key quality requirement for this assignment includes:

? A sound methodology/approach must be provided, consulted and agreed with the
PMU at
the beginning of the assignment. It should clearly show how the assignment will be
accomplished in most effective and feasible manner.
? Review/assessment and quality assurance criteria should be explained clearly
and with
sufficient details in the reports.
? All queries and concerns raised by potential users of the system will be
addressed by the
consultants in a satisfactory manner.
? All reports will be provided in both English and Vietnamese languages (first
in English
and approved version in Vietnamese).

QUALIFICATION AND EXPERIENCE

Minimum qualifications of the expert are as follows:

? University degree in management or computer science,
? Extensive skill set and experience in data management, processing, and analysis.
? Demonstrated experience (5 years) in development of relational databases and
remote
access software applications.
? Some experience related with development of M&E systems.
? Knowledge and familiarity with lighting technologies and issues, greenhouse
gas and
carbon emission reduction issues will be considered an advantage.
? Demonstrated skills in the use of MS Office suite such as Ms Word, Excel and
PowerPoint.
? English language skills, written and spoken, will be considered an advantage.


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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 18 01:28:22 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2009 08:28:22 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] UNDP: 01 Expert on Economic Feasibility and Technical
Assessment of VEEPL Demonstration Schemes (Code D2.09)
Message-ID: <49E8A016.6000806@gmail.com>

01 Expert on Economic Feasibility and Technical Assessment of VEEPL
Demonstration Schemes (Code D2.09)
Publish Date: 17-Apr-2009

Project PIMS 2031 CC FSP Vietnam: Energy Efficient Public Lighting (VEEPL) is a
joint effort of the Global Environment Facility (GEF)/United Nations Development
Programme (UNDP) and Vietnamese counterparts, aiming at encouraging application
of the energy efficient Public Lighting in Vietnam by all sectors, and through
that contributing to the reduction of Green House Gas (GHG) emission.

The project is seeking for 01 Expert on Economic Feasibility and Technical
Assessment of VEEPL Demonstration Schemes (Code D2.09)

Term of Reference (D2.09) attached.

All the national qualified and interested candidates are invited to send an
application letter, CV (English and Vietnamese versions) and relevant
certificates/degrees to address below.

"Vietnam: Energy Efficient Public Lighting" Project Management Unit
Vietnamese Academy of Science and Technology
Room 203, 2nd Floor, Building B1, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet St., Cau Giay Dist., Hanoi
Tel: (04) 3791 3792
Fax: (04) 3791 3793
Email: veepl at ims.vast.ac.vn

Deadline for submissions: Tuesday 05:00 PM | 05-May-2009


1
TERM OF REFERENCE (D2.09)

Position: Expert on Economic Feasibility and Technical Assessment of
VEEPL Demonstration Schemes
Task Location: Hanoi, Quy Nhon and Ho Chi Minh City as required
Duration: Six (06) months tentatively starting by May 2009
Task Manager: Project Manager

1. Background

The Project Vietnam Energy Efficient Public Lighting (VEEPL) is a joint effort
of the
Global Environment Facility (GEF) and Vietnamese counterparts, aiming at
encouraging
application of the energy efficient practices among Public Lighting in Vietnam, and
through that contributing to the reduction of Green House Gas (GHG) emission by the
sector.

The project will contribute to the transformation of Vietnam?s Public Lighting from
highly energy inefficient and polluting to energy efficient with greatly reduced
pollution
through the effective implementation of a carefully chosen and integrated mix of
project
components by relevant central government agencies, local governments,
institutions,
lighting industry and private sector.

One of the core project activities is to demonstrate to various stakeholders the
viability
and feasibility of energy efficient public lighting systems through actual design,
implementation, and financing of such systems. For this purpose, VEEPL Project has
provided technical support to the implementation of various demonstration street
and
school lighting projects in Quy Nhon, Ho Chi Minh City and Hanoi. One of the key
elements of VEEPLP?s technical assistance has been providing technical
assessment and
economic feasibility analysis of the proposed demonstration projects.

In order to continue to providing such assistance to more demonstration projects
VEEPLP
is seeking the services of a qualified expert with suitable experience and
qualification.
This position is available through a 6 month performance based contract.

2. Duties and responsibilities

The major responsibility of the expert is to conduct the economic feasibility
and technical
assessment of VEEPL demonstration schemes implemented:
? In Ho Chi Minh City for 2007 and 2009 with [the Subcontracts: i) Implementation
of Demonstration Schemes in Ho Chi Minh City in 2007, and ii) Analysis and
assessment of a Demonstration Central Control System for Street Lighting.
? In Quy Nhon City with the Subcontract ?Implementation of Demonstration
Schemes in Quy Nhon City? for 2008.
? In Ha Noi with Subcontract ?Implementation of Demonstration of EEPL at
schools of some levels (high schools, primary schools, and secondary schools) of
Hanoi City?.
The technical assessment shall examine the suitability of choice of energy
efficient
technology and suitability of scheme design to ensure that the design exploits
the full
potential of energy savings offered by the energy efficient technology and is
compliant
with local standards and regulations. The technical assessment shall also
provide a
2
comparison between the energy efficient technology being used in the project with
conventional standard technology that was either previously used or could have
been used
in the absence of energy efficient technology.

The economic feasibility will provide complete assessment/comparison between energy
efficient and standard technologies in terms of total investment and operational
costs for
the life of the project. The feasibility assessment will be detailed and will
address all
aspects of investment over the complete lifecycle of the project i.e. capital
investment,
operational costs, financing and loan repayment etc.


3. Scope of Work

? Work with PMU to develop a detailed working plan for the whole contract
duration;
? Collect required data/information on demonstration schemes, as described in
Section 2, from the relevant stakeholders. The relevant staff members at VEEPLP
shall assist the experts in accessing such data/information.
? Meet with owners/implementers of demonstration projects to discuss various
technical and economic aspects of the projects.
? Conduct the economic feasibility and technical assessment of the above-mentioned
demonstration schemes, in line with description of technical assessment and
economic feasibility provided in Section 2.
? Discuss the findings with the owners/implementers of demonstration projects and
relevant staff at PMU.
? Prepare 3 information sheets, each providing summary of description of the
project and key technical and economic findings for one type of demonstration
project.
? Prepare final report that provides details of methodology/approach used to
conduct the technical assessment and economic feasibility analysis, results and
recommendations to assist other stakeholders in improving technical and
economic design for similar energy efficient public lighting projects.

Deliverables

1. A detailed work plan, together with review/assessment and quality assurance
process for the whole contract duration.
2. Interim report on data collection and key findings as discussed and agreed with
the owners/implementers of demonstration projects and relevant staff at PMU.
3. Three project information sheets, each providing summary of description of the
project and key technical and economic findings for one type of demonstration
project.
4. Final report.

All communications and reports must be in Vietnamese and English. All the above
completed reports must be submitted to PMU.




3
Overall quality requirement for the assignment
Some key quality requirement for this assignment includes:
? A sound methodology/approach must be provided, consulted and agreed with the
PMU at the beginning of the assignment. It should clearly show how the
assignment will be accomplished in most effective and feasible manner.
? Review/assessment and quality assurance criteria should be explained clearly and
with sufficient details in the reports.
? All queries and concerns raised by relevant stakeholders and VEEPL staff will be
addressed by the expert in a satisfactory manner.

All reports will be provided in both English and Vietnamese languages (first in
English
and approved version in Vietnamese).


Qualification and Experience

Minimum qualifications of the expert are as follows:
? Bachelor or master degree in engineering, finance, economics, management or
related fields.
? At least 5 year experience of conducting economic feasibility assessment of
engineering/ development projects. Experience with energy efficiency related
projects will be considered an advantage.
? Knowledge and familiarity with lighting technologies and issues, greenhouse gas
and carbon emission reduction issues will be considered an advantage.
? Demonstrated skills in the use of MS Office suite such as MS Word, Excel and
PowerPoint.
? English language skills, written and spoken, are mandatory for this assignment.

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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 18 01:36:17 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2009 08:36:17 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] [Ha Noi] Authorities to crack down on firms dumping
toxic waste
Message-ID: <49E8A1F1.9020307@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://vietnamnews.vnagency.com.vn/showarticle.php?num=02ENV170409

Authorities to crack down on firms dumping toxic waste

(17-04-2009)


The Nhue River is polluted by the water discharged from To Lich and Kim Nguu
rivers. Punishments will become stricter to prevent firms from further polluting
the environment.?VNA/VNS Photo Hoang Lam

HA NOI ? The Ha Noi Department of Natural Resources and Environment has sent
three inspection teams out to monitor firms suspected of dumping toxic waste
into the Nhue River.

Head of the Environment Protection Division Nguyen Van Luong said the authority
had decided to act swiftly after nearly 10 tonnes of dead fish were removed from
a 2km stretch of the river running through the Ha Dong City early last month.

As many as 40 enterprises, mostly in Phu Dien and Minh Khai communes in Tu Liem
District, and two more in Ha Dong City were to be closely monitored, Luong said,
adding that inspectors would check to see if the companies were adhering to
environmental protection laws, which stipulate that toxic waste must be properly
treated before it is discharged into the city?s waterways.

"The teams will take samples of waste water from enterprises in industrial areas
and craft villages for further testing if necessary," he said.

Inspections, which began on Monday, will last until next Tuesday.

"The checks will identify the major polluters dumping untreated waste water into
the river. All violators will have to suspended operations. They will also be
fined or prosecuted depending on the violations," said Luong.

However, he said the punishments were not stringent enough to deter firms from
polluting the environment.

"The cost of industrial waste water treatment systems can be billions of dong
while the punishments are just tens of millions," Luong said, adding that the
law was due to be amended to make the punishments more severe.

Last year, the municipal Department of Natural Resources and Environment
inspected 112 enterprises around the city. As many as 87 enterprises were found
to be breaking environmental protection laws and 18 were fined a total of VND307
million (US$17,200). ? VNS




From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 18 01:40:22 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2009 08:40:22 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] French region helps build forestry nursery in Hue
Message-ID: <49E8A2E6.50107@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/tech/2009/04/842249/

French region helps build forestry nursery in Hue
10:58' 16/04/2009 (GMT+7)

VietNamNet Bridge ? France?s Nord Pas de Calais region has provided 47,000 EUR
for the construction of a tissue culture lab worth 2.6 billion VND to serve
afforestation in central Thua Thien ? Hue Province.

The 300 sq.m nursery, which has a capacity of one million plants per year, is
part of the cooperation between the French region and Thua Thien ? Hue Province
in agricultural sector.

It is expected to supply enough young trees for the planting of 200 hectares of
forest per year.

The lab will also conduct research on new varieties of agricultural plants,
flowers and pot plants to serve the locality?s demand.

VietNamNet/VNA


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 18 01:41:09 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2009 08:41:09 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Ba Vi crowds stop workers dumping piles of rubbish
Message-ID: <49E8A315.7080904@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/tech/2009/04/842334/

Ba Vi crowds stop workers dumping piles of rubbish
17:07' 16/04/2009 (GMT+7)

VietNamNet Bridge ? Hundreds of local people in Son Tay City and Ba Vi District,
Ha Noi, prevented sanitation workers from dumping waste at the Xuan Son dumping
ground and the Son Tay waste treatment factory to protest environmental
pollution in the area.

The people said their action was a response to the pollution caused by the waste
treatment process and the slow implementation of a project to expand the Xuan
Son dumping ground.

They urged local authorities to include land clearance compensation, safe-water
and electricity supplies and the provision of health care for people living in
polluted areas as part of the project.

The Son Tay Urban Work and Environment Company sterilised the area and covered
the nearly 400 tonnes of dumped rubbish with a canvas to reduce environmental
pollution, said company director Le Van Thuc.

"Local authorities are asking people to let the company?s sanitation workers
dump the rubbish and the situation is expected to be solved soon," he said.

In response to residents? complaints, Son Tay City authorities are working with
relevant agencies, particularly the project?s investor, to deal with the situation.

Call for inspection

Following up accusations of environmental pollution by the Son Tay waste
treatment factory, Nguyen Quang Manh, chairman of the city?s People?s Committee,
said the committee had asked the Ha Noi Department of Natural Resources and
Environment and the municipal Environmental Protection Department to inspect the
factory.

The city proposed that the factory temporarily stop collecting rubbish in order
to focus on treating rubbish that fails to meet dumping standards and pollution
caused by smoke from the incinerators. Son Tay City submitted a project to move
affected households out of polluted areas to the Ha Noi municipal People?s
Committee for approval.

The city entrusted Son Tay?s Safe Water Supply Company to provide water for
residents by April 20 and asked local clinics to provide free health check-ups
and medicine twice a year.

The Xuan Son dumping ground treats waste for Son Tay City and the six
surrounding communes.

It currently covers 13ha and has a capacity of treating more than 80 tonnes of
rubbish per day. Once the project is complete, the facility will cover over 25ha.

"The project is aimed at moving local people away from the dumping ground to
protect their health and improve the treatment capacity of the Xuan Son dumping
ground in order to reduce environmental pollution," Thuc said.

The dumping ground was currently able to treat around 80 per cent of collected
rubbish, he said.

VietNamNet/Viet Nam News


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 18 22:57:08 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Sat, 18 Apr 2009 05:57:08 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Opinion: Homo sociens and the New Ecological Growth
Economy
Message-ID: <49E9CE24.6000809@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://www.enn.com/business/article/39714

From: Peter David Pedersen , Global Policy Innovations Program, More from this
Affiliate
Published April 17, 2009 09:19 AM
Homo sociens and the New Ecological Growth Economy


new economy is on the doorstep. It's not the economy we used to know as "the new
economy." It's not the information-technology-driven growth of the last few
decades, although that makes up part of the new economy. A new economy is
rapidly emerging, one which will transform the ways that people live and do
business.

The name of the new new economy is the "ecological growth economy." This is
neither a bad joke nor an anachronism. It is the emerging new reality. It is
also the precondition for the continuation of human progress and the survival of
millions of other species on Earth. We have an obvious choice: We can speed up
the realization of the ecological growth economy now, or our children and theirs
will suffer for centuries.

It appears to be an easy choice, doesn't it? We can choose human progress over
suffering. And yet, we are not making this choice at sufficient speed or scale
today. Ignorance, institutional inertia, vested interests, and greed are the
main reasons for our far-too-slow action. However, as sentient creatures (Homo
sapiens), humans are equipped with knowledge, good will, and a degree of wisdom.
A majority of people around the Earth today are realizing that we cannot survive
without embracing the ecological growth economy. Most people are willing to join
forces and are willing to make certain sacrifices in lifestyle to achieve an
economy that will allow the continuation of human progress into future
generations. Fortunately, an increasing number of people are making great
efforts to bring about this new economy.

Is Growth Evil?

The ecological growth economy will not mean sacrifice, and will not cause a
return to low growth or no growth. It will not mean a less attractive lifestyle,
but will, in fact, create a more attractive one. It will drive the continued
growth of the global economy into the second half of the twenty-first century.
It will enable the greatest consumption boom in history and will create more new
business opportunities than ever before.

Does this sound unlikely or undesirable? I argue that it is inevitable. Why?
Because it is the only way we can choose life over death, continued human
progress over prolonged suffering.

The human population will consume at least twice as much food in 2050 as in
1995. Energy consumption will rise by approximately 76 percent between 2000 and
2030. The urban population will rise from 3.3 billion in 2007 to 5 billion in
2030 and further on to 6.4 billion in 2050. There will be an estimated 9.15
billion people on Earth in 2050, as compared to 6.7 billion in early 2009, and
they will all want to live decent lives.

They will want to be able to consume, to expand their personal freedom and
mobility, and to enjoy what they define as a prosperous or satisfactory
lifestyle. Their combined consumption drive will most likely be the greatest and
longest seen in human history in any 50-year span. Neither laws nor conventional
appeals to morality will stop these new consumers from consuming more.

There is a crucial question of "how much is enough" or of what constitutes a
prosperous lifestyle, and there is certainly gross over-consumption in many
countries, but prosperity will not be defined by scholars or by
environmentalists. It will be defined and realized by people all over the Earth
in and through their daily lives.

What is the Ecological Growth Economy?

To enable all people on Earth to pull out of hunger and poverty and create for
themselves a life of prosperity and human satisfaction, we must make operational
an ecological growth economy within the next decade or so. We do not have the
choice between growth and zero growth. Denial of continued growth in the next
few decades is not an option. It would deny billions of people a fair and decent
life and keep large portions of the global population mired in poverty and misery.

The question, at least when we look at the four to five decades ahead of us, is
not "growth or no growth." The question is "what will the quality of growth be"
and how will we achieve it. The obvious answer is growth based upon sound
ecological principles. Business as usual is a literal dead end. It would cause
more misery, death, and destruction. The quality of growth must undergo dramatic
changes within a very short period of time. What lies ahead of us is a grand
challenge: Not only is it an industrial revolution, it is also a revolution in
the way we perceive economics, business, profits, and prosperity. The bad news
is that we do not have much time. The good news is that the new economy is
already taking shape and picking up speed.

What does it mean to build an economy on sound ecological principles? It means
that all forms of business and other human activity will be directed toward a
truly cyclical use of resources, zero carbon emissions, and restoration and
reinvestment in natural capital. To describe this economy in detail is not
possible in this short article, but two major points are essential.

First, the ecological growth economy must be driven by a major restructuring of
the rules and incentives built into national as well as international economic
systems. This trend can only intensify in the coming years, and the truly
crucial question is whether the speed and scale at which this restructuring of
our economies takes place is great enough. We need to not just envision but also
implement the new rules and incentives of the next industrial revolution.
Second, the ecological growth economy represents one of the largest market
opportunities in human history. All sectors of the economy in virtually all
parts of the world will move toward green, clean, and sustainable?energy,
mobility, housing, appliances, food production, water usage. Every key area
supporting human life will be recalibrated or recreated as the ecological growth
economy picks up speed. Countries, companies, and entrepreneurs who understand
this transformation will be presented with a virtually unlimited supply of new
business opportunities.

Can We Evolve to Become Homo sociens?

In order to implement the ecological growth economy at sufficient speed and
scale, we need unprecedented global collaboration and a strong sense of shared
vision for the future. We also need to be better at listening to the voices of
future generations and the many other species on Earth. In more concrete terms,
we need more concerted and forceful action from international leaders in forums
such as the G-8, G-20, and United Nations, and new forms of collaboration
between business and civil society.

In the few decades since humans first saw Earth from space and then started
discussing the possibility that our present way of life might not be
sustainable, a greater sense of global consciousness has clearly emerged.
Technological tools such as fax machines, email, and the internet have helped
nurture this healthy sense of globalism. I believe that if we are to make the
grand shift to a new industrial and economic system, built firmly on ecological
pillars, we will need to further evolve culturally, mentally, and even
spiritually. I call this the evolution from Homo sapiens to Homo sociens?human
beings who share and collaborate.

We have sufficient knowledge of the ecological and social problems the world
faces today, and plenty of realistic simulations of how tomorrow might look.
This information should speed up our evolution into Homo sociens. This means
looking beyond national interests and placing a higher priority on global or
Earth interests. It means realizing that the human species cannot survive
without valuing and protecting the myriad living creatures on this planet that
enable our survival. Most importantly, it means making such values operational
in international and national agreements, as well as in corporate strategy. The
future is ours to choose.

This article is reproduced with kind permission of the
Global Policy Innovations Program (Policy Inovations).
For more news and articles, visit www.policyinnovations.org.


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 18 23:32:04 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Sat, 18 Apr 2009 06:32:04 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] =?utf-8?q?Why_Isn=E2=80=99t_the_Brain_Green=3F?=
Message-ID: <49E9D654.1030000@coombs.anu.edu.au>



http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/19/magazine/19Science-t.html?_r=1


April 19, 2009
THE GREEN ISSUE

Why Isn?t the Brain Green?

By JON GERTNER
Two days after Barack Obama was sworn in as president of the United States, the
Pew Research Center released a poll ranking the issues that Americans said were
the most important priorities for this year. At the top of the list were several
concerns ? jobs and the economy ? related to the current recession. Farther
down, well after terrorism, deficit reduction and en ergy (and even something
the pollsters characterized as ?moral decline?) was climate change. It was
priority No. 20. That was last place.

A little more than a week after the poll was published, I took a seat in a
wood-paneled room at Columbia University, where a few dozen academics had
assembled for a two-day conference on the environment. In many respects, the Pew
rankings were a suitable backdrop for the get-together, a meeting of researchers
affiliated with something called CRED, or the Center for Research on
Environmental Decisions. A branch of behavioral research situated at the
intersection of psychology and economics, decision science focuses on the mental
proces ses that shape our choices, behaviors and attitudes. The field?s origins
grew mostly out of the work, beginning in the 1970s, of Daniel Kahneman and Amos
Tversky, two psychologists whose experiments have demonstrated that people can
behave unexpectedly when confronted with simple choices. We have many automatic
biases ? we?re more averse to losses than we are interested in gains, for
instance ? and we make repeated errors in judgment based on our tendency to use
shorthand rules to solve problems. We can also be extremely susceptible to how
questions are posed. Would you undergo surgery if it had a 20 percent mortality
rate? What if it had an 80 percent survival rate? It?s the same procedure, of
course, but in various experiments, responses from patients can differ markedly.

Over the past few decades a great deal of research has addressed how we make
decisions in financial settings or when confronted with choices having to do
with health care and consumer products. A few years ago, a Columbia psychology
professor named David H. Krantz teamed up with Elke Weber ? who holds a chair at
Columbia?s business school as well as an appointment in the school?s psychology
department ? to assemble an interdisciplinary group of economists, psychologists
and anthropologists from around the world who would examine decision-making
related to environmental issues. Aided by a $6 million grant from the National
Science Foundation, CRED has the primary objective of studying how perceptions
of risk and uncertainty shape our responses to climate change and other weather
phenomena like hurricanes and droughts. The goal, in other words, isn?t so much
to explore theories about how people relate to nature, which has been a longtime
pursuit of some environmental psychologists and even academics like the Harvard
biologist E. O. Wilson. Rather, it is to finance laboratory and field
experiments in North America, South America, Europe and Africa and then place
the findings within an environmental context.

It isn?t immediately obvious why such studies are necessary or even valuable.
Indeed, in the United States scientific community, where nearly all dollars for
climate investigation are directed toward physical or biological projects, the
notion that vital environmental solutions will be attained through
social-science research ? instead of improved climate models or innovative
technologies ? is an aggressively insurgent view. You might ask the decision
scientists, as I eventually did, if they aren?t overcomplicating matters.
Doesn?t a low-carbon world really just mean phasing out coal and other fossil
fuels in favor of clean-energy technologies, domestic regulations and
international treaties? None of them disagreed. Some smiled patiently. But all
of them wondered if I had underestimated the countless group and individual
decisions that must precede any widespread support for such technologies or
policies. ?Let?s start with the fact that climate change is anthropogenic,?
Weber told me one morning in her Columbia office. ?More or less, people have
agreed on that. That means it?s caused by human behavior. That?s not to say that
engineering solutions aren?t important. But if it?s caused by human behavior,
then the solution probably also lies in changing human behavior.?

Among other things, CRED?s researchers consider global warming a singular
opportunity to study how we react to long-term trade-offs, in the form of
sacrifices we might make now in exchange for uncertain climate benefits far off
in the future. And the research also has the potential to improve environmental
messages, policies and technologies so that they are more in tune with the
quirky workings of our minds. As I settled in that first morning at the Columbia
conference, Weber was giving a primer on how people tend to reach decisions.
Cognitive psychologists now broadly accept that we have different systems for
processing risks. One system works analytically, often involving a careful
consideration of costs and benefits. The other experiences risk as a feeling: a
primitive and urgent reaction to danger, usually based on a personal experience,
that can prove invaluable when (for example) we wake at night to the smell of smoke.

There are some unfortunate implications here. In analytical mode, we are not
always adept at long-term thinking; experiments have shown a frequent dislike
for delayed benefits, so we undervalue promised future outcomes. (Given a
choice, we usually take $10 now as opposed to, say, $20 two years from now.)
Environmentally speaking, this means we are far less likely to make lifestyle
changes in order to ensure a safer future climate. Letting emotions determine
how we assess risk presents its own problems. Almost certainly, we underestimate
the danger of rising sea levels or epic droughts or other events that we?ve
never experienced and seem far away in time and place. Worse, Weber?s research
seems to help establish that we have a ?finite pool of worry,? which means we?re
unable to maintain our fear of climate change when a different problem ? a
plunging stock market, a personal emergency ? comes along. We simply move one
fear into the worry bin and one fear out. And even if we could remain
persistently concerned about a warmer world? Weber described what she calls a
?single-action bias.? Prompted by a distressing emotional signal, we buy a more
efficient furnace or insulate our attic or vote for a green candidate ? a single
action that effectively diminishes global warming as a motivating factor. And
that leaves us where we started.

Debates over why climate change isn?t higher on Americans? list of priorities
tend to center on the same culprits: the doubt-sowing remarks of climate-change
skeptics, the poor communications skills of good scientists, the political
system?s inability to address long-term challenges without a thunderous
precipitating event, the tendency of science journalism to focus more on what is
unknown (will oceans rise by two feet or by five?) than what is known and is
durably frightening (the oceans are rising). By the time Weber was midway into
her presentation, though, it occurred to me that some of these factors might not
matter as much as I had thought. I began to wonder if we are just built to fail.

Columbia?s behavioral labs are located underground and consist of a windowless
suite of bright, sparsely furnished rooms with whitewashed cinder-block walls
and gray industrial carpet. Each lab has a common area with a small rectangular
table; adjacent to the common area are several tiny offices equipped with Dell
computers. Depending on the experiment, test subjects, who are usually paid
around $15 to participate and who are culled largely from Columbia?s student
body, can work on tests collaboratively at the table or individually in the
private offices.

Each lab room is also equipped with a hidden camera and microphone. One
afternoon in February, I sat in a small viewing room and watched, on a
closed-circuit television monitor, a CRED experiment being conducted down the
hall by Juliana Smith, a graduate student at Columbia. Three subjects were
dealing with several quandaries. The first involved reaching a consensus on how
to apply $5 billion worth of federal funds to wind-energy technologies. Should
they spend it all on conventional wind turbines? Should they invest some (or
all) of the money on an as-yet-unproven technology that would employ magnetic
levitation to create a huge, long-lasting, superefficient wind-powered
generator? After the group came to a consensus in each of the test segments, its
members were asked to go into the offices and figure out their own individual
decisions.

When I first heard about these particular experiments at CRED, I assumed they
were meant to provide insight into our opinions about wind power. It turned out
the researchers had little curiosity about what we think of wind power. Because
CRED?s primary goal is to understand decision-making in situations of
uncertainty, the wind-turbine question ? should we spend money on building
turbines now with a proven technology or should we finance technologies that
might be more efficient someday? ? was intriguing not for its content but for
the way it revealed how our minds work. The familiar variables were all there:
uncertainty, time, potential gains, potential losses.

For the researchers, it was crucial to understand precisely how group dynamics
shaped decisions during the experiment. In Weber?s view, many important
environmental choices (building codes, for instance, or vehicle purchases) are
made by groups ? households, companies, community boards and the like. And
various experiments at CRED have established the ease of getting random
individuals to cooperate; in one test, simply giving some subjects a colored
sticker, a blue star, say, and telling them they were on the ?blue-star team?
increased group participation from 35 percent to 50 percent. (Just seating them
together at a table increased participation rates to 75 percent.) ?So
cooperation is a goal that can be activated,? Weber told me one morning. Her
point was that climate change can be easily viewed as a very large ?commons
dilemma? ? a version, that is, of the textbook situation in which sheepherders
have little incentive to act alone to preserve the grassy commons and as a
result suffer collectively from overgrazing. The best way to avoid such failure
is by collaborating more, not less. ?We enjoy congregating; we need to know we
are part of groups,? Weber said. ?It gives us inherent pleasure to do this. And
when we are reminded of the fact that we?re part of communities, then the
community becomes sort of the decision-making unit. That?s how we make huge
sacrifices, like in World War II.?

A few days before visiting Columbia?s behavioral labs, I watched a test run of
the same experiments at a large conference table at CRED?s nearby offices in
Schermerhorn Hall. Student subjects, two men and one woman, debated the two
windmill scenarios. ?We should put more money in project A,? one said. Another
countered, ?But science grows exponentially, so I think we should put more in
B.? An impassioned discussion about wind turbines went round and round.

I sat between Weber and Michel Handgraaf, a member of CRED and a professor of
psychol ogy at the University of Amsterdam. Handgraaf, who had already started
running a similar experiment in Amsterdam, leaned over and whispered to me:
?You?ll notice they?re saying, ?This has so-and-so effect over so many years? ?
that?s analytical. But then often they?re saying, ?But I feel this way? ? that?s
emotional.? In short, what Handgraaf and Weber were hearing wasn?t a
conversation about the best wind turbine but a tussle between the subjects?
analytical and emotional methods of risk assessment. These experiments would be
run with 50 different groups in New York, Handgraaf told me, and the
conversations would be recorded and scored for data. The data were in the words.
They were in how individuals parsed uncertainty and future trade-offs; they were
in the phrases they used as they navigated between thinking and feeling; they
were in the way the subjects followed a winding path to a consensual decision,
soothing worries or explaining technical information to one another or appealing
to the group?s more courageous instincts.

Embedded deep within the experimental structure was another inquiry, too. The
subjects in half of the 50 test groups would first make their decisions
individually and then as a group; the other half would make group decisions
first and individual ones second. Weber and Handgraaf were fairly confident,
based on previous work, that the two approaches would produce different results.
In Amsterdam, Handgraaf told me, he had already seen that when subjects made
decisions as a group first, their conversations were marked far more often by
subtle markers of inclusion like ?us? and ?we.? Weber, for her part, had seen
other evidence that groups can be more patient than individuals when considering
delayed benefits. ?One reason this is interesting is that it?s general practice
in any meeting to prepare individually,? Handgraaf said. Or, to put the matter
another way: What if the information for decisions, especially environmental
ones, is first considered in a group setting before members take it up
individually, rather than the other way around? In Weber?s view, this step could
conceivably change the decisions made by a corporate board, for example, or a
group of homeowners called together for a meeting by a public utility. Weber?s
experiments have also looked at how the ordering of choices can create stark
differences: considering distant benefits before immediate costs can lead to a
different decision than if you consider ? as is common ? the costs first. Here,
then, is a kind of blueprint for achieving collective decisions that are in the
world?s best interests, but I asked Weber if that wouldn?t that skew the natural
decision-making process.

?We tend to always wonder,? she replied: ?What?s that person?s true preference?
What do they really want? I think that?s the wrong question, because we want it
all.? People have multiple goals. If group involvement or the ordering of
choices changes the process of making a particular decision, and in turn the
result ? whether because it tweaked our notions of risk or because it helped
elevate social goals above individual goals and led to better choices for the
global commons ? that isn?t necessarily a distortion of our true preference.
There is no such thing as true preference.

At the moment, about 98 percent of the federal financing for climate-change
research goes to the physical and natural sciences, with the remainder
apportioned to the social sciences. In science-policy-speak, that leftover
percentage is typically referred to as ?human dimensions? research, an omnibus
description for studies on how individuals and groups interact with the
environment. Paul Stern, a psychologist who heads the Committee on Human
Dimensions of Global Change at the National Research Council in Washington and
whose work includes looking at how people consume energy in the home, told me
that human-dimensions work usually falls into one of three categories: the human
activities that cause environmental change, the impacts of environmental change
on people and society and the human responses to those consequences. Much of
CRED?s research is about the human responses to the experiences (or anticipated
experiences) of climate change. What makes CRED?s work especially relevant,
though, is that various human attitudes and responses ? How can there be global
warming when we had a frigid January? What?s in it for me if I change the way I
live? ? can make the climate problem worse by leaving it unacknowledged or
unaddressed. Apathetic and hostile responses to climate change, in other words,
produce a feedback loop and reinforce the process of global warming.

Lab experiments in the social sciences, like the ones I witnessed at Columbia,
are sometimes criticized for their counterfeit drama. After all, how often do we
actually get to disburse $5 billion from the Department of Energy on windmills?
Also, is the real world made up entirely of Columbia University students? These
factors don?t necessarily affect the knowledge that researchers can gain about
human decision-making processes; lab experi ments on investment decisions, for
instance, have long been shown to offer useful insights into our real-world
investment choices. Nonetheless, fieldwork has a value that can?t always be
reproduced in a lab. The lab experiment designed by Weber and Handgraaf actually
took a cue from research done by another CRED member, Ben Orlove, an
anthropologist at the University of California, Davis, who studied farmers in
southern Uganda. In 2005 and 2006, Orlove observed how the behavior of the
region?s poor farmers could be influenced by whether they listened to crucial
rainy-season radio broadcasts in groups or as individuals. Farmers in ?community
groups,? as Orlove described them to me, engaged in discussions that led to a
consensus, and farmers made better use of the forecast. ?They might alter their
planting date,? he said, ?or use a more drought-resistant variety of seed.?
Those in the community groups also seemed more satisfied with the steps they
took to increase their yields.

In 2005, Anthony Leiserowitz, a CRED member who directs the Yale Project on
Climate Change, began a multiyear field project when he drove to Anchorage in a
camper with his wife and 2-year-old son. ?I had worked on some national studies
about American perceptions of climate change,? he told me, ?and one of the clear
findings was ? and still is ? that most Americans think about climate change as
a distant problem. Distant in time, and distant in space.? In Alaska, however,
there was already evidence of melting permafrost, insect-driven tree mortality
and diminished sea ice. Leiserowitz saw a natural opportunity. The possibility
that society won?t act decisively on global warming until we experience a
shattering re ali zation ? a Pearl Harbor moment, as the climate blogger and
former Department of Energy official Joe Romm recently put it ? aligns with our
tendency to respond quickly to the stimulus of experience and emotion, but
slowly to a risk that we process analytically and that may be rife with
uncertainties. Leiserowitz simply wondered if Alaskans, now living in a state of
easily perceived climate changes, could illuminate how ? and by how much ?
direct experience could change attitudes.

Traveling the state, Leiserowitz interviewed scientists, journalists,
environmental leaders, politicians and ? in the remote northwestern city of
Kotzebue ? indigenous tribal leaders. He also commissioned a survey. His data
showed that the majority of Alaskans had indeed detected a change in climate and
attributed it to man-made causes; they also said they believed warming would
have significant impacts on Alaska and the world. But Leiserowitz found deep
perceptual gaps between urban Alaskans, whose experience of climate change was
limited, and rural residents. (People living in Kotzebue, for instance, were
experiencing a threat to their culture from the erosion of sea ice, which
limited their ice fishing.) In sum, Alaskans were no more worried than the
American public as a whole about climate change. And they were no more inclined
than typical Americans to see it as a serious threat to themselves or to their
communities. About half of them, in fact, considered climate change a long-term
problem that required more study before acting.

Among other things, the results suggested that experience of climate change is a
relative thing: something happening to another part of your state, or to a
different cultural group, doesn?t necessarily warrant a change in your own
response. It likewise hinted at the complexity of instilling feelings of
climate-related urgency in Americans. If you don?t think or feel there?s a risk,
why change your behavior? In response, researchers like Leiserowitz have
investigated messages that could captivate all different kinds of audiences.
Reaching a predominantly evangelical or conservative audience, Leiserowitz told
me, could perhaps be achieved by honing a message of ?moral Christian values,?
an appeal possibly based on the divine instruction in Genesis 2:15 to tend and
till the garden.

Over the past few years, it has become fashionable to describe this kind of
focused communication as having the proper frame. In our haste to mix jargon
into everyday conversation, frames have sometimes been confused with nudges, a
term made popular in a recent book, ?Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health,
Wealth and Happiness,? written by Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein when they
were academics at the University of Chicago. (Sunstein later moved to Harvard
Law School and has since been nominated as the head of the White House Office of
Information and Regulatory Affairs.) Frames and nudges are not precisely the
same; frames are just one way to nudge people by using sophisticated messages,
mined from decision-science research, that resonate with particular audiences or
that take advantage of our cognitive biases (like informing us that an urgent
operation has an 80 percent survival rate). Nudges, more broadly, structure
choices so that our natural cognitive shortcomings don?t make us err. Ideally,
nudges direct us, gently, toward actions that are in our long-term interest,
like an automated retirement savings plan that circumvents our typical inertia.
Thaler and Sunstein explain in their book that nudges can take advantage of
technology like home meters, which have been shown to reduce electricity usage
by making constant feedback available. These appeal to our desire for short-term
satisfaction and being rewarded for improvement. Or a nudge might be as simple
as a sensor installed in our home by a utility that automatically turns off all
unnecessary power once we leave for the day ? a technology, in effect, that
doesn?t even require us to use our brains. ?I think the potential there is
huge,? Thaler told me recently, when I asked him about environmental nudges.
?And I think we can use a whole bag of tricks.?

Leiserowitz and Weber spend a fair amount of time talking to scientists and
policy makers about how to translate their insights into possible frames and
nudges. In Weber?s view, CRED was established because the traditional model of
using decision research ? in which physical scientists doing a study might seek
the input of psychologists at the end to help them frame their findings ? seemed
both backward and ineffective. ?By then it?s too late,? Weber said, ?because you
haven?t explored all the initial options that would have been more beneficial.?
In other words, Weber says he believes decision science isn?t only about
structuring choices or finding the right frame to get a better outcome; it?s
about identifying useful information that can be used for innovative products,
policies and scientific studies. At the National Research Council, Paul Stern
offered the example of a climatologist who had been discussing climate change
with cherry farmers in several Michigan counties. The farmers didn?t care about
future temperatures as much as the date of the last spring frost. ?No one has
been interested in trying to predict the date of the last spring frost,? Stern
told me, but maybe they should be. ?They?ve been trying to predict average
temperature and heat waves.? Weber likewise envisioned a similar application in
technology or government policy. ?Whatever you design as the most cost-effective
or technologically feasible solution might not be palatable to the end users or
might encounter political oppositions,? she said. Behavioral research could have
helped you see such hurdles ahead of time. ?You could have designed a way to
implement it better. Or you could have thought about another solution.?

Over the winter, the Obama administration began working on regulations for
carbon-dioxide emissions, arguably the most important climate-related policy
ever undertaken. While many economists favor the simplicity of a carbon tax, it
seemed every person of influence in the United States government agreed that a
cap-and-trade policy ? in which carbon emissions are capped and firms can buy
and sell credits ? was preferable. Perhaps this was understandable: the
poisonous associations of the word ?tax? appear to doom it as a pol icy. And yet
this assumption can obscure what actually happens in the minds of Americans on
this issue. Not long ago, David Hardisty, a student of Weber?s, led an
experiment in which a 2 percent fee added to an airline ticket was described to
various subjects as either a carbon ?tax? or a carbon ?offset.? The subjects
were told the fee would finance alternative-energy and carbon-reduction
technologies. Hardisty predicted he would get different results from Democrats
and Republicans, and that was indeed the case. Democrats were willing to pay a
fee for an offset or a tax; Republicans were willing to pay for an offset but
not a tax. Clearly, the tax frame affected the outcome ? very much so for
Republicans.

A more interesting part of the experiment came next. Hardisty asked his subjects
to write down their thoughts, in order, as they decided whether to pay the tax
or the offset. Why should this matter? We?ve long understood that many of us
find the word ?tax? repellent, but we don?t know precisely how it repels us. For
the past few years, Weber and her husband, Eric Johnson, a professor at
Columbia?s business school, have been looking at how we construct our
preferences when making a choice; they theorize that we ?query? ourselves,
mustering evidence pro and con from memory as we clear a path to a decision. The
order of the thoughts matters ? early thoughts seem to sway our opinion, biasing
subsequent thoughts to support the early position. For Republicans in the
experiment who considered a carbon tax, their early thoughts were strongly
negative (?I will be old and dead by the time this world has an energy crisis?)
and thus led to conclusions that were overwhelmingly negative, too. That?s why
they rejected the tax. Yet for the same group, the word ?offset? actually
changed the way subjects proc essed their choice. In their thinking, they
considered the positive aspects of the offset first ? the financing of clean en
ergy ? and found the overall evidence positive and acceptable. Indeed, in a
follow-up study by Hardisty, merely asking people to list their thoughts about
the fee in one order or another (pros first or cons first) affected their
preference, regardless of whether they were Democrats or Republicans.

So in terms of policy, it may not be the actual tax mechanism that some people
object to; it?s the way a ?trivial semantic difference,? as Hardisty put it, can
lead a group to muster powerful negative associations before they have a chance
to consider any benefits. Baruch Fischhoff, a professor at Carnegie Mellon and a
kind of elder statesman among decision scientists, told me he?s fairly convinced
a carbon tax could be made superior to cap and trade in terms of human
palatability. ?I think there?s an attractive version of the carbon tax if
somebody thought about its design,? Fischhoff told me, adding that it?s a
fundamental principle of decision research that if you?re going to get people to
pay a cost, it?s better to do it in a simple manner (like a tax) than a complex
one (like in cap and trade). Fischoff sketched out for me a possible research
endeavor ? the careful design of a tax instrument and the sophisticated
collection of behavioral responses to it ? that he thought would be necessary
for a tax proposal to gather support. ?But I don?t think the politicians are
that informed about the realm of the possible,? he added. ?Opinion polls are not
all that one needs.?

One objection to potential nudges, whether on carbon taxes or household energy
use, is that they can seem insidious. ?They empower government to maneuver
people in its preferred directions,? Thaler and Sunstein note in their book,
?and at the same time provide officials with excellent tools by which to
accomplish that task.? Thaler and Sunstein conclude that a crucial principle is
to always preserve choice as an option (nudging people with a home energy meter,
for instance, is fine as long as they can opt out of using it). Weber and David
Krantz, two of the co-directors of CRED, have given the matter a good deal of
thought, too. ?People need some guidance over what the right thing to do is,?
Krantz told me. But he said that he was doubtful that you could actually deceive
people with decision science into acting in ways that they don?t believe are
right. ?Remember when New York tried to enforce its jaywalking laws?? he asked.
?You can?t enforce stuff that people don?t believe should be done.?

When I raised the issue of possible ethical dilemmas with Weber, she countered
by claiming that government constantly tries to instill behaviors that are
considered to be in society?s best interest. ?There?s no way around it,? she
told me. ?We?re always trying to push some agenda.? Take the decision to allow
certain kinds of mortgages and securities to be sold that are now considered
disastrous. In doing so, according to Weber, ?we were privileging certain
people, and certain institutions. And for a long time we were pushing the idea
that everyone should own a house.? As for the question of manipulation, Weber
contended that there is no neutral, ?value-free way? of presenting people with
information. ?I think you have to take it as a given that whatever we do,
whether it?s what we currently do or what we plan to do,? she said, ?has some
value judgment built into it.? The crucial question, at least to her, is whether
(and when) we want to use the tools of decision science to try and steer people
toward better choices. If our preferences aren?t fixed the way we think they are
? if, as Weber has argued, they?re sometimes merely constructed on the spot in
response to a choice we face ? why not try new methods (ordering options,
choosing strategic words, creating group effects and so forth) to elicit
preferences aligned with our long-term interest? That has to be better, in
Weber?s opinion, than having people blunder unconsciously into an environmental
catastrophe.

In fact, any potential climate disasters, at least to a behaviorist like Weber,
would likely signal the start of an intriguing but ultimately dismal chain of
events. A few years ago Weber wrote a paper for the journal Climatic Change that
detailed the psychological reasons that global warming doesn?t yet scare us; in
it, she concluded that the difficulties of getting humans to act are inherently
self-correcting. ?Increasing personal evidence of global warming and its
potentially devastating consequences can be counted on to be an extremely
effective teacher and motivator,? she wrote, pointing to how emotional and
experiential feelings of risk are superb drivers of action. ?Unfortunately, such
lessons may arrive too late for corrective action.?

Jon Gertner, a contributing writer, often writes about business and the environment.


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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 18 23:36:08 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Sat, 18 Apr 2009 06:36:08 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] How Carbon Dioxide Became a 'Pollutant'
Message-ID: <49E9D748.8000002@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124001537515830975.html

APRIL 17, 2009, 9:08 P.M. ET
How Carbon Dioxide Became a 'Pollutant'


By KEITH JOHNSON

The Environmental Protection Agency's decision to classify rising carbon-dioxide
emissions as a hazard to human health is the latest twist in a debate that has
raged for decades among politicians, scientists and industry: whether a natural
component of the earth's atmosphere should be considered a pollutant.

The EPA's finding doesn't say carbon dioxide, or CO2, is by itself a pollutant
-- it is, after all, a gas that humans exhale and plants inhale. Rather, it is
the increasing concentrations of the gas that concern the agency.

Carbon-dioxide levels in the Earth's atmosphere have fluctuated wildly for
millennia; at one point billions of years ago, it was the dominant gas in the
atmosphere.

Related Reading

U.S. in Historic Shift on CO2
However, the EPA ruled that today's higher concentrations are the "unambiguous
result of human emissions." Concentrations of carbon dioxide and other gases
"are well above the natural range of atmospheric concentrations compared to the
last 650,000 years," the agency said.

Over the years, many pro-business groups have discouraged regulation of
carbon-dioxide emissions by arguing that CO2 is an essential ingredient of life.
In its decision, the EPA stressed that it considers CO2 and other so-called
greenhouse gases to be pollutants because of their role in propagating climate
change, not because of any direct health effects.

In 1998, the Clinton administration EPA studied the question and determined that
the Clean Air Act was "potentially applicable" to CO2 and other greenhouse
gases. But despite continued pressure from environmental groups, the
administration never moved to regulate the gases.

According to the bulk of scientific research, such as that assembled by the
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the more greenhouse gases there are
in the atmosphere, especially carbon dioxide, the more heat is trapped. That
leads to rising temperatures. The EPA endorsed the IPCC research and
specifically said that "natural variations" in climate, such as solar activity,
couldn't explain rising temperatures.

The EPA lumped carbon dioxide with five other gases -- methane, nitrous oxide,
hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons and sulfur hexafluoride -- into a single
class for regulatory purposes. That's because they share similar properties: All
are long-lived and well-mixed in the atmosphere; all trap heat that otherwise
would leave the earth and go into outer space; and all are "directly emitted as
greenhouse gases" rather than forming later in the atmosphere.

Alternatively, tropospheric ozone wasn't included in the class, even though it
creates smog and contributes to global warming. But that gas isn't emitted
directly; rather, it is created in the atmosphere when sunlight reacts with
greenhouse gases emitted by human activity such as engine combustion and
industrial processes.

Similarly, the EPA declined to consider regulating water vapor or soot, also
known as "black carbon," both of which are big contributors to the greenhouse
effect but which don't share common properties with the six greenhouse gases.

The EPA did acknowledge some positive impacts from higher CO2 concentrations.

One is faster-growing trees in tropical forests, which helps offset
deforestation. Another is marshes that can more quickly grow above rising sea
levels, providing an insurance policy of sorts for some low-lying areas against
the potential ravages of rising sea levels resulting from warmer global
temperatures.

The EPA also acknowledged some positive aspects of rising temperatures, but
concluded that on balance, the negative impacts of climate change outweigh the
positive.

Write to Keith Johnson at keith.johnson at wsj.com


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sun Apr 19 22:45:37 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Sun, 19 Apr 2009 05:45:37 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Farmer shelters flock of 10,000 storks
Message-ID: <49EB1CF1.2040704@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/profiles/2009/04/842873/
--
Farmer shelters flock of 10,000 storks
17:26' 19/04/2009 (GMT+7)

Farmer Nguyen Van Ky takes a look at his wild boars.

VietNamNet Bridge - Trung Hieu joins a HCM City farmer, who has set aside half
his garden as a shelter for storks, to watch the birds take flight.

His family may be teetering on the edge of poverty, but 67-year-old Nguyen Van
Ky has given up half his land to help some unlikely two-legged friends.

Two hectares of Ky?s home in Long Thanh My Ward in District 9, on the outskirts
of HCM City, has become a popular eco-garden, dedicated to providing a home to a
huge flock of storks.

"The land has been in our family for generations," he says.

"Before the storks came, we used to cultivate two rice crops every year. We have
11 children so keeping them all fed was hard work," he says.

Faced with unrelenting hardship, Ky and his wife decided to take drastic action.
The family dug several ponds across the area so they could raise fish, shrimp
and ducks. On the banks of the ponds, the family grew coconut and fruit trees.
They began to make more money, and life became easier. When the coconut trees
began to bear fruit, hundreds of white storks arrived to shelter in the garden
at night.

"It was a wonderful surprise for us," Ky says. "There is a saying in Vietnamese:
"Dat lanh chim dau" (birds shelter on good land). The flock has grown to around
10,000."

Ky says at first he thought there must be something magical about his land to
draw the storks there. But then he discovered many locals liked to serve stork
meat at their drinking parties.

"We explored the neighbourhood and found that several kilometres from my home,
there is a coconut plantation that covers hundreds of hectares, but the storks
didn?t shelter there because they were afraid of people."

Feeling that they had a responsibility to the birds, Ky and his wife saved one
hectare of their land to grow bamboo for the storks to shelter in.

Ever aware of the threat of hunters, the couple eventually decided to confront
the stork killers face to face. Having observed who the perpetrators were, Ky
and his wife lured them into their home with alcohol and food, where they set
about trying to convince them to change their ways.

By raising local people?s awareness about the importance of protecting the
environment, gradually, fewer hunters targeted the storks.

Resisting temptation


Storks fly around the Hong Ky ecological garden.

"It was hard for me and my wife to scrape together the money to send our kids to
school," Ky says.

"But even though we struggled, we never considered abandoning the land."

Ky stood firm, even when faced with a big offer from a Taiwanese business group.

"They wanted to give us 7,000 taels of gold for our land," Ky says.

"At first we were sorely tempted by the proposal, but something wasn?t right. A
cong of land (1,000sq.m) in the neighbourhood costs only 0.1 tael, so why should
my two hectares be sold at such a huge price?" Ky says.

"Then we realised that actually the Taiwanese were after the storks, not the
land, so I asked them how could I have the right to sell something that belongs
to nature."

The businessmen didn?t give up easily, Ky says.

"They came back a few times, each time trying to convince me that my land would
get cleared by the Government for a construction project, and I would get little
compensation. But I stuck to my guns. I?ve never regretted my decision."

Bird fanciers

The stork garden has won Ky and his family many friends in high places.

"I?m a poor farmer, but because of the storks I have met important leaders. I
met Party Secretary Truong Tan Sang, who was then a municipal leader. He has
visited my garden many times. During an outbreak of avian flu, Sang phoned me to
ask how the storks were," he says.

The city?s Tourism Department has set up bio-tours to Ky?s land. They called it
Hong Ky Ecological Garden.

Today Hong Ky provides stable income for about 20 labourers. The farmer also
recently invested VND3 billion (US$171,428) to build a petrol station on the
road by the garden. It receives hundreds of visitors at the weekends and holidays.

The couple received official recognitions for the garden last year, when it
received a prize for being the third most Beautiful Biological Garden in HCM City.

The garden receives a lot of attention, Ky says.

"Many filmmakers have come to our garden to shoot their movies. Once director Le
Cung Bac came here to film Cong Tu Bac Lieu (Dude of Bac Lieu), I agreed to play
the role of the housekeeper."

Looking good

The storks seem to have delivered good fortune to Ky and his wife. They have
managed to save enough money to buy another six hectares beyond the river for
their children to develop their businesses. The family has transformed the area
into an orchard.

Visitors on the eco-tour to the stork nesting site often take the chance to also
explore the orchard. Many come from the city?s inner districts to escape the
smog and get some fresh air.

"It?s nice to relax in a hammock in the garden and feel the wind from the river.
At sunset the land turns white with all the returning storks," says Tran Minh
Tue, a visitor from the city?s Hoc Mon District.

With things looking up, five years ago, the farmer travelled to Nam Cat Tien
National Park in the central province of Binh Thuan and brought home a couple of
wild boars.

He bred them, and the trial was surprisingly successful, so the city?s Union of
Scientific Technological Associations granted him a merit certificate
celebrating Ky as the first person in the city to breed the animals.

But his ambitions didn?t stop there. Hearing news that people in Thailand had
also successfully bred this kind of boar, he headed there to learn more. Today,
his herd includes about 300 boars from Thailand, Viet Nam and Malaysia.

The family opened a restaurant. The chef, Nguyen Thi Le Huong, later became Ky?s
daughter-in-law. All his children are now grown-up, with the three youngest
still at university.

Many people put Ky?s good fortune down to his hard work, but the farmer is
insistent his fate has been entangled with the lives of his feathery friends.

"I don?t know if the storks own me a debt of gratitude, or if I own them a debt
for my fortune," he says.

VietNamNet/VNS


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sun Apr 19 22:47:32 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Sun, 19 Apr 2009 05:47:32 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Compost enzymes and new plant varieties
Message-ID: <49EB1D64.4030801@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/tech/2009/04/842724/

Compost enzymes and new plant varieties

12:50' 18/04/2009 (GMT+7)
VietNamNet Bridge - Under the watchful eye of the Prime Minister and with the
support of the various ministries and departments, a program that is to make use
of biotechnology in agriculture and rural development until 2020 has some
encouraging results. Under the program, 41 research projects were carried out in
2008.

The results of these projects were presented at a recent workshop hosted by the
Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development assessing their implementation in
agriculture and the fishery in 2007 and 2008.

In agriculture, the research projects established gene maps and gene separation
and grafting. The objective was to create new crop varieties that would give a
higher yield, be pest resistant and withstand adverse weather conditions.

Under the program, five research projects to genetically modify crops (maize,
soy beans, pine trees, bead trees, and duckweed) are underway and new
generations (T2) of corn and soy bean varieties have been created. The program's
steering committee said that they've created three new hybrid rice varieties and
two new hybrid maize varieties which could go into mass production by 2010,
along with several other genetically modified crops that, will be mass produced
by 2011. The Prime Minister enacted Decision 11/2006/QD-TTg approving a national
program to develop and apply biotechnology in agriculture and rural development
until 2020 back on January 12, 2006.

The Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development established a Steering
Committee of 15 members for the program, eight coming from the Ministry of
Agriculture and Rural Development, the other seven from the Government Office,
the Ministry of Science and Technology, the Ministry of Finance, the Ministry of
Planning and Investment and several others.


The program works with science technology and training organizations under the
Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development plus the Vietnam Academy of
Science and Technology the Institute of Food and Biological Technology and
several others.

The program's steering committee chairman Dr. and Associate Professor Nguyen
Quang Thach said that the biggest problem now is the reluctance of local
governments, industry organizations and businesses to make use of the program's
findings. "Local governments and state organizations are rarely interested in
research carried out by science and technology organizations," said professor
Thach. One reason for this reluctance is the practical inability to import new
technologies, which is what is needed to make use of biotechnology in production
to improve people's lives.

Twenty-two of the 41 research projects thus far were on enzymes for fertilizer
production, pesticide production, cattle feed, environmental pollution
treatments and the preservation of post-harvest agricultural produce and food.
Two research projects on the production of fertilizer through composting have
been widely applied in the Central Highland provinces.

Engineer Nghiem Thi Minh Thu from the Dak Lak Province Science and Technology
Application Center, a project manager, said that the center has thus far
developed 14 enzyme models that can be used by households and five models at can
be used on an extensive scale with a production capacity of 300 to 1,000 tonnes
of bio-enzymes per year. With the use of these enzymes, agricultural by-products
are composted making fertilizer.

More than 4,000 tonnes of enzymes were produced in 2008. The center sent in
records to register its product label BIOWA, a bio-enzyme for composting, and it
awaits approval. This was the first success of the 2006-2010 program that is to
make use of biotechnology to create new products and methods that can be used
under Vietnam's production conditions.

VietNamNet/VEN


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sun Apr 19 22:48:14 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Sun, 19 Apr 2009 05:48:14 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Test your food for toxins
Message-ID: <49EB1D8E.3070708@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/tech/2009/04/842734/

Test your food for toxins
14:48' 18/04/2009 (GMT+7)

VietNamNet Bridge - Vietnamese scientists have successfully invented a test kit
that can be used to find out if a food has a toxic substance in it in just
minutes. Convenience, reasonable price and high accuracy should make these kits
a must-have for housewives.

Invented by the people who work at the Institute of Biochemical Engineering (of
the General Department of Technology under the Ministry of Public Securities),
these kits will likely contain a glass cylinder or small bag and a plastic
stick, all Vietnamese-made materials.

One can know if there?s a toxic chemical substance in a food when the color of
the reagent (that comes with the kit) turns a certain color - the result is
visual. The institute plans to make 15 different kits, each of which will test
for a different toxin. The test procedure is simple and the results instant.

There?s to be a test kit for nitrite (a no-no in processed meat), lead (in root
crops from contaminated soil), insecticides (result to be obtained in 50
minutes) and other toxins, some of which will be able to get you results in just
five minutes. It?s said that the kits will be highly sensitive and accurate.

The institute hopes that government food quality inspectors will use these test
kits to protect us from poisons and that we consumers will use the kits
ourselves at our favorite markets and stores. The test kits have been invented
and the institute is now planning to take its invention to the patent office to
get it registered for protection. After the institute obtains its patent, it
then plans to take its invention into mass production. At this time the
inventors believe that the test kits will be able to be produced so cheaply that
the kit can be sold for only VND2,000-5,000.

A test kit for borax that was recently invented by the Ho Chi Minh city-based
Chemical Technology Institute (No.1, Mac Dinh Chi, District 1, Ho Chi Minh City)
and can be purchased for VND25,000 (good for 100 tests). This kit can identify
borax in raw meat, fish, fermented pork roll, pork sausages, dry products -
almost anything. If the food item has a borax level of five percent or more, the
kit can detect it. The kit contains a small bottle of reagent and a special type
of paper which is used specifically to identify chemical substances (if the
color of paper turns into red, it means that there?s at least five percent borax
in that food). The kit is fairly cheap and if five percent detection is good
enough for you, it?s a bargain.

In Vietnam traditional methods have been used to test for the presence of
microorganisms in foodstuffs. Experienced technicians need to do these tests and
it takes two to six days to get a result. This is why it takes up to a week to
find out what caused a particular food poisoning.

The people at the Chemical Technology Institute also wished to develop a test
kit that would identify the presence of microorganisms. "The use of molecular
biological techniques (PCR) in testing for pathogenic microorganisms in
foodstuff" was a research project of Professor Tran Linh Thuoc (Ho Chi Minh
University, Natural Sciences Department). This is a technique that multiplies
bacteria genes millions of times so that those genes become visually
identifiable. With molecular biological techniques, it only takes about 20 hours
to find out the cause of a food poisoning. This became the basis for a new test
kit that is now on the market.

The special feature of these kits is that they can identify 12 different kinds
of bacteria including E. coli, E. coli 0157:h7, salmonella spp and shegella spp.
Depending on the amount of bacteria that?s present in the food, these test kits
can identify up to 12 bacteria within 24 hours. Compared to the traditional
method, this newer method gives accurate results, it can identify more kinds of
bacteria, and it can do it in a shorter period of time.
Samples of these kits have been used at the Institute of Hygiene and Public
Health and Ho Chi Minh City Standby Public Health Center and they were thought
to be good. The E. coli-test kit costs about VND30,000 per test while a similar
kit that?s made by a foreign manufacturer will cost US$7-10.

VietNamNet/VEN


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sun Apr 19 22:49:05 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Sun, 19 Apr 2009 05:49:05 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Vietnam, Sweden talk climate change,
sustainable development
Message-ID: <49EB1DC1.6000202@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/tech/2009/04/842769/

Vietnam, Sweden talk climate change, sustainable development
22:03' 18/04/2009 (GMT+7)

VietNamNet Bridge - Sweden has set to prioritise environment and climate change
issues in its 2009-13 cooperation with Vietnam, Swedish officials said at a
seminar on ?sustainable development and climate change? in Hanoi on Mar. 18.

Representatives from the Swedish Embassy in Vietnam and the Swedish
International Development Agency (SIDA), which co-organised the seminar, said
they are willing to assist and facilitate cooperation between Swedish and
Vietnamese partners in carrying out projects in the field.

Deputy Minister of Planning and Investment Nguyen Bich Dat affirmed that the
Vietnamese Government has defined that sustainable development is a cause of the
people and for the people.

The sustainable development goals the country is striving to achieve include a
quality growth and comprehensive social development, reduced poverty, improved
living conditions and well-protected environment, Dat said.

However, to achieve those goals requires the Vietnamese government to put
elements of sustainable development into its socio-economic development
strategies and plans and strictly monitor the implementation of those works.

He hailed the international community and in particular Sweden for their
significant assistance in terms of funding and experiences to Vietnam in the
course of developing and implementing sustainable development orientations, and
hoped to continue receiving supports from countries and organisations with much
experience on environmental protection.

In the seminar, which was as part of celebrations of the 40th year of
Vietnam-Sweden cooperation, participants assessed the implementation of
Swedish-financed programmes on environmental protection and climate change in
Vietnam and discussing ways to improve it in the future.

VietNamNet/VNA


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sun Apr 19 22:50:09 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Sun, 19 Apr 2009 05:50:09 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Surprise inspections top nab industrial polluters
Message-ID: <49EB1E01.7080205@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/tech/2009/04/842768/

Surprise inspections top nab industrial polluters
22:02' 18/04/2009 (GMT+7)

VietNamNet Bridge - The HCM City Department of Natural Resources and the
Environment Police Department will carry our surprise inspections of all
factories operating in high-pollution industries.

These included chemical, textile, dye, food processing, cement and others.

Large plants that discharged over 100 cu.m. of waste water a day would be
inspected first, it said.

The action follows a report from the city People?s Council?s Economic and Budget
Section, which warned against the worsening environmental pollution.

It said many rivers and canals in the city were heavily polluted, with canals
like Thay Cai and An Hai in Cu Chi District, Ba Bup and Tran Quang Co in Hoc Mon
District turning black and fetid.

All of Binh Chanh district?s 55 canals, rivers and ditches were polluted, it said.

The report attributed the pollution to the discharge of effluent by factories in
industrial parks and export processing zones, especially Tan Phu Trung, Le Minh
Xuan and Vinh Loc industrial zones.

An environmental report by the municipal People?s Committee last year also
highlighted the fact that pollution was caused by many sources, including
hazardous waste from factories in industrial parks and elsewhere, and that the
water quality in canals and ditches had deteriorated alarmingly.

The department said the inspections would also take in 141 polluting plants that
had not been relocated under a city programme.

Factories found polluting the environment would not only face the maximum
penalty but also be suspended, it said.

If enterprises found flouting environmental norms in he past continued to do so,
the department said their power or water supply could be cut off or they could
be closed down until they repair the damage.

VietNamNet/VNA


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sun Apr 19 22:50:48 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Sun, 19 Apr 2009 05:50:48 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Forests disappear at rapid rate
Message-ID: <49EB1E28.6020309@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/tech/2009/04/842796/

Forests disappear at rapid rate
06:22' 19/04/2009 (GMT+7)

VietNamNet Bridge - The Central Highlands province of Dak Nong is rapidly losing
large tracts of tropical forests, with rangers struggling to cope with
increasing illegal loggers.

Deforestation intensified during the last year, with 440 hectares lost ? an
increase of 55 percent from the previous year ? according to the province?s
Department of Forestry.

Sixty cases involving dozens of people have been prosecuted out of over 1,300
cases, mostly in the districts of Krong No, Dak Song, Tuy Duc, and Dak Glong.

But the deforestation is actually happening on a greater scale, not fully
reflected by official statistics.

The most vulnerable areas are located on borders with other provinces where
officials? responsibilities are not clearly defined and forests are inhabited by
migrant slash-and-burn farmers.

Even closely-guarded national parks and conservation areas like Nam Cat Tien, Ta
Dung and Nam Nung are beginning to be violated.

Le Van Quang, deputy chairman of the Tuy Duc District People?s Committee, said
conservation work is complicated by the vast areas and difficult terrains
involved and massive migration by people in search of arable land.

Do Ngoc Duyen, head of Dak Nong?s Forestry Department, attributed the spreading
illegal logging to a lack of staff and resources plaguing many companies that
have leased the forests.

Some of them even closed down, leaving huge areas of forest to the mercy of
illegal loggers.

Duyen said that while local communes are tasked with protecting forests, their
rights and responsibilities are not spelled out, leaving authorities hesitant
when it came to taking action.

The coordination between the police, forest guards, and army is fitful and
usually ineffective, while penalties for offenders are not deterrent enough, he
said.

He also said the rises in prices of coffee, rubber, pepper, corn, cassava, and
other agricultural products prompted massive clearing of forests for farming
those crops.

The Dak Nong People?s Committee has asked various agencies ? including the
military, police, and forest guards ? to crack down on illegal loggers,
especially along the border.

It said it is imperative to relocate illegal migrants living in forests and
punish them for clearing forests.

The re-allocation of forests to communal authorities would be accelerated and
deforested areas seized for re-greening, it added.

Dak Nong, 230 km to the north-west of HCM City, has a forest area of 325,000 ha,
or 60 percent of its total area, making it one of the greenest provinces in the
country.

VietNamNet/VNA


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Mon Apr 20 04:42:27 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Sun, 19 Apr 2009 11:42:27 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Feature: Pesticide Use Linked to Birth Defects
Message-ID: <49EB7093.1020803@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Subject: Feature: Pesticide Use Linked to Birth Defects
Date: Sun, 19 Apr 2009 09:41:45 -0700
From: Yahoo Group <ashwani.vasishth at gmail.com>
Reply-To: envecolnews-owner at yahoogroups.com
To: Environmental Ecology News <envecolnews at yahoogroups.com>


http://www.loe.org/shows/segments.htm?programID=09-P13-00016&segmentID=1

*Pesticides and Birth Defects
* In the spring and early summer, levels of pesticides in water
increase. One weed killer in particular, Atrazine, shows up in
surprisingly high amounts. Host Steve Curwood talks with Dr. Paul
Winchester to learn why babies conceived between April and July may be
more likely to develop birth defects.

Air Date: Week of April 17, 2009

CURWOOD: From the Jennifer and Ted Stanley Studios in Somerville,
Massachusetts - this is Living on Earth. I'm Steve Curwood.

YOUNG: And I'm Jeff Young in Washington.

When crops go in the ground and start to grow, it's the time for
conventional farmers to apply chemical weed killers.

For example, millions of pounds of Atrazine are applied on US farms each
year, even though the herbicide is banned in Europe.

And it should not be surprising that between April and July, there tend
to be higher levels of pesticides in water than during the rest of the
year, as the U.S. Geological Survey has found.

CURWOOD: What is surprising is new research that shows an association
between the time of conception, pesticide levels, and the likelihood of
crippling or fatal birth defects.

The research is being led by Paul Winchester, a neonatologist. His
curiosity was aroused when he encountered a high level of birth defects
when he began working in the heart of farm country at St. Francis
Hospital in Indianapolis.

Dr. Winchester, what exactly did you find?

WINCHESTER: We found that birth defects like spina bifida, cleft pallet
and lip, down syndrome, urogenital abnormalities, club foot among others
are some of the birth defects that are more likely to occur for women
who conceive between April and July. That time period coincides quite
well with the time period when surface waters measured across the U.S.
are having significantly more pesticides in their concentration than any
other times of year.

CURWOOD: As a neonatologist, you must be seeing some of these children
who have quite extensive urogenital defects. How true is that of your
practice?

WINCHESTER: Well, the urogenital problems that are the most common are
those that effect male genitals, hypospadias is a good example and
undescended testicles. Both of these are now known to be linked to
exposures of chemicals in utero - not just pesticides, but some of the
other chemicals as well. Almost all of these chemicals can act in a way
that is similar to estrogen either by blocking testosterone or by
augmenting estrogen signaling. And of course that's anathema to the
normal development of a male genital.

CURWOOD: And how much of that are you seeing?

WINCHESTER: Well we do see a lot of it. Probably the most striking
things that's happened to us this last month, which is the month when
babies conceived in June are delivering is that it seems that we have
seen kind of one of everything. We've seen in a small hospital,
community hospital setting, we've seen major birth defects that range
from chromosome anomalies, spina bifida, adactyly, cleft pallet and lip
- we're just struck by the fact that this research appears to be right
on, this month.

CURWOOD: How much did this research cost you and how did you pay for it?

WINCHESTER: Well we're a non-funded research program. I kinda grew up on
a farm in Montana where when you see the fences broke you just grab a
fence post and a pair of pliers and go and fix it. And you hope that if
you're over there the neighbors will notice and give you a hand. And
pretty much that's how this research has been done. And I sometimes
wonder if I had been funded whether this question would have been asked.

CURWOOD: Which question is that?

WINCHESTER: That is the number one cause of infant deaths turns out to
have a higher risk occurrence in women who conceive between April and
July. I kind of wonder why that's news. And so, in a sense, we like to
ask this large question, because we now know some things in rats and
amphibians and alligators that these pesticides are in fact changing
them because of fetal exposure. And we don't have enough time to sort
this out before perhaps we could have harmed generations of children.

CURWOOD: Now you say we need to look at the down stream effects of
pesticide exposure - what do you mean exactly by that?

WINCHESTER: Probably one of the most important investigators in this
area is a man named Michael Skinner who has shown us that the capacity
that pesticides have to alter our lives has been grossly underestimated.
In his model a pregnant rat is exposed for just a brief period in the
very first phase of pregnancy to one pesticide. Keep in mind that there
are no children in America who are exposed to just one pesticide. The
average child is exposed to 300 chemicals at the time of conception. But
in his model with just one pesticide all the rat babies when they were
born did not have any birth defects at all. They looked perfectly
normal. That's really important to think about because had the
experiment ended there, it would have been declared a safe exposure, not
associated with any harm. As he likes to point out, thanks to some
inquiring minds he was allowed to keep his experiment going long enough
to see how these rats turned out as adults. And there he found that
ninety percent of the males were afflicted by a whole host of disorders
that we would refer to as adult disorders, adult diseases. They included
conditions like low sperm count and infertility, immune disorders,
kidney and prostate problems, cancer, high cholesterol and a shortened
life span. And if that sounds bad, it's really not as bad as the rest of
the experiment. Because the rest of the experiment showed that this
condition could be transferred to all subsequent generations without any
further exposure. So if one pesticide could do this, imagine what might
be happening in our society.

CURWOOD: What do you tell your patients, people who are thinking about
having children, what about conceiving during the beginning of the
growing season, this April to July period that seems to increase the
risk of birth defects?

WINCHESTER: Well, based on our current evidence we certainly can't prove
to you that it would be safer for you to avoid those time periods but
based on the current level of knowledge, if you have a choice, why not
try conceiving at some other time. We happen to notice that the time
associated with the lowest birth defect rate is also the time when women
are most likely to have a successful pregnancy and that turns out to be
December in the U.S. So the spring tends to be a high-risk period for a
lot of different complications of pregnancy and this may be more
relevant to some than others.

CURWOOD: Dr. Paul Winchester is a neonatologist at St. Francis Hospital
in Indianapolis. Thank you so much, sir

WINCHESTER: Thank you.

/*** NOTICE: In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, this
material is distributed, without profit, for research and educational
purposes only. ***/
//


From thuyfpd at yahoo.com Tue Apr 21 13:15:20 2009
From: thuyfpd at yahoo.com (Nguyen Thi Thu Thuy)
Date: Mon, 20 Apr 2009 20:15:20 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Consultancy: CBBC Project Mid-term Evaluation
In-Reply-To: <49EB7093.1020803@coombs.anu.edu.au>
Message-ID: <69840.86312.qm@web30208.mail.mud.yahoo.com>

Dear all,

Attached is an adverstisement for a consultancy to do a mid-term review of CBBC Project. I look forward to receiving your letter of interest.

Best regards,

Thuy




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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Tue Apr 21 14:08:08 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Mon, 20 Apr 2009 21:08:08 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] advances in quantifying climate and carbon
uncertainties: climate policy implications
Message-ID: <49ED46A8.8090807@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Subject: advances in quantifying climate and carbon uncertainties: climate
policy implications
Date: Mon, 20 Apr 2009 12:02:05 +0100
From: Jo House <jo.house at bristol.ac.uk>
Reply-To: Jo House <jo.house at bristol.ac.uk>
To: Climate Change Info Mailing List <climate-l at lists.iisd.ca>

Dear Colleague

This is to inform you of a recent article

"What do recent advances in quantifying climate and carbon cycle
uncertainties mean for climate policy?", in Environmental Research Letters,
Vol 3, pp044002(2008),

You can link directly to the article at:
http://stacks.iop.org/1748-9326/3/044002

Abstract
Global policy targets for greenhouse gas emissions reductions are being
negotiated. The amount of emitted carbon dioxide remaining in the atmosphere
is controlled by carbon cycle processes in the ocean and on land. These
processes are themselves affected by climate. The resulting 'climate-carbon
cycle feedback' has recently been quantified, but the policy implications
have not. Using a scheme to emulate the range of state-of-the-art model
results for climate feedback strength, including the modelled range of
climate sensitivity and other key uncertainties, we analyse recent global
targets. The G8 target of a 50% cut in emissions by 2050 leaves CO2
concentrations rising rapidly, approaching 1000 ppm by 2300. The Stern
Review's proposed 25% cut in emissions by 2050, continuing to an 80% cut,
does in fact approach stabilization of CO2 concentration on a
policy-relevant (century) timescale, with most models projecting
concentrations between 500 and 600 ppm by 2100. However concentrations
continue to rise gradually. Long-term stabilization at 550 ppm CO2 requires
cuts in emissions of 81 to 90% by 2300, and more beyond as a portion of the
CO2 emitted persists for centuries to millennia. Reductions of other
greenhouse gases cannot compensate for the long-term effects of emitting
CO2.
<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>
Joanna I. House,
QUEST, Department of Earth Sciences
University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building
Queens Road, Bristol BS8 1RJ
Tel: 0117 33 15131
Fax: 0117 925 3385
jo.house at bristol.ac.uk
NOTE: I only work part time
For other members of QUEST call 0117 33 15019
I check my e-mail most days, but not every day!
If it is really urgent you can reach me at home on 0117 907 0505

http://QUEST.bris.ac.uk
Quantifying earth system processes and feedbacks for better informed
assessments of alternative futures of the global environment
<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>




From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Tue Apr 21 14:14:48 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Mon, 20 Apr 2009 21:14:48 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] =?iso-8859-1?q?TTF=3A_Consultancy=3A_CBBC_Project_Mi?=
=?iso-8859-1?q?d-term_Evaluation_/_Nh=F3m_Tu+_va=5E=27n_=3F=E1nh_gi=E1_Gi?=
=?iso-8859-1?q?u+=7Ea_ky=60_=28Hai_chuy=EAn_gia_trong_nu+o+=27c=29?=
Message-ID: <49ED4838.6080001@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Subject: Consultancy: CBBC Project Mid-term Evaluation
Date: Mon, 20 Apr 2009 20:15:20 -0700 (PDT)
From: Nguyen Thi Thu Thuy <thuyfpd at yahoo.com>


Dear all,

Attached is an advertisement for a consultancy to do a mid-term review
of CBBC Project. I look forward to receiving your letter of interest.

Best regards,

Thuy

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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Tue Apr 21 14:59:56 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Mon, 20 Apr 2009 21:59:56 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Asia governments dangle carrots to attract green money
Message-ID: <49ED52CC.3040602@gmail.com>



http://www.reuters.com/article/GCA-GreenBusiness/idUSTRE53J1NH20090420

Asia governments dangle carrots to attract green money

Mon Apr 20, 2009 5:12am EDT
By Leonora Walet - Analysis

HONG KONG (Reuters) - Asian governments are warming to the idea of offering
incentives for green investment and could help attract billions of dollars in
funding for solar and wind power industries struggling under tight credit
conditions.

Major Asia-Pacific markets from Australia to China and Japan to South Korea are
at various stages of refining sweeteners to encourage renewable energy projects.
Some are raising renewable energy targets to boost large-scale green projects.

Boosted by such incentives, Asia could overtake the Americas and Europe to be
the biggest market for renewable projects by 2012, analysts say.

"As governments spend their way out of the financial crisis, part of that cash
is being used as incentives for green projects mobilizing increased private
investment," said Edgare Kerkwijk, managing director for Asia Green Capital, a
renewable energy and commodity-focused investment management firm.

While the credit crunch has discouraged private investment in some industries
and markets, Asia's renewable and environmental sectors should benefit from
government stimulus packages.

HSBC estimates spending on green-related investments, including railways used as
alternatives to carbon-intensive air transport and energy-efficient power grids,
to account for 20 percent, or $272 billion, of stimulus spending in Asia -- more
than double the amount earmarked for green projects in the Americas and five
times bigger than Europe's.

"We believe these commitments are but the first installments of further efforts
by governments to use low-carbon growth as a key lever for economic recovery,"
HSBC analysts Nick Robins and Robert Clover said in a report.

In Australia, analysts expect private and government investments in clean energy
projects to reach A$20-A$30 billion ($27.6-$41.4 billion) by 2020.

The country plans to introduce the world's broadest emissions trading scheme,
which will be its primary policy tool to drive reductions in greenhouse gas
emissions and boost investment in clean energy.

As part of the biggest stimulus package to date, China has also earmarked the
most to green-related projects. HSBC estimates green-related investments will
account for 34 percent, or $200 billion, of China's total stimulus package of
$586 billion.

That will be on top of solar subsidies Beijing announced last month aimed at
helping local manufacturers who face sagging international demand.

Japan and South Korea are also ramping up green investment, with Tokyo recently
announcing plans to install solar systems in about 37,000 schools and offer
subsidies of 100,000-250,000 yen ($1,009-$2,521) for each purchase of
energy-efficient cars.

South Korea has set a target for alternative energy to account for 11 percent of
total energy demand by 2030, compared with just 2.6 percent now. Investment
required to meet that target is estimated at 111.5 trillion won ($88.3 billion).

The country has various policy initiatives, including a price support scheme for
electricity from renewable sources similar to Germany's feed-in tariff,
benefiting green energy suppliers.

HURDLES AHEAD

Asian renewable companies, including China's largest solar company, Suntech
Power Holdings, and South Korean polysilicon firm DC Chemical, should benefit as
governments push harder for the development of clean energy.

Analysts said incentives for the solar sector will go a long way to driving
regional demand for solar energy systems, helping create bigger businesses for
companies involved in the entire solar supply chain.

Makers of solar cells in Taiwan including Motech Industries Inc, E-Ton Solar
Tech Co and Gintech Energy Corp should benefit, while boosting business
opportunities for panel makers like Japan's Kaneka Corp, Sanyo Electric Co Ltd
and Sharp, and China's Yingli Green Energy Holding Co Ltd and JA Solar.

Industry experts say most investments may go to wind power projects, which are
the cheaper option, benefiting wind turbine makers such as India's Suzlon Energy
Ltd and China's Xinjiang Goldwind Science & Technology Co Ltd.

Governments' green push should also help smaller alternative energy companies
like China Solar Photovoltaic SA.

"We were very encouraged by China's new policy, though it is too early to say
what the impact will be as the detailed guidelines have yet to come out," said
Veerraju Chaudary, chief operating officer at China Solar.

Analysts say there are hurdles ahead, however.

Most investors want to see clarity in regulations for government incentives, and
tight credit and strained government budgets could limit the flow of funds to
some projects.

"The subsidies showed the government is committed to supporting the industry,
but that's not enough," said Zhenhua Pan, deputy general manager of solar firm
Jetion Holdings Ltd. "Subsidies should also apply to solar power stations,
especially in the remote inland areas not covered by the national power grid."

China's offer of a subsidy of up to 20 yuan ($2.93) per watt on rooftop and
building-integrated solar projects still lacks detail on how it will be
implemented, and it's unclear if the same level of financial incentive will be
available to other types of solar projects.

A sharp fall in the price of carbon-based energy, meanwhile, has discouraged
investors from spending more on expensive renewables, but industry experts
believe government incentives could win businesses back to green projects.

"Cheap oil may have discouraged investments in alternative energy, but subsidies
and tax breaks are helping make these projects commercially viable," said Asia
Green's Kerkwijk.

(Additional reporting by Fang Yan in SHANGHAI; Editing by Ian Geoghegan)


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Tue Apr 21 15:04:34 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Mon, 20 Apr 2009 22:04:34 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Climate risk for Yangtze river: Report
Message-ID: <49ED53E2.1070602@gmail.com>

http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/china/2009-04/20/content_7693329.htm

Climate risk for Yangtze river: Report
By Li Jing (China Daily)
Updated: 2009-04-20 07:52


Climate change and major water conservation projects are a major risk to the
long-term "health" of the Yangtze River, claimed a report released at the weekend.

The Yangtze Conservation and Development Report 2009, compiled by the China
Academy of Science (CAS), states the basin of China's longest waterway has been
hit by a yearly reduction in rain since 2006, brought on by global warming.

Annual rainfall dropped 10.3 and 6.9 percent respectively in 2006 and 2007, the
report said, while severe droughts in 2007 and last year resulted in the
shrinking of two of the nation's biggest freshwater lakes, Poyang and Dongting.

The research also estimated that by 2030 the glacial area at the source of the
Yangtze River will be reduced by 6.9 percent from the level recorded in 1970.

"Long-tem observation and multi-disciplinary studies on possible impacts are
needed to better understand what climate change will do to the river," said Yang
Guishan, a CAS researcher and an author of the report.

The massive Three Gorges Dam project is also damaging the overall water quality,
ecosystems of the wetlands and fish stocks, said the report.

The research showed that with a hike in the concentration of nitrogen and
phosphorus, the water quality in reservoir areas of the Three Gorges Dam has
deteriorated since it began water storing in 2003.

An increase in outbreaks of algae caused by excessive nutrients in the water has
also been found in the reservoirs, said the report, while the Three Gorges Dam
and other conservation projects are disrupting migration routes for fish and
changing the ecology of the fish spawning sites in the Yangtze River.

The report found a steady fall in the number of black carp, grass carp, silver
carp and crucian carp since 2003.


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Tue Apr 21 15:07:22 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Mon, 20 Apr 2009 22:07:22 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] [IEA] Group Urges Beijing to Cut Coal Emissions
Message-ID: <49ED548A.5030700@gmail.com>

(see attached table.)

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124021811385234435.html


Group Urges Beijing to Cut Coal Emissions
Article


By SHAI OSTER

BEIJING -- The International Energy Agency warned that China must clean up its
coal sector or face dire environmental consequences for itself and the world.

The Paris-based body outlined steps to mitigate pollution in China, including
tougher enforcement of regulations, more foreign investment in energy, and
putting a price on carbon emissions.


Image: Reuters
A miner works at a coal mine in Changzhi, Shanxi province.


"Without strong action, CO2 emissions could rise in an unsustainable way," IEA
Executive Director Nobuo Tanaka said at a launch of a report on clean coal
technology in China. The report was done in cooperation with the Chinese
government, reflecting growing awareness in Beijing of the hazards posed by
current energy trends.

The IEA's list of recommendations included calls for greater openness of China's
domestic energy sector to outside investment, and a continued pursuit of new
technologies to capture carbon emissions from power plants and sequester them in
the ground or elsewhere. China has said it is making cleaning up its coal-fired
power sector a priority and has implemented reforms, such as shutting hundreds
of small and inefficient power plants, and instituting national
energy-efficiency standards.

But Mr. Tanaka also suggested that China will have to eventually charge for
carbon emissions -- a move Beijing has vigorously resisted out of fears it could
stymie economic growth. Making companies pay for how much carbon they produce
could be a part of setting national limits on emissions.

"Ultimately, a market in which emissions of carbon are priced will emerge," Mr.
Tanaka said. "I see that a debate is taking place in China about how quickly
China should move in that direction."


Developed countries participating in the United Nations' Kyoto Protocol on
global warming have already accepted national caps on greenhouse-gas emissions,
requiring industries that pollute more to buy so-called carbon credits.

China has no national limits on carbon emissions. It has earned billions of
dollars through the Kyoto plan because companies in developed countries can
invest in pollution-reduction programs in China in exchange for credits to apply
to their emissions back home.

China has surpassed the U.S. as the world's leading source of global-warming
greenhouse gases. That status is the byproduct of roaring economic growth that
has lifted millions from poverty, but relied heavily on coal as the primary
source of energy.

Write to Shai Oster at shai.oster at wsj.com
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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Tue Apr 21 15:08:33 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Mon, 20 Apr 2009 22:08:33 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] China considers setting targets for carbon emissions
Message-ID: <49ED54D1.4020908@gmail.com>

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/apr/19/china-environment-kyoto

China considers setting targets for carbon emissions

Government's decision could help negotiations on a Kyoto successor treaty in
Copenhagen

Jonathan Watts, Asia environment correspondent
guardian.co.uk, Sunday 19 April 2009 15.27 BST
Article history

The Chinese government is for the first time considering setting targets for
carbon emissions, a significant development that could help negotiations on a
Kyoto successor treaty at Copenhagen later this year, the Guardian has learned.

Su Wei, a leading figure in China's climate change negotiating team, said that
officials were considering introducing a national target that would limit
emissions relative to economic growth in the country's next five-year plan from
2011.

"It is an option. We can very easily translate our [existing] energy reduction
targets to carbon dioxide limitation" said Su. "China hasn't reached the stage
where we can reduce overall emissions, but we can reduce energy intensity and
carbon intensity."

A second government adviser, Hu Angang, has said China should start cutting
overall emissions from 2020.

While that is a minority view and final decisions are some way off, the
proposals are striking because they are at odds with China's official
negotiating stance.

Beijing has hitherto rejected carbon emission caps or cuts, arguing that its
priority is to improve its people's living standards ? and that the west caused
the global warming problem and should fix it. But developed nations argue that
they cannot commit to deep cuts and to substantial funding for developing
nations to fight climate change unless those countries embrace emissions targets.

Environmental groups and foreign diplomats said a carbon intensity target would
be a significant step forward. Any move by China, the world's fastest expanding
major economy, biggest emitter of greenhouse gases and most influential
developing nation, would have an enormous impact on the outcome of the
Copenhagen summit in December.

"It would be a significant step for China to set a target that directly links
carbon emissions to economic growth for the first time," said Yang Ailun of
Greenpeace.

"This is a green shoot of pragmatism that should be nurtured," said one European
diplomat.

Hu, an influential economist and advocate of "green revolution", is pressing the
government to take a leadership role in Copenhagen by making a public commitment
to reduce emissions, and last week submitted the proposal to set a new carbon
dioxide goal.

He is one of 37 members of an elite body that advised the premier, Wen Jiabao,
to include ambitious targets of a 20% improvement in energy efficiency and 10%
reduction of pollution in the 2006-2010 plan. With government figures suggesting
the country is on course to approach or exceed those goals, Hu suggests they be
extended for the next plan with the addition of the carbon dioxide target.

If his proposal is accepted, Hu believes China will be able to make an
international pledge this year to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from 2020.

His views are several steps beyond the negotiating position of the government
and officials on the national development and reform commission (NDRC) are
cautious even about goals for energy efficiency. "We are very optimistic to
reach the energy intensity target of 20% or so," said Su. "But personally I
don't think that we can achieve the same for the next five years as the
low-lying fruit is already taken."

He was still more doubtful about Hu's suggestion that China's carbon emissions
could start to go down after 2020.

"We are trying to reach the emissions peak as early as possible for the earth
and future generations. I cannot give you a specific year, but it's certainly
not realistic to say the peak will come in 2020," he said.

But the debate on China's role in greenhouse gas reductions is widening. Last
month, the Chinese Academy of Science reported that the country's carbon dioxide
emissions relative to GDP should be reduced by 50% by 2020, and that total CO2
emissions should peak between 2030 and 2040 if the country introduced more
stringent energy-saving policies and received more financial support and
technology from overseas.

The Brookings Institution, a US thinktank, has pinpointed domestic reductions in
emission intensity in China as a possible area of compromise with the US, which
has made a greater effort to reach out to Beijing on climate change issues under
President Barack Obama. The softening comes amid a flurry of talks between
Chinese and US leaders and officials in Washington, London and Bonn.

"The message we have got is that the current US administration takes climate
change seriously, that they recognise their historical responsibility and that
they have the capacity to help developing countries address climate change,"
said Su. But he called on the US to go further than Obama's promise to cut
emissions to 1990 levels by 2020.

Whether an agreement can be reached before the Copenhagen conference remains to
be seen, but the debate inside China is moving into new areas. "Chinese leaders
recognise China's responsibility. The question is whether or not they make a
public commitment about how much they will do and by when," said Hu.

The urgency is increasing. Citing new figures from the state bureau of energy,
Hu said China overtook the US last year as the world's biggest energy producer
with 2.6bn tonnes of standard coal equivalent, seven years ahead of
expectations. "If we can't succeed in reducing energy consumption, then no one
can. I tell the government that a 1% failure in China is a 100% failure for the
world," said Hu. "We must satisfy our national interest and match it with the
interest of humanity."


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Tue Apr 21 15:19:18 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Mon, 20 Apr 2009 22:19:18 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] WWF: Global Forest Trade Network (GFTN) Quarterly
Newsletter, April 2009
Message-ID: <49ED5756.7090604@gmail.com>

http://www.panda.org/about_our_earth/all_publications/?uNewsID=162521

GFTN Quarterly Newsletter, April 2009

Download
GFTN Quarterly Newsletter - April 2009 [pdf, 6.44 MB]
http://assets.panda.org/downloads/gftnnewsletter_april2009_final.pdf

GFTN Quarterly Newsletter - April 2009 (low resolution) [pdf, 520 KB]
http://assets.panda.org/downloads/gftnnewsletter_april2009_finallr.pdf

20 Apr 2009


Major highlights: expanding the reach of responsible forestry in India,
certified Chinese forest surpasses 1 million ha milestone, GFTN-UK participant
awarded largest UK CoC Certification, GFTN-Indonesia welcomes Sima Furniture and
Integra, Wal-Mart committed to responsible forestry in the Heart of Borneo,
influencing the future of the Malaysian timber industry, Tetra Pak reaches 100
million certified packs milestone, and more...


From ha.nguyenba at gmail.com Tue Apr 21 19:21:57 2009
From: ha.nguyenba at gmail.com (Nguyen Manh Ha)
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2009 16:21:57 +0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] (no subject)
Message-ID: <3B38B107-7423-4416-BBCB-C7D359A90670@gmail.com>



Anh yeu em

Sent from my iPhone


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Tue Apr 21 22:22:33 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2009 05:22:33 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Vacancy annoucement: WASH Advisor with SNV
Message-ID: <49EDBA89.607@gmail.com>

Subject: [Watsan-wg] Fw: Vacancy annoucement: WASH Advisor with SNV
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2009 14:25:39 -0700
From: bich ngoc <ngoc.rwsspvn at gmail.com>


Dear watsan group and RWSSP Partners,

SNV is now advertising the vacancy for *Rural Water SUPPLY and
Sanitation Advisor in Lao Cai/Hanoi.*

The TOR for this position is attached herewith for your information.

We highly appreciate your assistance in circulating this among your
colleagues who are interested in and their applications should be sent
to SNV Netherlands Development Organization; 6^th Floor, Building B, La
Thanh Hotel, 218 Doi Can, Hanoi, Vietnam or yennth at snvworld.org
<mailto:yennth at snvworld.org>, until 28^th of April 2009.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Pham Bich Ngoc
Information, Planning and Monitoring Officer
Rural Water Supply and Sanitation Partnership (RWSSP)
Ministry of Agricultural and Rural Development
Room 303, Building A8, 10 Nguyen Cong Hoan, Ba Dinh, Ha Noi
Tel: 04 37711422/0989183858, Fax: 04 37711420
Email: pham.bich.ngoc at rwssp.org.vn <mailto:pham.bich.ngoc at rwssp.org.vn>
pcu at rwssp.org.vn <mailto:pcu at rwssp.org.vn>
ngoc.rwsspvn at gmail.com <mailto:ngoc.rwsspvn at gmail.com>
website: http://www.rwssp.org.vn

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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Tue Apr 21 22:33:59 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2009 05:33:59 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] GM crops and the Gene Giants: Bad news for farmers
Message-ID: <49EDBD37.8030601@gmail.com>

http://www.scidev.net/en/opinions/gm-crops-and-the-gene-giants-bad-news-for-farmers.html

GM crops and the Gene Giants: Bad news for farmers
Kathy Jo Wetter and Hope Shand
15 April 2009 | EN | ??

BASF subjects rice plants to environmental stresses like salty soils or drought
BASF
Unproven and patented GM fixes will not help farmers in the South adapt to
climate change, say Kathy Jo Wetter and Hope Shand.

The global North's super-sized carbon footprint has already trampled the South's
farmers, most recently in the form of energy crop plantations, which have been
directly responsible for deforestation and farmer evictions in some developing
countries, includingIndonesia and Tanzania.

Now the world's largest seed and agrochemical corporations are stockpiling
hundreds of monopoly patents on genes in crops genetically engineered to
withstand the environmental stresses associated with climate change, such as
drought, heat, cold, floods and saline soils.

In 2008 the Action Group on Erosion, Technology and Concentration reported that
the largest of these companies, including BASF, Bayer, DuPont, Monsanto and
Syngenta, had already filed 532 patent documentson so-called 'climate ready'
genes at patent offices around the world.

Beyond Europe and the United States, patent offices in major food-producing
countries ? including Argentina, Brazil, China, Mexico and South Africa ? are
also being swamped. Since last year's count, the 'Gene Giants' have filed at
least 65 more patent documents related to the ability of plants to tolerate
environmental stresses, as opposed to biological stresses such as pests or
weeds. Monsanto, the world's largest seed company, and BASF, the world's largest
chemical firm, have forged a colossal US$1.5 billion partnership to develop such
crops, suggesting that the number of patent filings to date is just the beginning.

Bad news

But the huge number of patent filings does not mean that these companies have
found the key to unlocking how plants withstand environmental stresses ? though
they may be knocking on the right door. We do not yet know how these plants will
perform in the field. What is clear is that their appearance in the marketplace
will increase the concentration of corporate power, drive up costs, inhibit
independent research, and, most alarmingly, undermine the rights of farmers to
save and exchange seeds.

There is a further danger that, as the climate crisis deepens, governments may
strong-arm farmers into planting prescribed biotech seeds with traits deemed
essential for adaptation. This is already happening in the United States ? the
government's Federal Crop Insurance Corporation gives a discount to farmers
planting Monsanto's biotech maize seed because, according to data submitted by
Monsanto, there is reduced risk of low yields compared to other varieties. It is
common for US policies to serve as templates for developing countries, so we
shouldn't be surprised to see other governments following suit.

Biotech companies insist they don't want to hamper farmers in developing
countries who are struggling to eke out a living, nor do they want to take food
out of the mouths of hungry people. They point to projects like the Water
Efficient Maize for Africa collaboration as evidence. This brings together
Monsanto and BASF among others with US$47 million in funding from charitable
foundations to develop drought-resistant maize which they will give,
royalty-free, to farmers in Kenya, South Africa, Tanzania and Uganda.

While such projects provide good publicity for the companies involved, suspicion
is warranted. At the same time that companies appear to be engaging in
no-strings-attached philanthropy, industry groups such as CropLife International
are campaigning hard for governments in the South to enact tougher intellectual
property laws to ensure that farmers pay royalties on proprietary seeds.

Kenya, for example, recently adopted the 'Anti-Counterfeit Act', which applies
to "any intellectual property right subsisting in Kenya or elsewhere in respect
of protected goods". Uganda and Tanzania are following Kenya's lead to draft
their own anti-counterfeiting legislation. Kenya's law explicitly criminalises
violators of plant breeders' rights. Even more recently, Kenya passed a
biosafety law to allow production of GM crops. The influx of costly, proprietary
seeds in the marketplace and stricter intellectual property laws are no help to
farmers racing to adapt crops to changing climatic conditions.

Beyond biotech

Biotech proselytisers have been preaching that only genetic engineering can
beget crops that will survive climate change. On the contrary, the genetic
diversity of plants and animals and the diverse knowledge and practices of
farming communities are the most important resources for adapting local
agriculture to a changing climate.

Farmer-led strategies for adapting to climate change ? such as efforts to
diversify crops and bring them to the marketplace ? must be recognised,
strengthened and protected by society as a whole and by governments in
particular. Farming communities must be directly involved in setting priorities
and strategies for adaptation. Where appropriate, scientists can work with
farmers to improve conservation technologies, strengthen local breeding
strategies, and assist in identifying and accessing seeds held in banks.

This may involve strengthening and expanding farmer-to-farmer networks for
exchanging and enhancing crops through organisations such as La Via Campesina.
It may also involve facilitating access to new sources of genetic material for
farmers to experiment with breeding, and implementing Farmers' Rights under the
International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture.

Kathy Jo Wetter is a programme manager at ETC Group (Action Group on Erosion,
Technology and Concentration) and Hope Shand is its research director.


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Tue Apr 21 22:42:52 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2009 05:42:52 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Battle lines drawn over climate mitigation registry
Message-ID: <49EDBF4C.4080904@gmail.com>

http://www.scidev.net/en/news/battle-lines-drawn-over-climate-mitigation-registr.html

Battle lines drawn over climate mitigation registry
Laura Garc?a
16 April 2009 | EN | ES | ??

A registry would record mitigation measures such as the use of renewable energy
Warren Gretz NREL
[BONN] The issue of whether developing countries should be obliged to sign up to
a proposed registry of efforts to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions divided
delegations at the latest climate change meeting.

Some developing countries, such as Brazil and India, said that participating in
any kind of mitigation registry should be voluntary for developing nations.

But Japan and Norway ? among other developed countries ? said that national
mitigation actions should be "measured, reported and verified" (MRV) and that a
registry should be an obligation for all countries.

The debate was part of a UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)
meeting held in Bonn, Germany, which finished this month (28 March?9 April). It
was part of the lead-up to the Copenhagen UNFCCC meeting in December, where an
international climate change agreement to exceed the Kyoto Protocol's goals ?
the first commitment period of which expires in 2012 ? is due to be made.

Under the Bali Action Plan ? a two-year process leading to the Copenhagen
meeting that was agreed in 2007 ? developing countries are required to take
"nationally appropriate mitigation actions" (NAMAs). It is expected that those
actions will need support, such as finance and technology transfer, from
developed countries.

A registry would record countries' NAMAs for international recognition. It could
include broad mitigation targets and also specific policies and measures taken
by a country such as reduced emissions from deforestation and degradation
(REDD), energy efficiency standards, and renewable energy ratio.

India's representatives stressed that the proposed international registry should
simply be a compilation of NAMAs voluntarily proposed by developing countries,
and said that the implementation of such actions would depend on developed
countries providing resources.

China agreed that NAMAs should "be country driven", and said developing nations
must give priority to sustained economic growth and the eradication of poverty.

Saleemul Huq, head of climate change at the International Institute for
Environment and Development, says there seems to be a growing consensus amongst
most developing countries that such a registry would be useful.

"The issue is whether it should be voluntary or mandatory and that would depend
very much on the level of support (financial and technological) that they
received for such actions," he told SciDev.Net.

How such a registry would work in practice will be discussed in the next UNFCCC
meeting in Bonn in June.




From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 22 01:02:01 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2009 08:02:01 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Oxfam: 54% increase in number of people affected by
climate disasters by 2015 could overwhelm emergency responses
Message-ID: <49EDDFE9.9060400@gmail.com>

http://www.oxfam.org/en/pressroom/pressrelease/2009-04-21/increase-number-people-affected-climate-disasters

54% increase in number of people affected by climate disasters by 2015 could
overwhelm emergency responses

The summary document may be downloaded at:

http://www.oxfam.org/en/policy/right-to-survive-report

I had trouble downloading the main document but the summary report is at:
http://www.oxfam.org/sites/www.oxfam.org/files/right-to-survive-summary-eng.pdf


21 April 2009

It is poverty and political indifference that make a storm a disaster
?The humanitarian system works as if it?s a global card game dealing out aid
randomly, not based on people?s needs.?
Jeremy Hobbs
Executive Director, Oxfam International
Urgent reforms needed to outdated and unfair humanitarian system.

In six years time the number of people affected by climatic crises is projected
to rise by 54 per cent to 375 million people, threatening to overwhelm the
humanitarian aid system, said international agency Oxfam today.

The projected rise is due to a combination of entrenched poverty and people
migrating to densely populated slums which are prone to the increasing number of
climatic events. This is compounded by the political failure to address these
risks and a humanitarian system which is not fit for purpose. In its report, The
Right to Survive, Oxfam says the world needs to re-engineer the way it responds
to, prepare for and prevents disasters.

Oxfam used the best-available data of 6,500 climate-related disasters since 1980
to project that the number of people affected by climatic disaster will rise by
133 million to 375 million people a year on average by 2015. This does not
include people hit by other disasters such as wars, earthquakes and volcanic
eruptions.

The world needs to increase its humanitarian aid spending from 2006 levels of
$14.2 billion to at least $25 billion a year just to deal with these rising
numbers of people. Even this increase in money ? the equivalent of only $50 per
affected person ? is still woefully inadequate to meet their basic needs.
?The humanitarian system works as if it?s a global card game dealing out aid
randomly, not based on people?s needs. The response is often fickle ? too
little, too late and not good enough. The world barely copes with the current
level of disasters. A big increase in the numbers of people affected will
overwhelm it unless there is fundamental reform of the system that puts those in
need at its centre,? said Oxfam International?s Executive Director Jeremy Hobbs.
Oxfam says that the international humanitarian system needs to act swiftly and
impartially after a disaster, investing money and effort commensurate with the
levels of need. Aid is often given on the basis of political or other
preferences making it unfair. In 2004, an average of $1,241 was spent for each
victim of the Asian tsunami, while an average of only $23 was spent per person
affected by the humanitarian crisis in Chad.

The world must change the way it delivers aid so that it builds on the country?s
ability to prepare and withstand future shocks. National governments, with the
help of the international community, need to invest more in reducing the risk of
disasters.

And as climate change gathers pace, this trend is likely to continue to increase
well beyond 2015. Rich countries must commit now to cut greenhouse gas emissions
in order to keep global warming as far below 2?C as possible, and to provide at
least $50 billion a year in finance to help poor countries adapt to unavoidable
climate change.

?While there has been a steady increase in climate related events, it is poverty
and political indifference that make a storm a disaster,? said Jeremy Hobbs.
More people are now living in urban slums built on land prone to weather shocks.
More than 50 per cent of inhabitants of Mumbai, for instance, live in slums,
many of them built on reclaimed swamplands. In 2005, widespread flooding in the
city caused the deaths of around 900 people, most of them killed by landslips
and collapsed buildings.

Hunger is on the increase, caused by drought, population density and an
increasing demand for meat and dairy products in emerging economies. People are
being driven from their homes ? it is estimated up to a billion people will be
forced from their homes by 2050 due to climate change, environmental
degradation, and conflict. And finally more people are losing their jobs due to
the global economic crisis.

However, despite their poverty, some countries such as Cuba, Mozambique and
Bangladesh have invested heavily in protecting their people from storms.
Following the 1972 super cyclone that killed a quarter of a million people,
Bangladesh invested heavily in prevention and protection measures. The death
toll from super cyclones in Bangladesh is in the low thousands ? still far too
high, but much less devastating. The experience of Cuba, Mozambique and
Bangladesh shows that with sufficient help, even the world?s poorest countries
can better protect their citizens.

Oxfam also notes that while the total number of conflicts has reduced over the
years, a number remain intractable. ?Entire generations of people have been
displaced three, four or five times, and know nothing but armed violence and
displacement,? said Hobbs. More than 18 million people could not get enough
humanitarian aid because of conflict in 2007, according to UN figures.
Oxfam is shifting the way it responds to emergencies in the face of increasing
climatic disasters investment, toward helping to reduce poor people
vulnerability to disasters while still remaining a front-line agency that
responds to humanitarian crises.

?Climate change is already threatening our work to overcome poverty, increasing
the pressure on an already-difficult task of bringing relief to millions. It is
crucial that we tackle climate change head-on. We need governments to raise
their game. The world must agree a global deal to avoid catastrophic climate
change, stop the fickle way it delivers aid, and radically improve how it
responds to disasters.
Notes to editors

Oxfam analyzed data from the Center for Research on the Epidemiology of
Disasters (CRED) at Louvain University in Belgium to make its projection. The
data covered more than 6,500 climate-related disasters since 1980 and the
numbers of people affected.
The definition of people ?affected? by a disaster includes those who suffer
physical injuries or illness, as well as those made homeless or who otherwise
required immediate assistance during a period of emergency.
In order to avoid catastrophic climate change, global warming must be kept as
far below 2?C as possible. This requires industrialized countries as a group to
cut their emissions by 40 per cent below 1990 levels by 2020. This commitment
must be made at the latest when they meet in Copenhagen at the end of this year
to agree a new global deal on climate change.
Contact information

For more information, please contact:
Louis Belanger on +1 917 224 0834
Ian Bray on +4477 2146 1339
Read more

The Right to Survive: the stories behind the headlines
http://www.oxfam.org/en/campaigns/right-survive-case-studies

The Right to Survive: The humanitarian challenge in the twenty-first century
(Oxfam International report)
http://www.oxfam.org/en/policy/right-to-survive-report


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 22 01:21:37 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2009 08:21:37 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Earth Day Message from Achim Steiner,
UN Under-Secretary General and Executive Director, UN Environment Programme
Message-ID: <49EDE481.6010604@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://www.unep.org/Documents.Multilingual/Default.asp?DocumentID=579&ArticleID=6133&l=en

Earth Day Message from Achim Steiner, UN Under-Secretary General and Executive
Director, UN Environment Programme

Nairobi, 21 April 2009 On April 22, we celebrate the Anniversary of the first
Earth Day in 1970, a landmark in the history of the environmental movement - a
movement, which gave birth to the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) in
1972.

The first Earth Day was conceived partly out of frustration that basic issues
like air quality and water pollution still had not been addressed. Today,
intelligent management of the planet has to be a fundamental issue taking center
stage, as the international community faces the twin challenges of dealing with
the most serious global economic crisis since the 1930s, and negotiating an
equitable and definitive agreement on climate change in Copenhagen in December.

Many major economies have introduced "green" stimulus packages. Various
programs, such as UNEP's Green Economy Initiative, seek to re-focus the global
economy towards investments in clean technologies and "natural" infrastructure
such as forests and soils, as the best bet for real growth, combating climate
change and triggering an employment boom in the 21st century.

However, this is just the beginning. Sealing the climate deal at the crucial UN
climate convention in Copenhagen will not happen without a groundswell of public
pressure for action on climate change ? in developed and developing nations
alike. The message to world leaders is simple and urgent: "Seal the Deal! - Work
together to find a solution that is scientifically-credible, equitable and
economically-defensible.

The past few years have seen renewed interest from the public in engaging in
environmental stewardship. Bridging the gap between Earth Day on April 22nd, and
World Environment Day, 6 weeks later on June 5th, is one of the principal
vehicles through which the United Nations mobilizes this enthusiasm, enhancing
political attention and action. The theme for WED 2009, Your Planet Needs You.
UNite to Combat Climate Change, reflects the urgency for nations to join in
addressing climate change, by reducing their carbon footprint, and improving the
management of forests and other valuable natural resources.

Earth Day initiatives demonstrate how responsible governments, civil society,
and the private sector can catalyze this energy, by promoting an enhanced
understanding of the challenges we all face in safeguarding our own survival and
that of future generations.


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 22 02:16:14 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2009 09:16:14 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Training programme on Campaign [New Delhi]
Message-ID: <49EDF14E.1000603@gmail.com>


Subject: [INCL English] [INCL English]Indonesia Nature Conservation newsLetter
12-15a
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2009 17:34:26 +0700
From: [INCL English] <Incl.contact at gmail.com>

Training programme on Campaign

Training Programme on Campaigning for Change for development professionals
A civil society campaign is often intended to mobilize public support and
use democratic tools such as lobbying in order to instigate social change.
Civil society campaigns seek local, national or international objectives.
A strategically well planned campaign is a potent tool to translate
policies into action oriented implementation and to garner huge public
support for any social cause. Employing campaign techniques for
sensitization and creating awareness not only requires clear understanding
of the subject in hand to bring the intended change but it is also
quintessential to arm with theconventional art of campaigning .

A frequent tactic of civil society campaigns is the deployment of high
profile stunts and actions to draw attention to their cause. However, the
fundamental question is for any successful campaign is merely high profile
stunts the only method to catch the attention? Or does a blend of multi
campaign techniques lead to a much more successful campaign. As a key
focus area Lead The Action launches various social campaigns not only to
create awareness but also to 'Take Action & Bring Change'. Lead The Action
announces a three day training programme on 'Campaigning for Change' for
development professionals from 19 - 21 May 2009 at New Delhi.


Training Outcomes

The training is specifically aimed at building institutional and individual
capacities in designing meaningful social campaigns to bring the intended
change.

The training outcomes would be:

* Enhanced understanding of design and execution of social
campaigns
* Enhanced skills for identifying different techniques of
campaign
* Enhanced skills for employing alternative media for greater
visibility of the campaign

Who should attend
The programme is designed for NGOs operational and middle level
functionaries, practitioners, communication officers and consultants
involved in implementation of various social campaigns .

Programme Fee
Fee for the programme is INR 8,000 per participant. Payments can be made
through demand draft in favour of "Lead The Action", New Delhi. Outstation
candidates are encouraged to make their own arrangements for boarding and
lodging .Lead The Action can facilitate these arrangements for a limited
number of participants

Lead The Action
Lead The Action! is a Not-Profit Organisation that creates easily
accessible platforms for advocacy and action, on socio-politically relevant
issues using the power and current momentum in the sectors of
communication and information technology. Lead The Action makes available
spaces, both virtual and real, for potential change-makers to highlight
concerns and issues within existing social structures and mobilize support
for concerted 'Social Action'. The Web 2.0 powered online social
networking site of Lead The Action has successfully produced Netizen
campaigners across the globe initiating campaigns on series of social
issues for global alliance on Change.

For details on training please contact rebika at leadtheaction.com


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 22 02:17:16 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2009 09:17:16 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] ELTI-NUS Biofuels Conference - Singapore, May 12-13
Message-ID: <49EDF18C.9030400@gmail.com>

Subject: [INCL English] [INCL English]Indonesia Nature Conservation newsLetter
12-15a
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2009 17:34:26 +0700
From: [INCL English] <Incl.contact at gmail.com>

ELTI-NUS Biofuels Conference - Singapore, May 12-13

Biofuels: The Impact of Oil Palm on Forests and Climate
May 12-13, 2009
National University of Singapore

The Environmental Leadership and Training Initiative (ELTI), a joint
program of the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and the
Center for Tropical Forest Science of the Smithsonian Tropical Research
Institute, and the National University of Singapore (NUS) Department of
Biological Sciences would like to invite you to attend a conference
exploring the environmental costs and benefits of using oil palm as a
biofuel feedstock.

The Conference will consist of four panels, each revolving around one of
the following questions:

1. To what extent have tropical forests been converted or will
be converted to expand oil palm production for biofuels?
2. What factors determine the extent to which greenhouse gas
emissions are reduced by using oil palm-derived biodiesel?
How do biofuels compare to 'Avoided Deforestation' or REDD?
3. What is the potential for second-generation biofuel
feedstocks, such as jatropha and algae, to reduce negative
environmental impacts associated with oil palm?
4. What are the prospects for certification schemes to reduce
the environmental impacts of oil palm cultivation for
biofuels?

The conference will conclude with a final roundtable discussion
exploringwhat additional steps can be taken to minimize the environmental
impact of the biofuels industry in the region.

For additional information and registration, please visit
http://www.elti.org/biofuels2009 . The conference is free of charge, but
registration is required and seating is limited.

----------------


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 22 02:18:17 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2009 09:18:17 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Course: Green Jobs - International Training Centre of
the ILO - 22-26 June 2009, Turin, Italy
Message-ID: <49EDF1C9.8080108@gmail.com>

Subject: [INCL English] [INCL English]Indonesia Nature Conservation newsLetter
12-15a
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2009 17:34:26 +0700
From: [INCL English] <Incl.contact at gmail.com>

Course: Green Jobs - International Training Centre of the ILO - 22-26 June
2009, Turin, Italy

Green jobs: linking environment, climate change and the world of work. What
transitions are we witnessing and what changes do we need to anticipate?
How can decent work and green work match? How will the new social agenda
look like, in the aftermath of the international climate change
discussions? How can Green Jobs contribute to the way out of the economic
downturn?

After a successful pilot, the International Training Centre of the ILO will
host a one week training activity on green jobs in Turin, Italy from 22 to
26 June 2009. The training is targeted at governments, trade unions and
employers? organizations. More information can be found on our website, see
link provided.

Available online at:
http://www.eldis.org/cf/rdr/?item=42884&em=160409?=enviro


E-conference: Environment and health through a poverty lens, 10-23 June
2009

This e-conference, hosted by the Environment Health and Development
Network, is one element of a two-part major event. This moderated
e-conference focusing on ?Environment and health through a poverty lens? is
open to all network members over the 14 days.
Three key themes covered will include:

* Critical linkages between environment, health and development
* Applying different research approaches and their analytical value
* Ways forward for the Network

A 3 day symposium hosted by the University of East Anglia on 15-17 June
will form the second part of the event, with discussions from the
e-conference feeding into the symposium. Details of the e-conference and
how to participate will be circulated to network members and posted on the
website in May/June. To be redirected to the Network's website, please use
the full details link.

Available online at:
http://www.eldis.org/cf/rdr/?item=42458&em=160409?=enviro

----


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 22 05:26:14 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2009 12:26:14 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Ha Noi needs trucks - slide shoiw
Message-ID: <49EE1DD6.3000707@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Dear Colleagues,

G?nther asked me to pass this slide show on.
I've converted it from PPT to a smaller PDF file.

Thanks G?nther!!! Cheers all, Vern

G?nther Lahoff
work lahoff at t-online.de
home Bismarckstrasse 73
BERLIN 10627 Deutschland

--
Vern Weitzel (Mr.) BSc, BA, MA, M Env Man & Dev
<vern at coombs.anu.edu.au> <vern.weitzel at gmail.com> <vernweitzel at mac.com>

ANU/AVSL eMail Lists: http://coombs.anu.edu.au/~vern/forum.html
NGO Centre eMail Lists: http://ngocentre.org.vn/mailman/listinfo

Address during 2009: 2724 NE 24th St, Renton WA 98056 USA
phone/fax: +1 (425) 228-4513 Mobile: +1 (206) 3-9999-81
Ha Noi address: 1st stairwell, apartment 504-505, block A4 Giang Vo,
Ba Dinh, Ha Noi [off Ngoc Khanh Street, opposite Van Phuc Compound]
home phone: +84 4 3846-1751 Skype: vernweitzel
IF I DO NOT RESPOND IN A REASONABLE TIME, PLEASE RESEND YOUR MESSAGE

Kindness heals the wounds of a lifetime.
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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 22 10:07:17 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2009 17:07:17 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] International Conference: 4 Degrees and Beyond,
8-30 September 2009, Oxford
Message-ID: <49EE5FB5.4030807@gmail.com>



-------- Original Message --------
Subject: International Conference: 4 Degrees and Beyond, 8-30 September 2009, Oxford
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2009 04:38:32 -0500
From: mark.new at ouce.ox.ac.uk
Reply-To: mark.new at ouce.ox.ac.uk
To: Climate Change Info Mailing List <climate-l at lists.iisd.ca>

International Conference: 4 Degrees and Beyond, 8-30 September 2009, Oxford

The University of Oxford, Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research and the Met
Office are hosting a conference on the implications of a large climate warming
for society.

The rationale for the conference is (i) to assess the consequences of a change
in global temperature above 4+?C for a range of systems and sectors, and (ii) to
explore the options that are open for avoiding climate changes of this magnitude.

We invite abstract submissions for oral papers and posters that assess the
implications of 4+?C at global, regional, national and local scales, under the
following general themes:
I: Agriculture, Water and Food Security (global, regional and national)
II: Vulnerable People and Places
III: Ecosystems and ecosystem services
IV: Earth system feedbacks and thresholds
V: Emissions reductions

For more information on the conference program, invited speakers, online
abstract submission and general registration please visit conference website:
www.eci.ox.ac.uk/4degrees

First deadline for abstracts is 11 May 2009

On behalf of the conference organising committee:
Mark New
Kevin Anderson
Richard Betts
Chris West
Diana Liverman



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 22 10:09:11 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2009 17:09:11 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] =?windows-1252?q?THE_GREAT_TRANSFORMATION_=96_Climat?=
=?windows-1252?q?e_Change_as_Cultural_Change?=
Message-ID: <49EE6027.3010806@gmail.com>

Subject: THE GREAT TRANSFORMATION ? Climate Change as Cultural Change
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2009 16:54:07 +0200
From: Hermann Ott <hermann.ott at wupperinst.org>
Reply-To: Hermann Ott <hermann.ott at wupperinst.org>
To: Climate Change Info Mailing List <climate-l at lists.iisd.ca>

Dear collegues,

please find below the announcement of a conference that is organised
by the Wuppertal Institute, the Potsdam Institute, the Institute for
Advanced Studies in the Humanities and the Mercator Foundation.

It will take place at the same time as the climate negotiations in
Bonn and thus allow some commuting because Essen is only 1,5 hours
away by train.

Yours

Hermann Ott

###

THE GREAT TRANSFORMATION ? Climate Change as Cultural Change
International Conference June, 8-10, 2009 in Essen, Germany
www.greattransformation.eu

?THE GREAT TRANSFORMATION? is the first international conference to
address the interrelations between climate change and culture. Through
discussions with international experts from the worlds of academia,
politics and business, the conference aims at identifying existing and
potential shifts towards a new era, which concern all levels of the
global community: markets and mindsets, global co-operations and
democracy.

Accordingly, the conference focuses on four topics: the economics of
climate change, global governance, cognitive dissonance and political
participation. In the evenings, highly distinguished panel discussions
are designed to produce scientific policy advice on major issues such
as a ?New Green Deal? or the future of a ?Transatlantic Climate Bridge?.

Amongst the speakers are: Lord Anthony Giddens (former director of the
London School of Economics (LSE), author of ?The Politics of Climate
Change?), Prof. Dr. Klaus T?pfer (Deputy Chairman of the German
Council for Sustainable Development, RNE), John Podesta (President and
CEO of the Center for American Progress), and Prof. Thomas Homer-Dixon
(author of ?The Upside of Down?).

If you wish to attend the conference we kindly ask you to register
online before May 15 at www.greattransformation.eu Further
information on the conference program and the speakers is also
available online. There is no participation fee. Please note that the
conference will be held in English.

--
Dr. Hermann E. Ott
Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment and Energy
Head, Berlin Office
Hackesche H?fe
Rosenthaler Strasse 40/41
D - 10178 Berlin
Germany

Tel: *49-30-2809 5489 (Secr. -5494)
Fax: *49-30-2809 4895
e-mail: Hermann.Ott at wupperinst.org
http://www.wupperinst.org/en/contact/berlin_office/index.html

New articles on climate and environmental policy:
http://www.wupperinst.org/en/publications/berlin_office/index.html



Wuppertal Institut fuer Klima, Umwelt, Energie GmbH;
Sitz der Gesellschaft/Registered Office: Wuppertal, Germany;
Registergericht/Registered at: Amtsgericht Wuppertal, Germany;
Eintragungs-Nr./Registration no.: HRB 7619;
USt.-ID Nr./VAT ID No.: DE 121 091 633
Kaufmaennische Geschaeftsfuehrerin/Business Manager: Brigitte Mutert-Breidbach
Vizepraesident/Vice-President: Prof. Dr. Manfred Fischedick
Aufsichtsratsvorsitzender/Chairman of the Supervisory Board:
Staatssekretaer/State Secretary
Dr. Michael Stueckradt




From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 22 10:10:05 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2009 17:10:05 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] 5th Australia-NZ Climate Change & Business Conference
- Online Registration Available
Message-ID: <49EE605D.7020308@gmail.com>

Subject: 5th Australia-NZ Climate Change & Business Conference - Online
Registration Available
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2009 10:04:27 +1200
From: Climate Change & Business Centre <secretariat at climateandbusiness.com>
Reply-To: Climate Change & Business Centre <secretariat at climateandbusiness.com>
To: Climate Change Info Mailing List <climate-l at lists.iisd.ca>

Dear colleague

5th Australia-New Zealand Climate Change and Business Conference
(Melbourne, 24-26 August 09) - registration now available online

We are pleased to advise that early bird registration for the pre-eminent
climate change conference for business in the Australia/New Zealand region is
now available. This year's event will focus on three themes:
* domestic and international policy developments in the lead up to Copenhagen
* financing the transition to a low carbon economy in the global financial crisis
* practical advice on how business can respond to climate change.

For the first time, the conference will include an International Expo, organised
by our partner Point Carbon, providing the opportunity for climate change and
carbon market service providers to highlight their products and services.

The Victorian Government is Foundation Sponsor and Host of the event which will
be held in the new six-star Green Star rated Melbourne Convention & Exhibition
Centre. Organising support is provided by partners in five countries.
Sponsorship opportunities are still available.

Tailored for a business audience, the conference represents a unique opportunity
for an interchange of ideas between New Zealand and Australian business leaders
and policy makers in the run-up to Copenhagen.

This is a not-for-profit event.

http://www.climateandbusiness.com/


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 22 10:11:11 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2009 17:11:11 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Stakeholders invited to input into PEFC Standards
Revision process
Message-ID: <49EE609F.4050300@coombs.anu.edu.au>


Subject: Stakeholders invited to input into PEFC Standards Revision process
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2009 17:35:55 +0200
From: Thorsten Arndt <Thorsten.Arndt at pefc.org>
Reply-To: Thorsten Arndt <Thorsten.Arndt at pefc.org>
To: Forest Policy Info Mailing List <forests-l at lists.iisd.ca>

PEFC International is organizing a stakeholder dialogue on its Standards
Revision to gather expectations, input and comments from all interested
parties for the revision of two of its core documents dealing with
PEFC's global criteria for sustainable forest management and its
standard setting procedures at national level.



For PEFC, as a voluntary mechanism promoting the responsible management
of the world's forests, it is vital that its international
sustainability benchmarks are periodically reviewed and revised to
reflect best practises and incorporate the latest knowledge and
expectations by society. All stakeholders are invited to attend.



Date: 27th May 2009

Time: 09:00 ? 16:30

Location: Geneva, Switzerland



The dialogue aims at ensuring that the revision takes account of the
views of all stakeholders, and PEFC urges all interested parties to
participate in this important event, including:



* NGOs
* Governments, intergovernmental and United Nations organisations
* Forest owners
* Forest-based companies and companies along the value chain
* Certification and accreditation bodies
* Trade unions and other associations
* Indigenous peoples organisations
* Forest certification scheme representatives



Draft agenda and registration from are available at
http://www.pefc.org/internet/resources/5_1184_2015_file.2359.pdf

For further information, see also the invitation for nominations to the
working group:
http://www.pefc.org/internet/html/news/4_1154_65/5_1105_1976.htm





Thorsten Arndt
Head of Communications

PEFC International
World Trade Centre 1
10 route de L'A?roport
CH-1215 Gen?ve
Switzerland
www.pefc.org <http://www.pefc.org/>
t.arndt at pefc.org <mailto:t.arndt at pefc.org>
Tel: +41 (0)22 799 45 40
Fax: +41 (0)22 799 45 50
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The statements and opinions expressed in this message are those of the
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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 22 10:12:15 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2009 17:12:15 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Consultation on the the Global Strategy for Plant
Conservation Post 2010
Message-ID: <49EE60DF.9040209@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Subject: Consultation on the the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation
Post 2010
Date: Mon, 20 Apr 2009 16:18:20 -0400
From: Taffeta Gray <tgray at iucnus.org>
Reply-To: Taffeta Gray <tgray at iucnus.org>
To: Biodiversity Info Mailing List <biodiv-l at lists.iisd.ca>

Sorry for cross posting:


Dear Biodiversity Listserve,

**IUCN invites interested parties to participate in an important
consultation on the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation Post-2010:**

The current Global Strategy for Plant Conservation has a 2010 deadline,
this consultation will help determine what comes next and how a new
strategy may be put together. The timeframe for consultation is short:
it closes on April 30th.

There is a CBD liaison meeting for the Global Strategy at the end of May
in Dublin, where the future of the GSPC will be discussed. IUCN hopes to
be able to attend this meeting in order to represent the views of the
SSC network, in particular on ideas for new versions of targets 2, 5,
and 10 (species assessments, protection of important plant areas, and
management of invasive species that threaten plants, respectively).
These are the targets for which IUCN is a lead or partner in facilitation.

The online consultation will be open *from 1 to 30 April 2009 *and is
accessible at http://www.cbd.int/gspc/survey please see attached invitation


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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 22 10:13:11 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2009 17:13:11 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Announcement: Proposal Development Training Workshop
for Asia-Pacific trainees
Message-ID: <49EE6117.9090902@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Subject: Announcement: Proposal Development Training Workshop for
Asia-Pacific trainees
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2009 16:48:44 +0900
From: Linda Anne Stevenson <lstevenson at apn-gcr.org>
Reply-To: Linda Anne Stevenson <lstevenson at apn-gcr.org>
Organization: Asia-Pacific Network for Global Change Research
To: Climate Change Info Mailing List <climate-l at lists.iisd.ca>
CC: <lstevenson at apn-gcr.org>


*APN Proposal Development Training Workshop at the CSD 17 Partnerships Fair*

APN is organising a "Proposal Development Training Workshop under the
Scientific Capacity Building and Enhancement for Sustainable Development
in Developing Countries (CAPaBLE) Partnership" on 7 May 2009 during the
17th Session of the United Nations (UN) Commission on Sustainable
Development (CSD) in New York. Those attending the CSD-17 who are based
in the Asia-Pacific region are highly encouraged to attend. Please check
the attached flyer for more information.

Warmest regards

Linda

------------------------------------------------------------------------

*Dr. Linda Anne Stevenson***

*Scientific Officer***

*Asia-Pacific Network for Global Change Research (APN)*

APN Secretariat

5F, IHD Centre Building

1-5-1 Wakinohama Kaigan Dori, Chuo-Ku

Kobe 651-0073, JAPAN

Tel: (+81) 078-230-8017

Fax: (+81) 078-230-8018

Email: lstevenson at apn-gcr.org <mailto:lstevenson at apn-gcr.org>

Website: www.apn-gcr.org <http://www.apn-gcr.org/>

------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Asia-Pacific Network for Global Change Research (APN) is a network
of governments in the Asia-Pacific whose aim is to foster global change
research in the region, increase developing country involvement in that
research, and strengthen interactions between the science community and
policy-makers.

P Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.


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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 22 10:26:59 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2009 17:26:59 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Ecosystem Subsidies of Fossil Fuel [fossil fuels as
ecosystem services]
Message-ID: <49EE6453.3060809@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1117564

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Ecosystem Subsidies of Fossil Fuel
Date: Mon, 20 Apr 2009 13:37:20 -0400
From: David Hodas <drhodas at gmail.com>
Reply-To: David Hodas <drhodas at gmail.com>
To: Climate Change Info Mailing List <climate-l at lists.iisd.ca>

You be interested in a recently published article "Ecosystem Subsidies of Fossil
Fuels." The article analyzes the ecosystem service of photosynthesis collecting
and storing solar energy as fossil fuels (e.g., coal, petroleum, and natural
gas). The article demonstrates that legal systems fail to recognize the value of
this ecosystem service that is embedded in fossil fuels and that this imputed
ecosystem service price subsidy results in overuse of fossil fuels and emissions
of greenhouse gases which would not occur if the price of the fossil fuels
included the cost of its manufacture by the world's ecosystems. The article
reports that, ironically, almost none of the literature on ecosystem services,
including some of the groundbreaking work of the late 1990s, considers fossil
fuels in this context. Current international and domestic energy law and policy
nearly completely ignore this feature of fossil fuel energy. This Article
proposes that to control greenhouse gas emissions and move towards a more
sustainable energy system it is necessary to value the ecosystem services that
manufactured fossil fuels, and to find a legal mechanism to internalize that
value into the marketplace, either as a cost on the fossil fuel resource or a
subsidy on renewable energy alternatives that seek to collect solar energy and
convert it into a usable form. The Article concludes by considering a legal
decision-making model as an example of how to incorporate ecosystem service
values into energy decision-making. The article is available at
http://ssrn.com/abstract=1117564 . Professor David R. Hodas Widener University
School of Law 4601 Concord Pike Wilmington DE 19803-0474 302 477 2186 (tel) 302
477 2257 (fax) drhodas at widener.edu


Ecosystem Subsidies of Fossil Fuels

David Hodas
Widener University - School of Law



Widener Law School Legal Studies Research Paper No. 08-37
Journal of Land Use & Environmental Law, Vol. 22, No. 2, 2007

Abstract:
Ecosystems provide the invaluable service of collecting and storing solar energy
as fossil fuels (e.g., coal, petroleum, and natural gas). These concentrated
forms of energy were gifted to us by the sun and collected and stored for our
use by ancient ecosystem services. However, our legal and economic systems fail
to recognize the value of this ecosystem service that is embedded in fossil
fuels. As a result, society uses fossil fuels as though they were free and
inexhaustible. This market failure means that fossil fuels are being consumed
more quickly than they can be replenished, which in turn has affected the
world's environment. This ecosystem services price subsidy had led to overuse
and waste of the resource in the free market, which would not be occurring if
the price of the fossil fuels included the cost of its manufacture by the
world's ecosystems.

Ironically, almost none of the literature on ecosystem services, including some
of the groundbreaking work of the late 1990s, considers fossil fuels in this
context. Until we begin to understand stored energy as an ecosystem service, we
cannot reasonably expect to manage our fossil fuel energy resources sustainably.
Current international and domestic energy law and policy nearly completely
ignores this feature of fossil fuel energy. The ultimate consequences of this
disconnect are not just a matter of concern to energy policy, but are of the
utmost significance to national security as well.

This Article proposes that it is necessary to value the ecosystem services that
manufactured fossil fuels, and to find a legal mechanism to internalize that
value into the marketplace, either as a cost on the fossil fuel resource or a
subsidy on renewable energy alternatives that seek to collect solar energy and
convert it into a usable form. The Article concludes by considering a legal
decision-making model as an example of how to incorporate ecosystem service
values into energy decision-making.

Keywords: fossil fuels, ecosystems, environmental law, energy, global warming,
climate change

JEL Classifications: K32, Q4

Accepted Paper Series



From kdwilliams56 at yahoo.co.uk Wed Apr 22 12:18:13 2009
From: kdwilliams56 at yahoo.co.uk (Keith Williams)
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2009 02:18:13 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: [enviro-vlc] (no subject)
Message-ID: <782053.97041.qm@web27907.mail.ukl.yahoo.com>

Ohhhhh! Cam on anh...!

--- On Tue, 21/4/09, Nguyen Manh Ha <ha.nguyenba at gmail.com> wrote:


From: Nguyen Manh Ha <ha.nguyenba at gmail.com>
Subject: [enviro-vlc] (no subject)
To: "enviro-vlc at anu.edu.au" <enviro-vlc at anu.edu.au>
Received: Tuesday, 21 April, 2009, 7:21 PM


enviro-vlc - Environment in Viet Nam and the Region
New address to post messages: enviro-vlc at anu.edu.au
New list Information Page (remember your password): http://mailman.anu.edu.au/mailman/listinfo/enviro-vlc
Maximum message size: 2.5 mb.

--



Anh yeu em

Sent from my iPhone
_______________________________________________
enviro-vlc Environment in Viet Nam and the Region
Post message to list: enviro-vlc at anu.edu.au
List information page: http://mailman.anu.edu.au/mailman/listinfo/enviro-vlc
enviro-vlc List from the Australia Vietnam Science-Technology Link
contact: Vern Weitzel vern at coombs.anu.edu.au


The accuracy of information from media articles posted on this list
cannot be guaranteed and should be verified before use.



The new Internet Explorer 8 optimised for Yahoo!7: Faster, Safer, Easier.

From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 22 12:24:48 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2009 19:24:48 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] (no subject)
In-Reply-To: <782053.97041.qm@web27907.mail.ukl.yahoo.com>
References: <782053.97041.qm@web27907.mail.ukl.yahoo.com>
Message-ID: <49EE7FF0.3060508@coombs.anu.edu.au>

No, Keith. He means that he loves his iPhone. ;-)

Keith Williams wrote:
>
> Ohhhhh! Cam on anh...!
>
> --- On Tue, 21/4/09, Nguyen Manh Ha <ha.nguyenba at gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
> From: Nguyen Manh Ha <ha.nguyenba at gmail.com>
> Subject: [enviro-vlc] (no subject)
> To: "enviro-vlc at anu.edu.au" <enviro-vlc at anu.edu.au>
> Received: Tuesday, 21 April, 2009, 7:21 PM
>
> Anh yeu em
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> _______________________________________________

Vern Weitzel (Mr.) BSc, BA, MA, M Env Man & Dev
<vern at coombs.anu.edu.au> <vern.weitzel at gmail.com> <vernweitzel at mac.com>

ANU/AVSL eMail Lists: http://coombs.anu.edu.au/~vern/forum.html
NGO Centre eMail Lists: http://ngocentre.org.vn/mailman/listinfo

Address during 2009: 2724 NE 24th St, Renton WA 98056 USA
phone/fax: +1 (425) 228-4513 Mobile: +1 (206) 3-9999-81
Ha Noi address: 1st stairwell, apartment 504-505, block A4 Giang Vo,
Ba Dinh, Ha Noi [off Ngoc Khanh Street, opposite Van Phuc Compound]
home phone: +84 4 3846-1751 Skype: vernweitzel
IF I DO NOT RESPOND IN A REASONABLE TIME, PLEASE RESEND YOUR MESSAGE

Kindness heals the wounds of a lifetime.


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 22 13:08:18 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2009 20:08:18 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] =?utf-8?q?National_report_focuses_on_craft_villages?=
=?utf-8?b?4oCZIGVudmlyb25tZW50?=
Message-ID: <49EE8A22.9040408@gmail.com>

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/tech/2009/04/843315/

National report focuses on craft villages? environment
21:38' 21/04/2009 (GMT+7)

VietNamNet Bridge ? Many craft villages were seriously polluted, the latest
national environmental report showed.


Young volunteers clean up around Hoan Kiem Lake.

The report, National Environmental Report 2008: Viet Nam Craft Village
Environment, is part of Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment (MoNRE)?s
five-year master report on the environment.

It provides an overview of the villages? development and actions to deal with
pollution.

Dividing craft villages into six main groups, the report said they all faced
serious threats from water, solid waste and air pollution.

"Depending on the type of production, villages suffer different forms of
pollution," the report said.

Common to most villages was uncollected solid waste, dumped directly into the
environment.

Almost half of the 52 surveyed villages have polluted water, which comes from
villages processing food, animal husbandry and slaughtering and those working in
paper and metal recycling and cloth weaving and dying.

Air pollution from construction materials and stone work is common in pottery
villages.

The environment in most of the villages was below accepted standards and workers
constantly worked with the threat of pollution. The report said 95 per cent
worked with dust, 85.9 per cent with heat problems and nearly 60 per cent with
dangerous chemicals.

The report outlined issues facing the environmental protection of villages,
including a lack of clear management and specific regulations for their
environmental protection, as well as a mission for their protection from pollution.

Speaking at the report launch in Ha Noi yesterday, Minister of Natural Resources
and Environment Pham Khoi Nguyen said it was time to tackle most environmental
problems in the villages.

"Craft villages are one of the characteristics of the rural area and they have
played an important part in social and economic development, as well as helping
the country shift towards industrialisation and modernisation," Nguyen said.

"The development of craft villages towards sustainability has not received close
management, or instructions from authorities," he said.

"The report?s analysis proves the effects of environment pollution to people?s
health and to social and economic development as a result," he said.

"It also evaluates management in environmental protection, successes and
problems, and suggests solutions," he added.

Nguyen said the report would soon be translated into English for foreign readers.

VietNamNet/Viet Nam News


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 22 13:09:34 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2009 20:09:34 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Waste treatment takes centre stage
Message-ID: <49EE8A6E.1090507@gmail.com>

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/tech/2009/04/843107/

Waste treatment takes centre stage
23:06' 20/04/2009 (GMT+7)

Landfills falling far short of standards harm people and the environment

In response to the fact that most landfills in Viet Nam fall short of meeting
environmental standards, Deputy Prime Minister Hoang Trung Hai has asked the
Viet Nam Development Bank to develop a waste treatment project in the capital
last week.


A worker processes waste at a treatment plant in the capital. A programme for
investing in and building treatment plants between 2009-20 is needed to meet
environmental standards.

The Government assigned the bank and the Ministry of Construction (MoC) to
implement a programme for investing in and building waste treatment plants
between 2009-20.

MoC said 85-90 per cent of the landfills in the country are currently out of
date and use inefficient technology, which both harms the environment and has a
negative impact on the lives of local people.

Hai said that relevant ministries and departments should begin with a regional
pilot plant before launching a system of plants nationwide with the support of
State and private investment.

To start, the bank should create good incentive policies to attract investors
while MoC will work to approve feasible projects.

Both the ministry and the bank should co-operate in the creation of incentive
policies for investors.

MoC must work toward addressing the country?s waste management by providing
guidance to localities regarding the conditions and standards of waste treatment
technology, Hai said.

At a recent sustainable development conference, experts said the treatment of
domestic, industrial, hospital, and especially solid waste was urgent to every
locality in Viet Nam, with the hottest areas being the major urban hubs of Ha
Noi, HCM City, Hai Phong and Da Nang.

Conference participants also said that inadequate waste management contributed
to the nation?s economic losses and that estimates indicate up to 1.3 million
people will move to urban areas every year until 2020.

The urbanisation level in Viet Nam will reach 33 per cent by 2010 and 45 per
cent by 2020 ? doubling from 23 to 46 million people, shows ministry data.

Officials from MoC said the amount of residential, industrial and medical solid
waste throughout Viet Nam each day comes to about 20,000 tonnes, but on average
only 82 per cent is collected.

About 2,000 tonnes of the solid waste is recyclable.

Nearly 60 million tonnes of waste is generated in rural areas each year. Experts
forecast the amount of waste to increase 24 to 30 per cent by 2015.

Currently there are only 13 waste treatment plants to accommodate 2,000 tonnes
of waste per year for 740 urban areas in the country.

Under the project, officials expect to raise the number of plants to more than
60 over the next six years.

VietNamNet/Viet Nam News


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 22 13:11:06 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2009 20:11:06 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Nuclear power: Seven agencies allowed to offer training
Message-ID: <49EE8ACA.9080808@gmail.com>

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/tech/2009/04/843056/

Nuclear power: Seven agencies allowed to offer training
17:30' 20/04/2009 (GMT+7)

A nuclear power plant (photo: ecofriend.org).

VietNamNet Bridge ? According to the scheme to train human resources for the
nuclear power sector, seven agencies in Hanoi, HCM City and Lam Dam province are
permitted to offer training activities. The total funding for this scheme is
around VND2 trillion ($111.1 million).

The seven agencies are: the Hanoi Polytechnic University, the Hanoi-based and
HCM City-based universities for natural sciences, the Electricity University, Da
Lat University, the Vietnam Atomic Power Institute, and the Institute of Physics.

Deputy Minister of Science and Technology Le Dinh Tien said human resource
training for the nuclear power industry is critical, and needs to be begun as
soon as possible. Vietnam aims to have sufficient human resources for its first
nuclear power plant.

There are four universities in Vietnam which have nuclear energy faculties.
However, the Vietnam Atomic Power Institute said that the curriculums for these
universities don?t meet requirements for nuclear technology and safety training.

According to experts, preparation of human resources for the nuclear power
industry must be implemented early, tens of years before the first nuclear power
plant becomes operational.

It is estimated that this plant will need around 450 experts. Vietnam currently
has 600 people who are working in nuclear-related fields, mainly in non-energy
application areas, all of whom are of advanced age.

Chi Mai


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 22 13:14:26 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2009 20:14:26 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Germany finances eco-system management in Bac Lieu
Message-ID: <49EE8B92.1060007@gmail.com>

http://vietnamplus.vn/moi-truong-en/200904201423306461

Germany finances eco-system management in Bac Lieu
20-04-2009 | 18:50:03


The German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear
Safety (BUM) will provide 1.6 million euros for a project on sustainable
management of forest ecosystems for coastal protection in southern Bac Lieu
province.

An agreement to this effect was signed between Vice Chairman of the Bac Lieu
provincial People?s Committee Pham Hoang Be and German Technical Cooperation
(GTZ) Country Director for Vietnam Gunter Riethmacher in Hanoi on April 20.

Under the agreement, the three-year project, to be implemented in Hoa Binh and
Dong Hai districts and Bac Lieu town, aims to improve the ecological
functionality of coastal forests and the livelihood of people depending on them.

The objective is expected to be achieved through a combination of measures,
including coastal forest rehabilitation and biodiversity, conservation of Bac
Lieu bird sanctuary, institutional strengthening as well as networking among
stakeholders in the coastal areas of the Mekong River Delta.

The project in Bac Lieu province is one of the two projects funded by the BMU in
Vietnam . Earlier, the BMU provided 1 million euros for a wind energy
development project in central Binh Thuan province during the 2008-2011 period.

On a recent trip to the province, the German Parliamentary State Secretary of
the BMU, Astrid Klug, reiterated Germany ?s commitment to supporting projects in
Vietnam . ?Climate change is the primary concern of the BMU,? she said in a
meeting with the Bac Lieu provincial People?s Committee.

Lying in the Mekong River Delta, Bac Lieu is one of the Vietnamese localities
greatly affected by the climate change. Rising sea levels and storms of
increasing magnitude threaten the poor rural population as well as their rice
and shrimp production.

Over the past 20 years, large areas directly behind the protected mangrove
forests have been converted into shrimp farms. The land is sold or leased to
investors while the local residents are increasingly being pushed into the
hinterland, endangering the protective function of the coastal forests./.


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 22 22:59:25 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2009 05:59:25 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Climate Witness Community Toolkit
Message-ID: <49EF14AD.3050907@gmail.com>

http://www.panda.org/about_our_earth/all_publications/?uNewsID=162722

Climate Witness Community Toolkit

Download
Climate Witness Toolkit [pdf, 3.22 MB]
http://assets.panda.org/downloads/climate_witness_tool_kit_1.pdf

Climate Witness: Community Toolkit: WWF South Pacific Programme
? WWF SPP
22 Apr 2009

This Climate Witness Tool kit is the result of a process undertaken on Kabara,
Fiji, (the first Climate Witness site in the Pacific) to document local impacts
of climate change and to devise appropriate adaptation measures that local
communities can implement themselves.

The methodologies within the toolkit are an adaptation of participatory
techniques WWF-South Pacific has used over the years in community resource
conservation and development projects, and should give facilitators a clear
sense of process when trying to illicit information specific to impacts of
climate change and developing appropriate community response measures to them.



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 22 23:43:44 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2009 06:43:44 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] UK: Green and mean: The downside of clean energy
Message-ID: <49EF1F10.4030701@coombs.anu.edu.au>


http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20227041.300-green-and-mean-the-downside-of-clean-energy.html

Green and mean: The downside of clean energy

21 April 2009 by Fred Pearce

Magazine issue 2704.

For similar stories, visit the Endangered Species and Energy and Fuels Topic Guides

The Severn estuary could become the site of a giant tidal barrage, generating
huge amounts of clean energy but obliterating vulnerable wildlife habitats
(Image: Kevin Allen / Alamy)

2 more images

YOU can understand the frustration on both sides. Environmentalists worldwide
are clamouring for bold action to end the burning of fossil fuels and plug the
world into renewables. Politicians throw their weight behind a $14 billion
scheme that would replace the equivalent of eight coal-fired power stations with
tidal power. What do they get for their pains? Green outrage.

"This massively damaging proposal cannot be justified," said Graham Wynne, chief
of the UK's normally staid Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB).
Friends of the Earth said it was "not the answer". What is going on here? Have
greens lost the plot? Has environmentalism been hijacked by big construction
companies? Or do we simply have to learn that even environmental energy comes at
an environmental cost?

The project causing all the controversy is the Severn barrage on the west coast
of Britain, but similar stories are playing out across the world. As greens
gradually win the argument for switching to renewable energy, they are finding
that they don't always like the look of the new world they are creating.

The problem is one of scale. Bigness is often an issue for greens, many of whom
grew up reading one of the movement's key texts: E. F. Schumacher's Small Is
Beautiful. They liked biofuel while it was about recycling cooking fat, but not
when it became growing millions of hectares of palm oil in former Borneo
rainforest. Solar panels on roofs are good, but covering entire deserts with
them is another matter. They like small wind turbines and even small wind farms,
but get very jumpy as wind power reaches industrial scale.

Small may be beautiful, but it won't change the world. You can't generate vast
amounts of green energy without large-scale engineering projects, which
inevitably do some damage to the natural environment.

Greens have been here before, to some extent. Once, long ago, they loved large
dams. From the 1930s to the 1960s, hydroelectricity was regarded as the new,
clean and cheap source of electricity. Nobody cared about climate change then,
but they did care about the killer smogs from burning coal. From the Rockies to
the Alps, from Scandinavia to the Tennessee valley, nature would be harnessed to
provide clean power for the masses. Woody Guthrie once wrote a song about the
splendours of the Grand Coulee dam on the Columbia river: Roll along, Columbia,
you can ramble to the sea, but river, while you're rambling, you can do some
work for me he sang in 1941.

All that started to change in the 1960s after engineers tried to dam the Grand
Canyon on the Colorado river and hikers rebelled. By the mid-1990s opposition to
large dams had grown so intense that the World Bank stopped funding them for
several years. Even after green projects became a major priority for most
government aid agencies, none of them would touch China's Three Gorges dam on
the Yangtze river, even though it replaces some 20 large coal-fired power
stations. Projects like the Severn barrage are now provoking similar opposition.

The Severn estuary is a natural marvel. The British coastline has some of the
highest tidal ranges (the difference between high and low tides) in the world,
and the long funnel shape of the estuary gives it a tidal range that peaks at
more than 13 metres, the largest in the world apart from the Bay of Fundy on the
east coast of Canada. The tidal surge is so strong that spring tides create a
wave running upriver, known as the Severn bore.

In January, the UK government announced its intention to go ahead with a major
project to extract energy from the Severn's tidal range. The most likely option
is a giant 16-kilometre barrage across the estuary, though the shortlist
includes four smaller projects (see map and diagram).

First proposed 35 years ago, the full barrage would trap more than 400 square
kilometres of tidal estuary behind a wall of concrete and sand. As the tide
rises, sluice gates would be opened to let water in. At high tide the sluices
would be slammed shut and the outrushing water forced through turbines. The
barrage's theoretical peak generating capacity would be 8.6 gigawatts, enough to
supply 5 per cent of the UK's electricity and 35 times as much as the largest
existing tidal power plant, on the Rance estuary in France. Its lifetime might
be more than a century, several times that of a conventional power station.

Ironically, the estuary's enormous tidal range is also key to what the RSPB
calls its "truly exceptional ecological value" - hundreds of square kilometres
of intertidal mud flats, sand banks and salt marshes, around half of which the
barrage would obliterate.

In the parts of the estuary enclosed by the barrage, low tide would be about 5
metres higher than before, meaning that much of the intertidal zone would be
permanently flooded, including 190 square kilometres of treasured wildlife
habitat that is home to 70,000 birds in winter. The surviving flats might
compensate by hosting more wildlife, but nobody can be sure. The barrage would
also be a barrier to migrating eels and salmon. Even the famous bore might
disappear. Friends of the Earth says the barrage will "wreck one of the most
important wildlife sites in Europe".

Unfortunately there is nowhere like it for a tidal barrage. Engineers have
identified other potential sites to tap the UK's exceptional tidal range,
including Morecambe Bay, the Solway Firth and the Wash. But because the
electricity-generating potential of tides is equivalent to the square of the
tidal range, the exceptional range of the Severn estuary means it has about 80
per cent of the potential national resource.

One alternative is to ditch the full barrage and replace it with lagoons along
the estuary's coasts, which would generate electricity while saving some
habitats. Lagoons are on the shortlist, but engineers advising the government
say they would deliver less.

Or how about directly tapping tides for their strong currents? The idea is to
create an underwater version of a wind farm, with turbines attached to the sea
bed in areas where strong currents flow, such as through channels and around
headlands. The engineering company Metoc has identified 20 coastal areas where
this could be done around Britain, the best sites being the Pentland Firth
between mainland Scotland and Orkney, and around the Channel Islands.

Jewel in the crown

The problem is, nobody knows for sure how much power might be generated from
tidal currents. The upper theoretical limit from all 20 sites combined is about
the same as from the Severn barrage alone, but the technology is at a much
earlier stage of development, and the most promising sites are remote from the
transmission grids that carry power to customers. Nonetheless, the Scottish
government has singled out the Pentland Firth as the "jewel in the crown" for
its plans to exploit renewable energy.

There appears to be no getting away from the fact that only big projects can
deliver big quantities of renewable energy, and this inconvenient fact is
dividing green opinion. The UK government's Sustainable Development Commission,
chaired by the former director of Friends of the Earth Jonathon Porritt, has
come out in favour of the barrage. It concluded at the end of 2007 that,
provided alternative habitat could be created for the birds, the barrage should
be built. Porritt said "the enormous potential to reduce our carbon emissions"
outweighed the environmental harm. He made some enemies that day.

Wind power is another front line. Studies of the windiness of onshore Europe
have showed that most of the wind is in upland regions loved for their scenic
beauty. This is particularly true in the UK, which has an estimated 40 per cent
of Europe's exploitable wind and could make a big contribution to European Union
targets for generating a fifth of its power from renewables by 2020. But most of
this wind blasts into the Scottish Highlands, and tapping it means putting big
turbines on highly visible hilltops.

Many say the solution for wind is to put it offshore. The winds are stronger,
there are no neighbours, and turbines can be bigger. One bit of sea usually
looks much like another. But even then the issues don't go away.

Again the UK exemplifies the problem. Plans for 10 wind farms off the coast of
Scotland received a preliminary go-ahead this year. But Scottish waters have 45
per cent of Europe's breeding seabirds, many living around the reefs and
shallows favoured for wind farm sites. Another concern is noise. There is good
evidence that piledriving during turbine construction frightens away marine
mammals and maybe fish too.

In the US, too, offshore wind farms are creating dilemmas. The 130-turbine Cape
Wind project for Nantucket Sound, off the coast of Massachusetts, promises to be
the US's first offshore wind farm - as soon as an already decade-long permit
process is completed. The delay has been caused largely by objections from
influential residents, including the Kennedy family, who say their view of the
ocean will be spoiled. The battle has split the local environmental movement,
culminating in Greenpeace organising street protests against Robert Kennedy Jr,
an environmental lawyer and prominent opponent of the project.

Another emerging battleground is transmission. Scotland is debating whether to
build a ?300 million high-voltage power line linking the wind farms of the
Highlands to the population centres of lowland Scotland and England. The
cheapest way to do this would be to run overhead cables through the Cairngorms
National Park. Undersea cables would be aesthetically preferable but would cost
much more.

Scotland's dilemma will soon be writ large elsewhere. Most renewable sources of
energy are intermittent. The wind is a byword for variability. The tides are
predictable, but they ebb and flow to their own rhythm. Solar too comes and
goes: the sun's rise and fall may be predictable, but clouds are not. If
renewables are to be more than a niche source of power, this variability will
have to be evened out to meet patterns of demand.

The only real solution is monumental transmission systems that link up renewable
energy sources so they can substitute for one another. To work well, these
systems need to be built on a continental scale.

One idea on the table is a European supergrid linking big population and
industrial centres in countries such as Germany, France and the UK with the
continent's great potential sources of green energy, which are mostly on the
periphery. They include geothermal energy from Iceland, hydroelectricity from
Scandinavia, wind power from the North Sea, and solar energy from the Iberian
peninsula and even the Sahara desert (New Scientist, 14 March, p 42).

Such a network could guarantee renewable electricity for most, if not all,
Europe's needs. When the sun goes down in the Sahara, Germany could switch to
geothermal from Iceland. If the wind was blowing fiercely in the North Sea,
spare power could be used to pump water uphill between reservoirs on Norwegian
rivers, ready for release to generate energy when the winds dropped. But there
could be huge battles ahead if local environmentalists object to the power lines
passing through, and watch out for a "save the deserts" campaign when the solar
power people get serious.

"This could be a blueprint for India, too, or north-east Asia, southern Africa
or North America," says Nick Dunlop, founder of e-Parliament, an online global
network of parliamentarians that is backing the plan. In the US, President
Barack Obama is already on the case. He has promised to devote tens of billions
of dollars to a national electricity grid. The idea is to link up desert states
like Nevada, with their huge potential for solar power, and the Midwest states
with their wind, to the power-hungry markets of the east. Again, though, battles
lie around the corner.

Green schism

All these recurring disputes have to do with scaling up cuddly green technology
to the point where it makes a real difference to the climate. They expose an
emerging schism in the environmental movement. On the one side are the
"sustainable developers", for whom nature is a resource to be managed. On the
other are the "preservationists", who hold nature sacrosanct and for whom any
damage by mankind to natural ecosystems is a defeat. Radical British
environmentalist Paul Kingsnorth, who cut his teeth opposing road construction
in the 1990s, now says: "To me, a wind farm on a mountain, a tidal barrage that
turns a great river into a glorified millstream, or carpeting the Sahara with
giant solar panels... are a similar desecration." For the preservationists,
trade-offs are impossible. For sustainable developers, they are the essence of
environmentalism.

A wind farm, a tidal barrage that turns a great river into a millstream, a
carpet of solar panels on the Sahara... all are a desecration
There are many more disputes ahead. If more and more of the world decides to opt
for renewable sources of electricity, the drive to do it faster and cheaper will
grow. More large corporations with their eyes on the bottom line will get
involved. More corners will be cut. Environmentalists will inevitably find
themselves on the barricades defending the natural world from other
environmentalists intent on generating clean energy.

The bottom line for greens is that these dilemmas and contradictions are the
fruits of success. And the more successful their arguments for cutting
greenhouse gas emissions are, the greater and more frequent will be the
dilemmas. Rarely will there be a right or wrong answer. All visionaries imagine
that once they get their way, it will be plain sailing. It rarely is.

Fred Pearce is New Scientist's environment correspondent


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Wed Apr 22 23:53:17 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2009 06:53:17 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Rivers shrinking: Flow of many rivers in decline
Message-ID: <49EF214D.8090601@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_SCI_SHRINKING_RIVERS?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2009-04-21-17-21-46

Apr 21, 5:21 PM EDT

Rivers shrinking: Flow of many rivers in decline

By RANDOLPH E. SCHMID
AP Science Writer


WASHINGTON (AP) -- The flow of water in the world's largest rivers has declined
over the past half-century, with significant changes found in about a third of
the big rivers. An analysis of 925 major rivers from 1948 to 2004 showed an
overall decline in total discharge.

The reduction in inflow to the Pacific Ocean alone was about equal to shutting
off the Mississippi River, according to the new study appearing in the May 15
edition of the American Meteorological Society's Journal of Climate.

The only area showing a significant increase in flow was the Arctic, where
warming conditions are increasing the snow and ice melt, said researchers led by
Aiguo Dai of the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo.

"Freshwater resources will likely decline in the coming decades over many
densely populated areas at mid- to low latitudes, largely due to climate
changes, Dai said. "Rapid disappearing mountain glaciers in the Tibetan plateau
and other places will make matters worse."

Added co-author Kevin Trenberth, "As climate change inevitably continues in
coming decades, we are likely to see greater impacts on many rivers and water
resources that society has come to rely on."

While Dai cited climate change as a major factor in the changes, the paper noted
that other factors are also involved, including dams and the diversion of water
for agriculture and industry.

Nonetheless, he said, "long-term changes in streamflow should be a major concern
under global warming."

Indeed, the researchers wrote that "for many of the world's large rivers the
effects of human activities on yearly streamflow are likely small compared with
that of climate variations during 1948-2004."

"This is an important paper with new findings that are relevant to the health of
river ecosystems and the people who live near or rely upon rivers to meet water
needs," said Margaret A. Palmer, director of the Chesapeake Biological
Laboratory of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science.

"What is important from this study is these authors show that these decreases
are due to a changing climate, not human activities like extractions or dam
building, yet these changes will have impacts on humans and ecosystems because
many of these regions have large populations and drought-stressed ecosystems,"
said Palmer, who was not part of the research team.

Among the rivers showing declines in flow, several serve large populations.
These include the Yellow River in northern China, the Ganges in India, the Niger
in West Africa and the Colorado in the southwestern United States.

On the other hand, areas with rising streamflow near the Arctic Ocean tend to
have small populations.

There was considerable year-to-year variation in the flow of many rivers, but
the overall trend over the period showed annual freshwater discharge into the
Pacific Ocean fell by about 6 percent, or 526 cubic kilometers of water. That's
close to the 552-cubic kilometer average annual flow of the Mississippi, the
researchers reported.

The annual flow into the Indian Ocean dropped by about 3 percent, or 140 cubic
kilometers. In contrast, annual river discharge into the Arctic Ocean rose about
10 percent, or 460 cubic kilometers. There was little change in inflow to the
Atlantic Ocean, where increases in the Mississippi and Parana rivers were
balanced out by decreases in the Amazon River.

A cubic kilometer is a cube one kilometer on each side. A kilometer is about
six-tenths of a mile.

Discharge of river water into the oceans deposits sediment near the river mouth
and also affects worldwide ocean circulation patterns, which are driven by
variations in water temperature and salinity.

In the United States, the flow of the Mississippi River increased by 22 percent
over the period because of increased precipitation across the Midwest. On the
other hand, the Columbia River's flow declined by about 14 percent, mainly
because of reduced precipitation and higher water usage.

Major rivers showing declines in flow included the Amazon, Congo, Changjiang
(Yangtze), Mekong, Ganges, Irrawaddy, Amur, Mackenzie, Xijiang, Columbia and Niger.

Declines in the Niger River in the 1970s and 1980s in particular reflected the
Sahel Drought, the paper said. In addition, the periodic El Nino cooling of sea
surface waters in the tropical Pacific led to lower flows in the Amazon and
higher ones in the Mississippi when the phenomenon was in effect.

The research was supported by the National Science Foundation.

---

On the Net:

Journal of Climate:
http://ams.allenpress.com/perlserv/?requestget-archive&issn1520-0442

>> I can't get this link to work. Vern

? 2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be
published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Learn more about our Privacy
Policy.


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Thu Apr 23 02:14:54 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2009 09:14:54 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Celebrate Earth Day 2009
Message-ID: <49EF427E.3000604@gmail.com>

Subject: [procor] Celebrate Earth Day 2009
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2009 10:31:20 -0400
From: ProCor <procor at procor.org>
Reply-To: Global Dialogue <procor at list.procor.org>
To: Global Dialogue <procor at list.procor.org>

Celebrate Earth Day today by engaging in physical activity that protects your
heart and the planet. Here are our suggestions for ways in which you can promote
personal and environmental health on Earth Day 2009.

- Turn off the television or radio and engage in a physical activity that you enjoy.

- Walk or ride a bicycle instead of taking a bus or driving.

- Support your local parks or natural areas by visiting them (and carry a bag to
pick up litter along the way).

- Buy foods locally and seasonally.

- Recycle tin cans by decorating them and planting fresh herbs to flavor your
meals instead of salt.

- Plant a garden and enjoy your own vegetables or flowers.

- Eat less meat and increase consumption of fruits, vegetables, and fish.

- Cook vegetables by quickly steaming them in a small amount of water to retain
more nutrients and use less fuel.

- Advocate for healthier foods and physical activity programs in local schools.

Visit the Earth Day website (http://earthday.net) for more ideas and ways to get
involved.

Download a flyer of our suggestions for ways in which you can promote personal
and environmental health on Earth Day.
PDF (119 KB): www.procor.org/usr_doc/ProCor_Earth_Day_2009_flyer.pdf

Catherine Coleman
Editor in Chief, ProCor



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Thu Apr 23 04:50:40 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2009 11:50:40 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Dr. Monica Qamar Zaman CV for postdoc
Message-ID: <49EF6700.3070908@gmail.com>

Dear colleagues, I am posting a covering letter and CV
from Dr monica zaman <monica20022002pk at yahoo.com>
Please respond directly to her.
Thanks Dr Zaman, All the best, Vern

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: [giaoduc-vn] information for postdoc
Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2009 23:03:53 -0700 (PDT)
From: monica zaman <monica20022002pk at yahoo.com>
Reply-To: monica20022002pk at yahoo.com

Respected Sir/Madam

My name is Dr.Monica. I am Assistanr Professor in social work department,
university of Balochistan Quetta, Pakistan. I have done PhD in social work
and now I want to do postdoctorate.

I have visited your website. I am interested to do research work at solid waste
and air pollution, with gender equality and poverty reduction.

I have worked with Municiapl corporation at solid waste management program and i
have supervised a (Master's) thsis in pollution.

I am teaching and supervising Master's and Mphi/ PhD scholars in their research
work.

If you give me chance to do postdoc, i can take Master's classes, supervise in
research and field work, can organise trainning programs and extra curirculam
activites.

Kindly let me know , if i am eligible for postdoc scholarship, i will send you
research design with objectives and other required information.

I have attached my CV.

Regards
Dr. Monica Qamar Zaman
Assistant professor
social work department
university of Balochistan Quetta
Pakistan


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From kevinysli at graduate.hku.hk Fri Apr 24 00:29:56 2009
From: kevinysli at graduate.hku.hk (Kevin Yuk-shing Li)
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2009 22:29:56 +0800
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Cambodia - Mekong dredging continues
Message-ID: <A3257062076C4C76870B8082E929EE65@KevinLi>

Mekong dredging continues
Written by Khouth Sophak Chakrya and Meas Sokchea
The Phnom Penh Post. Thursday, 23 April 2009
http://www.phnompenhpost.com/index.php/2009042325473/National-news/Mekong-dredging-continues.html

Villagers living near the Neak Leung ferry in Prey Veng say authorities have
ignored sand-dredging operations they claim are causing riverbank collapses.

[Photo caption: Winton Enterprises, a Hong Kong-based company, dredges sand
from a Koh Kong estuary for export to Singapore in this file photo.]

THE homes, warehouses and farmland of 138 families in Prek Ksay Kor commune
in Prey Veng province's Peamro district continue to be threatened by
riverbank collapses resulting from sand-dredging operations in the Mekong
River, say affected villagers.

Mel Oun, 54, a villager representative, said Wednesday that sand-dredging
companies, including the Phal Sareth Import-Export and Tourism Co, had
increased their activities along the Mekong close to the Neak Leung ferry
crossing, worsening seasonal erosion along the river's banks.

"My banana and cassava farms and the farmland of other villagers has
collapsed into the river because of the sand dredging, but no authorities
have opened their eyes to the operations, which has caused riverbank
collapses and has almost destroyed National Road 11 in this area," he said.

"They are dredging sand for export to Vietnam, which is destroying the homes
and farmland of the people."

Uth Thay, 47 a villager in Prek Ksay Kor commune, told the Post that Phal
Sareth Co was filling five or six barges per day with sand from the Mekong
and was operating within 300 metres of the riverbank.

"My rice paddies and cassava warehouse collapsed into the river because Phal
Sareth Co is dredging in this area," she said, adding that authorities were
yet to find a solution.

Company and govt 'conspiring'
In a March 17 speech, Prime Minister Hun Sen warned authorities in Kandal
province to advise riverside residents to remove their homes in anticipation
of riverbank collapses in the province that locals have blamed on dredging.

Seng Sovann, who owns a rice paddy and cassava warehouse on the riverbank,
said sand-dredging operations in Prek Ksay Kor had increased since the prime
minister's announcement.

"[The company] brought a little bit of milled rice to give to the people who
lost their homes and farmland in the river," he said, but said the gift of
20kg of rice and 10,000 riels (US$2.44), handed out by the company in early
March, did not compensate for the loss of land.

"The authorities and company have conspired with each other, and they don't
care whether the people benefit," he added.

When contacted Wednesday, Peam Ro district Governor Sao Prasith said only
that the case depended on the central government, not the lower authorities.

But Phal Sareth Deputy President Bunchan Kreusna told the Post the company
had the proper government licences and it was operating according to the
technical regulations laid down by the relevant ministries.

He added that the company had helped many local people. "[The company] has
built a hospital, school, streets, [and provided] foods, petrol and
fertiliser to villagers in this commune," he said.

"I believe that people are angry with my company because they listened to
warehouse owners who incited the people."

Mao Hak, director of the Department of Hydrology and River Works at the
Ministry of Water Resources and Meteorology, said the company had already
been warned and that he would open new investigations.

"We will examine this case next week or next month. We will stop their
activities temporarily if we find they have made mistakes," he said.




From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 24 00:55:25 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2009 07:55:25 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Kontum Province Attracts 100 Hydropower Projects
Message-ID: <49F0815D.2050608@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Subject: [vnnews-l] PROV/HI: Kontum Province Attracts 100 Hydropower Projects
Date: Wed, 22 Apr 2009 23:45:28 -0700 (PDT)
sent to vnnews-l by Stephen Denney <sdenney at OCF.Berkeley.EDU>

Vietnam News Briefs: Industry: Vietnam Central Highlands Province
Attracts 100 Hydropower Projects
Vietnam News Briefs (Vietnam) - Tuesday, April 21, 2009

from the VIETNAM NEWS BRIEFS, April 21, 2009 Central highlands Kon Tum
province has to date attracted nearly 100 hydropower projects of different
sizes, a source from the state-owned Electricity of Vietnam Group (EVN)
said.

Of the total, 83 projects have got investment licenses while the rest are
completing necessary procedures.

Provincial authorities stipulate all hydropower projects must register
$3,000 per megawatt. Investors have registered VND8 billion ($473,372) in
total.

As of July 2008, nearly 70 small-and-medium-sized hydropower plants worth
over VND5 trillion ($304.87 million) have been built in the province.

The province has planned to build an additional 80 hydropower plants with
a combined capacity of over 500 MW by 2015.

The central highlands region has a great hydropower development potential,
which is estimated at 5,000 MW by 2010 to account for more than one-third
of Vietnam's existing electricity capacity.

(Icon Apr 20, Vietpan Database) Copyright 2009 Vietnam News Briefs
Provided By: Financial Times Information Limited - Asia Africa
Intelligence Wire



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 24 01:03:29 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2009 08:03:29 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] CALL FOR PAPERS - 11th Annual BIOECON Conference,
September 21-22, 2009, Venice, Italy
Message-ID: <49F08341.8080109@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Subject: CALL FOR PAPERS - 11th Annual BIOECON Conference, September
21-22, 2009, Venice, Italy
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2009 14:51:52 +0200
From: infoFEEM <infofeem at feem.it>
Reply-To: infoFEEM <infofeem at feem.it>
To: Biodiversity Info Mailing List <biodiv-l at lists.iisd.ca>

**11th Annual BIOECON Conference on
"Economic Instruments to Enhance the Conservation
and Sustainable Use of Biodiversity"*

*Centro Culturale Don Orione Artigianelli - Venice, Italy
September 21-22, 2009

*/hosted by
Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM)
in association with Conservation International, DEFRA, Department of
Land Economy of Cambridge University and European Investment Bank

/
The Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei <http://www.feem.it>, in association
with Conservation International <http://www.conservation.org/>, DEFRA
<http://www.defra.gov.uk/>, Department of Land Economy of Cambridge
University <http://www.landecon.cam.ac.uk/> and European Investment Bank
<http://www.eib.org/>, announces the Eleventh International BIOECON
Conference on "Economic Instruments to Enhance the Conservation and
Sustainable Use of Biodiversity". The Conference will be held at the
Centro Culturale Don Orione Artigianelli, in Venice, Italy, on September
21st-22nd, 2009.

The Conference is targeted to researchers, environmental professionals,
international organizations and policy makers who are interested in
working in the management and conservation of biodiversity. The
Conference is focused on identifying the most effective and efficient
instruments for biodiversity conservation, such as auctions of
biodiversity conservation contracts, payment-for-services contracts,
taxes, tradable permits, voluntary mechanisms and straightforward
command and control. Special emphasis will be given to policy reforms
aimed at increasing the commercial rewards for conserving biodiversity,
increasing the penalties for biodiversity loss and circulating
information on the biodiversity performance requirements of firms. An
increasing number of businesses, which were responsible for biodiversity
loss in the past, are now supporters of biodiversity conservation.
Markets for organic agriculture and sustainably-harvested timber are
developing at double-digit rates, while rapid growth is observed in the
demand for climate mitigation services, such as the protection of
forests and wetlands to absorb carbon dioxide. Bio-prospecting, the
search for new compounds, genes and organisms in the wild, is another
biodiversity business on the rise.

Papers are specifically invited on the themes of:

* Assessment of the effectiveness and efficiency of biodiversity
conservation instruments, taking into account spatial and
governmental considerations;
* Development of new, incentive-compatible instruments to conserve
biodiversity;
* Evaluation of the costs of conservation policies versus the costs
of 'business-as-usual' within an existing policy framework (e.g.
agriculture, fisheries, infrastructure, climate change, etc) that
causes ongoing losses of ecosystems and biodiversity.
* Determination of the factors - including the choice of policy
instruments - that increase or decrease a farmer's or public
body's motivation to conserve biodiversity on their land;
* Application to strategies and projects of the ecosystem services
approach for assessing and valuing environmental impacts;
* Benefit transfer methodologies to assess the socio-economic and
monetary value of ecosystems services;
* Applications of economic instruments to enhance the conservation
and sustainable use of biodiversity, with particular emphasis on
case studies in biodiversity hotspots.

We are particularly interested in papers documenting practical
applications and experiences on the above themes. Theoretical
contributions are welcome (e.g., using computer artificial intelligence
approaches), but also more applied work (e.g. how public bodies -
managing for example flood risks - can innovatively deliver wider
ecosystem benefits, or how private landowners can be encouraged to
conserve biodiversity on their land). We are also interested in
multi-disciplinary papers that combine scientific and economic
assessments. However, we will also accept papers on a range of other
issues related to renewable resources and biodiversity management.

The Conference will cover two days. Leading international environmental
economists will present their latest research in two plenary sessions.
The keynote speakers are: Professor Anil Markandya (University of Bath,
UK and BC3, Spain) and Professor Edward Barbier (University of Wyoming,
USA). Two special panel discussions are also scheduled. These are
characterized by a round table and shall be focused on climate change,
biodiversity management issues. One shall be co-organized with the
European Investment Bank and the second by Conservation International,
giving to the audience an interesting perspective that is the link
between theory and practice.

*Full/draft papers may be submitted* for presentation and will be
considered by the programme committee. Electronic copies (in WORD or PDF
format) should be sent to Ughetta Molin Fop (ughetta.molin at feem.it
<mailto:ughetta.molin at feem.it>) no later than* May 20th, 2009.*
Acceptance of papers will be notified by email in June 2009.

The Conference will open with an evening reception at the Centro
Culturale Don Orione Artigianelli on September 20th. Conference sessions
will commence in the morning of September 21st and end in the afternoon
of September 22nd. A Conference dinner will be organised on the evening
of September 21st. Lunches and refreshments will also be provided. All
the participants will be offered lunches and refreshments, the opening
reception, the social dinner and the Conference package (program
brochure with the book of abstracts, five hours of Internet connection,
folder, bag, pen, badge, logistical information, Venice map). There is
no registration fee.
Travel and accommodation expenses remain the responsibility of all the
participants.

In order to register to the Conference and the your accommodation
booking participants are invited to fill in the downloadable form at the
BIOECON web-site <http://www.bioecon.ucl.ac.uk/> and send it to the
Conference Secretariat (Ughetta Molin Fop, e-mail ughetta.molin at feem.it
<mailto:ughetta.molin at feem.it>, fax +39.041.2711461) by *July 15th, 2009*.

Further information about the Conference will be posted in the BIOECON
web-site at http://www.bioecon.ucl.ac.uk/.




From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 24 01:08:00 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2009 08:08:00 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Could your trashcan solve the energy crisis?
Message-ID: <49F08450.4040003@coombs.anu.edu.au>


http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20227051.500-could-your-trashcan-solve-the-energy-crisis.html

[Also, watch the video on the website.]

Could your trashcan solve the energy crisis?

22 April 2009 by Phil McKenna
Magazine issue 2705. Subscribe and get 4 free issues.


Could we vaporise all this trash and get clean energy? (Image: Steve Wilkes / Getty)

2 more images

Editorial: Waste gasification needs more light and less heat

AT FIRST glance, 303 Bear Hill Road in Waltham, Massachusetts, doesn't look like
the scene of an environmental revolution. But packed into a shipping container
in the car park of this modest suburban commercial building is a compact piece
of technology that its maker IST Energy insists can turn even the filthiest
waste into clean, green energy. "Trash will move from being a liability to an
asset, providing a clean source of energy that can be used right where it is
produced," says Stuart Haber, the company's CEO.

IST is not alone in this revolution. It is one of a growing number of companies
and research groups around the world working on gasification - a process that
zaps household waste into energy and which, its advocates say, produces few or
no harmful emissions. Yet as pilot gasification plants begin to spring up around
the world, this apparent environmentalist's dream is not being universally
welcomed. Opponents argue that the process is far from clean and that its track
record in terms of energy efficiency and emissions can hardly be considered
green. Not to mention the fact that it encourages the throwaway society that the
environmental movement has been trying so hard to get rid of. So what is the
real story? Is vaporising trash the answer to our energy and waste-disposal
woes, or an environmental wolf in sheep's clothing?

The idea of converting waste into energy has been around for decades. Heat from
garbage-fuelled incinerators can generate steam that drives a turbine that in
turn drives an electrical generator. Now fears over energy security and climate
change, combined with the rising cost of dealing with the world's waste, are
raising the possibility of disposing of household trash using higher-energy
methods once reserved for hazardous materials such as medical waste and asbestos.

Gasification, and its cousin plasma gasification, involve heating waste to a
high temperature inside a sealed chamber. This is done in the near absence of
oxygen, so organic components in the waste do not burn but instead reform into
syngas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. This can be filtered and
chemically "scrubbed" to remove toxic particles and gases, and then burned to
produce energy or converted into other fuels such as methane, ethanol or
synthetic diesel. All that's left to dispose of at the end is ash, dirty filters
and chemicals from the scrubbing process, which can be treated and sent to
landfill or into the sewers.

Gasification yields more energy per volume of trash than incineration, but the
possibilities don't end there. Adding an arc of superheated plasma to the mix
can increase that yield further. Plasma gasification vaporises waste at much
higher temperatures - up to 10,000 ?C compared with up to 1600 ?C for normal
gasification - which ensures that more of the organic waste is gasified.

In this kind of gasification, plasma arcs are created by passing a high-voltage
current through a chamber filled with an unreactive gas such as nitrogen (see
diagram). As the current flows through the enclosed space, it tears electrons
from the gas to form a superheated plasma that rips apart the molecules in
whatever is fed into the chamber. "It's like a continuous bolt of lightning that
disintegrates almost anything that crosses its path," says Daniel Cohn of the
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who has been working on plasma
gasification since the 1980s and now sits on the board of InEnTec, another
waste-to-energy company.

Plasma gasification is like a continuous bolt of lightning that disintegrates
almost anything in its path
A further advantage of this technique is that the very high temperatures cause
the waste to end up not as fine ash but as a glassy solid, which could in
principle be used as filler in the construction industry. And while the power
required to run InEnTec's pilot plant in Richland, Washington, amounts to
one-third to half of the power it produces, Cohn insists that the process is
financially viable. He says syngas can be converted to ethanol and synthetic
diesel at costs that can compete with petroleum-based equivalents. "We think we
can produce fuel at a cost of about $2 a gallon of gas equivalent," he says. If
he's right, trash could become the new oil.

Pilot gasification plants are being set up at various sites in the US, Canada,
France, the UK and Portugal, most of them using the plasma technique. Japan
already has two commercial plasma plants, but these are focused primarily on
simply disposing of household waste rather than generating energy from it.

While these new plants will all be large installations, IST Energy believes that
small is the way to go. Its container-sized non-plasma GEM system (short for
Green Energy Machine) can convert almost 3 tonnes of municipal waste a day into
enough syngas to heat and power an office building holding 500 people.

Keeping the system small and avoiding the expense of creating plasma makes it
affordable for businesses to deploy: excluding the gas burner, the system costs
$850,000 and, according to Haber, will pay for itself in four years through
savings on electricity, heating and waste disposal charges.

Haber says the entire system can save the equivalent of about 500 tonnes of
carbon dioxide emissions a year through reductions in landfill gases,
fossil-fuel use and the transport of waste. Haber also claims that, compared
with traditional incineration, the quantity of toxic gases produced by the GEM
system is negligible. "It's really a night-and-day difference," he says.

Gasification is not without its detractors, partly because early attempts to
gasify garbage were environmentally and financially disastrous. A series of
economic and environmental problems at an early commercial gasification plant in
Karlsruhe, Germany, including a leak of toxic gases that temporarily closed the
plant in 2000, caused the facility to shut down for good in 2004. These troubles
have tainted the reputation of gasification - and, by association, plasma
gasification - ever since.

One objection that sceptics raise is that gasification still produces CO2
emissions. Neil Tangri of the Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives
(GAIA) dismisses gasification plants as glorified incinerators. "There is an
intermediate step with gasification, but the end result is always combustion,"
he says.

Another concern is that the waste gas from gasification may contain dioxins,
which form when organic material is heated to high temperatures in the presence
of chlorine-containing compounds, which are ubiquitous in municipal waste.

"Any attempt to turn garbage into energy will most likely cause the production
of significant amounts of dioxin, which many consider the most significant
carcinogen known to science," says Ron Saff, a physician in Tallahassee,
Florida, and a member of Physicians for Social Responsibility.

Clean and green?

Others say that chlorine can cause an additional problem in the extremely hot,
oxygen-starved environment of a plasma gasification chamber. "If you pass mixed
waste with chlorine in it through a plasma arc, you get metal in the [syn]gas
that otherwise shouldn't be there," says Thomas Cahill, an emeritus professor of
physics and atmospheric science at the University of California, Davis. These
metal pollutants could escape into the environment when the gas is burned, he
argues.

Companies already running gasification systems point out that the process is as
clean as you make it: what matters is how efficiently the syngas is scrubbed and
how effectively the ash is disposed of. They also say that they operate to
strict national or regional standards governing emissions from waste-to-energy
power generation.

"The regulations that they have to comply with are much more stringent and focus
on a wider range of toxins than for a conventional power plant," says Marc
Wolman of the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection in Boston.
"If they don't meet these limits they get shut down, period."

On the issue of dioxins, at least one waste-to-energy company is making
reassuring noises. Andreas Tsangaris of the Plasco Energy Group in Ottawa,
Canada, which has been running an 85-tonne-per-day waste-to-energy pilot plant
since September 2007, says: "We remove virtually all the chlorine before
combustion. There is no chance for dioxins to form." The company's own
monitoring shows that its emissions, including those of dioxins and heavy
metals, have remained at or below the most stringent regulatory limits in North
America and Europe.

Nevertheless, a newspaper article by Cahill, based in part on his studies of
emissions from the smouldering remains of the World Trade Center in New York -
which he says are "eerily similar" to those from gasification plants - plus a
strongly worded editorial by Saff, had a direct impact on two proposals for
high-profile commercial plasma gasification plants in the US. A plant in St
Lucie, Florida, has been scaled back significantly, partly in response to
environmental concerns, and plans for a similar plant in Sacramento, California,
have been delayed indefinitely.

Another question mark over the green credentials of waste gasification concerns
just how efficient these plants are at producing energy and minimising
greenhouse gas emissions compared with other methods of waste disposal. A recent
study by the Tellus Institute, an independent think tank based in Boston,
compared gasification with landfill sites where methane is captured to be burned
for energy. It concluded that while gasification produces six times as much
energy per tonne of waste as landfill sites, landfills with methane recapture
systems save two-and-a-half times as much CO2 equivalent as the combination of
gasification and syngas burning. The Tellus report also found that the energy
saved by recycling a given amount of waste is 3.4 times the energy that can be
produced through gasifying it.

Some are opposed to gasifiers on principle. They say their very existence
discourages efforts to tackle the garbage crisis at its source. "Once you build
a gasifier, you have to feed it," says Tangri. "It creates a financial
disincentive to do waste reduction and recycling."

Ultimately, it may be some time before we realise the full effects, for good or
bad, of zapping our rubbish. Few long-term independent studies have been carried
out into emission levels, dioxin contaminants and the potential for toxins to
leach out from waste ash. Nor is it clear how much energy can be created by
gasifying various types of waste, or how reliable energy generation can be,
given variations in the waste stream from day to day and in different parts of
the world. So far, though, the indications are that gasification is neither the
panacea for our waste and energy woes that some are claiming it to be, nor an
environmental catastrophe waiting to happen.

For Kevin Whiting of Juniper, a British waste-processing consultancy based near
Dursley in Gloucestershire, the way forward may be on some kind of middle
ground. "If there is a market for recyclables, we should recycle as much as is
practicable and not take resources from our great-grandchildren," he says. "But
if waste can't be recycled, it has an energy value. And the more energy you can
generate [from it], the better."

Editorial: Waste gasification needs more light and less heat

Phil McKenna is a freelance writer based in Cambridge, Massachusetts




From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 24 01:10:38 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2009 08:10:38 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] China's plants absorb a third of its carbon emissions
Message-ID: <49F084EE.6020403@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://www.nature.com/news/2009/090422/full/news.2009.384.html

Published online 22 April 2009 | Nature | doi:10.1038/news.2009.384

News

China's plants absorb a third of its carbon emissions

But another study shows vegetation will absorb less carbon dioxide as nations
cut pollution.

Jeff Tollefson


Cleaner air may mean trees take up less carbon dioxide.Sandra Pati?o
Two studies published today reveal fresh details of how much carbon dioxide is
being taken up by the planet's plant life.

According to the first paper, published in Nature1, aerosol pollutants have
increased photosynthesis globally in recent decades by diffusing light, which
helps plants that can't compete in direct sunshine. In a separate study, also
published in Nature2, scientists have issued the first estimate of how much
carbon China's vegetation absorbs.

The research on the effects of aerosols is based on the insight that light
quality is often more important than quantity when it comes to aggregate plant
productivity. When aerosols scatter sunlight, trees in the upper canopy of a
forest are not much affected by the loss of direct light, but the diffuse light
penetrates lower down and promotes stronger growth in the shade.

Applied globally, this effect helped plants pull nearly 23.7% more carbon
dioxide out of the atmosphere between 1960 and 1999 than they otherwise would
have, according to a modelling study led by Lina Mercado at the Centre for
Ecology and Hydrology in Wallingford, UK. Their work is published in Nature1.

Although the team did not provide a quantitative analysis of how much carbon is
at stake, their results suggest the task of stabilizing atmospheric CO2 levels
could be even more daunting. As governments phase out emissions of sulphur
dioxide, the principal aerosol involved, light diffusion will decrease and so
plants will absorb less and less of the CO2 produced by industry.

"The air is going to be cleaner, and this contribution of the diffuse radiation
is going to disappear," Mercado says. "We need to take this into account."

Global dimming

Scientists have long known about a related effect whereby sulphate aerosols cool
the globe by reflecting sunlight back into space. This 'global dimming' trend
was particularly strong between 1950 and 1980.

?The air is going to be cleaner, and this contribution of the diffuse radiation
is going to disappear.?
Lina Mercado
Centre for Ecology and Hydrology

Sulphates also reduce the solar radiation available for photosynthesis, but
Mercado says climate models have already built in a 14.4% reduction in carbon
uptake to account for this effect. But once diffuse radiation is taken into
account, Mercado and her co-workers found carbon uptake actually increased by
9.3% over the same period. If, however, emission of aerosols declines in future,
carbon uptake could fall ? requiring even steeper cuts in global carbon dioxide
emissions to stabilise levels of the greenhouse gas.

Lianhong Gu, an environmental physicist at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in
Tennessee who was not involved in the project, says the research identifies and
helps fill an important gap in our understanding of the carbon cycle. "We need
to emphasize that it's basically a modelling projection, but we know both
theoretically and empirically that diffuse radiation is important for our
vegetative species," he says. "Qualitatively I think that the projection is sound."

Tracking China's carbon

In a separate study also appearing this week in Nature2, a team of scientists
from China and Europe is reporting the first solid estimates for how much CO2 is
taken up each year by plants and ecosystems in China. Similar work has been done
for the United States3, but this study provides the first comprehensive analysis
of China's terrestrial carbon uptake, which is critical for calculating the
country's net emissions.

Led by Shilong Piao, an ecologist at Peking University in Beijing, the team
estimated carbon uptake during the 1980s and 1990s using three different
methods: ecosystem modelling, plant and soil inventories, and an analysis of
atmospheric CO2 trends. The authors estimate a net carbon sink of between 0.19
and 0.26 billion tonnes of carbon per year, which translates to 28 to 37% of
China's emissions during the period in question.

"Everyone has been scrambling around to come up with an estimate for China,
because we don't have a lot of information," says Kevin Gurney, a climate
researcher at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana. "They really have
been methodologically thorough. They have tackled it from three different
angles, and the nice thing is that all three of those converge on the same
estimate."

"This is an impressive paper," says Gregg Marland, a climate researcher at Oak
Ridge National Laboratory. He credits the researchers with analysing the
question in three ways and getting a fair amount of agreement in their results.
"In spite of that, there is still a considerable amount of uncertainty," he
warns, "and that uncertainty cascades through the system."

Although studies such as this can give broad estimates of carbon uptake, Marland
says the only way to pin down some of these numbers might be via satellites,
like the Orbiting Carbon Observatory that plunged into the sea earlier this
year. "It's going to be a long while before we have the kind of satellite data
that we want."

References
Mercado, L. M. et al. Nature 458, 1014?1017 (2009).
Piao, S. et al. Nature 458, 1009?1013 (2009).
Pacala, S.W. Science 292, 2316?2320 (2001).


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 24 01:13:36 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2009 08:13:36 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Is Being Overweight a Climate Problem?
Message-ID: <49F085A0.5070602@coombs.anu.edu.au>


http://greeninc.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/04/22/is-being-overweight-a-climate-problem/

April 22, 2009, 8:13 AM
Is Being Overweight a Climate Problem?
By JAMES KANTER

Associated Press

He?s contributing more to global warming, a study suggests.
Looking for inspiration to lose weight?

It may be worth taking a look at the results of a report in latest issue of the
International Journal of Epidemiology.

Ddownload the article at:
http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/dyp172v1

The study concludes that being overweight or obese ?should be recognized as an
environmental problem? because of its contribution to climate change from
additional food and transport emissions.

Phil Edwards and Ian Roberts of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
found that a lean population, like the Vietnamese, consume about 20 percent less
food and produce fewer greenhouse gases than a population in a country like the
United States, where about 40 percent of people are obese.

The authors also found that transport emissions will be significantly less in
countries with healthy average body weights because it takes less energy to
transport slim people.


Many people already are aware that driving an S.U.V. or traveling by plane can
dramatically increase an individual?s carbon footprint, and the study seems to
support the idea that some of the most effective ways of reducing emissions
begin with changes in individual lifestyles.

Governments around the world are beginning to tax and regulate those activities
on the basis that doing so will help protect the climate. But the implication is
that attention could start to focus on the size of waistlines ? and that could
raise the specter of discrimination on the basis of weight.

(Such discrimination on the basis of body weight has been the subject of
controversy in the transport sector in past years. The Irish no-frills airline
Ryanair announced on Wednesday that roughly one-third of respondents to a
company poll had voted in favor of a so-called fat tax. ?The revenues from any
such fat tax will be used to lower the airfares for all Ryanair passengers yet
further,? the airline said.)

?Humankind ? be it Australian, Argentinian, Belgian or Canadian ? is getting
steadily fatter,? the London researchers said in their study. ?We need to be
doing a lot more to reverse the global trend towards fatness, and recognize it
as a key factor in the battle to reduce emissions and slow climate change.?



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 24 02:40:33 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2009 09:40:33 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] NAV: TOR for Climate Change Adaptation expert
Message-ID: <49F09A01.2000607@gmail.com>


-------- Original Message --------
Subject: TOR for Climate Change Adaptation expert
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2009 06:38:00 +0200
From: Hoang Thanh Mai <mai at navhue.org>



Nordic Assistance to Vietnam (NAV) is seeking a Climate Change
Adaptation expert for assessment of the impacts of climate change and
the vulnerability of local communities of two eco-systems (coastal and
mountainous) and developing a proposal for community-based pilots on
climate change adaptation.

Terms of Reference For Climate Change Adaptation Expert

Objective: Assessment of the impacts of climate change and the
vulnerability of local communities of two eco-systems (coastal and
mountainous) and developing a proposal for community-based pilots on
climate change adaptation.

Deadline for Application: May 10th, 2009

Location: Thua Thien Hue province (Hue City), Central Vietnam

Estimated Period: Mid June ? Mid August 2009



I. Background

Vietnam is considered one of the countries potentially most affected
by climate change in the world. Climate change may impact livelihoods,
food security, water supply, the health of people and animals, housing
and communities? emergency preparedness. Vulnerable communities
include farmers, fishermen, ethnic minority groups in mountainous
areas, senior citizens, women, children and poor people.

A National Target Program To Respond to Climate Change was approved by
the Prime Minister of Vietnam on December 2nd, 2008. This program
requires that every province affected by climate change has to develop
its own program for how to respond to the impact of climate change.

Nordic Assistance to Vietnam (NAV), the country office of Norwegian
Church Aid, has implemented community development programs in the
central provinces since 1994. Based on this experience and the above
NAV will recruit an expert on climate change to assist with developing
two or more appropriate pilots for local communities.

II. Scope of work

Key activities

The consultant will work closely with NAV?s climate change team and
potential partners for future pilots. Through the process of
collecting data and information, the consultant will make contact with
provincial authorities including its departments such as Natural
Resource and Environment, Planning and Investment, Agriculture and
Rural development, mass- and community based organizations, and
relevant departments of Hue University. Tasks include:

1. Review secondary sources on climate change relevant to Vietnam
and the Central Provinces including the national target program,
provincial development programs, and surveys and reports from
universities and other organizations.

2. Plan and develop the survey methodologies and instruments
together with the NAV climate change team on potential impacts of
climate change, the vulnerability and resilience of local communities
including their coping strategies.

3. Collect, process and analyze data based on information from
point 1 and 2 above.

4. Develop a written proposal for a pilot for the coastal area and
one for the mountainous area on community-based climate change
adaptation. Recommendations should be provided for strategies, project
components, activities, partner choice and cooperation with provincial
authorities. The latter with the aim to establish a good dialogue on
community-based climate change adaptation for the province.

5. Outline the key components of a Monitoring and Evaluation
Framework for the pilots for project results, outcomes and impacts.

6. Facilitate a workshop with NAV staff and key stakeholders for
presentation of the proposal including an overview of findings as well
as suggested project components.

III. Consultant Qualifications

? A postgraduate degree in one or more relevant subjects.

? Documented experience relevant to climate change preferably in
South-East Asia.

? Proven analytical skills and ability to relate consequences to
adequate and concrete actions and recommendations for a particular
context.

? Excellent oral and written communication skills in English.

? Experience in Programme/Project development and community
development on grassroots level.

? Knowledge of national and provincial strategies for climate
change as well as Vietnamese culture, politics and economic geography
is an advantage.

Both Vietnamese and expatriate consultants ideally located in
South-East Asia are encouraged to apply.

IV. Logistics

For work conducted in Thua Thien Hue, NAV will support with office
space, accommodation, local transport connected to the assignment and
other facilities.

V. Application

Each applicant will be required to submit the following material in
English:

? A curriculum vitae providing details on education and experience.

? A list of references from similar assignments.

? A short description of how the deliverables will be addressed
including a time plan.

? An overview of fees and per diems.

Only short-listed candidates will be contacted. Interviews will be
conducted in person or over telephone during the month of May.

Address for application:

Nordic Assistance to Vietnam (NAV)
76 Hai Ba Trung Street, Hue City
Vietnam
Telefax: 0084-54-3822613
E-mail: mai at navhue.org
Contact for further information:
Ms. Ingunn Gihle and Ms. Hoang Thi Thanh Mai
Email: ingunn.gihle at nca.no Mobile: 0084-905121017
mai at navhue.org Mobile: 0084-913449448




____________________

Hoang Thanh Mai
Nordic Assistance to Vietnam
Administrator
Add: 76 Hai Ba Trung Street,
Hue City, Vietnam
Tel/fax: + 84-54-3822613
Mob: + 84-913449448
Email: mai at navhue.org <mailto:mai at navhue.org>
website: www.nca.no <http://www.nca.no/>


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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 24 02:51:39 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2009 09:51:39 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] seeking employment,
volunteer opportunities: CV for Mr Ta Ngoc Quan
Message-ID: <49F09C9B.4080109@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2009 17:06:01 +0700
From: quan ta <ngocquanvfu at gmail.com>


CV Ta Ngoc Quan

Address: Yen Phu commune, Yen My district, Hung Yen
province

Mobile: 01672626276

Email: ngocquanvfu at gmail.com

DOB: 18/9/1984

Marital Status: Single

EXPERIENCE

August 2008 to date, Project Administrator

VFCD (Volunteer for Community Development and Education
Environment)

? Currently a Volunteer in Hanoi



Duties included the following:

? Administer and supervise an international volunteer
group in an social training project in the Mai Am Street
Children School through activates and games

? Act as translation assistant to the English Teacher in
the Mai Am School

? Tutor children in the Nguyen Viet Xuan Orphan School
environmental awareness though basic gardening skills

? Support the international volunteers by arranging
cultural exchanges, trips and entertainment

? Project Coordinator in Sapa and Xuan Thuy August 2008
? March 2009

Duties included the following:

? Organized social and educational development activates
for an underprivileged school in Ta Van, Sapa

? Developed and managed an international volunteer group
in an reforestation environmental project in Sapa

? Promoted an educational sustainable project for
farmers cultivating crops and maintaining the woodland in
Xuan Thuy

? Managed an international volunteer group with the view
to using English Lessons as a means to develop eco-tourism
in Xuan Thuy

? Arranged social and educational development talks by
international volunteers in Xuan Thuy?s local schools

? Acted as support to the Xuan Thuy?s National Park
staff as a guide for eco tourists

December 2008 United Nations Volunteers, Hanoi

? Volunteer

? In my spare time, for three weeks, I worked for the
UN.

? Assisted the coordinator in setting up International
Volunteer Day. Helped design a camp, aided in events and
gave support for Bach Khoa University.





January 2008 ? May 2008

Non-Timber Forest Product Research Center, Hanoi



Project Assistant

? Team Leader of a team of three, researching viability
of forestry as non timber products

? Produced a report based on a survey of the local
habitat in Lao Cai province, and interviews with the local
population. This report analyzed the feasibility of
forestry sustaining the local population by producing
non-timber products. This report was used to recommend
agricultural diversity to the local population, therefore
aiding forest conservation.

EDUCATION

2008 Degree in Forest Management and Environment
Engineering

Viet Nam Forestry University, Ha Noi

2000-2002 Technical Mechanics

College of Technical and Education 1, Hung Yen

SKILLS

Microsoft Office

Intermediate English

HOBBIES

Bird Watching

Volunteer for Eco Tours

English Lessons

Jogging

References and letters of recommendation available on
request.



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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 24 03:03:25 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2009 10:03:25 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] AdvertisementRDCS : Nature Conservation and
Sustainable Natural Resource Management in Phong ,
Nha-Ke Bang National Park Region Project, Vietnam
Message-ID: <49F09F5D.4080102@gmail.com>

Subject: Advertiserment of CAT survey
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2009 17:07:08 +0700
From: LE THE LUC <rdcs at dng.vnn.vn>

Please see the attachment for details.

*-----------------------------------------------------*

*LE THE LUC*

Deputy Director of

Phong Nha - Ke Bang Region Project

Add: 09 Quang Trung Str, Dong Hoi City,

Quang Binh Province, Vietnam

Tel (84) 0913 386 331; fax: (84) 052 3844 413

Emai: rdcs at dng.vnn.vn <mailto:rdcs at dng.vnn.vn>

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From kevinysli at graduate.hku.hk Fri Apr 24 09:27:18 2009
From: kevinysli at graduate.hku.hk (Kevin Yuk-shing Li)
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2009 07:27:18 +0800
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Vietnam's China Mining Plans Spark Rare Criticism
Message-ID: <DE0F02BAFB2E458192DA13E61751DCAA@KevinLi>

Vietnam's China Mining Plans Spark Rare Criticism
http://www.nasdaq.com/aspx/stock-market-news-story.aspx?storyid=200904192321dowjonesdjonline000520&title=vietnams-china-mining-plans-spark-rare-criticism

HANOI (AFP)--A plan to let a Chinese company build a bauxite mine in Vietnam
has triggered rare public outcry from critics, who say the environmental and
social damage would far outweigh any economic benefit.

Some even fear the plan, agreed to by leaders of the two communist countries
without broader dialogue, could ultimately mean the de facto seizure by
Beijing of a strategic region of Vietnam.

Vietnam's government estimates the country's bauxite reserves at 5.5 billion
tons - a major draw for the world's mining giants.

In 2007 it approved a plan for two major mining operations to be run by
state- owned Vietnam National Coal, or Vinacomin, and Mineral Industries
Group in the Central Highlands.

A subsidiary of Aluminum Corp. of China, or Chinalco, has been granted a
contract to build one mine, while the U.S. aluminum company Alcoa Inc. (AA)
has partnered with Vinacomin to explore the feasibility of a second.

But in a country that bitterly recalls 1,000 years of Chinese occupation -
and more recently a brief 1979 border war - any presence of Vietnam's big
neighbor on its territory is perceived by some as a menace.

Nguyen Ngoc, a writer whose work focuses on the Central Highlands and its
people, said there was a longer-term risk of seeing the region come under
strong Chinese influence.

"The Central Highlands constitute a strategic position for all of the south
of Indochina," said Ngoc, who alleges Chinese companies are already
exploiting bauxite across the border in Laos.

"They say that who is master of the Central Highlands is master of southern
Indochina."

While the bauxite project presents "financial, ecological and social
problems, " he said the most important question was that of security and
independence.

In a one-party state where public protest is rare, scientists, intellectuals
and former soldiers have joined critics of the regime to denounce the
government's plans.

"China has been notorious in the modern world as a country causing the
biggest pollution as well as other problems," 135 Vietnamese intellectuals
said in a petition criticizing the mining plan and delivered Friday to the
National Assembly, or parliament.

Deputy Prime Minister Hoang Trung Hai has said the bauxite mining industry
would help spur socio-economic development in the Central Highlands, the
state Vietnam News Agency reported.

The government estimates the projects would require total investment of more
than $10 billion and would, by 2025, annually produce between 13 million and
18 million tons of alumina, a partially-processed product of bauxite.

However, critics say the mines would bring only limited financial benefit to
Vietnam, which plans to export most of the alumina.

The plan's most prominent opponent is Gen. Vo Nguyen Giap, 97, who led
Vietnam's victory over French colonial forces.

In open letters to the government, he warned of the danger to the
environment, to the lives of ethnic minorities, and to Vietnam's "security
and defense."

The Ho Chi Minh City War Veterans' Association has expressed similar views,
and economics professor Nguyen Quang Thai said in a recent report to the
government that Giap's warning should be respected.

"We should not allow foreign laborers" into the area," Thai wrote, without
naming China.

Exploitation of natural resources - notably for coffee production - has
already provoked violent clashes in the Central Highlands, home to the
ethnic minority Christian Montagnards, who have battled land confiscation
and religious persecution.

Dissident monk Thich Quang Do, head of the banned Unified Buddhist Church of
Vietnam, has urged people to denounce the "destructive effects" of the
planned mine on indigenous people.

A permanent Chinese presence in the Central Highlands would pose "an
alarming threat" to national security, he said.

If the bauxite projects are carried out, scientists fear massive destruction
of the fertile soil where forests, coffee and tea grow.

They also worry about water pollution, and say the local population - some
of whom received or will receive compensation - risk loss of land and aren't
qualified to work in the facilities.

Writer Ngoc said there could be "new revolts" by the region's ethnic
minorities.

Experts estimate thousands of Chinese would arrive for the bauxite projects,
and say several hundred are already in Lam Dong province, where the ground
is being cleared.

"For countries like Vietnam...exploiting natural resources for development
is necessary," said geologist Dang Trung Thuan.

"Exploitation is obvious, but to what extent?"




From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 24 14:03:46 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2009 21:03:46 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Letter from Australian Youth Ambassadors for
Development Program
Message-ID: <49F13A22.3040905@gmail.com>

Subject: Letter from Australian Youth Ambassadors for Development Program
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2009 10:38:05 +0700
From: ayadvida vietnam <ayadvidavietnam at gmail.com>
CC: hanh.hoangvn at gmail.com

We hope this message finds you well. We are Australian Youth Ambassadors
for Development (AYAD) Program. We would like to introduce our
volunteering program to organisations such as local development
agencies, non-governmental organisations, UN agencies, international
organisations, and academic institutions located in Vietnam. Could you
please help us circulate the attached document to organisations in your
development network?

Thank you for your support.

We are looking forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

Nguyet

--
ICM Team

Block P, La thanh Hotel, 218 Doi Can St, Hanoi, Vietnam
Tel: 04 37628422
Fax: 04 37628423
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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 24 14:18:15 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2009 21:18:15 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Perspectives on Water and Climate Change Adaptation -
IUCN
Message-ID: <49F13D87.8020507@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://cms.iucn.org/what/ecosystems/?uNewsID=3064

WATER AND WETLANDS

Perspectives on Water and Climate Change Adaptation

23 April 2009 | News - News story

Download report:
http://cmsdata.iucn.org/downloads/iucnperspap__environment_as_infrastructure_1.pdf


'Water and Climate Change Adaptation' newest publication series is online. The
series includes a collection of 16 papers, produced in collaboration with the
World Water Council, CPWC, IWA and IUCN

The 16 perspectives papers offer various thematic, geographical and sectoral
views on water and climate change adaptation.

Contributing organisations for the perspective papers include ICIMOD, SOPAC,
GWP, ICLEI, WBCSD, IHA, CPWC, IRC, and IWA amongst others.

For a complete overview of perspective papers (available in English, Spanish and
French) together with the document ?Introduction, Summary and Key Messages?
please visit the Co-operative Programme on Water and Climate (CPWC) website.


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 24 14:20:23 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2009 21:20:23 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] How to stop biofuel crops becoming invasive - IUCN
Message-ID: <49F13E07.6050607@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://cms.iucn.org/news_events/?uNewsID=3065

How to stop biofuel crops becoming invasive
23 April 2009 | News - News story

Download reoprt:
http://cmsdata.iucn.org/downloads/biofuels_and_invasives_background_paper.pdf

Experts have come up with a series of tips for biofuel producers to stop biofuel
crops becoming invasive species.

All introduced crops for biofuel production should be treated as suspect or
potentially invasive until proven otherwise, according to the experts. Risk
assessments should be carried out at the earliest stages of planning biofuel
production, they add.

Production systems should be monitored for possible escapes and appropriate
barriers should be used, such as fences, gullies or buffer zones of resistant
plants to reduce chances of escapes and invasions.

Finally, the crops should be converted into the first stage of fuel on site if
possible to remove the possibility of spreading invasions through seeds or other
plant parts.

?We need alternatives to fossil fuels and the judicious development of a range
of biofuel production systems is a logical way of addressing that need,? says
Geoffrey Howard, IUCN?s expert on invasive species. ?Biological invasions from
the introduced species themselves, as well as from the production processes, are
real risks to biodiversity and livelihoods. The risks can be reduced by
following the recommendations we?ve set out.?

The recommendations, compiled by a workshop hosted by IUCN in Nairobi, Kenya,
will be published as soon as they have been refined by industry and other
invasive species experts.

The experts found that many characteristics of biofuel crops are shared by
invasive species, such as fast growth, high productivity, adaptability to a
range of soil and climatic conditions and resistance to pests and diseases.
?Existing standard food-crops that are used for biofuels have limited risk of
becoming invasive,? says Nadine McCormick, of IUCN?s Energy, Ecosystems and
Livelihoods Initiative. ?But new plants that are being proposed to increase
biofuel production often have higher risks of developing invasive tendencies.?
IUCN will develop a series of best practices and guidance for the avoidance of
biological invasions. This will be discussed at a second workshop later in the
year for eventual input to the Roundtable on Sustainable Biofuels principles.
For more information, please contact:

Geoffrey Howard, Species Programme, Invasive Species Coordination at IUCN
Nadine McCormick, Business and Biodiversity, Energy, Ecosystems and Livelihoods
Initiative



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 24 14:26:38 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2009 21:26:38 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Aussie vet helping bear cubs in Vietnam
Message-ID: <49F13F7E.90203@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Great story, Leanne! Good on ya! Vern


http://www.thewest.com.au/aapstory.aspx?StoryName=567976

Aussie vet helping bear cubs in Vietnam

24th April 2009, 11:13 WST

An Australian veterinarian is helping two moon bear cubs recover after they were
rescued from a bear bile farm in Vietnam.

Vet Leanne Clark works at the Tam Dao sanctuary in Vietnam, where the two cubs
were taken after being rescued by Animals Asia Foundation.

The cubs weighed only three kilograms each when discovered at a farm used to
produce bear bile for the traditional medicine market.

Ms Clark said the cubs, named Maggie and Damo, were progressing well after being
rehydrated.

"Maggie is very shy and laps milk from her bowl," she said.

"She plays with us quite gently, although is starting to come out of her shell a
little more each day.

"Damo on the other hand is very energetic, and plays very rough ... despite his
toughness, Damo still prefers the comfort of taking his milk from a bottle."

Animals Asia Foundation estimates 11,000 bears are imprisoned in Vietnam and
China on farms, where they are milked daily for bile.

The bile is used to treat illnesses such as high temperatures, liver complaints
and sore eyes.


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 24 14:35:08 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Thu, 23 Apr 2009 21:35:08 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] UNDP: RE-ADVERTISEMENT: Senior Technical Advisor in
Sustainable Development and Climate Change - Level: International ALD-4
Message-ID: <49F1417C.2050004@gmail.com>

RE-ADVERTISEMENT: Senior Technical Advisor in Sustainable Development and
Climate Change - Level: International ALD-4

Publish Date: 23-Apr-2009

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) is looking for highly qualified
and experienced international candidates for the position of Senior Technical
Advisor in Sustainable Development and Climate Change (Level: International ALD-4).

Duration of post: Initial one year full-time assignment

Job Description: STA in Sustainable Development and Climate Change
http://jobs.undp.org/cj_view_job.cfm?job_id=7942

To submit your applications, please click here: STA in Sustainable Development
and Climate Change
http://jobs.undp.org/cj_apply.cfm?job_id=7942

Deadline for submissions: Friday 05:00 PM | 08-May-2009



From communication.env at fpt.vn Fri Apr 24 21:49:44 2009
From: communication.env at fpt.vn (ENV Communication)
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2009 18:49:44 +0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Weekly Bulletin 312
Message-ID: <00b101c9c4d2$c3257d00$1101a8c0@tunganhyen>

Dear all,

This is our latest bulletin 312. See the file attached, pls

All the best,
------------------------------------------------------
Nguyen Thi My Dung
Communications Officer
Education for Nature-Vietnam (ENV)
Tel: 84 4 3 5148850
Email: communication.env at fpt.vn
Skype: communicationenv
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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Fri Apr 24 23:55:49 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2009 06:55:49 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Feature: Green Innovations Report Released
Message-ID: <49F1C4E5.7020307@coombs.anu.edu.au>

The report can be read online at:
http://innovation.edf.org/page.cfm?tagID=38814

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Feature: Green Innovations Report Released
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2009 06:30:36 -0700
From: Yahoo Group <ashwani.vasishth at gmail.com>
Reply-To: envecolnews-owner at yahoogroups.com
To: Environmental Ecology News <envecolnews at yahoogroups.com>
CC: Sustainability Planning News <sustplan at yahoogroups.com>



http://www.greenbiz.com/news/2009/04/21/innovations-report-2009

*Low-Carbon Meals, Employee Raises and Energy Incentives Highlighted in
Innovations Report

*By GreenBiz Staff
Published April 21, 2009

LAGUNA NIGUEL, Calif. -- To achieve environmental goals like cutting
emissions, reducing water use and encouraging energy efficiencies, many
companies have developed creative, viable methods to get the job done.

The Environmental Defense Fund highlights many of those actions in its
new report, Innovations Review 2009: Green Advances for a New Economy,
released as part of the Fortune Brainstorm: Green conference.

The innovations highlighted in the report were chosen base on four
criteria: environmental benefits, business benefits, ability to be
replicated and creativity. The report lists 15 actions, some of which
are being implemented by multiple companies, including Cisco Systems,
Coca-Cola, Google and Wal-Mart.

Innovations include commercial and residential energy efficiency
efforts, low-carbon meals, environmental-related compensation,
fertilizer reduction and supply chain transparency.

REI, for example, was able to reduce the energy use at its Boulder, Co.,
store by 25 percent after completing an extensive retrofit that included
solar water heating, skylights and efficient plumbing. According to the
EDF, if all retail and mall buildings in the US made the same cut, it
would reduce annual energy use by about 255 trillion BTUs, reduce
greenhouse gas emissions by 47 million metric tons and save $5.3 billion
a year in energy costs.

On the residential front, Midwest Energy runs a financing plan for its
How$mart program to encourage customers to make efficiency upgrades, and
homes participating in the program are seeing an average 25 percent
reduction in energy use. Zocalo Community Development in Colorado is
also encouraging smarter energy use by offering homebuyers lower
interest rates on mortgages for condominiums that come with solar panels.

Bon App?tit Management Company is looking to reduce emissions a
different way, with its Low-Carbon Diet, now in place in 400 corporate
and university cafeterias. Through the Diet, Bon App?tit aims to reduce
its emissions by 25 percent. The program includes sourcing all fruits,
vegetables, meat and water within North America; helping customers make
"low carbon" food choices; reducing food waste; and finding uses for
used frying oil and compostable materials.

Intel, Johnson & Johnson and PepsiCo have all started tying employee
compensation to company environmental goals. While Johnson & Johnson and
PepsiCo have only implemented programs for senior executive
compensation, Intel bases all employee bonuses partly on company-wide
performance towards its environmental goals.

Acequia, Hydropoint and PureSense have produced advanced computer
systems that monitor weather and soil conditions in real time, helping
companies reduce the amount of water used for crop irrigation and
commercial landscaping by 15-40 percent.

/*** NOTICE: In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, this
material is distributed, without profit, for research and educational
purposes only. ***/
//


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 25 00:00:55 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2009 07:00:55 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Most successful Congress to date says report [2008
World Conservation Congress]
Message-ID: <49F1C617.9090203@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Download the evaluation report at:
http://cmsdata.iucn.org/downloads/wcc_evaluation_final_report_vol1.pdf


http://cms.iucn.org/news_events/?uNewsID=3067

Most successful Congress to date says report
24 April 2009 | News - News story

The final evaluation report of the 2008 World Conservation Congress (WCC), held
in Barcelona, is available for consultation. The report, performed by
independent evaluators Universalia, calls the Barcelona Congress the most
successful congress to date.

The World Conservation Cngress brought together almost 7,000 participants from
183 different countries to debate on local, regional and global issues alike.
The Forum portion of the Congress showcased 943 events, of which 790 were
organized by IUCN members. As ambitious as the World Conservation Congress was,
the report cites areas for improvement or strategic redesign.

One particular need is to rework the model for receiving and processing the
increasing number of motions submitted for consideration by the IUCN Members?
Assembly.

IUCN is dedicated to improving on the World Conservation Congress and is
preparing a formal response to the recommendations in the evaluation report.


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 25 00:03:48 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2009 07:03:48 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Our Penchant For Rarity Could Threaten Conservation
Efforts
Message-ID: <49F1C6C4.1020207@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090421205234.htm

Our Penchant For Rarity Could Threaten Conservation Efforts

ScienceDaily (Apr. 23, 2009) ? Rare plant and animal species are like rare
stamps or coins: they are perceived to be inherently more valuable to people,
whatever they look like. Researchers Elena Angulo and Franck Courchamp, from
Universit? de Paris-Sud, have found that people are more attracted to species
labeled "rare" than those labeled "common" even when they do not know which
species are involved.


The study shows that this irrational value conferred to unknown items only for
the sake of rarity is both an asset and a threat for conservation.
It has been recently suggested that the value people place on rarity could lead
to the extinction of rare species as we are willing to pay the high costs of
exploiting the last individuals. Many hobbies, such as ecotourism or the keeping
of exotic pets, may cause this effect, known as the anthropogenic Allee effect.
However, this theory relies on the untested assumption that people do indeed
value rarity.

To assess whether people really do value rare species more than common ones,
Angulo and colleagues set up a website where visitors were told they could view
one of two slideshows of images: either one containing images of "rare species"
or one containing images of "common species." No other information about the
featured species was provided. When visitors downloaded a slideshow, a progress
bar appeared, showing what percentage of the slideshow had been downloaded. The
bar filled up after six minutes but the file still appeared to be downloading
and did not open. Visitors could cancel the download at any time and were taken
to an error page, which would then link them back to the slideshow download page
to try again (although the slideshows never opened).

The researchers measured: a) how attractive the rare slideshow was to the
visitors (based on the proportion of visitors who downloaded the rare slideshow
as their first or only choice), b) how long visitors were prepared to wait to
download each slideshow and c) how perseverant visitors were (how many times
they tried to download each slideshow before giving up). Even though visitors
knew nothing about which species each slideshow contained, more people opted to
view the rare species slideshow. Visitors also waited longer for the rare
species slideshow to download before giving up than they did for the common
species slideshow and after the download failed, they made more attempts to
download the rare species slideshow than the common one.

Angulo and colleagues concluded that people do value rare species more than
common ones and propose that conservationists should be prudent when using
rarity to promote conservation. "This is a crucial measure for the conservation
of countless plant and animal species, which fall victim to a growing
international trade of fuel collections, exotic pet, traditional medicine or
luxury markets," explain the researchers.

Journal reference:
Angulo et al. Rare Species Are Valued Big Time. PLoS ONE, 2009; 4 (4): e5215
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0005215

Adapted from materials provided by Public Library of Science, via EurekAlert!, a
service of AAAS.


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 25 00:05:45 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2009 07:05:45 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Pesticide exposure found to increase risk of
Parkinson's disease
Message-ID: <49F1C739.7070605@gmail.com>

http://www.newsroom.ucla.edu/portal/ucla/pesticide-exposure-found-to-increase-89084.aspx

Pesticide exposure found to increase risk of Parkinson's disease

Study finds exposure may have occurred years before symptoms appear
By Mark Wheeler | 4/20/2009

The fertile soil of California's Central Valley has long made it famous as one
of the nation's prime crop-growing regions. But it's not just the soil that
allows for such productivity. Crops like potatoes, dry beans and tomatoes have
long been protected from bugs and weeds by the fungicide maneb and the herbicide
paraquat.

Scientists know that in animal models and cell cultures, such pesticides trigger
a neurodegenerative process that leads to Parkinson's disease. Now, researchers
at UCLA provide the first evidence for a similar process in humans.

In a new epidemiological study of Central Valley residents who have been
diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, researchers found that years of exposure to
the combination of these two pesticides increased the risk of Parkinson's by 75
percent. Further, for people 60 years old or younger diagnosed with Parkinson's,
earlier exposure had increased their risk for the disease by as much as four- to
six-fold.

Reporting in the April 15 issue of the American Journal of Epidemiology, Beate
Ritz, professor of epidemiology at the UCLA School of Public Health, and Sadie
Costello, a former doctoral student at UCLA who is now at the University of
California, Berkeley, found that Central Valley residents who lived within 500
meters of fields sprayed between 1974 and 1999 had a 75-percent increased risk
for Parkinson's.

In addition, people who were diagnosed with Parkinson's at age 60 or younger
were found to have been at much higher risk because they had been exposed to
maneb, paraquat or both in combination between 1974 and 1989, years when they
would have been children, teens or young adults.

The researchers enrolled 368 longtime residents diagnosed with Parkinson's and
341 others as a control group.

Parkinson's disease is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system
that often impairs motor skills, speech and other functions. It has been
reported to occur at high rates among farmers and in rural populations,
contributing to the hypothesis that agricultural pesticides may be partially
responsible.

Until now, however, data on human exposure has been unavailable, largely because
it has been too hard to measure an individual's environmental exposure to any
specific pesticide.

"Because pesticides applied from the air or ground may drift from their intended
treatment sites ? with measurable concentrations subsequently detected in the
air, in plants and in animals up to several hundred meters from application
sites ? accurate methods of estimating environmental exposures in rural
communities have long been sorely needed," said Ritz, the study's senior author
and vice chair of the School of Public Health's epidemiology department.

So Ritz, Costello and colleague Myles Cockburn from the University of Southern
California, developed a geographic information system?based tool that estimated
human exposure to pesticides applied to agricultural crops. This GIS tool
combined land-use maps and pesticide-use reporting data from the state of
California. Each pesticide-use record includes the name of the pesticide's
active ingredient, the amount applied, the crop, the acreage of the field, the
application method and the date of application.

Research subjects were recruited between 1998 to 2007; telephone interviews were
conducted to obtain their demographic and exposure information. Detailed
residential history forms were mailed to subjects in advance of their interviews
and were reviewed in person or over the phone. The researchers recorded and
added lifetime residential histories and estimated ambient exposures into the
system for all historical addresses at which participants had resided between
1974 and 1999, the period covered by the pesticide-use data.

"The results confirmed two previous observations from animal studies," Ritz
said. "One, that exposure to multiple chemicals may increase the effect of each
chemical. That's important, since humans are often exposed to more than one
pesticide in the environment. And second, that the timing of exposure is also
important."

Ritz noted that this is the first epidemiological study to provide strong
evidence that maneb and paraquat act synergistically to become neurotoxic and
strongly increase the risk of Parkinson's disease in humans.

Of particular concern, Ritz said, and consistent with other theories regarding
the progression of Parkinson's pathology, is that the data "suggests that the
critical window of exposure to toxicants may have occurred years before the
onset of motor symptoms when a diagnosis of Parkinson's is made."

In addition to Ritz and first author Costello, study authors included Jeff
Bronstein, UCLA professor of neurology, and Xinbo Zhang of USC. The authors
declare no conflicts of interest.

The research was supported by the National Institute of Environmental Health
Science, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and the
Department of Defense Prostate Cancer Research Program. In addition, initial
pilot funding was provided by the American Parkinson Disease Association.

The UCLA School of Public Health is dedicated to enhancing the public's health
by conducting innovative research, training future leaders and health
professionals, translating research into policy and practice, and serving local,
national and international communities.



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 25 00:13:55 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2009 07:13:55 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Dartmouth researchers find concentrations of rare
element rising,
perhaps due to increased usage of automobile catalytic converters
Message-ID: <49F1C923.8030404@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://www.dartmouth.edu/%7Enews/releases/2009/04/21a.html

Dartmouth College Office of Public Affairs ? Press Release
Posted 04/21/09 ? Media Contact: Susan Knapp (603) 646-3661

Dartmouth researchers find concentrations of rare element rising, perhaps due to
increased usage of automobile catalytic converters

Mukul Sharma and Cynthia Chen (photo by Joseph Mehling '69)

Dartmouth researchers have determined that the presence of the rare element
osmium is on the rise globally. They trace this increase to the consumption of
refined platinum, the primary ingredient in catalytic converters, the equipment
commonly installed in cars to reduce smog. A volatile form of osmium is
generated during platinum refinement and also during the normal operation of
cars, and it gets dispersed globally through the atmosphere.

While osmium is found naturally, the researchers were surprised to discover that
most of the osmium in rain and snow, and in the surface waters of rivers and
oceans, is produced during the refining of platinum. ?It?s interesting, maybe
ironic, that we stopped adding lead to gasoline in the 70s so that catalytic
converters could be introduced to remove smog from car exhaust,? says Dartmouth
Associate Professor of Earth Sciences Mukul Sharma. ?Now we learn that using
platinum in the converters is responsible for an increase in osmium.
Fortunately, unlike lead, the concentration of osmium in water is extremely
small and may not adversely affect biology.?

Sharma worked with Dartmouth Ph.D. student Cynthia Chen and Peter Sedwick at Old
Dominion University. Their study will be published in the online edition of the
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences during the week of April 20, 2009.

The research team measured osmium in precipitation in North America, Europe,
Asia, and Antarctica, and in both surface water and deep water from the North
Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, and Antarctic (or Southern) Oceans. Human-made osmium
also comes from chromium smelters, hospital incinerators, and the normal
operation of cars, but it?s primarily the industrial extraction and refining of
platinum that produces the bulk of the osmium found in rain and snow.

Sharma explains that about 95 percent of the world?s platinum comes from South
Africa and Russia where it is roasted at extremely high temperatures during the
extraction and refinement process. The process removes sulfur present in the ore
as sulfur dioxide and, at the same time, releases osmium, which is abundant in
the ore.

?Neither South Africa nor Russia has implemented environmental laws regulating
this, but if steps are taken to minimize these emissions, the incidence of
osmium will certainly subside,? says Sharma. ?It?s surprising that we are seeing
this measurable increase in osmium on a global scale, and we can virtually blame
it on one thing: our insatiable demand for platinum-based catalytic converters.?




From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 25 11:00:36 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2009 18:00:36 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] =?windows-1252?q?TRANSPORT_OF_ENERGY_ACROSS_BORDERS_?=
=?windows-1252?q?REQUIRES_COLLECTIVE_EFFORT_=96_UN_OFFICIAL?=
Message-ID: <49F260B4.9060201@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Subject: TRANSPORT OF ENERGY ACROSS BORDERS REQUIRES COLLECTIVE EFFORT ? UN OFFICIAL
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2009 18:00:17 -0400
From: UNNews <UNNews at un.org>
To: <news9 at secint00.un.org>

TRANSPORT OF ENERGY ACROSS BORDERS REQUIRES COLLECTIVE EFFORT ? UN OFFICIAL
New York, Apr 24 2009 6:00PM
International cooperation is crucial for a reliable supply of energy across
national borders, whether through gas and oil pipelines or other means, a top
United Nations development official said today.

?Overcoming the barriers to reliable and stable energy transit requires a
collective response that is practical, takes into account the needs of all
affected countries, and draws on our collective expertise,? Sha Zukang,
Under-Secretary General for Economic and Social Affairs, said at a conference on
the issue in Turkmenistan.

International cooperation is crucial for a reliable supply of energy across
national borders, whether through gas and oil pipelines or other means, a top
United Nations development official said today.

?Overcoming the barriers to reliable and stable energy transit requires a
collective response that is practical, takes into account the needs of all
affected countries, and draws on our collective expertise,? Sha Zukang,
Under-Secretary General for Economic and Social Affairs, said at a conference on
the issue in Turkmenistan.

Mr. Sha is representing the Secretary-General at the conference, which follows
up on a General Assembly resolution on ?Reliable and Stable Transit of Energy
and its Role in Ensuring Sustainable Development and International Cooperation.?

Stable means of energy transport is of mutual benefit to many countries, he said.

Importing countries, he said, need to feel secure that their access to energy
will not be disrupted abruptly. Similarly, exporting countries want to feel
secure that there will be no abrupt disruptions in their incomes.

However, for developing countries, reliable energy transit requires investment
in infrastructure, and attracting adequate capital requires proper governance,
appropriate policies and creation of efficient markets.

In addition, he said, it is important to keep in mind that the ultimate goal of
energy transit, whether for trade or consumption, is to ensure continued
progress towards sustainable development.

?Effective energy sector governance can help stimulate investment not only in
energy transit infrastructure, but also in energy efficiency and advanced and
cleaner energy technologies,? Mr. Sha stressed.

The establishment of common and transparent rules in operation of energy markets
can play an important role in this regard, he said.


Stable means of energy transport is of mutual benefit to many countries, he said.

Importing countries, he said, need to feel secure that their access to energy
will not be disrupted abruptly. Similarly, exporting countries want to feel
secure that there will be no abrupt disruptions in their incomes.

However, for developing countries, reliable energy transit requires investment
in infrastructure, and attracting adequate capital requires proper governance,
appropriate policies and creation of efficient markets.

In addition, he said, it is important to keep in mind that the ultimate goal of
energy transit, whether for trade or consumption, is to ensure continued
progress towards sustainable development.

?Effective energy sector governance can help stimulate investment not only in
energy transit infrastructure, but also in energy efficiency and advanced and
cleaner energy technologies,? Mr. Sha stressed.

The establishment of common and transparent rules in operation of energy markets
can play an important role in this regard, he said.
________________

For more details go to UN News Centre at http://www.un.org/news




From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 25 11:25:02 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2009 18:25:02 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Fire is an important and under-appreciated part of
global climate change
Message-ID: <49F2666E.1070104@coombs.anu.edu.au>

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2009-04/nsf-fia042309.php

Public release date: 23-Apr-2009


Contact: Lily Whiteman
lwhitema at nsf.gov
703-292-8310
National Science Foundation

Fire is an important and under-appreciated part of global climate change

Study identifies signficiant contributions of fire to climate change and
identifies feedbacks between fire and climate change

Fire must be accounted for as an integral part of climate change, according to
22 authors of an article published in the April 24 issue of the journal Science.
The authors determined that intentional deforestation fires alone contribute up
to one-fifth of the human-caused increase in emissions of carbon dioxide, a
heat-trapping gas that increases global temperature.

The work is the culmination of a meeting supported by the Kavli Institute for
Theoretical Physics (KITP) and the National Center for Ecological Analysis and
Synthesis (NCEAS), both based at the University of California, Santa Barbara and
funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

The authors call on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to
fully integrate fire into their assessments of global climate change, and
consider fire-climate feedbacks, which have been largely absent in global models.

The article ties together various threads of knowledge about fire, which have,
until now, remained isolated in disparate fields including ecology, global
modeling, physics, anthropology and climatology.

Increasing numbers of wildfires are influencing climate as well, the authors
report. "The tragic fires in Victoria, Australia, emphasize the ubiquity of
recent large wildfires and potentially changing fire regimes that are
concomitant with anthropogenic climate change," said David Bowman of the
University of Tasmania. "Our review is both timely and of great relevance globally."

Carbon dioxide is the most important and well-studied greenhouse gas that is
emitted by burning plants. However, methane, aerosol particulates in smoke, and
the changing reflectance of a charred landscape each contribute to changes in
the atmosphere caused by fire. Consequences of large fires have huge economic,
environmental, and health costs, report the authors.

The authors state, "Earth is intrinsically a flammable planet due to its cover
of carbon-rich vegetation, seasonally dry climates, atmospheric oxygen,
widespread lightning and volcano ignitions. Yet, despite the human species'
long-held appreciation of this flammability, the global scope of fire has been
revealed only recently by satellite observations available beginning in the 1980s."

They note, however, that satellites cannot adequately capture fire activity in
ecosystems with very long fire intervals, or those with highly variable fire
activity.

Jennifer Balch, a member of the research team and a postdoctoral fellow at
NCEAS, explains that there are bigger and more frequent fires from the western
U.S. to the tropics. There are "fires where we don't normally see fires," she
said, noting that it is in the humid tropics that a lot of deforestation fires
are occurring, usually to expand agriculture or cattle ranching. "Wet
rainforests have not historically experienced fires at the frequency that they
are today. During extreme droughts, such as in 97-98, Amazon wildfires burned
through 39,000 square kilometers of forest."

Balch explains the importance of the article: "This synthesis is a prerequisite
for adaptation to the apparent recent intensification of fire feedbacks, which
have been exacerbated by climate change, rapid land cover transformation, and
exotic species introductions--that collectively challenge the integrity of
entire biomes."

The authors acknowledge that their estimate of fire's influence on climate is
just a start, and they highlight major research gaps that must be addressed in
order to understand the complete contribution of fire to the climate system.

Balch notes that a holistic fire science is necessary, and points out fire's
true importance. "We don't think about fires correctly," she said. "Fire is as
elemental as air or water. We live on a fire planet. We are a fire species. Yet,
the study of fire has been very fragmented. We know lots about the carbon cycle,
the nitrogen cycle, but we know very little about the fire cycle, or how fire
cycles through the biosphere."

"The large and diverse group of authors on this paper typifies an increasing
trend across many sciences," said Henry Gholz, an NSF program director. "NSF
explicitly supports this by funding "synthesis centers," such as NCEAS and KITP.
Instead of focusing on generating new data, these centers synthesize the results
of literally thousands of completed research projects into new results, theories
and insights. The conclusions of this paper--that fire is important to the
global carbon cycle and global climate, and that our ignorance about fire at
this scale is vast--and could not have otherwise been obtained."



From kevinysli at graduate.hku.hk Sat Apr 25 13:05:06 2009
From: kevinysli at graduate.hku.hk (Kevin Yuk-shing Li)
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2009 11:05:06 +0800
Subject: [enviro-vlc] In Vietnam, New Fears of a Chinese 'Invasion'
Message-ID: <C7672F2915084175B8751118D6A9220A@KevinLi>

In Vietnam, New Fears of a Chinese 'Invasion'
By Martha Ann Overland / Hanoi
TIME. Thursday, Apr. 16, 2009
http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1891668,00.html

Thirty years ago, Vietnamese soldiers waged a final, furious battle in the
hills of Lang Son near the country's northern border to push back enemy
troops. Both sides suffered horrific losses, but Vietnam eventually
proclaimed victory. Decades later, diplomatic relations have been restored
and the two nations, at least in public, call each other friend. Vietnam's
former foe is a major investor in the country, bilateral trade is at an
all-time high, and tourists, not troops, are pouring in.

No, not Americans. Chinese. As part of an aggressive effort to expand its
commercial and political influence in Southeast Asia, China is investing
heavily in Vietnam. Chinese companies are now involved in myriad road
projects, mining operations and power plants. Yet, despite the fact that
cooperation between the two communist countries is being encouraged by
Vietnam's leaders, this friendly invasion does not sit well among a people
who have been fighting off Chinese advances for more than a thousand years,
most recently in 1979. Many in Vietnam worry that China is being handed the
keys not just to their country's natural resources but also to sensitive
strategic areas, threatening the nation's security. "The danger is that
China has won most of the bids building electricity, cement and chemical
plants," warns Nguyen Van Thu, the chairman of Vietnam's Association of
Mechanical Industries. "They eat up everything and leave nothing." (See
pictures of the border war between China and Vietnam.)

Thu says he suspects some Chinese companies have won construction contracts
by submitting lowball bids, which could mean they are cutting corners,
threatening quality and safety. But Thu's biggest concern is the influx of
large numbers of Chinese workers, including cooks and cleaning staff, that
are taking jobs from Vietnamese and threatening the country's social
stability. "Chinese contractors bring everything here, even the toilet
seats!" declares Thu. "These are materials Vietnam can produce, and work
that Vietnamese can do."

The latest lightning rod for anti-Chinese sentiment is Hanoi's plan to allow
subsidiaries of the Aluminum Corporation of China (Chinalco) to mine bauxite
ore in Vietnam's Central Highlands. Bauxite is a key ingredient in aluminum,
which China needs to fuel its construction industry. Vietnam has an
estimated eight billion tons of high-quality bauxite, the third-largest
reserves in the world. The environmental cost of extracting the mineral,
however, can be high. Strip mining is efficient, but scars the land and
bauxite processing releases a toxic red sludge that can seep into water
supplies if not adequately contained. Several senior Vietnamese scientists
as well as Vietnam's burgeoning green movement have questioned the wisdom of
giving mining rights to China, whose own mines were shut down because of the
massive damage they caused to the environment.

But the real opposition appears to have less to do with the environment and
more to do with Vietnam's fear of its neighbor on the country's northern
border. Nationalist groups accuse Hanoi of caving in to pressure from
commodities-hungry China by allowing the mining project to go forward.
Bloggers are whipping up fears that the influx of Chinese workers is part of
Beijing's long-term strategy to occupy their country. Banned pro-democracy
groups, which are happy for any opportunity to criticize the authoritarian
government, call the mining venture an "ill-begotten scheme." Earlier this
month, a dissident Buddhist monk, Thich Quang Do, said that strip mining
will destroy the way of life of the region's ethnic minorities. He added
that the project created "an illustration of Vietnam's dependence on China."
There has been no such outcry against U.S. aluminum giant Alcoa's plans to
mine two sites in Dak Nong province in the Central Highlands.

Perhaps the most unexpected criticism has come from General Vo Nguyen Giap,
a revered Vietnamese military leader who helped defeat the French and later
the Americans. In a letter to Vietnam's Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung, the
97-year-old war hero voiced concern over the presence of large numbers of
Chinese in the Central Highlands, which is a strategic gateway to Vietnam,
one where battles have been won and lost.

Other countries in the region are made uneasy by China's thirst for
resources. Last month, the Australian government rejected a $1.8 billion bid
by Chinese mining company Minmetals to acquire debt-ridden OZ Minerals, the
world's second-biggest zinc miner, due to national security concerns. OZ
Minerals has operations near Australia's Woomera weapons testing site.

The Hanoi government says it is listening to concerns but it appears to be
unmoved. Dung recently declared bauxite mining a "major policy of the party
and the state." Deputy Prime Minister Hoang Trung Hai reaffirmed the
government's support, and several local provincial officials were on hand at
a recent mining conference to defend the project, arguing that despite the
presence of the Chinese workers, development will benefit the impoverished
ethnic minorities who live in the region.

The pressure on Vietnam to proceed as planned is enormous, says Carl A.
Thayer, a Vietnam expert who teaches at the University of New South Wales'
Australian Defense Force Academy. Vietnam needs to trade with China, the
world's third-largest economy, to survive. Thayer acknowledges that no
Chinese company operates independently of the government. "If you go up far
enough you will find a military or a security connection," he says. "But
Chinese occupation? I don't believe that."

Some of the problems are of Vietnam's own making, observes Thayer. The
country has become increasingly dependent on foreign direct investment to
buoy its economy. Last year, overseas investors sunk a record $11.5 billion
into Vietnam. China last year had 73 investment projects worth $334 million
in the country. But in the wake of the global recession, foreign direct
investment plummeted 70% in the first quarter of 2009 compared to the same
time period last year.

Hanoi has been calling for increased investment, and is even more desperate
for external cash infusions now that its economy has flatlined. Vietnam has
also racked up a massive trade deficit with China. As more Chinese companies
venture across the border and sink millions into new investment projects,
Hanoi can't dictate all the terms. Nor can they just close the spigot. "The
Vietnamese have to be careful of what they wish for," says Thayer.




From kevinysli at graduate.hku.hk Sat Apr 25 13:07:39 2009
From: kevinysli at graduate.hku.hk (Kevin Yuk-shing Li)
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2009 11:07:39 +0800
Subject: [enviro-vlc] The Economist - Bauxite bashers
Message-ID: <9ECFB4C6B04F4C3194BCF34C3FAD0F8C@KevinLi>

Vietnam and China
Bauxite bashers
The Economist. Apr 23rd 2009.
http://www.economist.com/world/asia/displaystory.cfm?story_id=13527969

The government chooses economic growth over xenophobia and greenery

IN A one-party state where people are routinely jailed for criticising
government policy, it is rare for all but the most brave or foolhardy to
speak out. But a government plan to allow a Chinese company to start mining
some of the massive reserves of bauxite lying beneath Vietnam's verdant
Central Highlands has provoked an unprecedented backlash from an unlikely
assortment of critics. They include a nonagenarian war-hero, Vo Nguyen Giap,
a dissident monk, Thich Quang Do, and a slew of leading scientists and
environmental campaigners.

Vietnam is blessed with the world's third-largest reserves of bauxite, the
raw material for aluminium, and the communist government is keen to reap the
benefits. Under a plan that the prime minister, Nguyen Tan Dung, has called
"a major policy of the party and the state", the government is seeking to
attract $15 billion or more of investment to develop bauxite mining and
aluminium refining projects by 2025. It has already signed a contract with a
subsidiary of Chinalco, a state-owned Chinese mining group, to build one
mine and agreed with Alcoa, an American aluminium giant, to carry out a
feasibility study for another.

Critics say the arrival of large-scale bauxite mining in a region that
currently grows coffee and other crops could cause irreparable damage to the
environment and displace the ethnic-minority groups who inhabit the Central
Highlands. Bauxite is usually extracted through open-cast mines, which leave
vast scars on the landscape. The process by which it is refined also
produces a toxic "red sludge", which can cause serious pollution if it
washes into streams and rivers.

As if that were not enough, the involvement of a Chinese company in such a
controversial project has rekindled latent anti-Chinese sentiment in
Vietnam, which was colonised by its larger neighbour for 1,000 years and
fought a short but bloody war against it in 1979. Thich Quang Do, the leader
of the outlawed Unified Buddhist Church, claims that Vietnam is "under
threat of invasion" because "whole villages of Chinese workers have
mushroomed on the plateau, and 10,000 Chinese settlers are expected in the
coming year." His comments have been echoed by Vietnam's enthusiastic army
of bloggers, and an anti-bauxite-mining group set up on Facebook, a popular
social-networking website, has attracted nearly 700 members. Chinese
bloggers are not, it seems, the only ones to resort to inflamed xenophobia.
And though much of the opposition is no doubt driven by that feeling, there
are also genuine concerns about the lousy environmental records of many
Chinese mining companies.

Whatever the motive, however, the Vietnamese government is nervous about
public criticism of China. It recently banned a bi-weekly newspaper called
Du lich (Tourism) for three months for running a series of articles about
territorial disputes between the two countries. The explanation is that
China is Vietnam's biggest trading partner. Vietnam also runs a massive
trade deficit with its neighbour and has been pushing China's government to
invest more in the country to offset the deficit. With foreign direct
investment 40% lower in the first quarter of 2009 than it was a year
before-and most rich nations short of cash-Vietnam needs Chinese money now
more than ever.

Much to the chagrin of the anti-China lobby, Mr Dung, the prime minister,
spent a week this month touring China, trying to drum up investment and
pledging to make it easier for Chinese companies to operate in his country.
Following a meeting with China's prime minister, Wen Jiabao, Mr Dung said
that the two countries would strive to expand bilateral trade from $20
billion in 2008 to $25 billion by 2010 and try to tackle the trade
imbalance.

Hoang Trung Hai, a deputy prime minister, recently told a conference of
scientists concerned about environmental damage that Vietnam will not pursue
the bauxite mining plan "at any cost". But the reality is that in straitened
economic times, beggars cannot be choosers.




From kevinysli at graduate.hku.hk Sat Apr 25 13:10:15 2009
From: kevinysli at graduate.hku.hk (Kevin Yuk-shing Li)
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2009 11:10:15 +0800
Subject: [enviro-vlc] 2,
000 Chinese laborers may work on Central Highlands alumina project
Message-ID: <3217934BE62C421A853E63B47411AA1F@KevinLi>

2,000 Chinese laborers may work on Central Highlands alumina project
15:23' 24/04/2009 (GMT+7)
http://english.vietnamnet.vn/social/2009/04/843914/

VietNamNet Bridge - The Chinese partner in the Nhan Co Aluminum Company is
preparing a request to employ 2000 Chinese workers at the bauxite mining
site in Dak Nong Province.

Before the end of the month, the Nhan Co Alumina JS Company will submit its
environmental assessment report on a proposed bauxite mining and alumina
refining project to the Dak Nong Province Peoples Council for its review.

The company is also preparing to start construction of a 650,000 tonne/year
alumina refinery, at a cost of VND12.5 trillion ($735.2 million) in Nhan Co
commune, Dak RLap district, Dak Nong.

Nhan Co General Director Bui Quang Tien said that Chalco is hastening
research on Vietnamese laws on foreign workers in order to bring Chinese
workers to the central highlands province.

Tien said that during important phases of construction, there may be up to
2,000 Chinese workers at Nhan Co.

Under the terms of the memorandum of understanding between the partners, the
only foreign workers that Nhan Co Alumina JS Company will employ will be
highly skilled specialists. They will stay in a 2ha area near the
construction site, according to the MOU.

The Nhan Co Company and the Dak Nong provincial police are working together
on the draft of a letter to Chalco explaining Vietnamese laws on employment
of foreign workers and the necessary conditions for maintaining public
security and order in Dak Nong.

At the Tan Rai bauxite mining project in adjacent Lam Dong province, which
has already been launched, there are 500 Chinese workers. Among that number,
many are simple laborers who entered Vietnam on tourist visas, said a vice
chairman of the provincial People's Committee.

Environmental impact assessment by Nhan Co joint venture called unconvincing

At a scientific seminar on the bauxite mining projects in the Central
Highlands on April 9, the central government, responding to criticism by
scientists, promised to re-examine the projected economic gains from these
ventures and adjust the bauxite industry development plan. It has been
waiting for the submission of a supplementary report on environment impacts
of the Nhan Co project.

On April 16, the Dak Nong provincial authorities considered the assessment
of the projected environmental impact of the Nhan Co alumina refinery. The
plant has a designed capacity of 650,000 tonnes yearly and may be expanded
to 1.2 million tones. In view of the concerns expressed by scientists
regarding bauxite exploitation in the central highlands, the report did not
contain enough solid information to persuade the local authorities of the
project's environmental safety.

At the seminar on April 9, Deputy Prime Minister Hoang Trung Hai stated that
alumina projects that have annual capacity of 1-2 million tones will be
submitted to the National Assembly for consideration.

VietNamNet/VOV




From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sat Apr 25 13:50:57 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Fri, 24 Apr 2009 20:50:57 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Can Wilderness Remain Natural Through Global Warming?
Message-ID: <49F288A1.7020706@coombs.anu.edu.au>


http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/1671108/can_wilderness_remain_natural_through_global_warming/

Can Wilderness Remain Natural Through Global Warming?

For those who think of nature as a wild, unspoiled Eden that preserves the
natural flora and fauna free from human interference, global warming has a nasty
surprise in store, according to University of California, Berkeley, biologist
Anthony Barnosky.

In his new book, "Heatstroke: Nature in an Age of Global Warming" (Island Press,
2009), Barnosky says that because of climate change, wilderness left to its own
will no longer look like the natural areas we see today. Our conservation
strategies must be rethought, he adds, because business-as-usual will not
preserve all the aspects of nature we have come to know, love and respect.

Setting aside preserves, for example, puts animals and plants in a bind: As
global warming makes their current habitats unsuitable, surrounding human
development prevents them from moving to more hospitable places. The
alternative, assisted migration, smacks of creating wild zoos - quasi-natural
areas like the dinosaur wonderland portrayed in the book and movie "Jurassic Park."

"The new twist in preserving nature is that we might have to come up with a
separate but equal system, where we actively set aside some tracts of land as
wildlands where people can experience this feeling of 'wilderness,' but
recognize that the species that live in those places and the landscape are not
going to be the species and landscape we are used to," he says. "Our kids are
going to see very different things in those kinds of places than we do."

Warming already altering patterns of migration

Barnosky describes in his book how global warming is already causing shifts in
the ranges of animals and plants, disrupting migrations and spawning, and
stressing animals confined to parks and reserves.

"We now have this conflict between saving species and saving natural ecological
processes; between saving species and saving the interactions that take place
between species in the absence of active management," he says. "Assisted
migration, where you help species along, is great and what we need to do, but as
soon as you do that, all of a sudden, nothing is wild anymore."

Barnosky is a paleoecologist who has studied and written about the rise and fall
of species over the past few million years and the climatic upheavals that
caused them. His book contrasts current ecosystem disruptions with past
extinctions, showing, for example, how climate change coupled with human
activity was the one-two punch that led to the extinctions of large animals
around the globe in the past 12,000-50,000 years. Mammoths, mastodons and giant
bison in North America, Irish elk and woolly rhinos in Europe, giant kangaroos
and hog-size wombats in Australia all disappeared - and extinctions were most
intense where global warming and human hunting coincided.

While ecosystem change and extinction are normal, Barnosky reminds us that past
climate change, such as cooling at the beginning of glacial periods and warming
with the onset of interglacial periods, took place over thousands of years. The
current warming is happening faster, by a factor of about 10.

In the best-case scenario, he says, the temperature in 2100 will be warmer than
it has been since humans first appeared. In the worst case, it will be hotter
than it has been in at least 3 million years, "which is longer than basically
any species you can name has been on Earth," he says, adding that animals and
plants are wired to evolve to adapt to change, but not at such a rapid pace.

"If you look at how ecosystems have responded over the past hundreds of
thousands and perhaps millions of years to natural climate changes, and then
compare that with how they are responding today and what they have to respond to
in the next 100 years, we are way outside the normal baseline of what those
ecosystems are adapted to," says Barnosky.

Global warming multiplies impacts of human activities

Global warming comes on top of many other environmental impacts that have been
stressing the environment, Barnosky notes in his book. He wrote "Heatstroke," in
part, because he "wanted to raise awareness that global warming is not just an
add-on consequence as far as impacts on ecosystems and nature are concerned. We
are all aware of habitat fragmentation, invasive species, growing human
populations, and the tradeoff between resources needed to sustain us versus
resources to sustain other species. People tend to think those are the big
problems, and that global warming is going to heat things up a bit.

"In reality, global warming, as far as how it is going to change nature, is as
big or bigger a problem than all of those other four, and especially when you
put it together with all of the other four. There are feedbacks that make
everything much more severe. It is like multiplying rather than adding
everything up."

In the book, he documents how global warming is already reducing roan antelope
and tsessebe populations in Africa, amphibians in Yellowstone National Park,
polar bears in the Arctic and pikas in the Western United States. One common
thread is that warming is targeting "keystone" species that, "although
represented by relatively small numbers of individuals, have an inordinately
important effect on keeping their ecosystems in functioning order," he writes.
"When elephants disappear in Africa or the whitebark pine dies out in
Yellowstone, the whole ecology can collapse."

Barnosky says the scientific data led him to the conclusion that "how to save
the particular ecosystems we value and, in the larger scheme of things, nature
itself, is the challenge we now face in the Age of Global Warming."

How do we protect both species and wilderness?

Wilderness must be protected, he says, if for no other reason than that it acts
as a canary in a coal mine, "a barometer of how healthy the Earth actually is."
But imperiled species must also be protected as biodiversity resources, he adds,
even if this requires assisted migration of not only the endangered species, but
also the plants and animals these species interact with in their ecosystem.

One alternative that some scientists have put forward is Pleistocene rewilding,
a wild idea to re-establish the large "megafauna" that dominated Earth during
the planet's last major bout with global climate change, the period of
on-and-off glaciation that took place between 2 million and 10,000 years ago.
This involves importing elephants from Africa to stand in for the extinct
mammoths and mastodons, lions and cheetahs for the saber toothed cats, wild
horses and camels as replacements for the grazers. This would preserve
endangered animals and plants that face pressure from humans and global warming
in their current habitat, but, as Barnosky points out, it could also have a long
list of downsides.

Unfortunately, both assisted migration and Pleistocene rewilding would lead to
managed ecosystems - the antithesis of wilderness. Just as we manage fisheries
to preserve an important food source, we will have to give up some wildness in
order to preserve species.

"We can't protect all three faces of nature - ecosystem services, like clean
water and fisheries; species diversity; and the feeling of wilderness - without
somehow separating those three different concepts of nature and working with
each one of them differently," he says. "All can be complementary, but you have
to do different things for each one."

"I think there are people who are quite happy to settle for one or two of those,
but my personal philosophy and feeling is that we can have all three faces of
nature," he says.

He foresees two types of preserves, for example: species preserves to protect a
species or assemblages of species, but requiring heavy management; and wildland
preserves that retain ecological interactions without the influence of humans -
the feel of wilderness - but which will see changing species and even extinctions.

Barnosky says he is optimistic that scientists, politicians and "the rest of us"
can hash out the details to preserve much of what we see today - but only if we
act now.

"Earth is not going to die. But global warming by itself, especially with
feedbacks from the other big threats on nature, is going to lead to a loss of
biodiversity big-time if we don't get our act together," he says. "We are not
over the brink yet. And we don't have to go over the brink unless we want to. It
is decision time."

By Robert Sanders, UC-Berkeley Media Relations

---

Image 1: Paleoecologist Anthony Barnosky excavating ice age fossils from a cave
in 2008. From studies of fossil ecosystems, he says, we know that the extreme
and fast global warming we?re now experiencing is far outside the range of
normal climate changes.




From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sun Apr 26 00:14:42 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2009 07:14:42 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] =?utf-8?q?World=E2=80=99s_largest_cave_discovered_in?=
=?utf-8?q?_Vietnam?=
Message-ID: <49F31AD2.6000304@coombs.anu.edu.au>

That's some big 'pot hole'.

http://www.nhandan.com.vn/english/travel/250409/travel_w.htm

Last updated: 17:10 - April 25, 2009

World?s largest cave discovered in Vietnam

The Quang Binh administration has revealed that an English potholing team has
discovered a cave believed to be the biggest in the world, in the Phong Nha-Ke
Bang World Natural Heritage site.

A representative from the central province said that the English cavers told the
provincial authorities at a meeting on April 22 that the cave, called Son Doong,
is approximately 200m high, 140-150m wide and over 5km long. The find is located
in an area that is extremely difficult to access, about 6 hours walk from the Ho
Chi Minh trail.

The Son Doong cave has replaced the Deer cave in Malaysia to take pole position
as the world?s largest cave.

The local authorities say that the local people knew of the caves existence
several years ago but have always been unable to access it.

During their one month trip, the English explorers discovered another 20 caves,
bringing the total number in Phong Nha-Ke Bang National Park to 150.

During their meeting, the English mission handed over all the information on
their discoveries to Phong Nha-Ke Bang National Park and promised to return in
the future to carry out for further exploration with more advanced technology.

Deputy Director of Quang Binh?s Foreign Affairs Service Vu Ngoc Quy said that
the English explorers have returned to Phong Nha-Ke Bang several times since
they first arrived in 1995 and their research has contributed considerably to
the conservation of the World Natural Heritage site.

When describing the newly-discovered cave, the team?s spokesman Haward Limbirt
said that it was a thing of overwhelming beauty and grandeur. He also warned the
local administration against using the cave to attract tourists and recommended
reserving it for scientific research. (VNA)


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sun Apr 26 00:48:08 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2009 07:48:08 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Feature: Environmentalism Ascendant In China
Message-ID: <49F322A8.8070708@coombs.anu.edu.au>

Subject: Feature: Environmentalism Ascendant In China
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2009 06:56:19 -0700
From: Yahoo Group <ashwani.vasishth at gmail.com>
Reply-To: envecolnews-owner at yahoogroups.com
To: International Development News <intldevelopmentnews at yahoogroups.com>
CC: Environmental Ecology News <envecolnews at yahoogroups.com>

http://features.csmonitor.com/environment/2009/04/23/chinas-green-leap-forward/

*China's green leap forward?
* Activists must tread softly to avoid antagonizing Beijing, but
there's much at stake in this rapidly developing country.

By Christina Larson | Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor/
April 23, 2009 edition

Kunming, China

Every environmental movement has its ideas people, and Yu Xiaogang is
among the emerging John Muirs of China.In a modest office, with the
lights and heat turned off to conserve electricity, Dr. Yu is warming
his hands over a cup of tea.

Illustration Omitted:
Yu Xiaogang was instrumental in suspending dam building along the Nu
River in 2004. He stands by the Yangtze here.
(Courtesy of the Goldman Environmental Prize.)

"Please excuse the books," he says, as he clears a wide-ranging
selection of titles, including "China's Natural History," "An Ecological
Economy," "Demanding Accountability," "Choices for the Poor," and
"Feminist Knowledge," from his desk and his visitor's chair.

Yu is a former government scientist and today is director of an
environmental nonprofit called Green Watershed that he founded in
southwestern Yunnan Province.

He is also the architect of what is widely considered the emerging
Chinese environmental movement's greatest victory to date: Five years
ago, he led a campaign of coordinated green groups to successfully
persuade the government to suspend a series of planned dams along
China's last wild river, the Nu.

Today he is pensive. With the rising demand for energy in China, a new
hydropower boom is under way. In just one province, Gansu, the number of
large dams has gone from three, 20 years ago, to almost 600 today.

Beijing's current economic stimulus plan, announced in March, calls for
$176 billion for infrastructure projects and $54 billion for rural
public works, both of which include such projects as new dams, highways,
and housing.

Yu follows such developments closely. Leaning forward in his chair, he
points to a map unfurled on his desk, noting the planned construction
sites he finds most alarming. "Some places, unique in the world, may be
lost that can never be replaced," he says.

"We cannot be against all hydropower," he adds, "but we must have the
precondition that projects pass environmental- and social-impact
assessments. We still need to find that middle way."

By this he means that dam planners should be required to pay greater
attention to the impact of dams on local populations and ensure that
adequate measures are taken to provide "poverty alleviation, local
education support, and restoration of livelihoods," as he puts it.

According to Yu's estimates, in the past 50 years some 40 million people
have been resettled as the result of large infrastructure projects in
China, about 12 million due to dam construction alone. About half now
live "in absolute poverty," he says.

On paper, China's resettlement compensation policies have become more
generous in recent years. But while resettled families are often moved
into newly built homes, land allotments are often inadequate to sustain
farming. Villagers receive little help in finding new livelihoods. Such
communities are called "empty economy towns."

A lack of transparency in how compensation funds are distributed
encourages corruption, with less money reaching intended recipients.

Yu's idea is based upon similar requirements in many countries,
including China, for environmental-impact assessments, which evaluate
the ecological impacts of dams and other major infrastructure projects
before construction begins.

He wants to extend that concept to include the concerns of local
communities in China: "What would the Nu River be without the Nu
people?" The Nu are a minority who live only in a small territory
alongside the river.

"With one hand, we hold the environmental-impact assessment," he says.
"With the other hand, we must hold the social-impact assessment."

He points out, knowingly, that following his suggestions would reinforce
the central government's stated goal of maintaining a "harmonious society."

Yu's promotion of social-impact assessments is an example of how the
emerging environmental movement in China is adapting to the unique
circumstances in which it is arising.

"Successful Chinese [nongovernmental organizations]," says Linden Ellis
of the China Environment Forum at the Woodrow Wilson Center in
Washington, D.C., "in stark contract to Western NGOs, make major efforts
to support and work with the government, particularly the central
government.

"In the US," Ms. Ellis continues, "the environmental movement really got
under way when people started suing the government; in China, good
intentions seem to be still good enough."

The Chinese environmental movement today, which has been growing rapidly
since the first environmental nonprofits were allowed to legally
organize in 1994, is often compared with the early years of the modern
American environmental movement. But there are key differences.

Major antidam campaigns were a hallmark of the US environmental movement
in the 1960s, during a cultural moment when activists in various spheres
were organizing to say "no" to perceived ills - from racism to sexism to
the Vietnam War.

That direct-confrontation approach has never been an option in China.

Rather than rejecting outright the government's desire to make
hydropower an increasing part of China's energy portfolio, Yu wants to
ensure that the dams that are built are as environmentally and socially
sustainable as possible.

"In China, we don't often have the option of saying 'no' to
development," he explains. "So we must find ways to make it the best
development."

He adds that some dams, such as a proposed hydropower project that would
span Tiger Leaping Gorge, located within a United Nations-designated
World Heritage site, should not be built at all.

Another defining aspect of China's environmental movement is that it has
always taken people into the equation.

"There are so many people in China," Yu says. "There is no place in our
country where there is only nature."

Wen Bo, a well-known environmentalist in Beijing who is co-director of
Pacific Environment's China Program, uses the phrase "ecological
justice" to describe Yu's approach in "mobilizing grass-roots activists
and empowering dam-affected communities."

Yu did not start out as an environmentalist, but as a government scientist.

While working for a ministry in his home province of Yunnan, he became
frustrated by his inability to challenge official assumptions. "I find
that inside the system, you can do only so-called 'decisionmaking
supporting research,' " he says. "That means the government has already
made the decision. You do research to support the decision. You never do
something that changes the decision."

His discontent with this mode of thinking led him to found his own
environmental nonprofit, Green Watershed, in 2002.

Since then his work has entailed frequent meetings in both impoverished
communities and government offices. A common theme in his campaigns has
been advocating for greater public participation in environmental
decisionmaking.

During the successful 2004 campaign against dams along the Nu, he
brought villagers threatened with resettlement to visit other
communities that had been moved for past infrastructure projects.

When villagers more clearly understood the implications of resettlement,
they began to organize in order to articulate their concerns about how
their livelihoods and culture would be affected.

That campaign galvanized national public attention, and Chinese Premier
Wen Jiabao personally intervened to suspend construction of the dams.

Provisions allowing for limited public input to major infrastructure
projects were enshrined in 2003 and 2004 laws, but these statutes are
still not well understood or used today. "Some people don't believe
their own strength," says Yu.

He notes that there are "not many well-known success stories" about
community organizers to look to for inspiration. Yet, even when dams
can't be stopped, communities may receive better resettlement options if
they can make their concerns known in a strategic fashion.

Yu has also been active in promoting his ideas to government officials.
In 2007, he was invited to give a presentation on social-impact
assessments to a training seminar for Communist Party officials.

Later that year, he helped organize a conference in Beijing that brought
together environmental officials and green NGO leaders to discuss "green
banking," another concept he has been championing. The idea is that
heavily polluting enterprises would be denied loans by state-run banks.

Although penalties are not uniformly enforced, the national
environmental ministry has begun to track the pollution violations and
loan applications of large enterprises.

For his work on various fronts, Yu was recognized with a prestigious
international award, the Goldman Environmental Prize, in 2006.

Today is a particularly tenuous moment for activists of all stripes in
China.

Here, limits exist on what advocates can say and the issues around which
they may organize. Monitoring of citizen groups was heightened in the
run-up to the Beijing Olympics last summer.

Many observers had expected that there would be more latitude for civil
society after the Games concluded, but that has not been the case. In
February, the Yitong law firm, famous for its work defending human
rights advocates in China, was preparing to fight a government closure
order in court.

"The government does not feel that this is a good time to relax its
control over society and allow freer political discourse," says Drew
Thompson, director of China Studies and Starr Senior Fellow at the Nixon
Center in Washington, D.C. "The potential social dislocations caused by
the global financial crisis will also lead the government to act
conservatively and prevent any grass-roots movement from challenging the
party's authority."

For his part, Yu says his emphasis is less ideological than it is
pragmatic. A scientist by training, he says, "I am asking: 'Is this data
accurate? Are these promises enforceable?' "

/*** NOTICE: In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, this
material is distributed, without profit, for research and educational
purposes only. ***/
//


From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Sun Apr 26 04:07:40 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2009 11:07:40 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Thu moi tham gia Tro chuyen Nghe thuat 7-Kham pha TUONG
Message-ID: <49F3516C.3030608@gmail.com>

Subject: Thu moi tham gia Tro chuyen Nghe thuat 7-Kham pha TUONG
Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2009 01:29:26 -0700 (PDT)
From: GreenZoom <greenzoom_hn at yahoo.com>
Reply-To: greenzoom_hn at yahoo.com
To: GreenZoom <greenzoom at greenzoom.org>

*Tr? chuy?n Ngh? thu?t s? 7: Kh?m Ph? Tu?ng*

Tu?ng (hay h?t b?i) l? m?t lo?i h?nh ngh? thu?t s?n kh?u mang t?nh c?
?i?n ??c ??o c?a Vi?t Nam ???c h?nh th?nh tr?n c? s? ca v? nh?c v? c?c
tr? di?n x??ng d?n gian v?n c? t? l?u ??i v? phong ph? c?a d?n t?c.

Bi?u di?n Tu?ng c? nh?ng nguy?n t?c c?ch ?i?u, ??c l? v? c?ng nghi?m
ng?t t? trong c?u tr?c k?ch b?n, ??n s?p x?p l?n ?i?u, t? c?u h?t, ??n
?m nh?c, ??c bi?t l? ph??ng ph?p bi?u di?n t?ng h?p, k?t h?p nhu?n
nhuy?n gi?a h?t v? m?a, gi?a tr?nh di?n v? v? thu?t d?n t?c, gi?a nh?p
vai v? tho?t vai. Kh?c v?i c?c lo?i h?nh s?n kh?u kh?c nh? ch?o, c?i
l??ng... Tu?ng mang theo ?m h??ng h?ng tr?ng v?i nh?ng t?m g??ng t?n
trung b?o qu?c, x? th?n v? ??i ngh?a, nh?ng b?i h?c v? l? ?ng x? c?a con
ng??i gi?a c?i chung v? c?i ri?ng, gi?a gia ??nh v? T? qu?c.

Trong nhi?u n?m qua, Tu?ng ?? l? nh?ng ng??i b?n tri ?m, tri k? c?a c?c
t?ng l?p nh?n d?n Vi?t Nam . V?i mong mu?n g?n gi? tinh hoa v?n c? c?a
?ng cha, ??c bi?t l? ??i v?i b? m?n ngh? thu?t truy?n th?ng ?? g?n li?n
v?i d?n t?c qua bao th? k?, GreenZoom ph?i h?p v?i Nh? H?t Tu?ng Trung
??ng t? ch?c Ch??ng tr?nh Tr? chuy?n Ngh? thu?t s? 7 v?i ch? ?? *"Kh?m
ph? Tu?ng"*. ??y l? ch??ng tr?nh ??u ti?n trong D? ?n *"??nh th?c Tu?ng
2009"* do GreenZoom th?c hi?n, nh?m ??a Tu?ng ??n v?i ??ng ??o kh?n gi?
h?n. Ch?ng t?i tin t??ng r?ng xem Tu?ng, hi?u Tu?ng v? h?c Tu?ng s? l?
nh?ng b??c ??m ??u ti?n ?? kh?n gi? y?u m?n, g?n b? v? t? ?? g?p ph?n
g?n gi? v? th?c ??y s? ph?t tri?n c?a m?n Ngh? thu?t n?y.

Ch??ng tr?nh Tr? chuy?n Ngh? thu?t s? 7 *"Kh?m ph? Tu?ng"* s? ???c chia
l?m hai ph?n:

- Bi?u di?n Tu?ng: C?c ngh? s? thu?c Nh? H?t tu?ng trung ??ng s? gi?i
thi?u c?c tr?ch ?o?n Tu?ng ti?u bi?u nh? ?ng gi? c?ng v? ?i xem, H?
nguy?t c? h?a c?o?

- Tr? chuy?n v? Ngh? thu?t Tu?ng: Giao l?u v?i NSND Ho?ng Khi?m v? c?c
di?n vi?n Tu?ng.

*Th?i gian: 17h Chi?u th? 4 Ng?y 29/04/2009*

*??a ?i?m: R?p H?ng H?- S? 51 Ph? ???ng Th?nh, Ho?n Ki?m, H? N?i.*

Ch??ng tr?nh ???c th?c hi?n ho?n to?n mi?n ph? v? d?nh cho m?i ??i t??ng.

Th?ng tin b? sung m?i theo d?i file ??nh k?m.

*?? ??ng k? tham gia, m?i c?c b?n g?i h? t?n v? n?i c?ng t?c qua email:
greenzoom at greenzoom.org <mailto:greenzoom at greenzoom.org>*


M?i chi ti?t xin li?n h?: Nguy?n Thu Th?y - Nh?m ?i?u ph?i GreenZoom
Mobile: 0979 872 105
Email: greenzoom at greenzoom .org, Website: www.greenzoom. org

T?i li?u tham kh?o v? Tu?ng m?i xem file ??nh k?m

-----------------------------------
GreenZoom Group

Website : http://greenzoom.org/joomla/
Email : greenzoom_hn at yahoo.com
Yahoo Mailing List : http://groups.yahoo.com/group/greenzoom
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From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Tue Apr 28 06:11:45 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Mon, 27 Apr 2009 13:11:45 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] FELLOWSHIP: The 2009- 2010 Water For People Research
Fellowship in Innovation and Sustainability
Message-ID: <49F61181.7070200@gmail.com>

[appears to be focused on Africa?]

Subject: [INCL English] Indonesia Nature Conservation newsLetter 12-16a
Date: Mon, 27 Apr 2009 17:37:43 +0700
From: [INCL English] <Incl.contact at gmail.com>

FELLOWSHIP: The 2009- 2010 Water For People Research Fellowship in Innovation
and Sustainability

Water For People is an international nonprofit organization that helps
people in developing countries improve their quality of life by supporting
the development of locally sustainable drinking water resources, sanitation
facilities and health and hygiene education programs. As a sector leader in
sustainability, Water For People seeks to expand its capacity to innovate
and field-test its innovations, with the ultimate aim of improving the way
we and the sector accomplish our work. The Fellowship in Innovation and
Sustainability supports an advanced scholar in the pursuit of original
research that promises to contribute directly to the knowledge base of
Water For People program staff and the sector as a whole.

We invite applications for the 2009?2010 Fellowship year, which will focus
on applying Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) to Water For
People?s country programs in Malawi, Uganda and Rwanda. Total time in the
field will be approximately 4 months, spread over 2 trips of 6 to 8 weeks.
The remaining 6 to 8 months will be spent in Denver on academic research
into IWRM; on information sharing with Denver-based staff; and on conference
presentations and writing for publication. Field research will take place
at the grassroots level of community?based water systems and at the
governmental level of policy and law. This research will tap into Water For
People?s strong network of NGO, private sector, government and university
partners. A portion of the work will be focused on developing one or more
case studies in the field; here, the Fellow will work with Water For People
staff and partners in helping stakeholders of a Water For People project to
apply principles of IWRM to the development of their water and sanitation
solutions.


Support for the Fellowship will include:

? 10 to 12 months stipend
? full funding for research & travel
? office space
? additional support for research from Water For People
institutional affiliations in Denver and incountry

Criteria for candidacy:

? advanced degree in water law, environmental policy, or a
related field (required)
? field experience in the developing world
? excellent verbal and ?people? skills
? excellent research and writing skills
? creativity, flexibility and a passion for development

To apply:

By May 15th, please send cover letter, cv and the names of three
references, to:

Nina Miller, PhD, Director of Volunteer Services, Training and Applied
Research (VSTAR) at nmiller at waterforpeople.org
Water For People
6666 W. Quincy Ave
Denver, CO 80235
720-488-4590




From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Tue Apr 28 06:13:47 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Mon, 27 Apr 2009 13:13:47 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] Invitation: to an E-forum on Land, Environment
Message-ID: <49F611FB.9040806@gmail.com>

Subject: [INCL English] Indonesia Nature Conservation newsLetter 12-16a
Date: Mon, 27 Apr 2009 17:37:43 +0700
From: [INCL English] <Incl.contact at gmail.com>


Invitation: to an E-forum on Land, Environment

From: GLTN Secretariat

The Global Land Tool Network (GLTN) contributes to the implementation of
pro poor land policies to achieve secure land rights for all.
Read more...

>From April 23rd to May 7th 2009, the Global Land Tool Network (GLTN) is
animating an e-forum on the following topic: Land, Environment and Climate
Change: Challenges, Priority Issues and Tools.


Why:

The e-discussion aims at further enriching the background paper that
provides an overview of the relationship between land tenure, land
management approaches and the environment (including climate change related
issues). The focus is on the linkages between land and the environment
moving from a scientific framework to a country level implementation
framework and to what implications this has in urban and rural areas.


Background document:

A background document is provided to guide the contributions. More
importantly, the document outlines potential issues, research topics and
tools to be discussed and prioritised. All participants and contributors
are urged to read and familiarise themselves with the background document.
The outcome of the e-discussion will be shared with all contributors who
will also receive the copy of the main and enriched report. We anticipate a
vibrant contribution to this endeavour. We are very much looking forward to
your ideas to enrich it and formulate concrete recommendations.


How to participate:

Log on to www.gltn.net/forum, register and you are ready to go.
Contributions are accepted from 23 April 2009 up to 7 May 2009. Once
registered, you can take full advantage of this opportunity to share your
views, knowledge, practices and experiences on the land and environment
nexus.

Two moderators are assigned for the two week exchange: Stein Holden,
Professor in Department of Economics and Resource Management, Norwegian
University of Life Sciences in ?s, Norway and (2) Dr Remy Sietchiping from
the Global Land Tool Network at UN-HABITAT.

For further information please contact the moderators, Professor Stein
Holden at stein.holden at umb.no or Dr Remy Sietchiping at
remy.sietchiping at unhabitat.org and copy to gltn at unahbitat.org and
humphrey.ngoiya at unhabitat.org



From vern.weitzel at gmail.com Tue Apr 28 06:15:45 2009
From: vern.weitzel at gmail.com (Vern Weitzel)
Date: Mon, 27 Apr 2009 13:15:45 -0700
Subject: [enviro-vlc] RELEASE: Forests for the Future: Climate Change
Lessons From Indonesia
Message-ID: <49F61271.3000900@gmail.com>

Subject: [INCL English] Indonesia Nature Conservation newsLetter 12-16a
Date: Mon, 27 Apr 2009 17:37:43 +0700
From: [INCL English] <Incl.contact at gmail.com>


RELEASE: Forests for the Future: Climate Change Lessons From Indonesia

By AMAN and DTE

April 22nd - Earth Day - 2009 ? The forest management practices of
indigenous peoples in Indonesia provides important lessons for world
governments about to make crucial decisions on how to deal with climate
change.

A new book launched today - Forests for the Future - is written by
indigenous communities across Indonesia and describes the skills and
knowledge used for generations to manage forest ecosystems without
destroying them.

CO2 emissions from runaway deforestation and peatland destruction in
Indonesia are making a substantial contribution to climate change
worldwide.

Forests for the Future avoids romanticising the indigenous way of life.
Instead it presents lessons learned from communities striving to meet
today's economic and political challenges. It is a testament to the
willingness of indigenous peoples to engage with an international audience
so that their ways of forest management may be better known and get the
recognition and respect they deserve.

Traditional knowledge has enabled indigenous communities to benefit from
the wealth of forest resources such as food crops, rubber, medicines,
materials for building and household goods.

Many governments are keen to include forests in mechanisms that permit
industrial polluters to buy carbon credits from forest schemes in countries
like Indonesia. But there are huge risks involved. For indigenous
communities, these risks include the loss of livelihoods and the violation
of their right to manage their forests. Powerful business and political
elites in Indonesia have pushed indigenous communities aside for decades in
Indonesia: now they may rush to grab more forests so they can profit from
the carbon trade.

Forests for the Future is published by Indonesia?s Indigenous Peoples?
Alliance, AMAN, and Down to Earth. It marks AMAN?s tenth anniversary and
aims to assist efforts to develop community-based models which present a
more achievable, viable and just way of addressing the challenges of
sustainability, poverty reduction and upholding the rights of indigenous
peoples.

The book can be downloaded from DTE's website at
http://dte.gn.apc.org/GNSCON.htm

For further information and/or interviews please contact:

Abdon Nababan, AMAN
+62 811 111 365
abdon.nababan at aman.or.id

Yuyun Indradi, DTE
+6281 31066 3859
y.indradi at gmail.com

Emil Kleden, Pusaka
+ 628131168311
emil.kleden at cbn.net.id

Chip Fay, Samdhana Institute
+63 917 718 3780
chip at samdhana.org

For more information about AMAN visit http://www.aman.or.id
For more information about DTE visit http://dte.gn.apc.org

--------------------



From ve