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UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF GEORGIA

UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF GEORGIA
Volume XXXVII April, 1940 Number 1
BULLETIN
GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
ATLANTA, GEORGIA
ANNOUNCEMENTS
1940 - 1941
Entered at the Post Office at Atlanta, Ga., as Second Class Matter under
Act of Congress of July 16, 1894. Acceptance for mailing at special rate
of postage provided in section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized.
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I
Volume XXXVII April, 1940 Number 1
GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
ATLANTA, GEORGIA
A SCHOOL OF AERONAUTICAL, ARCHITECTURAL, CERAMIC,
CHEl\HCAL, CIVIL, ELECTRICAL, GENERAL, MECHANICAL,
PUBLIC HEALTH AND TEXTILE ENGINEERING; ARCHI
TECTURE, CHEMISTRY, AND INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT
R E GISTER OF FACULTY AND STUDENTS, 1939-1940
ANNOUNCEMENTS, 1940-1941
THE UNIYERSITY SYSTEM OF GEORGIA
STEADMAN VI 'CENT SANFORD, Chancellor
BOARD OF REGENTS
GOVERNOR E. D. RIVERS, E.~ Officio, Atlanta, Georgia
MARroN SMITH, Chairman, Atlanta, Georgia, State-at-Largc
Concurrently with the Governor
JOHN G. KENNEDY, Savannah, Georgia, First District
Term Expires July 1, 1945
J. D. G ARDNER, Camilla, Georgia, Second District
Term Expires July 1, 1941
GEORGE C. WOODRUFF, Columbus, Georgia, Third District
Term Expires July 1, 1943
CASON C ALLAWAY, Vice-Chairman, LaGrange, Georgia, Fourth District
Term Expires July 1, 1941
CLARK HOWELL, JR., Atlanta, Georgia, Fifth District
Term Expires July 1, 1943
MILLER BELL, Milledgeville, Georgia, Sixth District
Term Expires July 1, 1941
R. D . HARVEY, Lind ale, Georgia, Seventh District
Term Expires July 1, 1941
JOHN W. BENNETT, Waycross, G eo rgia, Eigh th District
Term Expires July 1, 1943
SANDY BEAVERS, Gainesville, Georgia, inth District
Term Expires July 1, 1939
ABIT NIX, Athens, Georgia, Tenth District
Term Expires July 1, 1943
GEORGE HAINES, Augusta, Georgia, State-at-Largc
Term Expires July 1, 1940
J ACK LANCE, Young Harris, Georgia, State-at-Large
Term Expires July 1, 1942
DR. J. KNOX GHOLSTON, Comer, Georgia, State-at-Large
Term Expires July 1, 1940
L. W. ROBERT, JR. , Atlanta, Georgia, State-at-Large
Term Expires July 1, 1942
LEONARD ROBERT SIEBERT, Secretary, State Capitol, Atlanta, Ga.
W. WILSON NOYES, Treasurer, State Capitol, Atlanta, Ga.
[4J
STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY
Th e President is ex-officio a member of all standing committees.
AbseTIces-PERRY, SKILES, AND FULMER.
Admission-CALDWELL, SKILES, AND SAVANT.
Advisory-SKILES, BOGGS, PERRY, CALDWELL, CRENSHAW, FIELD,
SAVANT, McDANIEL, AND DUNKIN.
C071lme1lcement Program-CRENSHAW, PERRY, FITZGERALD, GROSS, AND
FAWELL.
CurriClllum-SKILES, PERRY, SAVANT, CALDWELL, DANIEL, AND KING.
El'ecutive-SKILES, CALDWELL, BOGGS, AND FIELD.
Experiment Station-KNIGHT, SAVANT, ALFRED W. SCOTT, C. A. JONES,
B UNGER, FRIEDMAN, AND VAUGHAN.
Graduate Courses-DAN IEL, KING, AND KNIGHT.
HOllors and Prizes-SKILES, CALDWELL, AND BOGGs.
Hospital-SKILES, ARMSTRONG, ALEXANDER, AND DR. FLOYD W . Mc
RAE, Medical Adviser.
Industrial Contact-VAUGHAN, FITZGERALD, J ONES, KING, AND QUIG-
LEY.
Library-PERRY, BOGGS, D ANIEL, HARTZELL, KNIGHT, AND VAUGHAN.
Public Safety and Sanitation-MASoN, FITZGERALD, SNOW, AND GAILEY.
Publications-D. M. SMITH, McDANIEL, AND HOWELL.
Publicity-Cox, AND FRIEDMAN.
Radio-FOLK, KNIGHT, JORGENSON, AND GERKS.
Schedules-SKILES, STAMY, AND SAVANT.
Standing-SKILES, BOGGS, AND SAVANT.
Student Supply-CALDWELL, KING, AND FITZGERALD.
[ 5 ]
OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION
MARION LUTHER BRITTAIN, AB., LL.D. 204 North Ave., N.W.
President
WILLIAM VERNON SKILES, B.S., A.M., Sc.D. 1057 Springdale Rd., N.E.
Dean
H UGH HARRIS CALDWELL, AB. Georgia Tech
Registrar and Secretary of the Faculty
JOHN LAURENCE DANIEL, M.A. 505 Church St., Decatur, Ga.
Dean of Graduate Courses
WILLIAM GILMER PERRY, AM., Litt.D. 192 E. Seventeenth St.
Deall 01 General Studies
DOMENICO PIETRO SAVANT, B.S. in E.E., M.S. in E.E., E.E.
737 Techwood Drive
Dean 01 Engineering
FLOYD FIELD, A.B., AM. 2865 Tupelo St., S.E.
D ean of Men
J AMES ERSKINE McDANIEL, B.A., LL.B. Cloudman Dormitory
Director 01 the Cooperative Department
WILLIAM HARRY VAUGHAN, B.S. in E.c., M.S. in Cer. E.
2569 Tilson Dr.
Director, State Engineering Experime71t Station
FELIX E. GROSS, Lt. Col. C.AC., U. S. Army 3774 Club Drive
Commandant, Atfilitary R.O.T.C.
R. M. FAWELL, Captain, U. S. Navy 1450 \,y. Peachtn:c St.
Commandant, Naval R.O.T.C.
JENNINGS LAMONT HENRY, M.D. 107 Terrace Drive, N.E.
School Physician
FRANK KING HOUSTON, C.P.A 717 Williams St., N.W.
Treasurer
ARTHUR HAMMOND ARMSTRONG, B.A., M.A 633 Techwood Dr., N.W.
Superintendent 01 Dormitories
ROGER SHEPPARD HOWELL, B.S. in M.E., M.Sc. 139 Fifth St., N .W.
Director 01 the Evening School 01 Applied Science
HOWARD WARD MASON, B.S. in M.E., M.S., M.E. Georgia Tech
Superintende71t of Buildings and Grounds
Roy STEVENSON KING, M.E., M.Sc., Sc.D. 1293 Oxford Road, N.E.
Superintendent 01 Shops and Power Plant
ESTELLE ALLEN, B.C.S. College Park, Ga.
A ssociate Registrar
HARRIET HENDERSON 826 Peachtree St., N.E.
Secretary to the President
MRS. JAMES HENLEY CROSLAND 22 Lakeview Ave., N.E.
Librarian
GEORGE CLAYTON GRIFFIN, B.S. in C.E. 18 Alden Avenue
Assistant to the Dean 01 Men
DAISY DANIEL, B.S. Techwood Drive
Director 01 Dining Hall
[6]
OTHER MEMBERS OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF
MARY MINTER, B.S. in Education and A.B. in Library Science
963 Ponce de Leon Ave., N .E.
Assistant Librarian
CAROLYNE ADAMS, A.B., AB. in L.S. 3749 Peachtree Road
Assistant Librarian
MARY ELI?AZAR BROWN 831 Techwood Drive, N.W.
Secretary to the Registrar
MRS. WILLIAM REID TAYLOR 887 Ponce de Leon Ave., N.E.
Secretary to the Dean
MRS. R. L. WILLIAMSON 719 Fowler Drive, N.W.
Office Secretary, Athletic Association
MRS. MARY ROBINSON 57 Sixteenth St.
Custodian 01 Instrum ents, Mechanical Laboratories
MRS. WALLACE SIMPSON 707 Cherry St., N.W.
Custodian 01 Instruments, Mechanical Labo/'atories
MARY WARING GREEN, B.A. 645 Sycamore St., Decatur, Ga.
Secretary to the Cooperative Department
MRS. LEILA DUNBAR WHITE 198 Ponce de Leon Avenue
Secretary, Mechanical Engineering Department
BERTHA PARMELEE NDc, AB. Georgian Terrace
Secretary to the Architectural Department
VIRGINIA HAMILTON PEED 1241 Clifton Road
Secretary, A. French Textile School
MRS. MARTHA HIERS PROCTOR 445 Ridgecrest Road, N.E.
Secretary, Departments 01 Chemistry and Chemical Engi71eering
MRS. J. E. BRANCH, AB. 379 Mayson Ave., N.E.
Secretary, Aeronautical Engineering Department
MRS. G. B. TURNER
Secretary, Night School, and B lIildings and Grounds
JAMES H. TIPTON, JR., B.S. in Com. Clark Howell, Sr., Dormitory
Assistant to the Treasurer, and Director 01 Radio Programs
GLADYS HAWES 826 Peachtree Street
Office Secretary, Y. M. C. A.
[7]
8 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
A. J. GARING 912 E. Ponce de Leon, Decatur, Ga.
Director of Music
MRS. D AVIS SEABORN 1781 Flagler Ave., N .E.
Assistant Librarian
MRS. W. C. THIBADEAU 1316 Emory Circle, N.E.
Custodian of Chemical Supplies
WI LLIAM FELDER GRIFFIN 286 Fifth St.
Chief Engineer of Power Plant
MRS. MARTHA TALLE ' T 712 Cherry St., .W.
P. B. X. Operator
ZELPHA STEPHENS Georgia Tech Hospital
Head Nurse
W. H. MCGEE Georgia Tech Y. M. C. A.
Y. M. C. A. Secretary
J AMES R. ANTHONY Route 3, Brown Mill Road
Clerk, Treasurer's Office
AMY DODD 1420 Peachtree St.
Stetlographer, Registrar's Office
MRS. W. L. GIRARDEAU 526 Griffin St., N.W.
Secretary, Personnel Office
LAURA FRANCES MCCORMICK 1474 Athens Ave., S.W.
Stenographer, Experiment Station
MRS. H. L. BOERLIN 63 Seventeenth St., N.E.
Stetlographer, Physics D epartmen t
FLORENCE ENGLAND 780 Cooper St., S.W.
Secretary, Industrial Education
RUBY JACOBS 867 Peachtree St.
Stenographer, Industrial Education
MRS. ALTA OSBORNE 794 Piedmont Ave., N.E.
Stenographer, Industrial Education
EVELYN WESTBROOK 373 Moreland Ave., N.E.
Stenographer, Industrial Education
MRS. G. RIVERS JOHNSTON 1100 Piedmont Ave.
Stenographer, Industrial Education
FACULTY
MARION LUTHER BRITTAIN, A.B., LL.D. 204 North Ave., N.W.
President
FRED W. AJAX, B.A. and M.A. Techwood Dormitory
Assistant Professor of English
WILLIAM ANDERSON ALEXANDER, B.S. in C.E. 743 Penn Ave., N.E.
Professor of Physical Culture
ROBERT LEWIS ALLEN, B.S. in M .E. 1446 Piedmont Ave., N.E.
Inttructor in Mechanical Engineering
DICE ROBBINS ANDERSON, JR., A.B., A.M. 1206 Peachtree St., N.W.
Assistant Professor of English
W. MONTGOMERY ANDERSON, B.S. in Arch. 618 C. & S. Bank Bldg.
Instructor in Architecture
ARTHUR HAMMOND ARMSTRONG, B.A., M.A. 633 Techwood Dr., N.W.
Associate Professor of Economics and Social Service
PERRY E. BABCOCK, B.S. in Education Savannah, Ga.
Associate Professor of Industrial Education
C. T. BAKER, JR. , B.S. 31 The Prado, N.E.
blstructor in English
DONALD HENRY BALLOU, PH.D. 154 Fourth St., N.W.
Assistant Professor of Mathematics
RICHARD K. BAUER 1410 Peachtree St.
Lecturer and Critic in D esign
MATHEW H. BILYK, M.E., M.S. 964 Piedmont Ave., N.E.
Instructor in Engineering Drawing arid Mechanics
RALPH PETERS BLACK, A.B., M.S., C.E. 858 Oakdale Road, N.E.
Associate Professor of Civil Engineering
GILBERT HILLHOUSE B OGGS, PH.D. 733 Williams St., N .W.
Professor and Director of the D epartmetlt of Chemistry and Chem
ical Engineering
FRANK BOGLE, B.S. in M.E. 660 Lexington Ave.
Instructor in Engineering Drawing and l11echanics
EARLE EDGAR BORTELL, B.S. in Eng., M.S. 750 Yorkshire Road, N.E.
Associate Professor of Physics
WILLIAM R. BOWDEN, JR. , A.B., M.A. 338 Techwood Dormitory
Instructor in English
[ 9 ]
10 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
JAMES EMORY BOYD, PH.D. 200 Montgomery Ferry Drive, Apt. 36
Associate Professor of Physics
JOHN Roy BRANDON 1760 Howell Mill Road
Instructor in Textile Engineering
MAURICE RAy BREWSTER, B.S., M.B.A 687 Cresthill Ave., N.E.
Associate Professor of Economics and Social Science
BRYAN L. BROWN, M.S. in M.E. 743 Williams St., N.W.
Assistant Professor of Engineering Drawing and Mechanics
HAL CHAPMAN BROWN, M.A 729 Brittain Drive, N.W.
Assistant Professor of English
J. CARLTON BROWN, B.S. in E.E., B.C.S. 70 Huntington Road
Instructor in Economics and Social Science
HAROLD ALAN BUNGER, PH.D. 333 Oakland St., Decatur, Ga.
Professor and Chief of the Division of Chemical Engineering
HAROLD BUSH-BROWN, AB., M.Arch. Old Ivy Road, Route No.6
Professor of Architecture and Head of the Department
PAUL KENNETH CALAWAY, PH.D. 143 Fifth St., N.W.
I nstructor in Chemistry
HUGH HARRIS CALDWELL, AB. 175 Westminster Drive
Registrar and Secretary of the Faculty
KENNETH S. CAMPBELL, B.S. in Chern. and B.S. in Textile Chern.
69 Maddox Drive
I nstructor in Textile ETlgineering
JOSEPH ABELARDO CAMPOAMOR, AB., M.A, LL.B.
1400 Boulevard, N .E.
Associate Professor of Modern Languages
ALBERT EDWARD CANNON, B.S., M.S. 203 Thirteenth St., N.E.
Instructor in Biology
WILLIAM LAWSON CARMICHAEL, B.S. and M.S. in T.E.
3459 Roxboro Road
Assistant Professor of Textile Engineering
CHARLES L. CARROLL, JR., B.S. and A.M. 310 Sixth St., N.E.
Instructor in Mathematics
ALLANDO A CASE 724 Cherry St.
Associate Superintendent of Shops
LLOYD WALTER CHAPIN, A.B., M.A. 167 Fourth St., N.W.
professor of Enilisl,
FACULTY
JOE D. CLARY, PH.D. 21 Third St., N.E., Apt. 3
Instructor in Chemistry
DAVID B. COMER, AB., A.M. 743 Techwood Drive, N.W.
Instructor in English
D. MITCHELL Cox, B.A, M.A. Ponce de Leon Apartments
dssistant Professor of English, Director of Publicity
CHARLES L. CRANE, JR., AB., M.A. 171 Fourth St., N.W.
Instructor in English
JOHN BASCOM CRENSHAW, AM., PH.D. 1830 Peachtree Road
Professor of Modern Languages and Head of the D epartment
JOHN LAURENCE DANIEL, M.A 505 Church St., Decatur, Ga.
Professor and Chief of the Division of Chemistry
NORRIS C. DEAN, B.S. 1005 Cherokee St., Marietta, Ga.
Instructor in Physical Culture, Freshman Football Coach
HUBERT E. DENNISON, B.A 2339 Cottage Ave., S.E.
Professor of Economics and Social Science
HENRY W. DERDEN, B.S.A. Covington, Ga.
Acting Assistant Professor of Industrial Education
ROBERT L. DODD 121 Eighth St., N.E.
Assistant Football Coach
11
HUGO BRUCE DULING, B.S., M.S. in E.E. 1359 N. Highland Ave., N.E.
Professor of Electrical Engineering
WILLIAM VAN DUNKIN, B.S. in M.E., M.E.
654 Cumberland Rd., N.E.
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and
Director, Industrial Management
HENRY LEITNER EDWARDS, PH.D. 105 Rumson Road, N.E.
Instructor in Chemistry
JESSB BOLAND EDWARDS, B.S., E. and M.E. 1179 Ridgewood Dr., N.E.
Professor of Physics
R. O. ELLIOTT, B.S.C., M.S.C. 1425 Oakview Dr., Decatur, Ga.
Instructor in Eco-nomics and Social Science
JAMES LAWTON ELLIS, B.S., and M.S. in E.E. Harrison Dormitory
Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering
ROBERT MILLER ERVIN, AB., M.A. 247 Cambridge St., Decatur, Ga.
Associate Professor of Modern Languages
WALTER P. EWALT, A.B., M.A 565 Cresthill Ave., N.E.
Jssistant Professor of Physics
12 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
REED M. FAWELL, Captain, U. S. Navy Biltmore Hotel
Commandant, Naval It. O. T. C.
FLOYD FIELD, A.B., A.M. 2865 Tupelo St., S.E.
Professor of Math ematics and D ean of M en
THOMAS WITT FITZGERALD, E.S.M.E., E.E., M.S.
3330 West Pace's Ferry Road
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Head of the D epartmCllt
EDWIN HENRY FOLK, JR., AB., M.A. 627 Techwood Drive, N.W.
Associate Professor of English
HORACE ORlON FOSTER, B.S. in E.E. 2045 Chelsea Circle, N.E.
Instructor in Wood Shop
H AROLD B. FRIEDMAN, PH.D. 884 Barnett St., N.E.
Associate Professor of Chemistry
HERMAN KYLE FULMER, B.S., M.A 1439 Cameron Court, N.E.
Associate Professor of Mathematics
ALBERT GAlL, DIPL.-ING. 2515 Forest Way
Assistant Professor of Aeronautical Engineering
JAMES HBRBERT GAILEY, B.S., M.S. in Arch. Lake Forrest Drive
Professor of Architecture
IRVIN H. GERKS, B.S. in E.E., M.S. in E.E. 199 Douglas St., S.E.
4ssistant Professor of Electrical Engineering
COUNT DILLON GIBSON, PH.B., M.S., M.S. in C.E., C.E.
64 Montclair Drive
Professor of Geology and Head of the D epartment
LoUIS J. GREEN, PH.D. 794 Williams St.
Instructor in Mathematics
*JOHN A GRIFFIN, A.B., M.A 1224 Albemarle Ave., N.E.
Instructor in English, Director of Radio Programs
FELIX E. GROSS, Lt. Col. C.AC., U. S. Army 3774 Club Drive
Professor of Military Science and Tactics
JAMES HENRY GROVES, B.S. in T.E. 821 Frederica St., N.E.
Assistant Professor of Industrial Education
HOMER V. GRUBB, B.S. in Chern. Eng. 964 Parkway Dr., N.E., Apt. 9
Instructor in Chemical Engineering
'Leave 1939-40.
FACULTY
OTTIS MILES H ARRELSON, B.S. in E.E., M.S. in M.E.
1074 Rock Spring Road
A ssociate Professor of M echallical Engineering
JULIAN H. HARRIS, B.S. in Arch. 177 Fifth St., N.W.
Instructor in Architecture and Ceramics
tEARNEST ROBERT HARRISON, B.S. 1084 Blue Ridge Ave.
hlstructor in Mechanical El1gineering
KARL DREW HARTZELL, PH.D. 163 Third St., N.W.
Associate Professor of Economics and Social Science
13
PAUL MALCOLM HEFFERNAN, B.S., M.S., M .Arch. 177 Fifth St., N.W.
Associate Professor of Architecture
RALPH A HEFNER, PH.D. 724 Techwood Drive, N .W.
Professor of Mathematics
JOHN HENRY HENIKA. 894 Oak St., S.W.
Foreman of Wood Shop
*"'ARTHUR VAN HENRY, PH.D. 826 Peachtree St., N .E.
Professor of Ceramic Engineering and Head of the Department
NEWTON SAMUEL HEROD, PH.D. Georgia Tech
Professor of Physics
FRANCIS MARION HILL, B.S. in Gen. Eng.
1076 Los Angeles Ave., N.E.
Assistant Professor of Engineering D rawing and Mechanics
RALPH LENTON HILL, B.S. in T.E. 127 Lindbergh Drive, N.E.
Associate Professor of Textile Engineering
W. A. HINTON, B.S. in M.E., M.S. in M.E. 1971 Tuxedo Ave., N.E.
Assistant Professor of M ech011icai Engineering
ARCHIBALD DINSMORE HOLLAND, B.S. in Eng., M .S. in M.E.
866 Greenwood Ave., N.E.
Associate Professor of M eehanical E~lgineering
CHANDLER H. HOLTON, A.B., A.M. Techwood Dormitory
Instructor in Mathematics
MARTIAL ALFRED HONNELL, B.S. in E.E. 1586 W. Peachtree, Apt.
Instructor in Electrical Engineering
CLARKE W. HOOK, A.B., M.A. 633 Amsterdam Ave., N.E.
Instructor in M athe11laties
tReslgned.
??Deceased.
14 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
SAMUEL H. HOPPER, PH.D. 55 Montclair Drive, N.E.
Assistant Professor of Biology and Public Health
ROCER SHEPPARD HOWELL, B.S. in M.E., M.Sc. 139 Fifth St., N .W.
Professor of Mechanical Engineering
JOSEPH HERMAN HOWEY, PH.D. 171 Fourth St., N.W.
Professor of Physics and Head of the Department
W. P. HUDSON, AB., AM. 159 Fourth St., N.W.
Instructor in English
R. KENNETH JACOBS, B.S. in C.E., B.S. in Education, M.S.
313 Fourth Street, N.W.
Instructor in Engineering Drawing and Mechanics
WILLIAM BEN JOHNS, JR., B.S. in Gen. Eng., M.S. in AE.
585 Martina Drive
Professor and Head of the Department of Engineering Drawing and
Mechanics
LAWRENCE V. JOHNSON, B.S. and M.S. in Physics
866 Virginia Circle, N.E.
Assistant Professor of Physics
CHARLES ALFRED JONES, B.S. in T.E. Vinings, Ga.
Professor of Te):tile Engiluering and Head of the Department
MATT L. JORGENSEN, AB., M.Arch. 1161 Peachtree St., N.E.
Assistant Professor of Architecture
Roy STEVENSON KING, M.E., l\II.Sc., Sc.D. 1293 Oxford Road, N .E.
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Head of the Department
MONTGOMERY KNIGHT, B.S. in E.E. 2525 Brookwood Drive, N .E.
Professor of Aeronautical Engineering and Head of the Department
RALPH ELTON LEWIS, B.S. in M.E., M.S. in M.E.
310 Ponce de Leon Ave., N. E.
Instructor in Engineering Drawing and Mechanics
ROBERT H. LINTON, B.A, M.A. 189 Fourth St., N.W.
Instructor in English
EMORY GALEN LOWER, A.B., l\1.D. 619 Myrtle St.
Assistant Professor of Biology
WILLIAM FRANKLIN LoZIER, AB., LL.B. 1294 Piedmont Ave., N.E.
Assistant Professor of Economics and Social Science
JAMES HERTY LUCAS, B.S. in M.E., B.S. in C.E., M.S. in C.E.
1117 Lanier Boulevard, N.E.
Associate Professor of Highway Engineering
FACULTY
EDWARD BENBOW MARTINDALE 86 Fifth St., N.W.
Foreman of Machine Shop
HOWARD ,,yARD MASON, B.S. in M.E., M.S., M.E.
Knowles Dormitory
Professor of Mechanical Engineering in charge of Mechanical
Laboratories
JESSE W. MASON, PH.D. 127 Superior Ave., Decatur, Ga.
Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering
J. R. McARTHUR, B.S. 587 Techwood Drive, Apt. 302
Assistant Coach, Football
15
J. WELDON MCCARTY, B.S. in Textiles Georgia Tech Y. M. C. A
Instructor in Textile Engineering
JAMES ERSKINE MCDANIEL, M.A, LL.B. Cloudman Dormitory
Professor and Director of the Co-operative Department
LANE MITCHELL, B.S. and M.S. in Cer.E. 1150 St. Charles Place, N.E.
Associate Professor of Ceramic Engineering
RICHARD THOMAS MOREN US, B.Arch. North Ivy Road, Route 6
Associate Professor of Architecture
RoY MUNDORFF, B.S. 734 Techwood Drive
Assistant Professor of Mathematics
PHIL BLASIER NARMORE, B.S. in Eng., M.S., Ph.D. 55 Park Circle
Professor of Engineering Drawing and Mechanics
*HOMER HARLAN NORMAN 436 Fourth St., N.W.
Instr?uctor in Wood Shop
WILLIAM GILMER PERRY, A.M., Litt.D. 192 E. Seventeenth St.
Professor of English and Head of the Department
C. RUSSELL PHELPS, B.S., AM. 171 Fourth St., N.W.
Instructor in Mathematics
DAVID ERNEST PHILPOT 1131 Woodland Ave., S.E.
Instructor in Textile Engineering
WILLIAM J. PROCTOR, A.B., M.A. and LL.B. 190 North Ave., N.W.
Assistant Professor of Economics and Social Science
EDWARD THERON PROSSER, B.A., M.A. 794 Williams St., N.W.
Assistant Professor of Physics
THOMAS H. QUIGLEY, A.B., B.S. 259 Fifth St., N .W.
Professor of Industrial Education and Head of the D epartment
? Deceased.
16 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
G LENN W . RAINEY, A.B., M.A. 165 Avery Drive, N.E.
A ssistant Professor of English
W ALTER REYNOLDS, JR., B.S. in M.E., M.Sc. 22 Glenwood Drive
A ssistant Professor of Math ematics
WILLIAM BANKS RICHARDSON, B.S. ill Chern. Eng., M.S. Chern.
2286 Stephen Long Drive, N.E.
A ssistant Professor of Chemistry
NELSON ROBINSON, PH.D. 63 LaFayette Drive
Instructor in Mathematics
GERALD A. ROSSELOT, PH.D. 166 Fifth St., N.W.
Associate Professor of Physics
J. W. SANDERS, JR., M.S. 723 Williams, N .W.
I,zstructor in Chemistry
DOMENICO PIETRO SAVANT, B.S. in E.E., M .S. in E.E., E.E.
737 Techwood Drive
Professor of Electrical Engineering
A. M. SCHWARTZ, A.E. 1140 Piedmont Ave., N.E., Apt. 11
Assistant Professor of A eronautical Engineering
W ALTON H. SEARS, JR. , A.B. , M.A. 28 Seventh St., N.E., Apt. 11
Instructor in Math ematics
THOMAS GRAYSON SEIDELL, B.S. in E.E., E.E.
25 Exeter Road, Avondale Estates
Professor of Electrical Engineering
*W. E. SEWELL, PH.D. Techwood Dormitory
Assistant Professor of Mathematics
MAURICE SIEGLER, Graduate of Penn. Academy of Fine Arts,
B.S. in Arch. 670 Juniper St., N.E.
Assistant Professor of Architecture
WILLIAM VERNON SKILES, B.S., A.M., Sc.D.
1057 Springdale Rd., N. E.
Dean and Professor of Mathematics
DAVID M. SMITH, PH.D. 192 E. Seventeenth St.
Professor of Mathematics and Head of the Department
JACK MORGAN SMITH, B.S., M .S., c.E. 1434 Morningside Drive
Professor of Civil Engineering
'Leave of absence.
FACULTY
FRANKLIN C. SNOW, B.S., c.E., Sc.D. 1198 North Ave., N.E.
Professor of Civil Engineering and Highway Engineering and
Head of th e D epartments
WILLIAM MONROE SPICER, PH.D. 1230 Virginia Ave.
Instru ctor in Chemistry
ASHFORD WORTHI NGTON STALNAKER, E.E. 593 Hightower Ro ad
Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering
DAVID LESLIE STAMY, A.B., A.M. 930 Myrtle St., N.E.
A ssociate Profess or of Mathematics
AUSTIN LA ROY STARRETT, A.B. and A.M. 153 Roanoke Ave., N.E.
I 'lstructor in Mathema tics
FREDERICK H ENRY STEEN, PH.D. 532 Peeples Street, S.W.
Assistant Professor of Mathematics
RAY L. SWEIGERT, B.S. in M.E., M.A., PH.D.
1755 Inverness Ave., N.E.
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director of Freshman.
Engineering
17
CHARLES CROMBIE T AYLOR, B.S., 1\11. Arch. 149 Peachtree Circle, N.E.
Instru ctor in Architecture
J.~lIJES L. TAYLOR, A.B., M .S. 618 Cresthill Ave., N.E.
1 nstructor in Chemistry
WILLIAM SIMPSON TAYLOR, PH.D. 788 Spring St., N.W.
Professor of Chemistry
MACK T HARPE, B.S. Biltmore Apartments
Assistant Coach, Football
KENNETH M ATHESON THRASH, B.S. in C.E., M.S. In C.E.
24 E. Lake Drive, N.E.
Assistant Prof essor of Civil Engin eering
JOHN TOPHAM 224 Dodd Ave., S.W.
Instructor in Machine Shop
RICHARD ADELBERT TROTTER, B.S. in M .E., M.S. il'l M .E.
28 Thirteenth St., N.E.
Associate Professor of M echanical Engineering
WILLIAM VAN HOUTEN 170 Fifth St. , N.W.
Foreman of Foundry
WILLIAM HARRY VAUGHAN, B.S. in Eng. Chern., M.S. in Cer. Eng.
2569 Tilson Drive
Professor and Head of Ceramic Engineering
18 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
JOSEPH PAUL VIDOSIC, M.E., M.S. 820 Techwood Drive, N.W.
I nstructor of Engineering Draw ing and M echanics
HOWARD MEFFERT W ADDLE, PH.D. 741 William St., N.W.
Assistant Professor of Ch emistry
ANDREW J. WALKER, PH.D. 765 San Antonio Drive
Associate Professor of English
NOAH WARREN, B.S. in Commerce, M.A., c.P.A.
1742 Johnson Road, N.E.
Associate Professor of Economics and Social Scieuce
DONALD L. WEBB, PH.D. 649 Norfleet Rd., N.W.
Assistant Professor of Mathematics
HOMER S. WEBER, RS. in M.E., M.S. 66 Eleventh St., N.E.
Associate Professor of Engineering Drawing and M echauics
PAUL WEBER, A.B., M.S., PH.D. 729 Techwood Drive
Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering
CORNELIUS AUGUSTUS WELLS, B.S., M.S., A.M. 365 Sixth St., N.W.
Assistant Professor of Chemistry
WILLIAM RUPPERT W EEMS, RS. in A.E., M.S.
1031 Virginia Ave., N.E.
A ssistant Professor of A eronautical Engineering
FRED R WENN, RC.S., M.A. 114 Fifth St., N.W.
Associate Professor of Economics and Social Science
WYATT CARR WHITLEY, PH.D. 21 Third St., N.E., Apt. 4
Assistant Professor of Chemistry
DONALD BRooKS WILCOX, RS., M.S. in M.E. 344 Fourth St., N.E.
Instructor in Mechanical Engineering
BENJAMIN BLACKISTON WROTH, PH.D. 190 Fifth St., N.W.
Professor of Chemistry
HUGl-I ALLEN WYCKOFF, RS., M.S. 3201 W. Shadow Lawn
Professor of Biology and Head of the Department
STUART ESTES WHITCOMB, PH.D. 166 Fifth St., N.W.
I nstructor in Physics
L. DAVID WYLY, M.S. 680 Juniper St., N.E.
I nstructor in Physics
CHARLES F. WYSONG, RS. 1294 Piedmont Ave.
Instructor in Ceramic Engineering
RESEARCH FELLOWS
IRVIN BARNETT-................................................................. E xperiment Station
M. W. BEARDSLEY .................................................. .... . ..... E.t:periment S tatiou
E. I. BRICKER .................................................................... E xperiment Sta tion
R. H. FAGAN .. ............................. .. ..................................... Experiment Sta tion
O. C. F A LKOVICH .................................. .............. .. ............ Experiment Statio n
CHARLES P. GOODYEAR ...... ............. ...... .... .............. .... ..... E xperim ent Station
J. B. HOSMER ... ............ ..... . .................. .. ........ ................... Experiment Station
GRADUATE ASSISTANTS
L. R. AHERN .. .... ............................ ............... ............... Clzemical E ngineerillg
ALFRED BARNARD ................... .. .... . ........ ... . ....... _ ......... ......... Experiment Station
C. L. BELCHER, JR ...... ......................................................................... G eology
L. L. BLANTON .................................................................................. Clzemistry
E. P. BOUNOUS ..................................................... .A eronautical Engineering
W. J. BRENNAN ................................................................................ Clzemistry
L. C. BROOKS ........................................................................... ........... Ch emistry
J. A. C ARRAN ...... .. ........................................... .... ...... _ ...... Experim ent Station
J. C. CLARK .. ........... .......... . . .. .. .... .... .... ......... .... ................ E xperiment Stati01l
T. J. DANIELS .. .... ........................ ........... .... .... .... _ ........ Chemical Engiueeri1lg
D. W. DuTToN .. ......... .............. ............ ................ ........... E xperiment Station
A. K. FORNEY .. ................ ........ ..................... .... ...... . . ... .... .. Experiment Station
C. W. GAyLER .................................................................................. Chemistry
L. A. GEYER ............................................................ A eronautical Ellgin eering
H. H. HERRING ....................................................................... ........... Chemistry
JERRY HOFFER ....................................................... .A erona ll tical Engineering
D. M. LESLIE ................ . .. .... .. ......... .. .............. .. .......... Electrical Engineering
T. H. LIGHTNER ........................................... ..................................... Chemistry
R. E. MERRYMAN ... ....... .......................... ...... .... .......... Chemical Engineering
1. E. PARKS .................................................................... .................. Chemistry
J. T. REDD .......................................................... ...................................... Physics
V. G. REDMOND ...................................................... A eronautical Engineering
F. M. ROBERTS .................................................................................. Chemistry
WATER5 R055 ...................................................................................... Chemistry
W. E. SI5CO ........................................................................................ Chemistry
J. D. SMITH ...................................................................................... Chemistry
NATHAN SUGARMAN .............................. . . . . ...................... Experime1lt Station r
STUDENT ASSISTANTS
F. M. MACK ...................................................................................... Chemistry
J. D. HUTCHESON .......... .... .... . ....... . . ................... ..... Mechanical Engineering
J. W. CHENEy ................. . ........ ... . . ............................. Electrical Engineering
[ 19]
DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS
Reserve Officers' Training Corps
FELIX E. GROSS, Lt. Col., C.A.C.
Commandant and Professor of Military Science and Tactics
HEADQUARTERS STAFF
TECHNICAL SERGEANT H. L. ELLIS (D.E.M.L.)
Property and Finallce
SERGEANT R. M. SIMMS (D.E.M.L.)
INFANTRY
LT. COL. DONALD HENLEY, Inf.
Unit Commander
ASSISTANTS
MAJOR EDMUND J. LILLY, JR., Inf.
STAFF SERGEANT D. S. PARCHMAN (D.E.M.L.)
COAST ARTILLERY CORPS
MAJOR WM. D. EVANS, e.A.C.
Unit Commander
ASSISTANTS
MAJOR RILEY E. MCGARRAUGH, C.AC.
CAPTAIN HOWARD H . NEWMAN, e.AC.
SERGEANT E. G. PATRICK (D.E.M.L.)
SIGNAL CORPS
LT. COL. JAMES B. HASKELL, S.C.
Unit Commander
ASSISTANTS
CAPTAIN GEORGE L. RICHON, S.C.
SERGEANT DICK W EIR (D.E.M.L.)
ORDNANCE
CAPTAIN EDWARD C. FRANKLIN, O.D.
Unit Commander
SERGEANT CHARLES H. WEESE (D.E.M.L.)
[20 ]
DEPARTMENT OF NAVAL SCIENCE AND TACTICS
Reserve Officers' Training Corps
CAPTAIN REED M. FAWELL, U. S. Navy
Commandant and Professor of Naval Science and Tactics
STAFF
COMMANDER HUBERT E. PADDOCK, U. S. Navy
LIEUTENANT COMMANDER PAUL R. COLONEY, U. S. Navy
LIEUTENANT COMMANDER WYATT CRAIG, U. S. Navy
LIEUTENANT WILTON S. HEALD, U. S. Navy
LIFUTENANT GEORGE W. ASHFORD, U. S. Navy
FRANK M. CRISWELL, C.G.M., U.S.N.R.
PAUL B. FICKES, e.S.M., U.S.N.R.
EUGENE AN HEIR, e.Y., U.S.N .R.
THOMAS A HOWARD, C.S.K., U.S.N.R.
[21 ]
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GENERAL INFORMATION
HISTORICAL SKETCH
On N ovember 24, 1882, the General Assembly passed a resolution,
introduced by Honorable N. E. Harris, to consider the establishment
of a technical school in Georgia. A commission of ten was appointed to
visit the leading engineering institutions of the country, and in 1885,
the law was passed appropriating $65,000 for the institution. In J anu
ary, 1886, the first commission was appointed, consisting of Honorable
N. E. Harris, S. M. Inman, O. S. Porter, E. R. Hodgson and Columbus
Heard. Five places, Athens, Atlanta, Macon, Milledgeville and P en
field, offered bids for the new school, and on October 20, 1886, Atlanta
was chosen as the location. Professor M. P. Higgins of the Worcester
Institute was secured to supervise the new work, and on O ctober 7
1888, the installation ceremonies were held at the Opera House i~
Atlanta.
CAMPUS
Five acres were purchased from the Peters Land Company at the
outset, and later, Mr. Richard Peters donated four additional acres.
The campus has been increased by purchase and gifts from time to
time until it now comprises 44 acres. The original shop buildings de
stroyed by fire were replaced in 1891, and at present there are on the
campus the following:
Academic Building ........................................ 1888
Old Shop Building .................. ...................... 1892
Knowles Dormitory ...................................... 1898
Textile Building ............................................ 1898
Swann Building ............................................ 1900
Electrical Building ........................................ 1901
President's House ........................................ 1903
The Lyman Hall Laboratory ................... .1906
Carnegie Building ........................................ 1906
Whitehead Memorial HospitaL ............... 191O
Y. M. C. A. Building ................................. .1911
Power Plant .................................................. 1914
Military Building .......................................... 1917
Automobile Building .................................... 1918
Mechanical Building .................................... 1920
Physics Building ............................................ 1923
Ceramics Building ........................................ 1924
Julius Brown Memorial HaIL ................. 1925
Grant Field Stadium ................................... .1925
Emerson Addition to Chemistry B1dg .... .1925
N. E. Harris Dormitory ........................... .1926
[22 ]
Completed
$ 80,000
40,000
55,000
60,000
60,000
50,000
15,000
50,000
30,000
30,000
80,000
80,000
10,000
5,000
190,000
225,000
35,000
85,000
300,000
100,000
75,000
GENERAL INFORMATION 23
---------------------------------------------------------
Army Headquarters Building_ ................... 1927
Dining Hall .................................................. l928
Rose Bowl Building ...................................... 1929
Guggenheim Building .................................. 1930
Cloudman Dormitory .................................. 1931
Naval Armory .............................................. 1934
*Techwood, Inc., Dormitory ........................ 1935
W .P.A. Addition to Chemistry Bldg ........ .1936
Auditorium-Gymnasium (in part) ............ 1937
Civil Engineering Building .......................... 1938
Engineering Drawing Building ................. .1938
Clark Howell Dormitory ............................ 1939
George W. Harrison, J r., Dormitory .... 1939
Engineering Experiment Station ................ 1939
GIFTS
30,000
150,000
75,000
100,000
75,000
130,000
250,000
40,000
93,000
150,000
130,000
106,000
100,000
100,000
Several of these in part and much of the machinery and apparatus
have been given by generous friends. Some of these are the Knowles
and Swann Dormitories, the A. French T extile Building, Electrical
Building, Lyman Hall Laboratory of Chemistry, Carnegie Library,
Y. M. C. A. Building, Grant Field, and Stadium, The Joseph Brown
Whitehead Memorial Hospital, and the Physics Building, towards
which the Carnegie Corporation made an appropriation of $1 50,000;
the remainder of the $200,000 expended upon this structure was received
from the Alumni and friends of the school, through subscriptions to the
Greater Tech Campaign Fund of $1,585,080.11. By will, Honorable
Julius L. Brown left two-thirds of his estate to the school, and this it
is believed will be when realized in full approximately $200,000. Mrs.
Josephine Cloudman left the residue of her estate to the endowment
fund in amount believed to be approximately $70,000. In 1930, the
Guggenheim Board gave $300,000 for the establishment of a Depart
ment of Aeronautical Engineering at Georgia Tech. In addition, gen
erous friends have contributed loan funds to help needy students, as
will be shown under the head of Scholarships and Prizes. George W .
Harrison, Jr., left by will $16,000 which is invested in the purchase of
two lots near the campus and in improvement of the Ceramic Building.
PRESIDENTS AND TRUSTEES
Dr. 1. S. Hopkins was the first President of the Georgia School of
Technology. While at the head of Emory College in 1886, there was
built under his direction the first shop for technical training of college
?Owned by tbe Federal agency, Tecbwood, Inc., for use of tbe Georila Scbool of
Technology.
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24 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
men in this State. Naturally, he was the choice of the Trustees for
leadership in the new work. He served until his health failed in 1896.
Dr. Lyman H all, Professor of Mathematics at the School, a grad
uate of West Point, was the second president. The continuous effort to
meet the conditions required by the General Assembly in providing funds
for the new buildings undermined his health, and he died in 1905.
To succeed him, the Trustees elected Dr. K. G. Matheson, who Was
then Professor of English at Georgia Tech. Dr. Matheson continued
as president until April 1, 1922, when he resigned to become president
of Drexel Institute in Philadelphia.
Mr. N. P. Pratt, Chairman of the Executive Committee of the
Board of Trustees, served as Administration Executive Ad Interim for
four months, until the Board elected Dr. M. L. Brittain as President,
effective August 1, 1922.
Governor N. E. Harris served as chairman of the Board of Trus
tees until his de ath, September 21, 1929. Other trustees besides the
four already mentioned on the first commission who have rendered
service are: D. N. Speer, W. B. Miles, George Winship, George W.
Parrott Walter M. Kelley, . P. Pratt, Hal G. Nowell, E. R. Hodg
son, Sr.: and J r., George G. Crawford, L. W. Robert, Jr., Floyd Fur
low, E. R. Black, Harrison ]. Baldwin, J. S. Akers, John W. Grant,
George H. Carswell, W. H. Glenn, John H. Porter, Frank Freeman,
G. M. Stout, Harrison Hightower and John S. Cohen. Besides these
regular members, there were three ex-officio trustees appointed each by
the Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia,
and in addition the Governor and State Superintendent of Schools served
ex-officio. On J anuary 1, 1932, all State boards of Georgia State Col
leges were abolished and the following now compose the State Board of
Regents for the entire University System:
John G. Kennedy, J. D. Gardner, Miller S. Bell, R. D. Harvey,
George C. Woodruff, Cason Callaway, Clark Howell, Jr., John W .
Bennett, Sandy Beavers, Abit Nix, Marion Smith, George Haines, Jack
Lance, Dr. J. Knox Gholston, L. W. Robert, Jr., and Governor E. D.
Rivers.
COURSES AND DEGREES
During the first eight years of its history the Georgia School of
Technology offered one course of study leading to the degree of Bach
elor of Science in Mechanical Engineering. From time to time other
courses have been added, and at present the following degrees are
granted, the figures giving the year when each course was established:
Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering ... .................... .1888
Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering ......... .................. .1896
Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering ................................... .1896
G EN ERAL INFORMATION 25
Bachelor of Science in Textile Engineering ............................... .1899
Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering .. ........ .......... _ ...... .1901
Bachelor of Science in Chemistry ................... ....... ...... _ ..... _ ........ .1 906
Bachelor of Science in Architecture ................. _ ..... ............... ___ ... 1908
Bachelor of Science in Engineering Courses, Co-operative
Plan .............................................................................. _ ............. 1912
Master of Science .................................................. .............. ............ 1922
Bachelor of Science .......................................................................... 1923
Bachelor of Science in Ceramic Engineering ......................... _ ... .1924
Bachelor of Science in Aeronautical Enginee ring ...... ....... _ .... _ ... 1930
Bachelor of Science (General Engineering) ........... -........ -- ....... .1 934
Bachelor of Archi tecture ................................................................ 1934
Bachelor of Science (Industrial M anagement ) .. _ ...... _ ........ _ ...... .1934
Bachelor of Science in Public Health Engineering ..... _ .... _ ........ .1939
GENERAL REGULATIONS
The regular session officially opens on Wednesday following the
second Friday in September. For further details see calendar on page 2.
All students are urged to be present at the beginning of the term,
since those who enter classes late are seriously handicapped. Freshmen,
except those in the co-operative course, are required to report for regis
tration at 9 a. m. or 2 p. m. on Tuesday, September 17, 1940.
All freshmen are required to take placement tests in English, Mathe
matics Science, and Social Science. This work begins at 8 a. m. on
Wedn~sday, September 18, 1940, and continues through the week includ
ing besides the placement tests, physical exarnin~tion, payment of fees,
use of Library, etc. Any transfer student who IS rated as a freshman
(i.e., 50% or more of his schedule in the freshman class) is required to
take the above tests.
ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS
An applicant may be admitted to the freshman class by certificate
under the following conditions:
(1) He must have graduated from an accredited school with a rec
ord high enough to indicate that he is prepared for, college work. (2)
He must meet the requirements in units as shown below. (3) He must
be at least sixteen years ?of age.
The institution reserves the right to reject or to require entrance
examinations of any applicant whose record indicates that he is not
adequately prepared to do college work. Non-residents of Georgia, who
rank in the lower third of their classes, are not eligible to take the
examinations. Entrance examinations may also be required of those who
have finished high school more than one year prior to entering college.
See "Admission by Examination."
Those who have attended a college or other educational institution
since graduation from preparatory or high school must present ~ record
of such attendance with the credits received and an honorable discharge.
See "Admission with Advanced Standing."
SPECIFIED OR REQUIRED UNITS
(I t is very important that all
A qualitative condition, if allowed,
English ............................................ 3
Algebra .......................................... 2
Plane Geometry* ........................ 1
of these be presented on entrance.
must be mad?<. up within one year.)
History .......................................... 1
t Physics ....... _ ................................... 1
Optional Units, at least ................ 7
.Solld Geometry also Is strongly recommended.
tAn .appllcant for Architectural. Industrial Management, or regular Tenlle Course
may substitute another science for Physics.
[26 ]
GENERAL REGULATIONS 27
Applicants for Architecture should offer two units in French.
Prospective students in Chemistry or Chemical Engineering should
take either French or German in High School.
OPTIONAL UNITS
English ........ ..................... .
Sol. Geometry .............. ..
Trigonometry ................. .
Adv. Arithmetic .. ........... .
Hist. and Civics ............. .!
Economics ........................ 0
Latin or Greek ............... .!
Ger., French or Span, ...... 1
Bible ........... .. .......... ........... 0
o
o
o
to 3
to 1
to 4
to 3
to 1
Biology ....... .............. ......... ;~ to
Chemistry........... ............. 0 to
Gen. Science .................... 0 to
Physiography .................... .~ to
Physiology ........................ :/~ to
{
D~awing .................... ;~ to 2
Commerce .................. 1' to 3
Shop Work ................ }~ to 2
. Agriculture ........... ..... 1 to 2
Military ......... ............. J~ to 1
Ordinarily not more than three units will be allowed from the group
including Drawing, Commerce, Agriculture, Military and Shop Work.
Special attention is called to the required units in Algebra, as a great
many students are conditioned in this subject. To receive entrance
credit for the second year in algebra the course must have included
Logarithms, Ratio, Proportion, Variatioll, Binomial Th eorem and Pro
gressions.
We wish to urge that students have a good working knowledge of
all the Mathematics required for entrance. It frequently happens that
members of the Freshman Class must be turned back to review their
foundation work in Algebra. During the last half year of the high
school course the prospective engineering freshman should be given a
thorough review of simplifications, exponents, radicals and equations.
Such a review will be of great value and may prevent discouragement
and failure in college work.
ADMISSION BY EXAMINATION
An applicant with fifteen or more units, who is not eligible for
admission by certificate but whose general record is approved, may enter
by passing qualifying examinations. These examinations are: English,
Jdvanced Algebra, Plane Geometry and Physics. Students who expect
to take Architecture, Textile Engineering or Industrial Management
may substitute some other science for Physics.
Two general entrance examinations will be held: One at the time of
the final examinations of the spring term, and the other at the opening
of the fall term. Applicants for admission to the Freshman Class will
be admitted to either or both of these examinations, and by special ar
rangements with the principal may stand entrance examinations at their
local schools about June 1st. For full particulars address the Registrar,
Georgia School of Technology.
28 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
ADMISSION WITH Aov ANCED STANDING
Applicants who have made satisfactory records in scholarships and
in conduct in other accredited colleges may enter with advanced stand
ing provided the subjects satisfactorily passed cover in time and content
certain of the required subjects in the courses which they expect to
enter at Georgia School of Technology. Such students, especially those
from colleges of arts and sciences, are notified that in transferring to a
technical course they will lose some of their credit hours. No definite
statement of advanced standing can be given until an official transcript
is received from the Registrar of the institution previously attended.
A catalog of the institution must be sent with the transcript. Ordinarily
an applicant who has less than a "C" average is not accepted. A student
who has been dropped from another college for failure in his studies or
for misconduct cannot be admitted. First year transfer students who
are rated here as freshmen may be required to live for one year in one
of the college dormitories.
Transfers from other colleges with sixty or more semester hours of
credit will not be required to take the basic course in R.O.T.C. but for
graduation will be required to present six credit hours to cover the two
year basic course in lVlilitary.
TUITION AND FEES
The rates for f ees, board and room rent are subj ect to change at
the e71d of any semester. BEGINNING WITH THE 1940-41 SESSION THE
TUITION WILL BE $115.00 ANNUALLY FOR GEORGIA STUDENTS AND
$230.00 ANNUALLY FOR THOSE RESIDING OUTSIDE THE STATE.
All checks for f ees, board, or other deposits should be made payable
to the G eorgia School of Technology and mailed to F. K. Houston,
Treasurer.
By a law of the State, the fees for each term must be paid in ad
vance before the day on which the term opens. To qualify for Georgia
tuitioll the student's parents must be legal and actual residents of Geor
gia. The fees for 1940-41 are:
For stude1lts whose parents are legal residents of Georgia:
1st T erm 2nd Term
Tuition ............................................. ....... ................ .. $57.50 $57.50
Student Activities Fee ............................................ 11.00 11.00
**Deposit for Laboratories, etc ............................. 10.00
Medical Fee.............................................................. 3.00
Total charges ............................................ $81.50 $68.50*
'To this amount must ba added laboratory charges incurred during the 1st t erm.
The normal laboratory fee for freshmen is $3.00.
"For students majoring in Chemistry or Chemical Engineering. whose rating is
sophomore or higher. the deposit for laboratories. etc .? is $20.00.
'.
(, \
GENERAL REGULATIONS
For students whose parents are not legal r esidents of
lstTerm
Tuition ................................................... ................. $1 15.00
Student Activities Fee.......................................... 11.00
*Deposit for Laboratories, etc.............. ............... 10.00
Medical Fee .......................................................... 3.00
Total charges .......................................... $139.00
29
Georgia:
2nd Term
$115.00
11.00
$126.00*
D eposit for Laboratories, etc. This is not a fee but a deposit, re
quired of every student upon admission, and must be kept intact as long
as he is in school. All laboratory or other similar charges are made
against the student and deducted from this deposit. Some laboratory
courses carry special fees, the amounts of which are given in the de
scription of the courses. At the beginning of each term the student pays
the amount of these charges for the preceding term, and keeps the credit
balance at $10.
SUMMARY OF EXPENSES
Below is an estimate of the necessary expenses for the first half year
of a freshman whose parents are legal residen ts of G eorgia and who is
taking the regular course. Those whose parents are not legal residents
of Georgia must add $57.50 to the figures given. Students entering the
co-operative courses should consult the bulletin issued by that depart
ment.
Low
Tuition and Fees ........................................... ......... $ 81.50
Board, Room and Laundry .................................. 135.00
U niform .................................................................. 27.50
Books and Equipment............................ .............. 25.00
Total for First Term ......... ................... $269.00
High
$ 81.50
175.00
27.50
40.00
$324.00
Expenses for second term should average $40.00 less than the above
figu res.
PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS
Each student upon registration and before attendance at any classes
is required to take a physical examination, which is given by a corps of
specialists.
Each student is required to submit, to the examining physician, a
certificate from his family doctor, stating that he has had satisfactory
'See footnote on page 28.
s { ~-
l.-l
- -I 63. f.; c,
~ 3"
~
57 J-e;
'2--
2. 1> CI ~
").3 0 ~ I I .s~~_ --;/J-
30 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
smallpox immunization within the past four years. All students are
also urged to have typhoid-paratyphoid prophylaxis before entering
school.
For the school year 1940-41 the examinations will be held from
Wednesday, September 18, through Saturday, September 21.
An additiorral fee of $2.00 will be charged each student who fails to
take this examination when scheduled. Medical certificates from else
where will not be accepted.
R.O.T.e.
All freshmen and sophomores, except aliens and those physically
unfit are required to take military or naval training. The freshman
milit~ry uniform is furnished at a cost of $27.50 which amount must
be paid to the Treasurer by every new freshman or sophomore. This
deposit will be refunded to those exempted from military. Further in
formation will be found on those pages of this catalog which are headed
"Military Science and Tactics."
A student who is physically disqualified for military or who is not a
citizen of the United States must present for graduation six hours of
extra credit for the two-year basic course in Military.
MISCELLANEOUS
Each member of the Senior Class must pay a diploma fee of $5.00
before graduating.
Examinations at other than the regular examination times will be
granted in exceptional cases only and by Faculty action. A fee of $2.00
will be charged in all such cases.
A fee of $2.00 will be charged to old students reporting late for reg
istration or payment of fees without a valid excuse.
The student is advised to defer the purchase of drawing instruments
and materials until he can have the direction of the professors in their
selection. The prices range from $15.00 up.
No fees are refunded to students who are required to withdraw on
account of conduct or for failure in work or who may withdraw for any
reason, except for disabling sickness, properly certified to by a reputable
physician. In the latter event, an equitable prorated amount will be
refunded, provided the student is not able to return to the School before
the end of the term in which he withdraws.
The remainder of the laboratory deposit may be returned to the stu
dent at the end of the school year, provided he presents a written state
ment from his parent or guardian that he has withdrawn from the in
stitution.
DORMITORIES
All students in the freshman class who do not reside with their par
ents, near relatives, or bona fide guardians legally appointed, are re-
\ ,
GENERAL REGULATIONS 31
quired to live in the school dormitories for the entire school year. This
applies also to transfers from other colleges, who are rated here as
freshmen. Students in other classes who are assigned to a dormitory
must remain there throughout the year. The School has dormitory
accommodations for about 1000 students. Those who expect to enter
the freshman class should write early in the preceding term for a room
reservation and should state which dormitory is preferred. A deposit
will be required with each reservation as explained below.
Address all correspondence about dormitory reservations to the
SuperintendeTIt of Dormitories, and not to the Registrar's office.
KNOWLES DORMITORY
The Knowles Dormitory is one of the older buildings, but many
students prefer it both for its convenient location and for the lower
rates. Two students are assigned to a room, and the rate for each is
$22.50 per term, payable in advance. In the assignment of rooms in this
building preference will be given to students from Georgia.
HARRIS DORMITORY
This building is located on Techwood Drive immediately across the
athletic field from the center of the campus. Two students are assigned
to a room and the rate for each is $45 per term, payable in advance
for the term of four and a half months.
JULIUS BROWN MEMORIAL HALL
This dormitory has accommodations for 100 students, two in each
room. The rates are $45 per term per student, payable in advance for
the term of four months and a half.
CLARK HOWELL DORMITORY
This dormitory, which was first occupied in September, 1939, will
accommodate about one hundred freshmen who are enrolled in a regular
course. Two students are assigned to a room, and the rates are $45 per
student for the term of four and one-half months.
CLOUDMAN HALL
This dormitory is open to co-operative students. The room rent is
$22.50 per quarter. Co-operative freshmen who are non-residents of
Atlanta are required to send in advance a deposit of $22.50 for a room
reservation.
GEORGE W. HARRISON DORMITORY
This new dormitory is open to students on the Co-operative Plan
except freshmen. Two students are assigned to a room and the rates are
$27 per quarter for each student.
32 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
TECHWOOD DORMITORY
Through the Federal Government the Techwood Dormitory has been
recently erected at a cost of $250,000 on a lot adjacent to the Georgia
Tech Campus. This building is not open to Freshmen, but students in
other classes may obtain rooms there at rates of $8 or $10 per month
per person.
DORMITORY DEPOSITS AND LIVING EXPENSES
(Make all checks payable to Georgia School of Technology and mail
remittance to Mr. F. K. Houston, Treasurer.)
All regular students who make dormitory reservations are required
to deposit with the Treasurer by August 15th the amount shown below:
For Knowles Dormitory .................................................. $22.50
For Harris, Brown or Howell Dormitory ................ 45.00
In case the student finds it impossible to enroll, the deposit willi be
refunded provided notice is given the President not later than Septem
ber 4th.
Students who room in the dormitories are required to furnish the
following articles: One pillow, three pillow cases, four shflets, blankets
or comforts, towels, and other small and portable articles needed about
their rooms. The articles named should be brought from home. The
school furnishes with each room: single beds, mattresses, springs, ward
robe, or closet, bureau and table.
THE DINING HALL
The dining hall is thoroughly modern and sanitary throughout. The
plant embodies the best features of the cafeterias in use in the leading
colleges and universities. It accommodates more than 500 students at
one time, and provides table service for more than 1500. Through this
service, it is possible to furnish meals at cost to a majority of the stu
dents, and thus effect a substantial reduction in their living expenses.
Students are advised to purchase meal ticket books, $22.50 for $20.00
or $11.00 for $10.00.
LAUNDRY
Laundry is handled by contract. The student receives a discount on
his actual bill, which usually averages seventy-five cents to a dollar per
week. All students in the dormitories are required to send their laundry
to the company holding contract.
EXAMIN AT IONS
Final examinations are held at the end of each term. Students may
be dropped from the roll of their classes at any examination, when they
do not meet the requirements, as well as at any time when they neglect
their studies and fall hopelessly behind their classes. No fees are re
funded under such circumstances.
GENERAL REGULATIONS 33
The General Assembly of Georgia requires each Senior to pass a
satisfactory examination on the State and Federal Constitutions as a
prerequisite for graduation. Instruction is given by lecture and other
wise in these subjects, and the required examination is given in March
or April.
REpORTS
Reports of the standing of students are issued at the close of each
term.
At the end of each period of six weeks reports of students whose
work is unsatisfactory in any subject are posted on the bulletin boards
of the departments, and copies of such reports are mailed to parents.
The Faculty will drop from the rolls at any time a student whose
record in scholarship, attendance, or conduct is plainly unsatisfactory.
CHANGES OF COURSES AND WITHDRAWALS
Changing from one course to another, in some cases, is highly advis
able, but is to be discouraged unless there are valid reasons for such a
change. In all cases where the student wishes to change his course or to
withdraw from the school, he must file written permission from his
parent or guardian to this effect.
It is extremely important that the. parent notify the President of the
Institution promptly when a student withdraws on account of illness or
for any other reason.
MARKING OR GRADING SYSTEM
The following marking system is now in effect: A-Excellent; B
Good; C-Fair; D-Barely Passing; E-Conditioned; F-Failure. A
mark of E will entitle the student to a re-examination the following
September if he is otherwise eligible to continue. However, a student ?
having a mark of E in a first term .subject will ordinarily repeat it if
offered during the second term. A subject carrying a mark of F must
be repeated.
A mark of D is passing in a single subject but a general average of
approximately C is required for graduation.
CURRICULA
In the following pages there will be found in alphabetical order a
tabulation of the work required for a degree in the regular four-year
courses offered by the Georgia School of Technology.
The basic Freshman course given below is required in all the engi
neering courses. The Freshman work in Architecture, which differs
somewhat from the basic course in Engineering, as described in the
sections devoted to this depar tment. The Freshman work in Industrial
Management substitutes Drawing 5-6 for Drawing 9-10, but is other
wise the same as the course given below, except as shown in the foot
notes.
FRESHMAN YEAR
Uniform in all Engineerillg Courses*
FIRST T ERM
Course No. Subject Class Lab. Credit
Chern. 3 or 1 InorganIc ChemIstry -------------------------- 4 4
Dr. 9 EngIneerIng Drawing - - ----- - ----- - ----------- 2
Eng. 11 Composition and Rhetorlc ______ ______________ __ 3
Math. 17 Elementary Functlons ------- - ---- - - -- - - - - -- - -
M.L. French, Spanish or Germani" ________ _________ }
Social SClen~: ________ ________________ _____ 3 8 .S. 11
R.O .T.C. 1 ~ll11tary or Naval Instructlon ___________ ___ ____ 5 l.5
Or. Orlentatlon --------- - ------------ ---- ---- -- - - 0
TotaL __ __ ___ ______ _____________ 16 15 18.5
SECOND TERM
Chem. 4 or 8 InorganIc Chemistry - ---- - --------- ----------- 4
Dr. 10 Engineering Drawing ----- - --------------- - --- 6 2
Eng. 12 Composltlon and Rhetorlc ______ __ __ ______ ______ 3 3
Engr. 2 Introductlon to Engl n eerlnl: __________________ __
Math. 18 Analytic Geometry - - ------- --------- - ------- -
M.L. French, Spanish or Germant ________________ .}
Social Sclen~: ______________________________ . 3 S.S. 12
R.O.T.C. 2 1I1111tary or Naval Instructlon _________ _________ 5 1.5
Tota L __________________________ 16 15 19.5
? Freshmen In IndustrIal Management take Drawing 5-6 Instead of DrawIng 9-10,
and they may substitute 8. 8 . 21-22 for M. L. or for S. S. 11-12.
tFreshmen who expect to major In ChemIstry or ChemIcal Engineering must elect
German.
[34 ]
DEPARTMENT OF AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING
Daniel Guggenheim School of Ll eronautics
PROFESSOR KNIGHT, ASSISTANT PROFESSORS SCHWARTZ, WEEMS ,
AND G AIL, AND ASSISTANT
GENERAL INFORMATION
The D epartment of Aeronautical Engineering, which is known as the
Daniel Guggenheim School of Aeronautics, was established in 1930
through a gift of $300,000 from the D aniel Guggenheim Fund for the
Promotion of Aeronautics. The purpose of this award was to establish
opportunities at the Georgia School of Technology for study and re
search of the highest order in the field of aeronautics.
The School of Aeronautics offers three alternatives to prospective
students.
1. Students may take the five basic aeronautical courses, A. E. 121 ,
124, 133, 134, 141, and 142, listed below, in the Senior year of the
course in General Engineering and receive the degree of Bachelor of
Science in General Engineering at the end of the fourth year. This
course is suited to students wishing to obtain employment wi th the air
transport companies and is recommended for students who contemplate
taking fifth year or graduate work in Aeronautical Engineering. For
information on the General Engineering course, see page 123.
2. Students who have received the degree of Bachelor of Science in
General, Mechanical, Electrical, or Civil Engineering may obtain the
degree of Bachelor of Aeronautical Engineering by taking a fifth year
study. This broad training in Aeronautical Engineering will enable the
student to qualify in the design and manufacture of aircraft and aero
nautical accessories. Students contemplating fifth year study should com
municate with Prof. Knight prior to the second term of their Senior year
rega rding prerequisites.
3. Students who have received the degree of Bachelor of Science
in Aeronautical, General, Mechanical, Electrical, or Civil Engineering
may obtain the degree of Master of Science in Aeronautical Engineer
ing by completing a course consisting of intermediate and graduate sub
jects plus a thesis, the curriculum in each case to be approved by the
Committee on Graduate Courses. This advanced work will prepare the
student for research or teaching in aeronautics. Most candidates for
this degree, and especially those who have not taken undergraduate
courses in aeronautics, will find it necessary to spend more than one
year in fulfilling the requirements. For complete information on grad
uate courses see page 178 of this catalogue.
EQUIPMENT
The School of Aeronautics is well equipped for offering laboratory
work to augment and lend interest to the theoretical courses. Most of
[35 ]
36 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
this equipment is also suitable for research projects conducted by grad
uate students and members of the staff.
The School is housed in a large building designed especially for it.
Among other things this building contains a 9 ft. wind tunnel, a 2~ ft.
wind tunnel, an aircraft structural testing laboratory, an instrument
laboratory, and a laboratory for the testing of high speed blowers. The
School also has its own machine and woodworking shop in which all its
models and special apparatus are constructed. A large drafting room
is provided adjacent to which is a room containing structural exhibits
for the use of design students. A comprehensive and completely indexed
reference library on aeronautical subjects is also located in the build
ing. In addition, the Mechanical Engineering Department possesses three
large aeronautical engines and dynamometer equipment.
FIFTH YEAR COURSE IN AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING
FIRST TERM
COltrse No. Subject Class Lab. Credit
A.E. 121 'Aerodynamics of the Airplane L ______________ 3
A.E. 133 'Theory of Aircraft Structures L _______________ 3
A.E. 141 'Airplane Design L ___________________________
A.E. 145 Seminar
-------------------------------------
A.E. 155 Aircraft Structural Labora tory _________________
A.E. 15T Wind Tunnel La bOM tory _______________________
A.E. 163 Aeronautical Instrumentation
----- ------------ a a
M.E. 186 Aeronautical Engines
-------------------------
3 3
TotaL __________________________ 13 15 18
SECOND TERM
A.E. 124 'Aerodynamics of the Airplane IL _____________
A.E. 134 'Theory of Aircraft Structures IL _____________
A.E. 142 'Airplane Design IL __________________________
A.E. 14G Seminar
-------------------------------------
A.E. 152 Dynamics of the AIrplane ______________________
A.E. 148 'Airplane Detail Deslgn _____________________ .}
A.E. 158 'Aeronautlcal Laboratory ___________________ .
A.E. 164 'Alrcraft Instrument Laboratory ______________
A.E. 166 Propeller Design
-----------------------------
M.E. 94 Aeronautical Engine Laboratory _______________
TotaL __________________________ 11 18 17
'Note: Fifth year students who have already taken these courses must SUbstitute
approved electives.
'Note: Choice of A. E. 148. A. E. 158, or A. E. 164.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
NOTE: 4-3-5 means 4 hours class, 3 hours laboratory, 5 hours credit.
A E. 121-124. AERODYNAMICS OF THE AIRPLANE I-II . Prereq
uisites: Math. 136, Mech. 40.
)
AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING 37
Senior G. E. and Fifth Year A. E., first and second terms, 3-0-3.
Applied aerodynamics including performance calculations, static stabil
ity and other problems of airplane design.
A. E. 133-134. THEORY OF AIRCRAFT STRUCTURES I-II. Prereq
uisites: Mech. 40, 48.
Senior G. E. and Fifth Year A E., first and second terms, 3-0-3.
Development of the basic theory of structural analysis progressing
through the methods of analysis for complex structures including those
of the monococque type.
A. E. 141-142. AIRPLANE DESIGN I-II. Prerequisites: Mech. 40, 48.
Parallels A. E. 121, 124, 133, and 134.
Senior G. E. and Fifth Year AE., first and second terms, 0-9-3.
Design of a stressed-skin type airplane in accordance with the U. S.
Civil Aeronautics Authority airworthiness requirements including stress
analysis for the more important loading conditions.
A. E. 145-146. SEMINAR.
Fifth Year A. E., first and second terms, 1-0-1.
Scheduled meetings at which individual students present technical
papers on important current aeronautical developments, the reading of
each paper being followed by a class discussion.
A. E. 148. AIRPLANE DETAIL DESIGN. Prerequisites: A. E. 121, 133,
141.
Fifth Year, A E., second term, 0-3-1.
Detail design and layout of aircraft fittings and sub-assemblies and
preparation of production drawings.
A. E. 152. DYNAMICS OF THE AIRPLANE. Prerequisite: A E. 121.
Fifth Year A E., second term, 3-0-3.
Mathematical study of dyn amic stability and certain special maneu
vers such as the spin.
A. E. 155. AIRCRAFT STRUCTURAL LABORATORY. Prerequisites: Mech.
40, 48. Parallels A E. 133.
Fifth Year A. E., first term, 0-3-1.
Testing of aircraft materials and structural elements to show extent
of agreement between theory and experiment and to acquaint the student
with aircraft structural testing methods.
A. E. 157. WIND TUNNEL L ABORATORY. Prerequisites: Math. 24,
Mech. 40. Parallels A . E . 121.
Fifth Year A. E., first term, 0-3-1.
Testing of a complete airplane model in the 2~ ' wind tunnel to
demonstrate the value of this form of testing to the airplane designer.
38 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
A. E. 158. AERONAUTICAL LABORATORY. Prerequisite: A. E. 157.
Fifth Year A. E., second term, 0-3-l.
Study of special problems for students interested in aeronautical
research.
A. E. 163. AERONAUTICAL INSTRUMENTATION. Prerequisites: Math.
136, Mech. 40.
Fifth Year A. E., first term, 3-0-3 .
Theoretical study of instruments used in aircraft and in aeronautical
laboratories.
A. E. 164. AERONAUTICAL INSTRUMENT LABORATORY. Prerequisite :
A. E. 163.
Fifth Year A. E., second term, 0-3-l.
Study of aeronautical instruments under laboratory and operating
conditions.
A. E. 166. AIRCRAFT PROPELLERS. Prerequisites: A. E. 121, 133.
Fifth Year A. E., second term, 1-3-2.
Study of the aerodynamic and structural design of aircraft propellers.
For Graduate courses see page 180 of this catalogue.
DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE
PROFESSORS BUSH-BROWN AND GAILEY; ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS
MORENUS AND HEFFERNAN; ASSISTANT PROFESSORS SIEGLER AND
JORGENSEN; PART-TIME INSTRUCTORS HARRIS, ANDERSON AND
TAYLOR; AND SPECIAL LECTURER AND CRITIC RICHARD BAUER
The course in Architecture was opened to the students in the autumn
of 1908 as one of the full professional courses in the Georgia School of
Technology. The regular course extends over five years, leading to the
degree of Bachelor of Architecture.
The Department of Architecture is a member of the Association of
Collegiate Schools of Architecture. The degree carries with it certain
examination immunities for those seeking licenses to practice archi-
tecture.
The "University Medal" was awarded to the Department of Archi
tecture, February, 1940, by the Groupe Americain, Societe Des Archi
tectes Diplomes Par Le Gouvernement Francaise, for excellence in
teaching based on record of awards, 1938-1939, for student work sub
mitted to Beaux-Arts Institute of Design in New, York.
The new five-year curriculum in Architecture, as contained in this
catalogue, went into effect beginning September, 1934. Except for one
course, An Introduction to Design, the freshman year is virtually the
same as for the men taking Engineering. At the beginning of the Sopho
more year students taking Architecture will be called upon to select
either the Design option or the Structural option. Both of these options
lead to the degree of Bachelor of Science at the end of the four-year
course. For those who select Option No.1, the Design: option, and in
tend to become 'practicing architects, a fifth year will be given leading
to the degree of Bachelor or Architecture. For those who may wish to
hold a position in almost any branch of the building industry, either
four-year option will furnish a preparation.
The fifth year is for men whose intention is to become architects,
and only such men as complete the five-year course will receive a degree
in Architecture. A student will be admitted to the fifth year only upon
recommendation of the faculty of the Department.
The architect is, more than anyone else, responsible for the safe,
useful, and aesthetic realization of our needs as to shelter. He is the
natural leader in the building industry. He should be something of an
artist, an engineer, and an executive. He must combine common sense
and imagination in order to bring into being structures which are to be
permanent and serviceable in addition to expressing their purpose.
It is evident that a broad foundation of academic training is neces
sary. The fundamental and cultural courses include English, the Social
[39 ]
40 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
Sciences, Physics, Mathematics, and Modern Language. In addition, the
purely professional subjects may be classified under a number of gen
eral headings. For the five-year professional course Option No.1, these
are listed as follows:
(1) A rclzitectural Design. (4 yrs., 50 cr. hrs.) Individual creative
work on the part of the student representing analysis and solu
tion of architectural problems.
(2) Architectural Engineering. (3 yrs., 24 cr. hrs.) Closely associ
ated with the above and including building materials, structural
theory and design, and the mechanical plant.
(3) History. (2 yrs., 10 cr. hrs.) The history of the architecture of
the Western World from Egypt to, and including, the present.
(4) Freehand Drawing. (4 yrs., 11 cr. hrs.) Charcoal, watercolor
pencil renderi~g, life drawing, etc. '
(5) Graphics. (1 yr., 5 cr. hrs.) Descriptive Geometry, Shades and
Shadows, and Perspective.
(6) Professional Practice. (1 term, 2 cr. hrs.) The business, legal,
and ethical phases of architectural practice.
COMBIN ATlON COURSE
By taking additional courses during at least one summer session, it
is possible to take Option 2 receiving the B.S. degree with a major in
Architectural Engineering at the expiration of four years and at the
same time qualify to receive the B. of Arch. degree at the end of the
fifth year. A special program of courses should be determined with the
approval of the Head of the Department by the end of the Freshman
Year.
SPECIAL COURSES
Under certain conditions special students may enroll in the Depart
ment with the intention of concentrating on professional subjects. To
be classified as a SPECIAL STUDENT, a man must be a high school grad
uate; he must have had at least three years of experience in the office
of a practicing architect or the equivalent; and he must be ordinarily
at least twenty-one years of age. The special course is intended for
mature men of proved ability who have become definitely committed to
architecture as a life work. Letters of recommendation from employers
testifying to length and quality of service are required, and no appli
cant will be finally admitted except after an interview with the Head
of the Department. At the successful completion of the required pro
fessional studies, for which a minimum of three years should be antici
pated, such men are entitled to a Certificate of Proficiency.
ANNOUNCEMENT: A COURSE IN INDUSTRIAL DESIGN
Beginning September, 1940, elementary courses in Industrial Design
will be offered intended primarily for Sophomores. It is the intention to
DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE 41
-
d ? t year's catalo<Tue a complete four year curriculum leading inclu e In nex ~.
B S degree in Industnal DeSign. to a .' . r d
Students who may be interested in the field of deSign as ~pp Ie to
d t of industry should investigate further. There IS a need the pro uc s d' f . I d
. . d t for designers having a basic understan mg 0 matena s an
iO In us ry h b'I' d .. t f manufacture and who have tea I Ity an trammg 0
the process 0 d' f h I
? sfully To do so necessitates an understan mg 0 t e aws deSign s ucces . I d
h ( and presupposes a feeling for form, co or, an texture, as of aest e ICS 1 . I h 11 s technological knowledge, and an ana yhca approac .
we U~der Industrial Design may be included variouds fiehl.ds s~cdh as .the
'1 I dustry' the clay products and glass an c ma m ustnes; Text! en, .... d . I . h Id appliances and fUrOlshmgs ; mdustnal an commercia equlp-
house 0 d dl'splays ' transportation; building products, etc. The most
roent an , d I . d materials include ceramics (clay and glass), metal, woo , p ashcs
used t'les Georgia School of Technology is in a unique position in
an tex I . . d' f I d . 1
? bl to furnish a complete technological foun atlOn or n ustna being a e
Design in all its various branches.
EQUIPMENT
The quarters occupied by the Department o~ Architecture provide
for twO large drafting rooms, a lecture room, a library, a freehand stu
d' materials laboratory, and several smaller rooms and offices. The
1
.lbo, a 's part of the school library, but functions as a separate depart-
I rary I 1 h d'
I rbrary and all architectural books are permanent youse m roenta I , h' h h' t nt the department. Books and documents, w IC serve as suc an Impor a
art of the work, are easily accessible to the students. and are us.cd
p . ly I'n Design History and other courses. The library contams
extenSive " dd' .
? 1 800 volumes and is kept up to date by constant a ItlOns.
some , '
SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUNDS IN ARCHITECTURE
The Georgia Chapter of The American Institute of Archi~ects h~s
d $200 00 to be used as a loan fund to help students m archl-donate .
tecture. .
Through the generosity of Mrs. Blanche Coleman of ~dwaukee,
W? . a scholarship of $6000 per year has been established as a IsconSIn, '. d'
. 1 to her son Holland Coleman, and IS awarded to a eservmg roeroona ,
student in the Department.
42
Cottrse
Arcb.
Eng.
Matb.
M.L.
S. S.
R.O.T.C.
Or.
Arch.
Eng.
Matb.
M. L.
S. S.
R.O.T.C.
GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
THE REGULAR COURSE IN ARCHITECTURE
FRESHMAN YEAR
FIRST TERM
No. Sttbject Class L.b.
1 Introduction to Deslgn ________________________ 2 3
11 Composition nnd Rbetorlc _____________________ S
11 Elementary Functions ------------------------ 5
Frencb or German ____________________________ S
11 Social Science -------- - ---------------------- 3
1 Milltary or Naval Instructlon _____________ _____ 5
Orienta tion
------ ----------------------------
TotaL _______ ________ ___________ 17
SECOND TERM
2 Introduction to Deslgn ________________________ 1
12 Composition and Rbetorlc ______________________ 3
18 Analytic Geometry --------------------------- 5
Frencb or German ______ ______________________ 3
12 Social Science
------------------------------- 3
2 Military or Naval In structlon __________________ 5
TotaL __________________________ 15 12
Credit
3
5
S
S
1.5
18.5
3
3
5
3
3
1.5
18.5
Note: A student entering without French or German will be r equired to take two
years or one or the other, except that tbls will not apply to a man selectlng Option No.2.
SOPHOMORE YEAR (Option No. I-Architectural Design)
FIRST TERM
Cottrse No.
Arcb. 9&
Arcb. 11&
Arch. 13
Eng. 33
Phys. 21
R.O.T.C. 3
Arch. 9b
Arcb. 11b
Arcb. 14
Eng. 34
Phys. 22
R.O.T.C. 4
Sttbject Class Lab. Credit
Freeband Drawing __________________________ _
Architectural Design (elementary) ____________ _
Graphics-Shades and Shadows _______________ _
Humanities ________________ _________________ _
Physi cs _____________________________________ _
Milltary or Naval Instruction __________ _______ _
1
3
3
TotaL_______ ______________ _____ 8
SECOND TERM
Freehand Drawing __________________________ _
Arcbltectural Design (elementary) _____________ _
Grapblcs- Perspectlve _______________________ _
Humanities _________________________________ _
Physics _____________________________________ _
M!lItary or Naval In" truction? _________________ _
1
3
3
TotaL___________ _______________ 8
3
12
4
3
5
27
3
12
4
3
5
27
1
5
2.5
3
4
1.5
11
5
2.5
3
4
1.5
17
Note: A student entering with advanced stalld\ng who can be given credit for
Chemistry, may SUbstitute this for Physics.
DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE 43
---------------------------------------------------------
JUNIOR YEAR (Option No. I-Architectural Design)
FIRST TERM
Collrse No. Subject Class Lab.
~9C Freehand Drawing
Arch.
Arch.
Arcb.
Ec.
--=
ArCh.
Arcb.
Arch.
Arcb.
Mecb.
COlI'"
Arch.
Arcb.
Arch.
Arch.
Arch.
M.E.
Arch.
Arch.
Arch.
Arch.
Arch.
E.E.
---------------------------
}1C Architectural Design (intermediate) ____________ 1 16
15a History or
Archltecture _______________________ 3
30a Construction-Building Materials -------------- 2
24 EconomiCS ---------------- - ------- - --- - --- --- 3
Elective: Government or English ______________ 3
TotaL __________________________ 12 19
SECOND TERM
9d Freeba.nd Drawing --------------------------- 3
}1d Architectural Design (Intermediate) ________ ____ 1 16
15b HIstory or
Archltectur e ________________________ 3
30b Construction-Building Materials -------------- 2
42 MechaniCS of
MaterLals ________________________ 3
Elective: Publlc Speaking or E conomlcs ________
TotaL __________________________ 12 19
SENIOR YEAR (Option No. i-Architectural Design)
FIRST TERM
No. Sttbject Class Lab.
ge Freehand Drawing --------------------------- 3
Ile Architectural Design
(Intermediate) ____________ 1 16
15c History or
Archltecture _______________________ 3
33 Construction-Wood --------------------------
83 Water Color --------------------------------- 3
69 The Mechanical
PlanL ________________________
TotaL _________ ----------------- 25
SECOND TERM
9r Freehand Drawing --------------------------- 3
Ilf Architectural Design (Intermediate) __ __________ 1 16
15d History of
Archltecture ______ __________________ 3
34 Construction-Steel --------------------------- 3 3
84 Water Color --------------------------------- 3
56 The Mechanical Plant (electr icity ) ____________ 1
Elective ---------------- --------------------- 2
Tota 1 ________ ---- - - ------------- 10 25
Credit
1
6
2.5
2
3
3
17.5
2.5
2
3
3
17.5
Credit
2.5
1
2
16.5
1
6
2.5
4
1
2
17.5
44 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
FIFTH YEAR (Option No. I-Architectural Design)
FIRST TERM
Course No. Subject Class Lab. Credit
-----------------------------------------------------Arch.
Arch.
Arch.
C.E.
65 Professional Practice _________________________ 2 2
109a Freehand Drawing (life) ______________________ 4 1.5
IlIa Archlteclural Design (advanced) _______________ 21 8
11 Construction (reinforced concrete) _____________ 3 2
Architectural Electives _______________________ 2 3 3
TolaL _________________________ _
SECOND TERM
Arch. 109b Freehand Drawing (life) _____________________ _
Arch. 111b Archlteclural Design (advanced) ______________ _
Architectural Electives ______________________ _
Academic Elective ___________________________ _
C.E. 72 Construction (reinforced concrete) ____________ _
Total ________________________ __ _
ARCHITECTURAL ELECTrvES:
Arch. 81 Landscape Architecture ______________________ _
Arch. TT & 78 Pen and Ink ________________________________ _
Arch. 70 HIstory of ArL ______________________________ _
Arch. 71 & 72 Modeling ________________________________ ___ _
Arch. 79 & 80 Outdoor Sketching __________________________ _
Arch. 120 rown Planning and Houslng __________________ _
Phys. 40 Acoustics and llluminatlon ____________ _______ _
2
3
2
2
81 16.5
4
21
3
3
31
4
3
4
1.5
8
3
3
2
17.5
2
1.5
2
2
1.5
1
2
SOPHOMORE YEAR (Option No.2-Architectural Engineering)
FIRST TERM
COUTse
Arch.
Arch.
Eng.
Math.
PhY6.
R.O.T.C.
No.
13
30a
33
23
21
3
Arch. 14
Arcb. SOb
Eng. 34
Math. 24
PhY8. 22
R.O.T.C. 4
Subject
Graphics
Construction-BuIlding Materials _____________ _
Humanities _________________________________ _
Calculus ____________________________________ _
PhysiCS _____________________________________ _
MllItary or Naval Instructlon ________________ _
Class
1
2
S
5
TotaL__________________________ 14
SECOND TERM
Graphics
Constructl()n-Bulldlng Materials _____________ _
Humanities _________________________________ _
Calculus _____ _______________________________ _
Physics _____________________________________ _
lI1U1tary or Naval Instructlon _________________ _
2
3
5
3
TotaL__________________________ 14
Lab. Credit
4 2.5
2
3
5
3 4
5 1.5
12
4
3
5
12
18
2.5
2
3
5
4
1.5
18
..
DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE
JUNIOR YEAR (Option No.2-Architectural Engineering)
FIRST TERM
4S
COMse No. Subject Class Lab. Credit
Arch.
Arch.
Arch.
C.E.
Ec.
Mach.
Arch.
Arch.
Arch.
Arch.
Ee.
Meeh.
6a
9a
57
21
24
33
Design and Working Drawlngs ________________ _
Freehand Drawing -------------- -------------
History: General Survey_____________________ 2
Plane Surveying _~___________________________ 1
Economics ___________________________________ 3
Applied MechanIcs ___________________________ 3
TotaL________ __________________ 10
SECOND TERM
6b Design and Structure _________________________ _
9b Freehand Drnwlng --------------------------
46 Construction-Wood and JI1asonry _____________ _
58 Hlslory: General Survey______________________ 2
32 EconomiCS ___________________________________ 3
36 Applied Mechanics ---------------------------Elective _____________________________________ 2
TotaL__________________________ 13
12
3
3
3
21
12
3
15
5
2
3
4
17
18
SENIOR YEAR (Option No.2-Architectural Engineering)
FIRST TERM
Course No. Subject Class Lab. Credit
Arch.
Arcb.
Arcb.
Ec.
M.E.
M.E.
Arcb.
Arcb.
C.E.
E.E.
Eng.
6c
47
51
51
57
69
Design and Constructlon______________________ 1
Constmctlon-Steel __________________________ 3
Office Practice ______________________________ _
Government or Electlve _______________________ _
Materials Lab. _______________________________ 1
The MechanIcal Plant (Plumbing and Heating) __ 2
Total___________________________ 12
SECOND TERM
6d Design and Constructlon______________________ 1
52 Offlce Practice _______________________________ 2
T4 Constructlon-C()ncrete -----------------------
56 The Mechanical P1ant (Electrical) _____________ 1
45 Public Speaking or Electlve____________________ 3
Total___________________________ 10
16
19
16
3
19
6
3
2
3
1.3
2
17.3
6
2
4
1
3
16
46? GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
NOTE: 4-3-5 means 4 hours class, 3 hours laboratory, 5 hours credit.
ARCH. 1 and 2. INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN.
Freshman, first term, 2-3-3; second term, 1-6-3.,
An introductory study of the principles of visual design and the rela
tion of design to everyday living through art and industry. A survey of
the fields of Architecture and Industrial Design-their function, scope,
and requirements. The course consists of lectures, assigned reading,
class work, and first hand experience in drafting room and shop.
ARCH. 6. DESIGN, WORKING DRAWINGS, AND STRUCTURAL DESIGN.
6a and 6b-Juniors, Option No.2, first and second term, 1-12-5.
6c and 6d-Seniors, Option No.2, first and second term, 1-16-6.
This course is in part similar to Arch. 11 but includes,/hesides the
work in design, carrying certain problems through the working-drawing
stage and later design problems are used as a basis for construction
problems including computations and drawings of structures of wood,
steel and concrete.
ARCH. 9a and 9b. FREEHAND DRAWING.
Sophomores, first and second term, 0-3-1.
Drawing from simple plaster casts in pencil and charcoal. Principles
of proportion and values are stressed.
ARCH. 9c and 9d. FREEHAND DRAWING. Prerequisite, Arch. 9b.
Juniors, first and second term, 0-3-1.
A continuation of Arch. 9b, the casts now used being of sculptural
architectural details.
ARCH. ge and 9f. FREEHAND DRAWING. Prerequisite, Arch. 9d.
Seniors, fi rst and second term, 0-3-1.
Drawings of various subject matter, including outdoor sketching.
ARCH. 11. ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN.
lta, ltb-Sophomore (Elementary) 1-12-5. Prerequisite, Arch. 1
and 2.
. ltc, ltd, lle, llf-Junior and Senior (Intermediate) 1-16-6. Pre
requisite, Arch. lla.
11la, I1tb-Fifth year (Advanced) 1-21-8.
Laboratory fee, Juniors, Seniors and Fifth Year men, $7.50 per term
to cover registration in B. A. 1. D.
DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE 47
Programs giving conditions of a problem are issued at intervals to
the class. Each student, with individual criticism and under the guid
ance of the instructor, works out and presents his own solution. The
drawings by students of a class, turned in together at a specified time,
are judged by a jury consisting of members of the faculty, assisted,
ordinarily, by one or two practicing architects of Atlanta. The problems
assigned are at first simple; in the intermediate classes medium sized
buildings are studied and designed; in advanced work the programs
deal with larger buildings or groups of buildings contituting problems
of greater complexity.
Programs issued by the Beaux Arts Institute of Design, New York,
are used very largely. Each major problem covers a period of five or
six weeks. Short problems and one-day sketches without criticism are
also assigned from time to time to encourage independence of thought,
originality, and rapidity of expression.
Drawings considered worthy are sent to New York for judgment in
competition with those from other schools throughout the country.
Drawings are the property of the school and such drawings as are
needed for exhibition or other purposes will be retained.
In order to emphasize the fact that design is an art based on or con
ditioned by consideration of structure and the practical use and dis
position of materials, some time during the intermediate design course
at least one problem is carried beyond the usual presentation stage and
completed in the form of scale working drawings, and one other pro
gram is carried on through the engineering design of structural elements.
The work in the drafting room outlined above is accompanied by
lectures on the theory and principles of design. Included under this are
such related subjects as Landscape Architecture, Housing and City
Planning.
ARCH. 13 and 14. GRAPHICS.
Sophomores, first and second term, 1-4-2.5.
Descriptive Geometry, shades and shadows, perspective-the repre
sentation of three dimensional form in what is the architect's medium
of expression, two dimensional drawings.
Text: Kenison and Bradley, Descriptive Geometry. Lawrence's
Perspective.
ARCH. lSa. HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE (Ancient).
Juniors, first term, 3-0-2.5.
Two lectures a week are given with the aid of lantern slides, and a
48 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
seminar once a week-subject, the history of architecture from early
Egypt to and including ancient Rome. Research on the part of the
students, both selective and assigned, supplements the class room lec
tures, and illustrated reports or notes are called for from time to time.
ARCH. 15b. HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE (Medieval). Prerequisite,
Arch. 15a.
Juniors, first .term, 3-0-2.5.
The history of Early Christian, Byzantine, Romanesque, and Gothic
Architecture.
ARCH. 15c. HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE (Renaissance). Prerequisite,
Arch. 15b.
Seniors, first term, 3-0-2.5.
The history of the Renaissance in Italy and the other principal
countries of Europe.
ARCH. 15d. HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE (American). Prerequisite,
Arch. 15c.
The history of American Architecture is studied, beginning with the
early settlements and tracing its development through to the present,
including an analysis of the contemporary movement.
ARCH. 22. FREEHAND DRAWING.
Sophomores, Textile, second term, 0-3-1.
This begins with problems in freehand perspective followed by prob
lems done in pencil with the object of developing a sense of proportion
and in general, a better coordination between eye and hand.
ARCH. 30a and 30b. CONSTRUCTION (Building Materials).
Option No.1, Juniors; Option No.2, Sophomores; 2-0-2.
This course is devoted to the study of the materials of construction,
with attention given to the effect which the nature of the material should
have on design, and the best ways of using building materials in modern
construction.
ARCH. 33 and 34. BUILDING CONSTRUCTION. Prerequisite, Arch.
30a and 30b.
Option No.1, Seniors, first and second term, 3-3-4.
This course is devoted to the theory of building construction, deduc
tion of formulas, the use of statics to investigate forces and stresses,
DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE 49
d the study of the strength of materials to resist stresses. The prin
a? les studied are applied to practical building design by problems in
C1P ? k d . f b wood, steel, and masonry constructIOn, wor e out 10 con erence e-
tween instructor and student.
Text: Wood, Structural Design Data. Hauf, Design of Steel Build
ings.
ARCH. 46. CONSTRUCTION (Wood and Masonry). Prerequisite,
Arch. 30a and 30b, and Mech. 47.
Option No.2, Juniors, second term, 3-0-3.
F rame, mill, and ordinary construction.
ARCH. 47. CONSTRUCTION (Steel). Prerequisite, Arch. 46.
Option No.2, Seniors, first term, 3-0-3.
Fireproof and non-fireproof steel construction.
ARCH. 51 and 52. OFFICE PRACTICE. Prerequisite, Arch. 30a and
30b.
Option No.2, Seniors, first and second term, 2-0-2.
Writing specifications, architectural supervision, building superin
tendence, and estimating.
ARCH. 57 and 58. ELEMENTARY SURVEY OF ARCHITECTURE.
Juniors and Seniors, first and second term, 2-0-2.
This course is given for men taking Option No.2 and for those not
ursuing a professional course in Architecture. It covers in outline the
historic styles down to and including the present, and is intended to
familiarize the student with architectural form and give him an ele
mentary understanding of the principles of design.
ARCH. 65. PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE.
Fifth year, first term, 2-0-2.
A course of lectures and discussions on professional ethics, office
organization and management, competitions, contracts, specifications,
legal questions, and the general procedure of architectural practice.
ARCH. 70. HISTORY OF ART. Prerequisite, Arch. 15c.
Elective; first or second term, 2-0-2.
This is a course of lectures, assisted by lantern slides, starting with
50 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
the primitive manifestations of the artistic instinct, and covering in suc
cessive steps the further development of art down to modern art.
ARCH. 71 and 72. MODELING.
Fifth year elective; first and second terms, 1-3-2.
Modeling of architectural ornament.
ARCH. 77 and 78. PEN AND INK DRAWING. Prerequisite, Arch 9d.
Elective; first and second terms, 0-4-1.5.
The drawing and rendering in pen and ink of architectural subjects.
Stress is laid upon the composition of the sketch as well as its presenta
tion. Drawings by recognized masters are studied to familiarize the
student with good technique.
ARCH. 81. INTRODUCTION TO LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE.
(Optional) 2-0-2.
The different styles of landscape architecture and the principles gov
erning landscape design.
Text: Hubbard and Kimball.
ARCH. 83 and 84. WATER COLOR.
Senior, first and second term, 0-3-1.
Water color drawings are made from nature, still life objects, and
architectural details.
ARCH. 109a and 109b. LIFE DRAWING. Prerequisite, Arch. 9d.
Fifth-year students, first and second term, 0-4-1.5.
This course is devoted to practice in drawing from the living model,
not only to give familiarity with the human figure but because of the
value of this practice as training.
ARCH. 120. TOWN PLANNING AND HOUSING.
Fourth and fifth year, 1-0-1.
ARCH. 179 and 180. OUTDOOR SKETCHING. Prerequisite, Arch. 9d.
Elective; firsf and second terms, 0-4-1.5.
Studies in va', ious media, mainly dealing with outdoor subjects.
For Graduate Courses see page 182 of this catalogue.
DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY AND PUBLIC HEALTH
PROFESSOR WYCKOFF, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR LOWER,
AsSISTANT PROFESSOR HOPPER, AND INSTRUCTOR A. E. CANNON
The course in Public Health Engineering is arranged to meet the
increasing demand for men who have knowledge of bacteriology and the
principles of sanitation, public health, industrial hygiene, and public
health administration, together with sound basic training in engineering.
Men with such training should be 0'? immediate value in such fields as
the various public health agencies; consulting sanitary engineers organi
zations and other private engineering practice; manufacturing industries
where water supply and stream pollution from industrial wastes are
problems of the first ~agnitude; sal:s engi?eering P?sitions representing
manufacturers of eqUipment used 10 samtary engmeering structures;
and other organizations having special problems in sanitation.
In conjunction with the course outlined below will be numerous
inspection trips to water and sewage treatment plants, public health lab
oratories, industrial plants presenting problems in sanitation, and field
trips to projects dealing with mosquito eradication, rat-proofing, etc.
Satisfactory completion of the course leads to the degree of Bach
elor of Science in Public Health Engineering.
Course No.
BioI. 45
Eng. 33
Math. 23
Phys. 27
R.O.T.e. 3
Chern. 13
C. E. 25
Eng. 34
Math. 24
Phys. 28
R.O.T.e. 4
FRESHMAN YEAR
See Page 34
SOPHOMORE YEAR
FIRST TERM
Subject Class
General Biology ______________________________ 3
HumanJties __________________________________ 3
Calculus ____________________________________ _
Physics ______________________________________ 5
Naval or M1l1tary Instructlon _________________ _
TotaL__________________________ 16
SECOND TERM
Qualltallve Analysis _________________________ _
Topographical Mapping ______________________ _
Humanities _________________________________ _
Calculus __________ " _________________________ _
Physics _____________________________________ _
Naval or M1l1tary Instructlon _________________ _
TotaL__________________________ 15
[ 51 ]
Lab.
12
6
3
5
17
Credit
4.3
3
5
6
1.5
19.8
5
6
1.5
19.5
52 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
JUNIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM
Course No. Subject Class
BIoI. 47 Parasitology --------------------------------- 2
Chem. 17 Quantitative Analysis ------------------------ 2
Chem. 26 Organic Chemistry -------------------- -------
C.E. 21 Plane Surveying ----------------------------- 1
C.E. 33 Hydraulics ----------------------------------- 3
Mech. 31 Applied Mechanics --------------------------- 3
TotaL __________________________ 14
SECOND TERM
BioI. 58 Bacteriology --------------------------------- 3
Chem. 18 Quantitative Analysis
------------------------
1
Chem. 27 Organic Chemistry
---------------------------
3
C.E. 35 Sewerage and Sewage TreatmenL ______________ 2
Eng. 45 PlIblic Speaking ----------------------------- 3
Mech. 47 Mechanics ot Materlals ________________________
TotaL _____ _____________________ 14
SENIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM
Course No. Subject Class
Bioi. 61 Sanitary Chemistry --------------------------
BioI. 63 Sanitation ----------------------------------- 3
C. E. 51 Water Supply Englneerlng _____________________ 2
C.E. 155 Concrete Structures -------------------------- 3
C.E. 153 Structures ----------~- ----------------------- 3
M.E. 69 Heating, Ventilation and Plumblng _____________
Total ___________________________ 15
SECOND TERM
BIoi. 66 Industrial Hygiene -------- - ------------------ 3
BioI. 68 Sanitary Bacteriology ------------------------ 2
BIoI. 70 Epidemiology --------------------------------- 2
BioI. 72 Public Health Admlnistratloll __________________ 2
C.E. 40 Quantity Surveying -------------------------- 1
C.E. 61 Contracts and Specltlcatlon"-__________________ 2
BioI. 74 Vital Statistics -------------------------------
TotaL __________________________ 14
Lab. Credit
3 3
6 3
4
3 2
3
3
15 18
4 4.3
6 2.3
4
2
3
2
13 17.6
Lab. Credit
3 3
a
2
3 4
3
2
9 18
3
4 3.3
2
2
3 2
2
2
7 16.3
BIOLOGY AND PUBLIC HEALTH
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
BIOLOGY 38, 38c. GENERAL BACTERIOLOGY.
Junior C. E., either term, 2-4-3. Fee, $2.50.
Junior C. E. Co-op., second and third terms, 3-4-3.
53
The purpose of this course is that of familiarizing the student with
the bacteriology of sanitation. It is necessary that this be preceded by
a study of the general characteristics and activities of bacteria. A
large part of the course is, therefore, given to the study of the activities
of the different groups of bacteria and their significance.
Text: Elementary Bacteriology, Greaves.
BIOLOGY 45. GENERAL ZOOLOGY.
Sophomore, Industrial Management and Public Health Engineering.
First term, 3-4-4.3. Fee, $3.00.
This is an introductory course in which the fundamental principles,
the theories and problems of biology a re presented. Attention is directed
to the vital phenomena as exhibited in the lower animals with the pur
pose of giving the student a broader and more accurate conception of
those processes at work in the higher forms of life, including man him
self. In the laboratory special study is made of representatives of the
various invertebrate forms.
Texts: College Zoology, Hegner. Hyman's Laboratory Manual for
General Zoology, and Library References.
BIOLOGY 46. VERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY.
Second term, 3-4-4.3. Fee, $3.00.
This is a continuation of course 45. The lectures take up the devel
opment, structure, functions and relationships of the vertebrate animals.
In the laboratory representatives of the various vertebrate classes are
studied, stressing comparative anatomy.
Texts: Vertebrate Zoology, Newman; Biology of the Vertebrates,
Walters; College Zoology, Hegner.
BIOLOGY 47. PARASITOLOGY. Prerequisite, BioI. 45.
First term, 2-3-3. Fee, $2.50.
A general survey of the parasites of man consisting of three approxi
mat~ly equal parts: (1) protozoology, (2) helminthology, and (3) in-
54 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
sects of medical importance. Special attention is given the public health
aspects of the subject.
Text : Parasitology, Chandler.
BIOLOGY 51. HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY. Prerequisite, BioI. 45.
Second term, 3-0-3.
This course is designed to give the student definite information as to
the structure and function of the human body, together with the condi
tions which may interfere with normal functioning.
BIOLOGY 58. BACTERIOLOGY.
P. H. Eng., Second term, 3-4-4.3. Fee, $2.50.
Dealing with the fundamental principles of bacteriology and the
relation of micro-organisms to fermentation, putrefaction, and disease;
the principles of infection and resistance; the practice of bacteriological
technique.
BIOLOGY 61. SANITARY CHEMISTRY. Prerequisites, Chern. 18 and 27.
First term, 2-3-3. Fee, $3.00.
Chemical examination of water and sewage wi th lectures on the
sanitary significance and practical applications.
BIOLOGY 63. SANITATION.
First term, 3-0-3.
Dealing with the general principles of sanitation including water
supplies, sewage and refuse disposal, milk and food sanitation, housing,
swimming pools, and general inspection methods.
BIOLOGY 66. INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE.
Second term, 3-0-3.
The problems of health administration in industry. Special attention
is given to industrial poisons, occupational hazards and diseases, indus
trial fatigue, ventilation, and accident prevention.
BIOLOGY 68. SANITARY BACTERIOLOGY. Prerequisite, BioI. 58.
Second term, 2-4-3.3. Fee, $2.50.
The bacteriology of water, sewage, and foods. Special attention is
given the various standard methods of analysis.
BIOLOGY AND PUBLIC H EALTH
BIOLOGY 70. EPIDEMIOLOGY.
Second term, 2-0-2.
55
Detailed consideration of the natural history of disease epidemics
and their causes in relation to public water supplies, milk supplies,
sewage systems, insects, and personal causative factors.
BIOLOGY 72. PUBLIC HEALTH ADMINISTRATION.
Second term, 2-0-2.
Consideration of the history, organization and administration of
public health departments and various health agencies.
BIOLOGY 74. VITAL STATISTICS.
Second term, 2-0-2.
A study of statistical methods, consideration of possible errors, critical
analysis and interpretation of data.
DEPARTMENT OF CERAMIC ENGINEERING
PROFESSOR VAUGHAN, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR MITCHELL,
INSTRUCTORS WYSONG AND H ARRIS
A four-year curriculum leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science
in Ceramic Engineering. Graduate work leading to the Master of
Science in Ceramic Engineering is also offered. A broad basic training
is given in the fundamental and engineering courses, thus preparing
the student to enter successfully any division of ceramic engineering.
However, the necessary cultural courses are included. The class room,
laboratory and library work are coordinated to combine theoretical and
practical knowledge. Periodic contacts with the clay-working industries
of the State enlarge the practical viewpoint of the student.
The department also concerns itself with direct service to the ceramic
industries. This takes the form of research, testing of materials and
products, and manufacturing assistance. Georgia is in the center of an
area which produces much of the country's supply of ceramic raw ma
terials, and either leads or ranks high in the production of kaolin,
fullers earth, ocher, manganese and limestone. In recognition of favor
able market and manufacturing advantages, the department is using its
facilities to aid logical industrial development in the South.
Course
Cer. E.
Cer. E.
Eng.
Math.
Phys.
R.O.T.C.
Cer. E.
Chern.
Eng.
Math.
Phys.
R.O.T.C.
THE COURSE IN CERAMIC ENGINEERING
FRESHMAN YEAR
No.
21
23
3S
23
27
S
24
13
34
24
28
4
See Page 34
SOPHOMORE YEAR
FIRST TERM
Subject Class
Functional Ceramic Art ______________________ _
Products and lIIaterlals____________________ ____ 3
Humanities __________________________________ 3
Dlfterential Calculus ______________ ___________ 5
Physics ________________ _____________________ _
Military or Naval Instructlon _________________ _
Total___________________________ 16
SECOND TERM
Equipment and Tests _________________________ _
Qualitative Analysis ________________________ _
Humanities _________________________________ _
Integral Calculus ___________________________ _
Physics ______ _______________________________ _
Military or Naval Instructlon _________________ _
1
2
3
5
5
TotaL____________________ ______ 16
[ 56]
Lab.
S
11
3
6
5
17
Credit
3
3
5
6
1.5
19.5
3
3
5
1.5
20.5
-
course No.
cer.E. 31
Cer. E. 35
Geol. 41
Mech. 33
M.E. 43
Dr. 23
'Ec. 95
CERAMIC ENGINEERING
JUNIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM
Subject Class
Processing and Formlng_______________________ 3
Heavy Clay Products Laboratory --------------
General Geology -----------------------------
Applied Mechanics ___________________________ 3
Thermodynamics ________________________ _____ 2
Engineering Drawing --------- ----------------
Accounting ___________________________________ 3
TotaL__________________________ 14
'Military or Naval Instruction Is optional for Accounting.
Cer. E. 36
Cer. E. 38
Cbem. 20
Gcol. 44
Mech. 36
Phys. 50
Course No.
Cer.E. 51
Cer.E. 59
Cer.E. 165
Chem. 151
Geol. 51
M. E. n
'/d.E. 45
SECOND T ERM
Bodies _______________________________________ 4
Calcul.atlons _________________________________ 3
Quantitative Analysis -----------------------
General Geology Laboratory --------------------
Applled Mechanics ___________________________ 2
Pyrometry -----------------------------------
Total_______________________ ____ 13
Subject
SENIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM
Drying Claywares ---------------------------
Whltewares Laboratory ----------------------
Ceramic Microscopy -------------------------
Physical Cbemlstry ---------------------------
Mineralogy ----------------------------------
Steam Power EnglneerLng _____________________ _
Instruments and Fuel L:lboratory --------------
Class
3
1
2
4
57
Lab. Credit
6 2
3
3 4
2
6 2
3
15 19
3
3
12
Lab.
3
3
4
3
5
2
17
Credit
3
3
4
2
1.3
TotaL _______________________ ,__ 15 15 19.3
'~1l1itary or Naval Instruction optional for Instruments and Fuel Laboratory.
Cer. E. 52
Cer.E. 54
Cer.E. 56
Cer. E. 64
Cbem. 152
'Ec. 24
SECOND TERM
Firing Claywares -----------------------------
Retractorles ____ _____________________________ _
"Itreous Ceramic Coatlng"-___________________ _
Design and Constructlon _____________________ _
Physical Chemistry --________________________ _
Economics --____________________________ _
? 'Electlves ________________________ __________ _
2
2
3
.3
3
TotaL__________________________ 13
.~ll1ltary or Naval Instruction Is optional for Economics.
3
8
11
2
4
2.5
S
S
3
19.5
58 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
OOELECTIVES
COltrse N o. Subject Class Lab. Credit
Cer. E. 70
Cer. E . 110
Cer . E . 120
Thesis
E n n m els ____________________________ ________ _
Cements ____________________________________ _
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
NOTE: 4-3-5 means 4 hou7'S class, 3 hours laboratory, 5 hOllrs credit.
CER. E. 21. FUNCTIONAL CERAMIC ART.
Sophomore, first term, 0-3-1.
History, theory and practice of color and design composition; their
functional values in utilitarian ceramic products.
CER. E. 23. PRODUCTS AND MATERIALS. Prerequisite, Chern. 4.
Sophomore, first term, 3-0-3.
An engineering survey of ceramics i relationship between industrial
service requirements and the properties of ceramic products. The com
mon ceramic materials are classified according to mineralogical charac
ter; their influence on each other and the effects of size, physical, and
pro-physical properties of particles are stressed.
CER. E. 24. EQUIPMENT AND TESTS. Prerequisite, Cer. E. 23.
Sophomore, second term, 1-3-2.
Testing of ceramic raw materials and products; requirements of
proper test methods and practical applications to industry.
Interpretation of results and writing of formal reports. Uses, opera
tion, and calibration of machinery, apparatus, and equipment for ceramic
manufacture or testing. Mathematical analysis of data; inherent errors.
CER. E. 31. PROCESSING AND FORMING. Prerequisite, Cer. E. 24.
Junior, first term, 3-0-3.
Winning, refining and preparation of ceramic raw materials; methods
and mechani sm of processing and forming ceramic products; their effects
on the control of the properties of the products and adaptation to service
requirements.
CER. E. 35. HEAVY CLAY PRODUCTS LABORATORY. Prerequisite, Cer.
E. 31.
Junior, first term, 0-6-2.
CERAMIC ENGINEERING 59
The relation of laboratory technique to plant practice including
erties of materials, machines, processing and products. Commercial
prop materials and products are provided and analyzed and, where prac
raW . I .. d
tical, the correspondmg p ants are vlstte .
CRR. E. 36. BODIES. Prerequisites, Chern. 13, Cer. E. 31.
Junior, second term, 4-0-4.
The physical and chemical properties of earthy materials throughout
mmon processes used in the production of ceramic wares. Control of
co . d'h d h . phases of manufactur~ to m~ro. uce In t e pro ~ct t ~se properttes
vice conditions reqUIre. Pnnctpally concerned With white-wares, but ~~~ra cotta, heavy clay products and glass are included.
CER. E. 38. CALCULATIONS. Prerequisite, Cer. E. 31.
Junior, second term, 3-0-3.
Solutions of engineering and practical mathematical problems m-
volved in the manufacture of ceramic wares. Statistical methods.
CRR. E. 51. DRYING CLAYWARES. Prerequisites, Phys. 28, Cer. E. 36.
Senior, first term, 3-0-3.
Fundamental considerations of water removal from unfired ceramic
oducts by heat and air. Control of humidity, tempe rature, air velocity ~~d volume; economy and efficiency of drying and driers; problems to be
met in safe drying.
CER. E. 52. FIRING CLAYWARES. Prerequisite, Phys. 28, M. E. 77.
Senior, second term, 2-0-2.
Objectives of firing; combustion behavior of gaseous, liquid and solid
fuels' the mechanics of heat transfer, physical and chemical properties
of cl~y and other raw materials under heat treatment; design, operation
and heat accounts of periodic and continuous kilns.
CRR. E. 54. RFRACTORIES.
Senior, second term, 2-0-2.
The utilization of refractories in industry i the control of properties
of refractories through raw materials and all phases of manufacture to
best meet industrial requirements i fundamentals of aggregate packing
and photo-elastic study of expansion and contraction.
CER. E. 56. VITREOUS CERAMIC COATINGS.
Senior, second term, 3-3-4.
60 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
Phase relations of the important oxides and the properties of these
oxides in siliceous melts are studied. The fundamental underlying meth
ods of calculating, compounding, manufacturing and using silicate coat
ings on ceramic and metallurgical bodies are covered as well as the
methods commonly employed to correct faults.
CER. E. 59. WHITEWARES LABORATORY. Prerequisite, Cer. E. 36.
Senior, first term, 1-6-3.
Practical and fundamental laboratory studies to determine the control
characteristics and properties of molds, saggers, whitewares, and slips
by experiment and conclusions. Students are also encouraged to design
and execute pieces and experiments in their spare time.
CER. E. 64. DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION. Prerequisite, Cer. E. 51.
Senior, second term, 0-8-2.5.
Design and working drawings of ceramic manufacturing equipment
and plant layouts for specified products. The student makes his own
selection under the supervision and with the approval of the instructor.
CER. E. 70. THESIS.
Senior, second term, 0-9-3.
Each senior electing to prosecute a thesis, conducts an original in
vestigation on an approved ceramic subject under the supervision of
the instructor in charge. The object of this course is to place the student
upon his own initiative and to coordinate the knowledge that he has
previously received.
CER. E. 110. ENAMELS.
Senior, second term, 2-3-3.
Covers metallurgy and foundation materials, and the processing of
the metal and enamels for sheet iron and cast iron enameled ware. Past
and current theory and practice are included.
CER. E. 120. CEMENTS.
Senior, second term, 2-3-3.
Includes the required properties of raw materials, processing and
the hydraulic properties of cements. Portland, magnesia, high alumina,
dental, and gypsiferous cements are included.
CERAMIC ENGINEERING 61
CER. E. 165. CERAM IC MICROSCOPY. Prerequisite, Geo!. 51 , Phys. 28.
Senior, first term, 2-3-3.
Involves the use of the microscope in the study and control of com
position and structure of ceramic bodies and raw materials. Nature of
light and crystallography are briefly studied.
INSPECTION TRIPS.
Periodically during the course, representative ceramic industries of
the Southeast are visited and studied. The seniors are encouraged to
attend the annual meeting of the American Ceramic Society and to take
part in the functions and plant tours.
For Graduate Courses see page 182 of this catalogue.
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND CHEMICAL
ENGINEERING
GILBERT H. BOGGS, PROFESSOR AND DIRECTOR OF THE' DEPARTMENT
The Department operates in two branches, the Division of Chem_
istry and the Division of Chemical Engineering.
THE DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY
JOHN L. DANIEL, PROFESSOR AND CHIEF OF THE DIVISION
PROFESSORS WROTH AND TAYLOR, W.S.; ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR FRIED
MAN, ASSISTANT PROFESSORS WELLS, RICHARDSON, WHITLEY, AND
WADDLE; INSTRUCTORS SPICER, TAYLOR, J. L. EDWARDS, CALAWAY, AND
CLARY, AND ASSISTANTS
Included in this Division are:
1. The courses in chemistry required in the vanous engineering
curricula.
2. A curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in
Chemistry.
3. Graduate courses which may be used in meeting the requirements
for the Master's Degree. (See page 183.)
The number of students accepted as candidates for the degree in
chemistry will be limited. A selection will be made at the beginning of
both the Sophomore and the Junior years.
FRESHMAN YEAR
See page 34. German must be elected.
I 62 ]
CHEMISTRY AND CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 63
-Cattrse No.
Chem. 15
Eng. 33
Math. 23
PhYs. 21
MIl. 3
-Chem. 20
Eng. 34
Math. 24
Phys. 28
MIl. 4
Course No.
Chern. 28
Chern. 151
Ee. 24
Chern. 29
Chern. 158
Phys. 161
Course No.
Chern. 101
Chern. 128
SOPHOMORE YEAR
FIRST TERM
Subjfct
'l'heory of Analys!s ____________________________
Humanities
- --- - - -- - --- ---- - ------- ---- - -----
Differential Calculus
------------ ---------- ----
Mechanics and He n L _______ _________________ __
R.O.T.C. Basic Cou r8e ____ _____________________
'fotaL _____ _____________________
SECOND TERM
Quantitative Analysis -------------------------
Humanities ------------ ---------- ------------
Integral Calculus ----------------------------
Electricity, Sound, and LlghL _________________
R.O.T.C. Basic Course _________________________
Total ______________ _____________
JUNIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM
Subject
Organic Chemistry ___________________________ _
Physical Chemistry _________________________ _
Economics for Englneers _____________________ _
Electives ___________________________________ _
SECOND TERM
Organic Chemistry ________ _______________ ____ _
Physical Chemistry __________________________ _
Introduction to Modern Physlcs _______________ _
Electives
Subject
SENIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM
Advanced TopIcs In ChemIstry ________________ _
TechnIcal Analysis __________________________ _
Electives
SECOND TERM
Chern. 108 Advanced TopIcs In ChemIstry ------------____ _
Chern. 111 IndustrIal Chemistry ------------ --------------
Chern. 114 OrganIc AnalysIs -----------------------------Electives __________ _________________________ _
Class Lab. Credit
5
3 3
5
1.5
16 14 20.5
3 5
3 3
5
3 6
5 1.5
16 14 20.5
Class Lab. Credit
4 5.6
3 3
6
3
3 4.6
3
Class Lab. Credit
3
4
10
3 S
3
4
8
64 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
The degree, Bachelor of Science in Chemistry, will be awarded upon
the completion of the above prescribed courses and 30 semester hours
of elective work chosen from the following list of subjects in confer_
ence with the Chief of the Division. No elective course will be given
for less than six applicants. A student must have had the prerequisites
for any course he elects.
COllrse
Chern.
Chern.
Chern.
Chern.
Chern.
Chern.
No.
121
122
105-6
123
124
125
ELECTIVES
S.tbjcct Class Lab. Credit
Colloid Chemistry _________________ ___________ 3 3 4
Food and Nutrltlon__________________________ 2 3 3
Specl-al Problems ______________________________ (By Arrangement)
Topics In Organic Chemlstry___________________ 3 3
Topics In Physical Chemlstry__________________ 3 3
Valence and Structural Cbemlstry______________ 3
Any Course In Chemical EngIneering
Any No. 200 to 299 Course In Chemistry
Any Course In Biology
Any Course In Geology
Any Course In Physics from No. 100 to No. 299
Any Course In Mathematics from No. 100 to 299
English 45
Mil. 5. 6, 1, 8
Phys. 65
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN CHEMISTRY
NOTE: 4-3-5 meallS 4 hours class, 3 hours laboratory, 5 hours credit.
t:HEM. O.
Students unprepared to take the Freshman Chemistry course are
placed in Chern. O. No college credit is allowed for completion of this
course.
CHEM. 3-4. ELEMENTARY GENERAL CHEMISTRY.
Both courses, both terms, Freshman, 4-3-4. Fee, $3.00, each term.
In this course the simpler and more fundamental laws and theories
of Chemistry are studied with enough descriptive matter for illustrative
purposes. Parallel laboratory work exemplifies the classroom study.
CHEM. 7-8. GENERAL CHEMISTRY. Prerequisite, Entrance Chemis
try and Physics.
First and second terms, Freshman, 3-3-4. Fee, $3.00, each term.
A somewhat more advanced course for Freshmen who have had good
preparatory courses in Chemistry and Physics.
CHEMISTRY AND CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
CHEM. 7c-8c. GENERAL CHEMISTRY.
First term, Freshmen Co-op, 5-3-4.
Second term, Freshmen Co-op., 4-6-4. Fee, $3.00, each term.
65
CHEM. 13. ELEMENTARY QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS. Prerequisite,
Chern. 4, with a minimum grade of C, or Chern. 8.
Second term, Sophomore, Cer. E. and T. E., 2-6-3. Fee, $5.00.
The lectures deal with the fundamental laws and theories of analyti
cal chemistry. The practice work includes the identification of the com
lDon positive and negative ions.
CHEM. 13c. THE THEORY OF ANALYSIS. Prerequisite, Chern. 8c.
First term, Co-operative Sophomore Ch. E. and Pre-Junior T. E.,
3-9-3.3. Fee, $5.00.
The lectures deal with the laws and theories of analytical chemistry
and the practice work with inorganic reactions and the identification of
both positive and negative ions.
CHEM. 15. THE THEORY OF ANALYSIS. Prerequisite, Chern. 4 with
a minimum grade of B, or Chern. 8 with a minimum grade of C and
Math. 17.
First term, Sophomore Chern. and Ch. E., 3-6-5. Fee, $5.00.
A classroom and laboratory study of the laws, theories and reactions
of analytical chemistry with practice work in inorganic reactions and
the identification of both positive and negative ions.
CHEM. 17-18. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS. Prerequisite, Chern. 13.
First term, Senior T. E., and P. H. Eng., 2-6-3. Fee, $5.00.
Second term, Senior T. E., and P. H. Eng., 1-6-2.3. Fee, $5.00.
The purpose of these courses is to give the textile and public health
student drill in the simple manipulations of quantitative chemistry and
the solution of chemical problems.
CHEM. 17c. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS. Prerequisite, Chern. Be.
Second term, Co-operative Sophomore Ch. E., 3-9-3.3. Fee, $5.00.
This course is similar to Chern. 20 but somewhat shorter.
CHEM. 20. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS. Prerequisite, Chern. 13 or
Chern. 15.
66 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
Second term, Sophomore Chern. and Ch. E. and Junior Cer. E.,
3-6-5. Fee, $5.00.
A course designed to acquaint the student with the apparatus and
manipulations of the analyst. The determinations will be selected to
illustrate typical procedures.
CHEM. 26-27. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. Prerequisite, Chern. 4 or
Chern. 8.
First and second terms, Junior T. E., 3-3-4. Fee, $6.00, each term. \
A study of the various classes of organic compounds. The labora
tory work is similar to Chern. 28 and 29 but not as extended.
CHEM. 28-29. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. Prerequisite, Chern. 4 or
Chern. 8.
First and second terms, Junior Chern. and Ch. E., 3-6-5. Fee, $8.00,
each term.
The principal classes of organic compounds, aliphatic and aromatic
are studied. The laboratory work includes the preparation of typicai
compounds and the study of their properties.
CHEM. 3lc-32c. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. Prerequisite, Chern. 8c.
First and second terms, Co-operative Junior T. E., 4-4-3.6. Fee,
$6.00, each term.
Similar to Chern. 26-27 with fewer laboratory exercises.
CHEM. 35c-36c. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. Prerequisite, Chern. 8c.
First and second terms, Co-operative pre-Junior Ch. E. 4-8-4.4. Fee,
$8.00, each term.
Similar to Chern. 28-29.
CHEM. 105-106. SPECIAL PROBLEMS. Prerequisite, Chern. 20 and
Chern. 29.
Either term, Senior Chern.
The instruction will be individual and will include library, confer
ence, and laboratory work. The time and fees will vary with the prob
lem studied.
CHEM. 107-108. ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. Prerequisite,
Chern. 158.
First and second terms, Senior Chern., 3-0-3.
CHEMISTRY AND CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 67
The chemical reactions of atoms and ions; the periodic law; the
electronic theory of valence; history of chemistry.
CHEM. 111. INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY. Prerequisite, Chern. 29.
Second term, Senior Chern., 3-0-3.
The chemistry of the Process Industries IS studied, as well as the
orientation of the chemist in industry.
CHEM. 114. ORGANIC ANALYSIS, QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE.
Prerequisite, Chern. 20 and Chern. 29.
Second term, 1-9-4. Fee, $6.00.
Ultimate analyses of organic substances are made and the methods
of identification of compounds and characteristic groups are studied.
CHEM. 121. COLLOID CHEMISTRY. Prerequisite, Chern. 147.
First or second term, 3-3-4. Fee, $3.00.
Lectures, recitation, and laboratory work on the preparation, prop
erties, and practical applications of colloidal substances.
CHEM. 122. FOOD AND NUTRITlON, BIOCHEMISTRY. Prerequisite,
Chern. 20 and Chern. 29.
First or second term, 2-3-3.
A study of the chemistry involved in the production and distribution
of foods and in their nutritive values.
CHEM. 123. TOPICS IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. Prerequisite, Chern.
29.
First or second term, 3-0-3.
Special topics such as carbohydrates, heterocyclic compounds, isomer
ism and molecular rearrangements.
CHEM. 124. TOPICS IN PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. Prerequisite, Chern.
158.
First or second term, 3-0-3.
The topics chosen depend upon the interests a~d needs of the stu
dents and cover such fields as chemical thermodynamics, kinetics of
chemical reactions, catalysis, phase rule, and electrochemistry.
CHEM. 125. VALENCE AND STRUCTURAL CHEMISTRY. Prerequisite,
Chern. 158.
First or second term, 3-0-3.
68 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
A critical discussion of the modern concept of valence and a study
of the relationship between molecular structure and physical and chem
ical properties.
CHEM. 128. TECH NICAL ANALYSIS. Prerequisite, Chern. 20.
First term, Senior Chern., 1-9-4. Fee, $5.00.
Tests and analyses of commercial products and methods used in the
control of plant operations will be studied in class and laboratory. The
modern instruments of the analytical chemist will be used.
CHEM. 147-158. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. Prerequisite, Chern. 20,
Phys. 28, and Math. 24.
First term, Junior Ch. E., 3-5-4.6. Fee, $3.00.
Second term, Junior Ch. E., 3-5-4.6. Fee, $3.00.
Courses in theoretical chemistry similar to Chern. 157-158, but not
as comprehensive, and with some stress on engineering applications.
A laboratory course illustrating the principles studied accompanies the
lectures.
CHEM. 151-152. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. Prerequisite, Chern. 20,
Phys. 28, Math. 24.
First term, Senior Cer. E., 4-0-4.
Second term, Senior Cer. E., 3-0-3.
These courses consist of the lectures only of Chern. 157-158 below.
CHEM. 157-158. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. Prerequisite, Chern. 20,
Phys. 28, Math. 24.
First term, Junior Chern., 4-5-5.6. Fee, $3.00.
Second term, Junior Chern., 3-5-4.6. Fee, $3.00.
Physico-chemical properties of matter in the gaseous, liquid, solid,
and colloidal states; equilibrium, kinetics, and thermodynamics of chem
ical reactions; electrochemistry. A laboratory course illustrating the
principles studied accompanies the lectures.
CHEM. 153c-154c. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. Prerequisite, Chern. 17c,
Chern. 36c, Phys. 35c, and Math. 33c.
This sequence is identical in content with Chern. 147-158.
First term, Co-op Junior Ch. E., 5-6-4.7. Fee, $3.00.
Second term, Co-op Junior Ch. E., 5-6-4.7. Fee, $3.00.
THE DIVISION OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
HAROLD A. BUNGER, PROFESSOR AND CHIEF OF THE DIVISION
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR WEBER, PAUL, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR
MASON, J . W., INSTRUCTORS YATES AND GRUBB, AND ASSISTANTS
The degree B.S. in Chemical Engineering may be obtained upon the
mpletion of the following curriculum, or that offered on the Co-opera ~?ve Plan. (See page 86.) The number of students who will be permit
t
1
d to register for the Junior and Senior work in Chemical Engineering
eill be strictly limited. The selection will be made on the basis of the :~udent's ability as demonstrated in two years of previous work.
Courses are also described in this section which, along with those
outlined in the Graduate section, may be used as credit towards the
Master's Degree in Chemical Engineering.
FRESHMAN YEAR
See page 34. Chemical German must be elected, and if Chern. 3 and
4 are taken, the record must be above the average of the class.
SOPHOMORE YEAR
Same as for Chemistry, except that an introductory course is added
for Chemical Engineers, which is described on page 70.
COllrse No.
Ch. E. 45
Chem. 28
Chem. 141
Ec. 21
Mech. 35
Ch. E. 44
Cil. E . 56
Chem. 29
Chem. 158
FA:. 22
Mech. 36
JUNIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM
Subject Class Lab. Credit
Gas-Fuels, Stoichiometry ______________________ 3
Organic Chemistry ____ ________________________ 3
Physical Cberolstry ____ _______ _______________ 3
Econoluics ______________ _____________________ 3
Applied Mecbanlcs ____________________________ 3
TotaL___________________ _______ 15
SECOND TERM
Chem. Eng. Literatu re________________________ 1
Unit Operations ______ _______ _____ _____ _______ 3
Organic Chemistry _______ _______ __________ ____ 3
Physical Chemistry __________________________ 3
Economics ______________________ __ ______ _____ 3
Mechanics of M?aterlals-__ ____________________ _
TotaL________ __ _________ _______ 15
[69 ]
3
6
14
3
6
5
14
5
4.6
19.6
4.6
3
2
19.6
70 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
SENIOR YEAR
FIRST T ERM
Course No . Subject Class Lab. Credit
Ch. E. 41
Ch.E. 157
Ch.E. 161
Ch. E. 109
Ch.E. In
E. E. 2
Ch. E. 110
Ch.E. 162
Ch.E. 172
E.E. 3a
M. E. 7S
M.E. 74
PhY8. 161
Phys. 65
EngIneerIng MaterIals ________________________ 3 3 4
Unit Operations ______________________________ 3 3 4
Chern. Technology ------------------__________ 3 3
SpecIal Problems ___________________________ _
Ch. E. Calculatlons____________________________ 3
Applied ElectrIcity ___________________________ 3
Total___________________________ 15
SECOND TERM
Special Problems
-----------------------------
Chem. Technology
---------------------------- 3
Ch. E. Calculatlons ____________________________ 3
E . E . Laboratory _____________________________
Heat Engines
--------------------------------
4
Heat Engines Labora tory ______________________
Int. Modern Physlcs ___________________________
Advanced Laboratory
-------------------------
Elective
------------------------------------- 2
Tot?aL __________ ________________ 15
9
3
3
3
3
12
3
3
18
1
3
3
1.3
4
3
1
2
19.3
155.5 Is the minImum number of credits required for the Bachelor of Science Degree
In ChemIcal Engineering.
MllItary or Naval Electives:
JunIor, first term _________________________ Ec. 21
Junior, second term _______________________ Ec. 22
SenIor, first and second, term ______________ N one
Ch. E. 160 will be offered to ten Seniors as an elective in the second
term Senior year.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN CHEMICAL
ENGINEERING
CH. E. 33-34. I NTRODUCTION TO CHEMICAL ENGINEERING.
First and second term, Sophomore, Ch. E ., 0-1.5-0.
An introduction to Chemical Engineering is offered in the form of
a course to students who will become applicants to enter the junior
Chemical Engineering curriculum. There is no outside preparation. The
course is meant to give the prospective student a preview of the training
in Chemical Engineering and the place of the Chemical Engineer in
industry, in order to permit him to be certain that he wishes to pursue
the curriculum in the junior and senior year, and to permit the Chemical
Engineering staff to become acquainted with the students so that they
may be intelligently selected at the beginning of the junior year. The
CHEMISTRY AND CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 71
urse consists of lectures, practice in the use of general Chemical prin
c~ I s calculations, lectures from visiting engineers, and visual training.
CIP e ,
CH. E. 33c-34c. INTRODUCTION TO CHEMICAL ENGINEERING.
First and second term, Co-operative Sophomore, Ch. E., 0-2-.5.
See course description under Ch. E. 33-34.
CH. E. 41. ENGINEERING MATERIALS. Prerequisite, Chern. 147.
First term, Senior Ch. E., 3-3-4. Fee, $3.00.
An introduction to the properties and preparation of the materials
ed in the construction of chemical plant equipment. Elementary phys ~s I metallurgy, heat treatment and corrosion are included in the class
lea k while these topics form the major portion of the laboratory course. wo r ,
CR. E. 41c. ENGINEERING MATERIALS. Prerequisite, Chern. 153c.
Second term, Co-operative Senior Ch. E., 3-3-2.6. Fee, $3.00.
See course description under Ch. E. 41.
CH. E. 44. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING LITERATURE. Prerequisite, Ch.
E.45.
Second term, Junior, Ch. E., 1-0-1.
This course has as its objective the trammg of students in the use
of the sources of information and an introduction on how to find infor
mation in the library.
CH. E. 44c. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING LITERATURE.
Second term, Co-operative Junior, Ch. E., 1-0-.7.
See description under Ch. E. 44.
CH. E. 45. GAS AND FUELS, INDUSTRIAL STOICHIOMETRY. Prereq
uisite, Chern. 20.
First term, Junior Ch. E., 3-3-4. Fee, $3.50.
A study of the utilization of fuels, their evaluation, analysis, calori
fic value, as well as the examination of petroleum products and boiler
water. Heat and material balances are introduced.
CH. E. 45c. GAS AND FUELS, INDUSTRIAL STOlCHIOMETRY. Prereq
uisite, Chern. 17 c.
First term, Co-operative Junior, Ch. E., 3-3-2.6. Fee, $3.50.
Similar to Ch. E. 45.
72 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
CH. E. 56. UNIT OPERATIONS. Prerequisite, Mech. 35.
Second term, Junior Ch. E., 3-3-4. Fee, $3.00.
The types of equipment used for the Unit Operations of Chemical
Engineering are discussed, the fundamental theory developed, and num
erous problems solved in this connection. Problems are also given which
involve the specification of equipment after consideration of the economic
factors involved. The laboratory work follows the class work in actual
performance tests of equipment.
CH. E. 56c. UNIT OPERATIONS. Prerequisite, Mech. 47c.
Second term, Co-operative Junior Ch. E., 3-3-2.6. Fee, $3.00.
Same as Ch. E. 56.
CH. E. 61. METALLURGY. Prerequisite, Chern. 4 or Chern. 8.
First and second terms, Junior G. E., and Senior E. E., 2-0-2.
This is primarily a course in elementary applied physical metallurgy,
with accent on the study of the ferrous metals. The time devoted to
such subjects as ore dressing, reduction and refining, is the minimum
required to lay a foundation for the discussion of these processes on the
final properties and structure of the metal.
CH. E. 61c. METALLURGY. Prerequisite, Chern. 8c.
First term, Co-operative Pre-Junior C. E., M. E., Senior E. E.,
4-0-2.6.
Same content as Ch. E. 67.
CH. E. 67. METALLURGY. Prerequisite, Chern. 4 or Chern. 8.
First and second terms, Sophomore, M. E., and A. E., 3-0-3.
A study of the fundamental principles of ferrous metallurgy and
metallography, and the heat treatment of steels, alloy steels, and cast
iron, which furnishes the theory for a subsequent course in heat treat
ment.
CH. E. 109-110. SPECIAL PROBLEMS. Prerequisite, Ch. E. 56 con
currently.
First and second terms, Senior Ch. E., 0-3-1; fee to be arranged.
The student is given an opportunity to develop initiative and to apply
fundamental principles by doing semi-original laboratory investigation
of a Chemical Engineering research nature.
CH. E. 109c-110c. SPECIAL PROBLEMS. Prerequisite, Ch. E. 16lc.
t
I
CHEMISTRY AND CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 73
First and third terms, Co-operative Senior Ch. E., 0-6-1.3. Fee will
be arranged.
Same content as Ch. E. 109-110.
CH. E. 157. UNIT OPERATIONS. Prerequisite, Ch. E. 56.
First term, Senior Ch. E., 3-3-4. Fee, $3.00.
A continuation of Ch. E. 56.
CH. E. 157c-158c. UNIT OPERATIONS. Prerequisite, Ch. E. 56c.
First and second terms, Co-operative Senior Ch. E., 3-3-2.6. Fee,
$3.00.
Continuation of Ch. E. 56c.
CH. E. 159-160. DESIGN OF CHEMICAL MACHINERY AND ApPARA
TUS. Prerequisite, Ch. E. 157.
First and second terms, Senior Ch. E., 0-8-2.6.
Equipment for a specified purpose and capacity is designed from the
student's calculations. Sketches are made which form an adequate basis
for a machine drawing. Plant layouts are included as well as individual
pieces of equipment.
CH. E. 160c. DESIGN OF CHEMICAL MACHINERY AND ApPARATUS.
Prerequisite, Ch. E. 16lc.
Third term, Co-operative Senior Ch. E., 0-8-1.7.
Parallel content to Ch. E. 159-160.
CH. E. 161-162. CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY. Prerequisite, Chern. 29
and Ch. E. 56.
First term, Senior Ch. E., 3-0-3.
Second term, Senior Ch. E., 3-0-3.
The chemical and chemical engineering principles which underlie the
process industries are studied. Economic factors which have a bearing
are included.
CH. E. 161c-162c-163c. CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY. Prerequisite,
Chern. 36c and Chern. 56c.
First, second and third terms Co-operative Senior Ch. E., 3-0-2.
Same content as Ch. E. 161-162.
CH. E. 165. PHYSICAL METALLURGY. Prerequisite, Ch. E. 41, or
equivalent.
74 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
First term, Senior and Graduate Ch. E., M. E., 3-3-4. Fee, $3.00.
The material discussed includes theory of heat treatment, corrosion,
physical testing and allied subjects in both ferrous and non-ferrous
metallurgy.
CH. E. 171-172. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING CALCULATIONS. Prereq-
uisite, Ch. E. 56, Chern. 147.
First term, Senior Ch. E., 3-0-3.
Second term, Senior Ch. E., 3-0-3.
The application of physicochemical principles and the thermodynamic
method to the problems of industry.
CH. E. 171c-l72c-173c. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING CALCULATIONS.
P rerequisite, Ch. E. 56c, Chern. 147c and 148c.
F irst, second and third term Co-operative Senior Ch. E., 3-0-2.
Same content as Ch. E. 171-172.
DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING
PROFESSORS SNOW AND J. M. SMITH; ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS BLACK
AND LUCAS; ASSISTANT PROFESSOR THRASH
Civil Engineering is construction engineering. The Civil Engineer
designs, builds, maintains and, often times, operates railroads, highways,
bridges, buildings, harbors, sewers, sewage disposal plants, water sup
plies, power developments, irrigation systems, drainage districts, airports,
city plans and maps.
He is given a title , such as, highway engineer, bridge engineer, etc.,
depending on which of these becomes his specialty, but the title of "Civil
Engineer," which embraces all of them, is the important one, toward
which a college course should lead.
As practical experience is demanded before the C. E. degree can be
granted, it is proper to confer the B. S. in C. E. at the end of the college
course, or the M. S. in C. E. later, if enough additional college work
is completed.
Based on these fundamental ideas, this civil engineering course, cov
ering basic subjects, is offered.
[ 75 ]
76
Course No.
C.E. 23
Eng. 33
Math. 23
Phys. 21
R.O.T.C.
C.E. 24
Eng. 34
Math. 24
Phys. 28
R.O.T.C. 4
C OII,rse No.
BIoI. 38
C.E. 25
C.E. 33
Geol. 41
Math. 136
Mech. 39
Mech. 47
C. E. 35
C.E. 36
Eng. 45
Geol. 46
Mecb. 48
M. E. 44
M. E. 10
GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
FRESHMAN YEAR
See Page 34
SOPHOMORE YEAR
FIRST TERM
Subject
Plane Surveying ____________________________ _
Humanities _________________________________ _
Calculus ____________________________________ _
Physics _____________________________________ _
MlIltary or Naval Tralnlng ___________________ _
Class
2
3
5
5
TotaL __________________________ 15
SECOND T ERM
Route Surveying ________________________ _
Humanities _________________________________ _
Calculus ____________________________________ _
Physics _____________________________________ _
Military or Naval Tralnlng ___________________ _
2
3
5
5
Tot.L__________________________ 15
General
JUNIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM
Subject
Bacteriology
-------------------------
Civil Engineering Dr awing ____________________
Hydraulics
--
- - -------------------------------
Geology
-------------------------------------
Dlfferentlal Equations (Elec. for MIl.) ________
Applled Mech?anlcs
----------------------- ----
Mechanics of Materlals ________________________
Total ___________________________
SECOND TERM
Sewage and Sewerage Treatment ______________ _
Engineering Economics (Elec. for MIl.) _______ _
Public Speaking ____________________________ _
Geology _____________________________________ _
Mechanics of Materlals ___________________ ____ _
Thermodynamics ______________________ ______ _
Weldlng and Heat TreatmcnL ________________ _
Class
2
3
3
3
3
2
16
2
3
3
3
3
TotaL______ ____________________ 16
Lab.
6
3
14
3
5
14
Lab.
4
3
3
10
3
3
3
Credit
4
3
5
6
1.5
19.5
4
3
5
6
1.5
19.5
Credit
1
3
3
3
4
2
19
2
2
3
4
3
3
18
CIVIL ENGINEERING 77
SENIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM
No. COllrse Subject Class Lab. Credit
C.E. 48 Highway Economics
------------------------- - 2 3 3 C.E. 51 W ... ter Supply Engineering (Elec. or MIl.) ______ 2 2 C.E. 153 Framed Structures
--------------------------- 3 3 4 C. E. 155 Reinforced Concrete
-------------------------- 3 3 4 Ec. 24 Economics
----------------------------------- 3 3 Geol. 51 Mineralogy
----------------------------------- 1 3 2 M. E. 51 Materials Laboratory
------------------------- 1 3 1.3
TotaL __________________________
15 15 19.3
SECOND T ERM
=
Elec.) _______ C.E. 61 Contracts and Spectflcatlons (Mil. 2 C.E. 154 Framed Structures
--------------------------- 2 3 3 C.E. 156 Concrete Structures
--- ----------------------- 2 3 3 C.E. 159 Highway Economics
---- ---------------------- 2 3 3 C.E. 164 City Planning
-------------------------------- 3 2 M.E. 56 Hydraulic Laboratory
------------------------ 1 3 1.3 M.E. 11 Elementary Steam Power Engineerlng __________ 3 3
1'otaL __________ ________________
13 15 11.3
COURSE S OF I STRUCTION
NOTE: 4-3-5 means 4 hours class,3 hours laboratory, 5 hours credit.
C. E. 21, 21 c, 23. PLANE SURVEYING. Prerequisite, Math. 17, lIe.
Fee, $1.00.
Sophomore A. E. and M . E. , second term, 1-3-2.
Junior P. H. E., first term, 1-3-2.
Sophomore C. E., and Junior G. E. , firs t term, 2-6-4.
Junior T . E., second term, 1-3-2.
Pre-J unior C . E. and M. E. Co-op. , first term, 2-4-2.2.
The construction, care and use of surveying ins truments, traversing,
land surveying, profile and differential leveling, computation of areas,
parting of land, reduction and plotting of field notes.
Theory of stadia, pla ne table applications to topog r aphic surveying,
city and mine surveying, U. S. Government system of public land sur
veys. Filing and recording of deeds.
For the final project a complete topographic survey is made and the
notes plotted. A finished map is required of each student.
78 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
Texts: Elements of Surveying, Davis, Foote and Rayner. Plane
Surveying, Finch; Surveying Manual, Ives.
C. E. 24, 24c. ROUTE SURVEYING. Prerequisites, C. E. 23, 21c. Fee,
$1.00.
Sophomore C. E., second term, 2-6-4.
Junior C. E. Co-op., first term, 3-4-3.
Reconnaissance, preliminary, location and construction surveys for
routes of all kinds, including simple, compound and reverse curves,
spirals and easement curves as used on railroads and highways. Super
elevation of curves. Computations of earthwork. Construction of quan
tity, haul and mass diagrams.
For a final project a complete railroad location must be made and
the maps finished.
Text: Route Surveying, Ruby.
C. E. 25, 25c, 26c. CIVIL ENGINEERING DRAWING.
Junior C. E., second term, 0-3-1.
Sophomore C. E., Co-op., first term, 0-3-7.
Sophomore C. E. Co-op., second term, 0-6-1.3.
Sophomore P. H. E., first term, 0-3-1.
Mapping, profile plotting, topography, plotting form field notes, titles
and map lettering. For a final project a complete set of highway plans
is required of each student.
Text: French, Engineering Drawing.
C. E. 33, 33c. HYDRAULICS. Prerequisites, Phys. 27, 33c. Math.
23, 32c.
Junior E. E. and G. E., second term, 3-0-3.
Junior C. E., M. E. and P. H. E., first term, 3-0-3.
Junior C. E. and M. E. Co-op., second term, 4-0-2.6.
Junior E. E. Co-op., second term, 4-0-2.6.
The study of the laws which govern the flow of liquids and control
their behavior at rest. Hydrostatics, hydrokinetics, measurement of
volumes. Applications to pipes, canals, conduits. Generation of water
power.
Text: Hydraulics, Schoder and Dawson.
CIVIL ENGINEERING 79
C. E. 35, 35c, 81c, 82c. SEWERAGE AND SEWAGE TREATMENT. Pre-
requisites, C. E. 33, 33c.
Junior c. E. and P. H. E., sec~nd term, 2-0-2.
Senior C. E. , Co-op. , second and third term, 2-0-1.3.
A study of the design, construction and maintenance of sewerage
systems and sewage disposal plants. Methods of sewage disposal.
Text: Civil Engineering Handbook, Urquhart.
C. E. 36, 38c. ENGINEERING ECONOMICS.
Junior C. E. and I. M ., second term, 2-0-2.
Pre-Junior Co-op., first term, 3-0-2.
This course is intended to give the student a found ation for the solv
ing of the problems of economic selection. It deals with Interest, An
nuities, Depreciation, Sinking Funds, Salvage, Repairs and Renewals,
Annual Costs, Selection of the best machine for a given purpose, Bonds,
Valuations.
Text: Mimeographed notes.
C. E. 40. QUANTITY SURVEYING.
Senior P. H. E., second term, 1-3-2.
A course in the estimating of q'uantities of materials required in con
struction, made from plans. Material ordering sheets. Reinforced con
crete bar bending schedules, Labor needed in several types of building
construction. Computing of bids and checking of costs. Collection of
cost data.
C. E. 48, 48c, 83c. HIGHWAY ENGINEERING.
Senior C. E., first term, 2-3-3.
Senior C. E. Co-op., second term, 3-6-3.3.
Includes the historic, economic and structural phases of highway
engineering. Study of traffic census, traffic classification as related to
type of highways. Methods of construction and design of highway and
road types. Grades and curves, clear sight distance. Study of soils,
road machinery and materials.
Text: Principles of Highway Engineering, Wyley.
The laboratory course is intended to teach the student how to test
materials of construction such as cement, sand, gravel, slag, rock, etc.,
80 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
for the purpose of deciding whether they are suitable for use m roads,
buildings or other structures. Fee, $1.00.
Text: Mimeographed notes.
C. E. 51, SIc, 85c. WATER SUPPLY ENGINEERING. Prerequisites,
C. E. 33, ~3c.
Senior C. E. and P . H. E., first term, 2-0-2.
Senior C. E., Co-op., first term, 2-0-1.3.
Methods of impounding water, designing of city water systems. The
design of dams and stand pipes. Water purification processes and plants.
Water softening.
Text: Civil Engineering Handbook, Urquhart.
C. E. 61, 61c, 62c. CONTRACTS AND SPECIFICATIONS.
Senior C. E., M. E. and P. H. E., second term, elective, 2-0-2.
Senior C. E., M.E., Co-op., third term, 3-0-2.
A course in business law for engineers and the writing of engineer
ing specifications. A complete set of specifications, contract, proposal,
advertisement, etc., is required of each student as a final project.
Text: Business Law for Engineers, Allen.
C. E . 63c, 164. CITY PLANNING AND GEODETIC SURVEYING. Pre-
requisites, C. E. 23, 21c. Fee, $1.00.
Senior C. E., second term, 1-3-2.
Senior C. E. Co-op., first term , 3-3-2.7.
Cadestral and aerial surveys, astronomical obse rvations, geodetic
computations, city planning, airport design.
Texts: Surveying, Davis, Foote and Raynor i City Planning, Loh
mann i Government bulletins.
C. E. 71, 72. BUILDING CONSTRUCTION.
Senior Arch E., first and second term, 1-3-2.
Methods of designing concrete floors, buildings, columns, beams,
foun dations and footings .
Text : Mimeographed notes.
C. E. 75. MATERIALS OF CONSTRUCTION.
CIVIL E GINEERING 81
Junior M. E., first term, 2-0-2.
Design of concrete mixes, selection of concrete aggregates, mlxmg,
placing and protection of concrete, waterproofing of concrete, design of
simple concrete structures.
Text: Mimeographed notes.
C. E. 86c. RESERVOIRS AND DAMS.
A continuation of 85c dealing with design of D ams, Impounding
Reservoirs and Conduits.
Senior C. E., Co-op., third term, 2-0-1.3.
C. E. 153, 53c, 68c, 69c. FRAMED STRUCTURES. Prerequisites, Mech.
39, 47, 47c, 48, 48c.
Senior C. E., G. E. and P. H. E. , first term, 3-3-4.
Senior C. E. Co-op., first and second term, 2-3-2.2.
A course in which is grouped the analytical and graphical determina
tion of stresses in framed structures. The subjects covered are girders,
roof and bridge trusses, wood and steel trestles, towers, viaducts and
tanks.
Text: Introduction to Structural Theory, Sutherland and Bowman.
C. E. 154, 54c, 70c. FRAMED STRUCTURES. Prerequisite, C. E. 153,
53c.
Senior C. E., second term, 2-3-4.
Senior C. E. Co-op., third term, 2-3-2.2.
A continuation of C. E. 153 and 53c. Designs and detai ls of steel
st ructures. Bills of materials. Detail plans, fabrication and erection.
Text: Steel Structures, Urquhart and O'Rourke.
C. E. 155, 55c, 65c, 66c. REINFORCED CONCRETE. Prerequisites,
~1ech. 39, 47, 47c, 48, 48c, or parallel 48, 48c.
Senior C. E. and P. H. E., first term, 3-3-4.
Senior C. E. Co-op., first and second terms, 2-3-2.2.
Construction of shear and moment diagrams under intricate load
ings and the practical applications to reinforced concrete. Continuous
moments. Straight line design theories, fundamental formulae and the
applications to beams, girders, floors, bridges, columns and buildings.
Text: Mimeographed notes.
82 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
C. E. 156, 56c, 67c. CONCRETE STRUCTURES. Prerequisites, C. E.
155, 55c.
Senior C. E., second term, 2-3-3.
Senior C. E. Co-op., third term, 2-3-2.
A continuation of C. E. 155 and 55c, devoted to the design of re
taining walls, buildings, arches, floors and special structures. E ach
student is placed very largely on his own resources and is watched
carefully and guided by his instructor to prevent him from arriving at
absurdities.
Text: Mimeographed notes.
C. E. 159, 59c, 84c. HIGHWAY ECONOMICS. Prerequisites, C. E. 48,
48c, 83c.
Senior C. E., second term, 2-3-3.
Senior C. E. Co-op., second and third term, 3-6-3.3.
The economic design of highway structures, the costs of maintenance
of various types of pavements, methods of financing road construction,
estimates of original costs. The laboratory work is a continuation of
that of C. E. 48, 48c and 71c. Fee, $1.00.
Text: Johannesson's Highway Economics.
For Graduate Courses see page 185 of this catalogue.
THE CO-OPERATIVE PLAN
COURSES IN CHEMICAL, CIVIL, ELECTRICAL,
MECHANICAL, AND TEXTILE ENGINEERING
J. E. McDANIEL, DIRECTOR OF THE CO-OPERATIVE PLAN; J. I. TEAT,
ASSISTANT TO THE DIRECTOR; MARY WARING GREEN, SECRETARY
(For the faculty see the regular departments listed in alphabetical
order.)
Since 1912 the Georgia School of Technology has offered two courses
in engineering, the standard four-year course as given by other engi
neering colleges, and a five-year co-operative course for those students
who wish to combine practical experience with technical theory.
The Co-operative Plan originally offered only the Mechanical and
the Electrical course; but, during the period between September, 1920,
and September, 1928, the Civil, Textile, and Chemical courses were
added, making five engineering courses available to students under this
Plan. This work is arranged to equip students for positions in design
ing, production, and sales departments of industry.
Under the Co-operative Plan the students are divided into two sec
tions: While section one is on college class work three months, section
rwo is at work for the same length of time in the various shops
throughout the Southeast. The two sections alternate or exchange places
with each other every three months until the second semester of the
senior and fifth year when they merge, remaining at college continu
ously until graduation exercises in June. The students always remain
on the jobs assigned them until the shop and college officials advance
them to a higher grade of work. By the time they graduate they will
have received training in practically all departments of an industry.
Three weeks vacation on college time is given within a year, one week
coming during the Christmas holidays, and two weeks within the month
of June.
No applicant will be placed at work until he has attended classes
under the co-operative plan three months. Without permission from
the co-operative office, no student is allowed to seek a position which
another student has held; neither is he allowed to leave or change
his job.
The school is at present co-operating with about one hundred and
sixty firms, including power companies, gas companies, railroads, manu
facturers of machinery and mechanical equipment, pulp and paper com
panies, chemical industries, foundries, steel mills, construction and engi
neering firms, textile mills, electric and telephone companies. The area
[83 ]
84 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
covered by these industries includes the Southern States and many sec
tions of the Middle Atlantic States.
These co-operating fi rms offer a wide variety of practical training
and many lines of specialization. It is expected that by the end of the
first year the student will have found th e career in which he is most
interested ; the school will then use every effort to place him in the work
for which he is best fitted. A high percentage of students located and
trained in this way follow and succeed in their chosen profession.
The co-operative student will receive wages for his work at the pre
vailing rate in the par ticular shop in which he is employed. The school
does not guarantee wo rk nor stipulate any certain amount of compensa
tion, but uses every effort to place students to their best financial and
educational advantage. The employers pay the wages directly to the
students for the actual time worked in the shops.
The average freshman should have at least $350 subject to check
ing account, in addition to what he will earn from his practice work.
Upper-classmen should need less additional money each year as they
advance in their practice field.
For co-operative studen ts who live in cities away from Atlanta it
is obviously advantageous to work in tjle shops of their home town,
thus reducing the cost of room and board.
Co-operative students pay slightly less tuition per year than the four
year students, since the co-operative tuition is prorated over a period of
five rather than four years.
Freshmen who do not live in Atlanta are required to lodge in Cloud
man Hall, the co-operative dormitory, and must pay the $22.50 rent
each term in advance.
The entrance requirements for co-operative engineering courses in
clude all specified units on page 26. Seven optional units on page 27
must be selected to make a total of fifteen units. However, an appl icant
must be a graduate of an accredited secondary school, and must be
specifically recommended by its principal. Only applican ts who are in
the upper third of their high school or preparatory class and who expect
to graduate under the co-operative plan are accepted for this course.
Anyone interested in making application for admission into the co
operative courses should write for the departmental bulletin which gives
full particulars about fees, living expenses, wages paid the student while
at work, discipline, school activities, etc.
Address communications to:
J. E. McDANIEL,
Director of the Co-operative Plan,
Georgia School of Technology,
Atlanta, Georgia.
~
Course
Chern.
tCo-op .
Dr.
Eng.
Math.
Mil.
Chern.
Dr.
Eng.
Malh.
MI!.
No.
7c
lc
9c
llc
llc
llc
8c
10c
12c
12c
12c
THE CO-OPERATIVE PLAN
FRESHMAN YEAR
(Identical for all Co-op. Engineering Courses)
FIRST TERM (12 WEEKS)
Subject Class
InorganiC Cbemistry _________________________ 5
Co-ordination _______________________________ _
Engineering Drawing ________________________ _
ComposiUon and Rbetoric ____________________ _
Elementary Functions _______________________ _
M!1Itary Instruction _________________________ _
TotaL__________________________ 15
SECOND TERM (1 1 WEEKS)
InorganIc Chemistry _________________________ _
EngIneering Drawing ________________________ _
ComposItion and Rbetoric_____________________ 4
Elementary Functions _______________________ _
MUltary Instruction _________________________ _
TotaL__________________________ 14
tRCQulred of all Orst-term fresbmen.
SOPHOMORE YEAR
85
Lab. Credit
3 4
.2
2.6
3.3
11 13.1
6 4
9 2
20
2.6
4
13.6
(Identical for Co-op. Civil, Electrical, Mechanical, and Textile
Engineering Courses except as noted)
Course No.
-Dr. 25c
Eng. 33c
M th. 13c
MI!. 13c
Phys. 33c
-Dr. 26c
EOI/. 34c
Malb. 31c
Mil. 14c
Phys. 34c
FIRST T ERM (12 WEEKS)
Subject Class
Engineering Drawing
-------------------------
HumanIties ---------------------------------- 4
AnalytIc Geome;try
---------------------------
6
MUltary Instruction
--------------------------
Pbyslcs
--------------------------------------
Total___________________________ 16
SECON D T ERM (11 WEEKS)
Engineering DrawIng _______________________ _
Humanities __________________ ________________ 5
Calculus _____________________________________ 5
Mllltary Instruction _________________________ _
Pbyslcs _____________________________________ _
TotaL __________________________ 16
Lab.
3
5
3
11
5
14
Credit
.1
2.6
4
1
4.7
13
l.S
3.3
3.3
1
4.1
13.6
'Clvil Engineering students bave C. E. 25c, three hours a week the Orst term In
slead or DrawIng 25c; C. E. 26c, six bours a week, tbe second term Instead of Draw
Ini 26c.
86 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
CHEMICAL ENGINEERI G
The first year of co-operative chemical engineering includes the fun
damental subjects which are given in all co-operative engineering
courses. The three remaining years, which have principally the study
of chemical engineering, prepare students for work in large chemical
industries.
Unless twelve or more students elect this course it will not be given.
Course No.
Ch. E. 33c
Chern. 13c
Math. 13c
MU. 13c
Phys. 330
Ch. E.
Chern.
Math.
Mil.
Phys.
Mc
I1c
31c
140
34c
For Freshman Year, see page 85.
SOPHOMORE YEAR
FIRST T ERM (12 WEEKS)
Subject Class
Introduction to Chem. Eng. ___________________ _
Qualitative Analysis _________________________ 3
Analytic Geometry _____________ ______________ 6
?t1ll1 tary InatrucUon _________________________ _
Physics _____________________________________ _
TotaL__________________________ 15
SECOND T ERM (1 1 WEEKS)
Introduction to Cbem. Eng. ___________________ _
Quantitative Analysis _______________________ _
Calculus ____________________________________ _
MlUtary Instruction _________________________ _
Physics _____________________________________ _
TotaL__________________________ 14
PRE-JUNIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM (12 WEEKS)
Course No. Subject Class
Chern. 35c Organic Chemistry __________________________ _
Math. 32e Calculus _____________________________________ 5
PhY8. 35e Physics ______________________________________ 4
'M. L. Ie Germw ______________________________ ________ 3
Chern.
Math.
Mech.
?M.L.
36c
33e
S9c
2e
TotaL__________________________ 16
SECOND TERM (11 WEEKS)
OrganiC Chemistry __________________________ _
Calculus _____________________________ _______ _
Applied Mechanics __________________________ _
Germw
4
5
4
3
TotaL__________________________ 16
Lab. Credit
2 .5
9 3.3
4
5
3 4.1
19
2
9
5
3
19
13.5
.5
3.3
3.3
1
4.1
12.8
Lab. Credit
8 4.4
3.3
3 3.3
11
8
14
2
13.0
4.4
3.3
4
2
13.1
Course No.
Cb. E. 45c
Cbem. 153c
Eog. 33c
Mecb. 41c
'M. L. Sc
Cb. E. 44c
Cb. E. 56c
CbeIJI. 154c
Eng. 34c
'M.L. 4c
== Couru No.
Cb. E. 109c
Cb. E. 157c
Cb. E. 161c
Cb. E. 111c
' Ec. 24c
E. E. nc
tM. L. Ie
Cb. E. 41c
Cb. E. 158c
Cb. E. 16%c
Cb. E. 172c
E. E. 74c
'Eog. 45c
M.E. 43c
THE CO-OPERATIVE PLAN
JUNIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM (12 WEEKS)
Subject Class
Gas?Fuel ____________________________________ 3
PhYsical Chemistry __________________________ 5
Humanities __________________________________ 4
Mechanics of Matarlals________________________ 3
German ______________________________________ 3
TotaL__________________________ 18
SECOND T ERM (11 WEEKS)
Cbem. Eng. Llterature _______________________ _
Unit OpemUous _____________________________ _
Physical Chemistry _________________________ _
HumanlUes ________________________________ _
German
1
S
5
5
3
TotaL______ ____________________ 11
SENIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM (12 WEEKS)
Subject
Special Problems
Unit Operations _____________________________ _
Chemical Technology ________________________ _
Chern. Eng. Calculatlons _____________________ _
Economics __________________________________ _
Applied E lectricity __________________________ _
Class
3
3
3
4
4
TotaL__________________________ 17
German ______________________________________ 3
TotaL __________________________ 20
SECOND TERM (11 WEEKS)
Engineering Materials _______________________ _
Unit Operations ____________________________ _
Chemical Technology ________________________ _
Cbem. Eng. Calculatlous _____________________ _
E. E. Laboratory _____________________________ _
Public Speaking _____________________________ _
Thermodynamics ____________________________ _
3
3
3
3
3
3
Total_________ __________________ 18
87
Lab. Credit
3 2.6
6 4.7
9
3
6
9
2.6
2
2
13.9
.7
2.6
4.7
3.3
2
13.3
Lab. Credit
6 1.3
3 2.6
9
9
3
8
4
10
2
2
2.6
2.6
13.1
2
15.1
2.6
2.6
2
2
1
2
%
U.I
88 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
THIRD TER:l-1 ( 11 WEEKS)
Ch.E. 110c Special Problems ----------------------------- 6 1.3
Ch.E. 160c Design -------------------------------------- 8 1.1
Ch.E. 163c Chemical Technology ------ -------- ----------- 3 2
Ch.E. 173c Chem. Eng. Calculatlons ______________________ 3 2
Eng. 63c Technical EngUsh ---------------------------- 3 2
M.E. 14c Heat Engines Lab. ____________________________ 3 1
M.E. 17c Elementary Power Eng. ________________________ 4 2.6
TotaL __________________________ 14 11 12.6
tM.L. 2c German -------------------------------------- 3 2
TotaL __________________________ 17 17 14.6
"Tbe advanced course tn mll!tary, 2 credit hours per quarter for SiX quarters, may
be takon Instead ot German, Economics, and PubUc Speaking.
tSenlors taking advanced military who have not completed M. L. 1c and 2c, will
be r eq uired to take M. L. 1c >lind 2c In the first and third terms senior year.
CIVIL E GI EERING
The co-operative civil engineering course, which is practically the
same as that of the four-year school, prepares its students for construc
tion and design work of various kinds.
Unless twelve or morc students elect this course it will not be given.
Course No.
Ch.E. 61c
C.E. 21e
Math. 32c
M.E. 10c
M. L. Ie
PhY8. 35c
C.E. S8c
Geol. 36c
Math. 33c
Mech. S9c
"M.L. 2c
COURSE OF STUDY
For Freshman and Sophomore Years, see page 85,
PRE-JUNIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM (12 WEEKS)
Subject
Metallurgy
---------- ----- --------------------
Plane Surveying
-----------------------------
Calculus
-------------------------------------
Welding
-------------------------------------
German
--------------------------------------
PbYSlcs
-------------------------------------
Totnl ___________________________
SECOND TERM (11 WEEKS)
Engineering Economics
-----------------------
Geology
-------------------------------------
Calculus
-------------------------------------
Applied Mechanics
---------------------------
Gel'm~n
--------------------------------------
TotaL __________________________
Class Lab.
2 4
3
3
18 10
3
3
4 6
3
18 9
Credit
2.6
2.2
3.3
.1
S.3
14.1
2
2.1
3.3
4
2
14.0
-Course
C.E.
Eng?
M. E.
M. E.
Mech.
Mech.
')1. L.
BioI.
C.E.
M.E.
M. E.
Mech.
'M.L.
= Course
C.E.
C.E.
C.E.
C.E.
Eng.
'E.E.
M.E.
No.
24c
45c
43c
45c
40c
41c
3c
38c
33c
56e
71c
48e
4c
No.
63e
65c
68e
85c
6Se
11e
83e
THE CO-OPERATIVE PLAN
JUNIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM (12 WEEKS)
Subject
Route Surveying ____________________________ _
Publlc Speaking ____________________________ _
Thermodynamics ____________________________ _
Calibration Laboratory ______________________ _
Applied Mechanlca __________________________ _
?Iechantca of 1I1aterlals _____ __________________ _
German
Class
1
3
3
3
TotaL__________________________ 19
SECOND TERM (11 WEEKS)
Sanitary Engineering _______________________ _
Hydraulics _________________________________ _
HydrauUc Laboratory ________________________ _
Elementary Power Englnecring _______________ _
Mechanics of M,aterlals _______________________ _
German
4
4
3
TotaL__________________________ 19
SENIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM (12 WEEKS)
Subject Class
Geodesy and City Plannlng____________________ 3
Reinforced Concrete _________________________ _
Framed Structures __________________________ _
Water Supply Englneerlng_____________________ 2
Technical English ____________________________ 3
Applied Electricity ___________________________ 4
Heat Power Laboratory _______________________ _
TotaL __________________________ 16
SECOND TERM (11 WEEKS)
C. E. 66c Relntorced Concrete __________________________ 2
C. E. 6ge Framed Structures ---------------------------
C. E. 83c HIghway Engineering ________________________ 3
C. E. 81c Sewerage and Sewage Treatment______________ 2
Ee. 24e Economlca ____________________ _______________ 4
'E. E. 14c Electrical Engineering Laboratory _____________ _
TotaL__________________________ 13
Lab.
3
4
3
Lab.
3
3
3
4
13
3
3
4
16
89
Credit
3
2
14
2.6
2.6
2.6
2
13.8
Credit
2.7
2.2
2.2
1.3
2
2.6
14.0
2.2
2.2
3.3
1.3
2.6
12.6
90 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
THIRD TERM ( 11 WEEKS)
C. E. 62e Contracts and Speclfleatlons ___________________ 3 2
C.E. 67e Reinforced Concrete -------------------------- 2 3 2.2
C.E. 70c Framed Structures -------------------------- 2 3 2.2
C.E. 84e Highway Economics -------------------------- 3 6 3.3
C.E. 82e Sewerage and Sewage TreatmenL ______________ 2 '1.3
C.E. 86e Reservoirs and Dams _________________________ 2 1.3
M.E. 51c Materials Laboratory ------------------------- 3
TotaL __________________________ 15 15 13
.The advanced course in: military, 2 credit hours per quarter for six quarters, may
be taken instead of German, Applled Electricity, and Electrical Engineering Laboratory.
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
The first two years of co-operative electrical engineering include
principally the fundamental subjects, such as mathematics, chemistry,
applied mechanics, and mechanical drawing. The last three years which
have to do with some mechanical engineering subjects, but more es
pecially with electrical subjects, prepare students for the branches of
applied electricity, such as transportation engineering, power genera
tion and transmission, the design of electrical machinery, experimental
investigation, and management of public utilities.
Unless twelve or more students elect this course it will not be given.
Course
Ec.
E.E.
Math.
?M. L.
Phys.
E.E.
Math.
M.E.
Meeh.
?M.L.
No.
24c
91c
32c
Ie
35e
92e
33c
43e
3ge
2e
COURSE OF STUDY
For Freshman and Sophomore Years, see page 85.
PRE-JUNIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM (12 WEEKS)
Subject
Economics __________________________________ _
Electricity and Magnellsm ___________________ _
Calculus ____________________________________ _
German
Physics
Class
4
4
5
3
4
TotaL__________________________ 20
SECOND TERM (11 WEEKS)
Principles of D. C. Machlnery_________________ 4
Calculus _____________________________________ 5
Thermodynamics ______________________________ 3
Applied Mechanics ___________________________ 4
German 3
TotaL______________________ ____ 19
Lab.
3
6
6
Credit
2.6
2.6
3.3
2
3.3
13.8
2.6
3.3
2
4
2
13.9
-Course No.
E.E. 81c
E.E. 93c
Math. 136c
Mech. 40c
Mech. 47c
'M.L. 3c
THE CO-OPERATIVE PLAN
JUNIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM (12 WEEKS)
Subject
Electrical Engineering Laboratory ______ ______ _
Alternating Current Clrcults __________________ _
Differential Equations ______________________ _
Applied Mechanics __________________________ _
Mechanics of Materlals _______________________ _
German
Class
1
4
4
3
3
TotaL__________________________ 18
SECOND TERM (11 WEEKS)
C. E. 33e Hydraulics ----------------------------------- 4
E. E. 82c Electrical Engineering Laboratory ____________ _
E. E. 94e Altern-atlng Current Clrcuits________ ___________ 4
M. E. 45c lnstruments and Fuels Laboratory______________ 1
~l. E. 71c Power Plant Engineering______________________ 4
'M. L. 4e German ---------------------------___________ 3
,,'
TotaL__________________________ 17
91
Lab. Credit
1.4
2.6
2.6
2
2
2
5 12.6
2.6
1.4
2.6
3 1
2.6
2
8 12.2
'''Signal Corps students take E. E. 50c and one hour of Mllltary tnstead of
German.
Course No.
E.E.
E.E.
E.E.
E.E.
M.E.
Al.E.
27c
83c
95c
133e
10e
47c
E. E. 28c
E. E. 66e
E. E. 84e
E. E. 96c
tEo E . 134e
M. E. S3c
SENIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM (12 WEEKS)
Subject Class Lab. Credit
Seminar ____________________________________ _
Electrical Engineering Laboratory _____________ 1
Alternating Current Machinery ________________ 5
Radio Engineering ___________________________ 4
Welding and Heat Treatlng __________________ _
Power Plant Auxlilarles_______________________ 1
'.MllItary or Electlve_________________________ 3
TotaL___________________ _______ 18
SECOND TERM (11 WEEKS)
Seminar ___________________________ _________ _
Trensmlssion ____________ _____________________ 4
Electrical Engineering Laboratory _____________ _
Alternating Current Machlnery________________ 4
Radio Engineering or an Electlve______________ 5
Heat Power Lahoratory _______________________ _
"Mllitary or Electlve_________________________ 3
TotaL__________________________ 18
6
3
16
7
4
11
.7
1.8
3.3
2.6
1.4
2
12.8
.1
2.6
1.8
2.6
3.3
1
2
14
tSlgnal Corps' students who take E. E. 134c will be excused from two hours of
Military.
92
Ec. 93c
E.E. 85c
E.E. 91c
"E.E. 136c
Eng. 45c
M.E. 81c
GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
THIRD TERM (11 WEEKS)
Finance ____________________________________ _
Electrical Engineering Laboratory _____________ _
Alternating Current Machlnery ________ ________ _
Radio Laboratory or ",n Elective ______________ _
Public Speaking ----------------------------
Heat Power Laboratory -----------------------
""Elective
3
1
3
1
3
TotaL__________________________ 14
4
19
2
1.8
2
2
2
12.8
"Advanced course In mllltary. 2 credit hours per quarter for six quarters. may be
taken Instead of German and electlves.
""Electives .are listed on page 101.
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
The co-operative mechanical engineering c'ourse affords broad train
ing which may be applied successfully to various kinds of engineering.
Many students taking this course spend their first two years of
practice work in welding, forge and machine shops, and their last three
years in drafting rooms, pattern shops and testing departments.
Unless twelve or more students elect this course it will not be given.
COURSE OF STUDY
For Freshman and Sophomore Years, see page 85.
PRE-JUNIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM (12 WEEKS)
Cottrse No. S"bject Class Lab. Credit
Ch.E. 61c Metallurgy ----------------------------------- 4 2.6
lILE. 22c Heat Treating and Welding Laboratory _________ 2 8 2.3
Math. 32c Calculus ------------------------------------- 5 3.3
?M.L. lc German -------------------------------------- 3
Phys. 35c PhysiCS -------------------------------------- 4 3 3.3
TotaL __________________________ 18 11 13.5
SECOND TERM (1 1 WEEKS)
Ec. 24c Economics ----------------------------------- 4 2.6
Math. 33c Calculus ------------------------------------- 5 3.3
M.E. 1c Foundry ------------------------------------- 1
M. E. 23c Pattern Making ------------------------------ I 3 1
Mech. 39c Applled Mechanics --------------------------- 4 6 4
?111. L. 2c German -------------------------------------- 3
TotaL __________________________ 17 13 13.9
-COtlrse No.
litE. 39c
M.E. 53e
M.E. I6c
1I1.E. 45e
Mech. 40c
Mecb. 41c
"M.L. 3c
M.E. 103c
M.E. 40c
M.E. 41c
M.E. 5Sc
M.E. 6Sc
Mecb. 4Sc
"M. L. 4c
COllrse No.
C.E. 2tc
E.E. 6tc
M.E. 19c
M.E. 55c
M.E. 6Sc
M.E. 83c
"Ec. 94c
E.E. 62c
Eng. 45c
M.E. 59c
M.E. SOc
M.E. S1c
M.E. 10c
"Ec. 95c
THE CO-OPERATIVE PLAN
JUNIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM (12 WEEKS)
Subject
Thermodynamics ____________________________ _
Time and Motion Study ________ ______________ _
Machine Laboratory _________________________ _
Instruments and Fuels Laboratory ____________ _
Applied Mechanics __________________________ _
Mechanics of Materlals ______________________ _
German
Class
2
1
3
3
TotaL__________________________ 18
SECOND TERM (11 WEEKS)
Fluid Flow _________________________________ _
Thermodynamics _____________________________ _
Power Auxiliaries Laboratory _________________ _
Seminar ____________________________________ _
Power Plants _______________________________ _
Mech?anlcs of Materlals ______________________ _
German
3
1
1
5
4
3
TotnL__________________________ 21
SENIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM (12 WEEKS)
SlIbject Class
Surveying
-------------------- --------------- 2
D. C. Machlnes _____________________ __________ 3
Machine Design
------ - - -- - ------------------- 3
Organization and ManagemenL ________________ 4
Internal Combustion Englnes __________________ 3
Heat Power Laboratory ________________________
Marketing
----------------------------------- 3
TotaL __________________________ 18
SECOND TERM (11 WEEKS)
A. C. Machines ____________________________ ___ 3
Public Speaking
-----------------------------
Seminar
------------------------------------- 1
Machine Design
------------------- ----------- 5
Heat Power Laboratory _____________________ ___
Refrigeration, Heating and Ventllatlng _________ 5
Accounting
----------------------------------
Total ___________________________ 20
Lab.
3
6
3
12
3
Lab.
4
4
4
4
93
Credit
3.3
1.3
2
1
2
2
2
13.6
2.6
.2
3.3
2.6
2
13.1
Credit
2.2
2
2.6
2
2
13.8
2
2
.2
3.3
1
3.3
13.8
94 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
THIRD TERM (11 WEEKS)
C.E. 62c Contracts and
Speclflcatlons ___________________ 3 2
E.E. 64c Electrical Engineering La bora tory _____ --------- I 6 2
Eng. 63c Technical EngUsh ---------------------------- 3 2
M.E. 60c Seminar ------------------------------------- .2
M. E. 88c Heat Power
Laboratory _______________________ 4 1
M.E. 81c Machine Design -------------------- - --------- 5 3 4
Elective ------------------------------------- 3 2
TotaL __________________________ 16 13 13.2
-The advanced course in mUltary, 2 credit hours per quarter for six quarters, may
be taken instead of German, Marketing, and Accounting.
TEXTILE E GI EERING
The co-operative textile course gives special training in yarn manu
facture, dyeing and finishing, fabric design and analysis, weaving, and
knitting. These students obtain practice work in various kinds of textile
industries, such as rayon plants, cotton, woolen, and silk mills.
Unless twelve or more students elect this course it will not be given.
Course
Chem.
Math.
-M. L.
Phys.
T.E.
T. E.
Mdh.
M.E.
Mech.
-M. L.
T.E.
T. E.
No.
13c
32c
1c
35c
23c
39c
33c
45c
39c
2c
24c
40c
COURSE OF STUDY
For Freshman Year, see page 85.
PRE-JUNIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM (12 WEEKS)
Subject
Qualltatlve Analysis Calculus ____________________________________ _
German _____________________________________ _
Physics _____________________________________ _
Fabric Design _______________________________ _
Weavlng ____________________________________ _
Class
3
5
3
4
TotaL__________________________ 15
SECOND TERM (11 WEEKS)
Calculus
Callbratlon Laboratory ----------------------
Applled Mechanics ---------------------------German _____________________________________ _
Fabric Design _____________________________ __ _
Weaving ____________________________________ _
5
4
3
3
TotaL__________________________ 16
Lab. CTedit
9 3.3
3.3
2
3 3.3
4 1
4 1
20 13.9
3.3
3
6 4
2
4 1
3 2.1
16 14
-Course No.
Chern. 31c
M.E. 37c
'M.L. 3c
T.E. 33c
T.E. 45c
T. E. 61c
-Cbem. 32c
M.E. 43c
?M.L. 4c
T. E. 22c
T.E. 34c
T.E. 46c
T.E. 62c
Course No.
E.E. llc
T. E. 21c
T.E. 37c
T.E. 53c
T.E. 63c
T.E. 83c
Ec. 24c
E.E. 14c
M.E. 77c
T. E. 28c
T.E. 64c
T.E. 168c
THE CO-OPERATIVE PLAN 95
JUNIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM (12 WEEKS)
Subject Class Lab. Credit
Organic Chemistry
-------------- -------------
4 4 3.6
Kinematics of Mechanlsm _______ .? ________ _____ 3 4 3
German
-------------------------------------- 3 2
Fabric Design
--------------------------------
4 1
Weaving
-------------------------------------
3 4 3
Yarn Manufacture, Theory ____________________ 4 2.6
Total ________________________ 17 16 15.2
SECOND TERM (11 WEEKS)
Organic Chemistry
---------------------------
4 4 3.6
Thermodynamics
----------------------------- 3 2
German
--------------------------------------
3 2
Dyeing Laboratory
--------------------------- 4 1
Fabric Design
-------------------------------
4 1
Weaving
-------------------------------------
4 2.6
Yarn Manufacture, Theory _____________________ 4 2.6
TotaL ______________________ ? ___ 18 12 14.8
SENIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM (12 WEEKS)
Subject Class Lab. Credit
Applled ElectrIclty
---------------------------
4 2.6
~brlc Analysis
------------------------------
4 1
Jacquard Design
-------------------- ---------
4
Weaving
-------------------------------------
4 1
Yarn Manufacture, Theory and Practlce ________ 4 4 3.6
Dyeing
----------------------------- ---------
4 4 3.5
TotaL __________________________ 12 20 12.1
SECOND TERM (11 WEEKS)
Economics
-----------------------------------
4 2.6
Applled Electrical Engineering Laboratory ______ 4 1
Elementary Power Englneerlng ________________ 4 2.6
Fabric Analysis
------------------------------
4 1
Yarn Manufacture, Theory and Practlce _______ 4 4 3.6
Testing
---------- ----------------------------
2 S 2
TotaL __________________________ 13 15 12.8
96
Eng.
T. E.
T. E .
T. E .
T. E.
T. E .
GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
THIRD TERM (11 WEEKS)
45c Publlc Speaking ________________ _____________ 3
38c Jacquard Design ---------- -------------------
54c Weaving - ------- ------------ --------- --------84c Dyeing ______________________________________ 3
81c Knitting __________ ___________________________ 1
91c Textlle Costing ______ ______________ ______ ____ S
Elective
TotaL __________________________ 10
4
4
4
3
15
2
1
1
3
1.3
2
3
13.3
-The advanced course In military, 2 credit hours per quarter tor tour quarters, may
be taken Instead of two years German.
ELECTIVES
T. E. 181c Rayon Processing
or
T. E. 101c Textile Raw Materlnls ________________ _______ _
T, E. 133c Fabric Layouts --- ------ ------------ ---------
2 6
2
3
2
1
Note : For 1940-1941 senior co-op students will follow the regular four-year senior
curriculum, selecting anyone of the four options offered.
SPECIAL COURSE OF INSTRUCTION
CO-ORDIN ATION
Before the freshmen are sent to work in the practical field, mem
bers of the co-operative department instruct and advise them how they
should make friends with regular shop employes. Harmony and good
will between the co-operative apprentices and regular shop forces are
necessary for efficiency and production. Oftentimes a personal inter
view with a superintendent or foreman will clear up a difficulty that
might be aggravated through a letter. The increase or adjustment of
wages, the transfer of a student from one department to another may
be accomplished only by a' personal visit to the shop.
The correlation of practical work with a course of study at college
can be obtained only when the shop and college officials find common
interest in each other, particularly in the work of student apprentices.
Personal contact arouses this interest and brings about co-ordination.
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS AND
SOCIAL SCIENCE
PROFESSOR DENNISON; ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS ARMSTRONG, WENN,
WARREN, HARTZELL, BREWSTER; ASSISTANT PROFESSORS PROCTOR,
- LOZIER; INSTRUCTORS ELLIOTT AND BROWN
NOTE: 4-3-5 means 4 hours class, 3 hours laboratory, 5 hours credit.
Ec. 21. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS.
First term, 3-0-3.
This is an introductory course covering the fundamental principles
of Economics. The subject matter includes a general survey of our
present economic system and a study of the principles describing its
operation. This course is designed to serve as a foundation for all of
the more specialized courses which follow it.
Ec. 22. ECONOMIC PROBLEMS.
Second term, 3-0-3.
This is a continuation of Ec. 21, which must precede it, the general
purpose being to apply the principles of economics to contemporary
problems, particularly those related to industrial management and en
gineering. Problems of maladjustments in production, employment, dis
tribution, money and credit and the place of the manager and engineer
in economic planning are given special attention.
Ec. 24. ECONOMICS FOR ENGINEERS.
First and second terms, 3-0-3.
This course is designed particularly for those students who are un
able to include more than three hours of economics in their courses. It
is essentially a summary of Ec. 21 and Ec. 22, except that problems
related to engineering are given special emphasis. Engineering students
desiring a more comprehensive course are urged to take Ec. 21 and
Ec. 22.
Ec. 27. PARTNERSHIP AND AGENCY.
First term, 3-0-3.
This course deals with the formation, characteristics, duration and
dissolution of the partnership; the rights, powers and duties of the
partners; limited partnerships and the Uniform Partnership Act.
It also includes a brief discussion of the Law of Principal and Agent.
[97 ]
98 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
Ec. 28. CORPORATIONS.
Second term, 3-0-3.
This course deals with the formation of corporations, their manage_
ment, including the issue and tran.sfer of stock; the rights and liabilities
of promoters, stockholders and directors; the proper methods of hold
ing corporate meetings; liability of the corporation for torts and crimes;
the dissolution of the corporation.
?Ec. 32. L AND ECONOMICS AND HOUSING.
Second term, 3-0-3.
This course is designed especially for those students who plan to
enter the fields of architecture, city engineering and management, and
construction. It deals chiefly with principles of city growth and struc
ture, appraising problems, and problems of urban land utilization.
Housing problems and slum clearance are given special attention. Pre
requisite, Ec. 21 or Ec. 24.
Ec. 33. INTRODUCTORY ACCOUNTING.
Junior, first term, 3-3-4.
This is an introductory course in bookkeeping preparatory to the
course in accounting. It does not require a previous knowledge of book
keeping. It includes the theory of debits and credits, the construction
of the trial balance, the profit and loss statement, and the balance sheet.
Practice is given in the use of the various types of modern books of
original entry. Students who have completed a high school course in
bookkeeping may substitute another course for the first term's work
by securing a special permit from the head of the department.
Ec. 34. PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING.
Junior, second term, 3-3-4.
This course reviews briefly single proprietorship and then emphasizes
accounting and co-partnerships. Each individual asset account, and lia
bility account, on the balance sheet of a co-partnership is taken in detail
in lecture and illustrated by problems in classroom and in the laboratory.
Ec. 37-38. BUSINESS LAW.
Junior, first and second terms, 3-0-3.
This course is designed to acquaint the student with the economic
problems resulting from such fields of business law as Contracts,
Agency, Bailments, Sales, Partnership, Corporation, Negotiable Instru
ments, Bankruptcy and Real Property.
ECONOMICS AND SOCIAL SCIENCE
Ec. 41-42. THE ECONOMICS OF MARKETING.
Senior, first and second terms, 3-0-3.
99
This course deals with the location, production and assembling of
raW products; with manufacturing, assembling and distributing of
finished products and it presents a descriptive survey of marketing ma
chinery. Original problems form an essential part of the course and
those problems which especially concern the engineer and manager are
stressed.
Ec. 44. PRINCIPLES OF INVESTMENT.
Senior, second term, 3-0-3.
This course is a study of the fundamental principles of investment
analysis and policy. I t includes a discussion of the financial policy of
corporations and gives detailed attention to various classes of public
and corporate securities, investment trusts, building and loan associa
tions, the operation of the New York Stock Exchange, underwriting,
reading the financial page, and sources of information. Prerequisite,
Ec. 93.
Ec. 45-46. INDUSTRIAL ACCOUNTING.
Senior, first and second terms, 2-0-2.
This course deals with the application of cost analysis to manufac
turing and distribution. Problems and exercises will be used to illus
trate the methods of compiling and analyzing material, labor and man
ufacturing expense costs. In order to develop the student's ability to
use statements as a means of executive control, considerable time will
be given to the preparation and interpretation of financial statements
for industrial organizations.
Ec. 48. STATISTICAL METHODS.
Senior, first or second term, 3-0-3.
This course is designed to provide the student with an elementary
knowledge of statistical analysis. Emphasis is placed on the principles
of gathering, summarizing, and interpreting quantitative data in the
fields of economics, business and engineering.
Ec. 51. AMERICAN GOVERNMENT.
First and second terms, 3-0-3.
The primary purpose of this course is not only to develop better
and more intelligent citizenship, but particularly to have the student
understand the intimate relationship between government and business.
f
100 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
After brief consideration of the framework and functions of the
branches of government, special emphasis is laid upon ~h: regulation
and promotion of business through statutes and c~~':Il1SSlOns. C~ses
and judicial decisions are employed to show the dIVIsIOn of constitu
tional authority over business between the states and the federal gov-
ernment.
Ec. 61. PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING.
Junior, first term, 3-3-4.
This is a continu ation of Ec. 34. Corporation accounting is illus
trated by careful study in lecture and quiz sections. A practice set
illustrating corporation accounting is used in the laboratory. The lab
oratory practice also illustrates the evolution of the holding company
and the methods of accounting fo r the same. A single entry bookkeep
ing system is studied during the latter part of the course.
Ec. 62. ACCOUNTING PROBLEMS.
Junior, second term, 3-3-4.
This course consists of carefully selected problems taken from ex
aminations set by the Certified Public Accountancy Boards ih the dif
ferent states, and by the American Institute of Public Accountants.
They deal with single entry statements of profit and loss, single entry
balance sheet construction, work sheet for adjusting a trial balance,
the preparation of statements for factory operations, the opening and
closing of sets of accounts for the different forms of organizations, the
special problems of different corporate openings, problems involved in
mergers, consolidations, promotions, holding companies, stock donations,
refunding voluntary bankruptcy, statement of affairs and deficiency ac
count, receivership, reorganization, realization and liquidation of in
solvent sole proprietors, administrative accounts. In all problems the
work sheets and various report forms are worked out as the case may
require.
Ec. 63-64. FACTORY COST ACCOUNTING.
Senior, first and second term, 3-0-3.
Lectures w ill be given explaining the elements of costs, principles
and general methods of cost finding, direct and indirect expenses, wage
systems, recording material and labor costs, and devising cost systems.
The students will be required to work up a set of manufacturing cost
books during the first term. During the last term they will be given
problems involving the various phases of cost accounting.
ECONOMICS AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 101
Special emphasis will be given to problems relating to textile and
cotton oil mills, lumbering and other distinctly Southern industries.
Ec. 65. LABOR PROBLEMS.
Junior, first term, 3-0-3.
This course is designed to equip the student of engineering and
management with a knowledge of the economics of labor problems.
Four chief approaches to modern labor problems are presented: Trade
Unionism, Collective Bargaining, Personal Management and L abor
Legislation. Special attention is given to wages, hours, working condi
tions, unemployment, insecurity, and to methods of industrial peace.
Ec. 66. PUBLIC FINANCE.
Junior, second term, 3-0-3.
This is a survey of the main principles and problems of public finance
and taxation. Its main purpose is to famili ar ize the engineer and man
ager with public expenditures, borrowing, various forms of taxation
and other types of public revenue. Special attention is given to the
economics of taxation and to modern developments in the fields of
national, state and local public finance.
Ec. 67. I NSURANCE.
Senior, second term, 3-0-3.
This subject is treated from the viewpoint of both the policyholder
and the insur ance company. It involves a study of types of policies,
policy contracts, principles of rate making, hazards, reserves for pro
tection of policyholders , examination of the company to determine its
safety, adjustments of losses, state regulation and fixing of rates, and
the methods of organizing an insurance company or agency.
Ec. 71 , 72. CORPORATE FINANCE.
Senior, first and second terms, 3-0-3.
This course treats briefly with the nature of single proprietorships
and partnerships, after which follows a more extensive study of the
corporation. The methods by which corporations are organized and
financed and the principles that underlie corporate management are
explained. The difference between what is permissible at law and what
is expedient in practice will be emphasized. The course includes a study
of the instruments of finance, inter-business relationships, distribution
of profits, reorganizations, causes of failures and many other problems
connected with the corporation. Ec. 93 may be substituted for Ec. 71.
102 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
Ec. 93. FINANCE. Survey Course.
First and second terms, 3-0-3.
This course is designed to introduce the student to the main prin
ciples of money and banking and to acquaint him with the financial
organization of society. It is also. des.igned t.o acqua~nt the s tu~ent with
the more popular business orgamzatiOns w ith special emphasIs on the
corporation. Various types of corporate securities are studied. This
course may be substituted for Ec. 71.
Ec. 94. MARKETING. Survey Course.
First and second terms, 3-0-3 .
A general survey course designed to familiarize the students with
the modern facilities for marketing, and the methods employed in dis
tributing goods.
Ec. 95. ACCOUNTING. Survey Course.
First and second terms, 3-0-3.
A brief su rvey of the analysis and recording of business transactions;
preparation of financial statements, and their interpretation.
Ec. 96. BUSINESS LAW. Survey Course.
First and second terms, 3-0-3.
This cou rse is deiigned to give to the student a brief survey in Con
tracts, Agency, Bailments, Sales, P artnerships, Corporations, Negotiable
Instruments, Bankruptcy and Real Property Law.
S. S. II , 12. SOCIAL SCIENCE.
Freshman, fi rst and second terms, 3-0-3, each course.
A survey of Western Civilization since the seventeenth century with
emphasis on the industri al revolution, the French revolution, the evolu
tion of democratic government in England, France and the United
States, the rise of nationalism and imperialism, the first world war and
its political, social and economic effects. The second semester will be
devoted to the period after 1875 with special attention to post-war con
ditions in Europe and the United States. The pertinent offerings of
History, Economics, Government, Sociology and Geography with some
Philosophy, will be woven into an intelligent revelation of the unfolding
of our civilization of today.
Freshmen who have attained a grade of "B" in S. S. 11 and upper
classmen may take S. S. 12 as a seminar course, provided the instructors
ECONOMICS AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 103
in charge elect to conduct the course in that manner, for the benefit of
a limited number of students.
A fee of $1.00 for each semester will be charged each student taking
this course.
S. S. 19-20. THE HISTORY OF MODERN EUROPE, 1500 TO THE
PRESENT.
First and second terms, 3-0-3. (Not to be taken in the same year
with S. S. 11-12.)
An intensive survey of Europe from the Renaissance to the present
time, with attention primarily centered upon political, social and intel
lectual development.
S. S. 21. THE ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL D EVELOPMENT OF ENGLAND
FROM 1688 TO THE PRESENT TIME.
First term, 3-0-3.
This course will be concerned primarily with the development of
English parliamentary institutions, the industrial revolution, its social
and political effects in the nineteenth century, the expansion of England's
colonial empire, and her policies as a world power after 1900. The
economic material of this course together with S. S. 22 is designed to
furnish a historical background for courses in Economics.
S. S. 22. AMERICAN ECONOMIC HISTORY.
Second term, 3-0-3.
This course is designed to furnish a background for the study of
contemporary economic problems and to supplement the economic ma
terial presented in S. S. 21. Special attention is given to the rise of
the modern industrial system, the frontier and westward movement,
the development of banking, the rise of complex business organizations,
the labor movement, and government regulation of economic activity.
S. S. 25. HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES.
First term, 3-0-3.
A survey of the history of the United States with special attention
given to particular periods of American development. Among the sub
jects receiving special emphasis are: colonial society, the revolutionary
period, adoption of the Constitution, Jeffersonian Democracy, the fron
tier, states' rights, Jacksonian Democracy, the conflict between the
states, reconstruction, urbanization, trusts, the tariff, imperialism, the
World War and post-war problems.
104 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
S. S. 31. SEMINAR IN WORLD HISTORY SINCE THE ARMISTICE.
First term, 3-0-3.
Not open to Freshmen or other students with less than a "B" aver_
age. Enrollment limited to ten students. Permission of instructor in.
charge required for admission to the class.
S. S. 42. ApPLIED PSYCHOLOGY. 3-0-3.
This course undertakes to show the part psychology plays in daily
industrial life. Special attention will be given to such problems as:
Motivation, Vocational Guidance, The Man and His Job, Personal
Efficiency, Directing the Work of Others. Students will be given text
assignments as a guide to aid in making special reports and conducting
psychological tests. The course should be of special application to those
intending to handle administrative duties.
DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
PROFESSORS FITZGERALD, SEIDELL, SAVANT AND DULING; ASSOCIATE
PROFESSOR ELLIS; ASSISTANT PROFESSORS STALNAKER AND
GERKS; INSTRUCTOR HONNELL
The curriculum includes courses in English, economics, the humani
ties, and public speaking. It is planned so as to also give a comprehen
sive training in the fundamental sciences of chemistry, physics, mathe
matics, and applied mechanics. Adequate training is given in the scien
tific and applied aspects of important branches of engineering other than
electrical, such as constructive materials, steam engineering, hydraulics,
and hydraulic machinery.
Parallel with the theoretical work are carefully planned laboratory
courses, beginning with the first year in chemistry and continuing
throughout the four years in the various sciences and engineering
branches studied. The laboratory work is so conducted as to enable the
student to verify theory by performing fundamental experiments.
In the majority of cases students can complete both the electrical
and mechanical engineering courses in five years provided they plan
their work with the two departments concerned, beginning with the
Junior year.
The course of study for the Sophomore, Junior and Senior years is
given in the following pages. For the Freshman year, see page 34.
Course No.
Ec. 24
Eng. 33
Math. 23
Pbys. 21
R.O.T.C. 3
Ec. 95
Eng. S4
Math. 24
Pbys. 28
R.O.T.C. 4
SOPHOMORE YEAR
FIRST TERM
Subject Class Lab. Credit
Economics ___________________________________ 3
Humanities _______ ~__________________________ 3
Calculus _____________________________________ 5
Physics ______________________________________ 5
lI1111tary or Naval Instruction _________________ _
TotaL__________________________ 16
Accounting
Humanities
SECOND TERM
Calculus ____________________________________ _
Physics _____________________________________ _
lI11litary or Naval Instruction _________________ _
3
5
5
TotaL__________________________ 16
[ 105 ]
3
5
8
3
5
8
3
3
5
6
1.5
18.5
3
3
5
6
1.5
18.5
106
Course No.
E.E. 87
Math. 136
M.E. 5
M.E. 43
Mech. 31
Mech. 47
Elective
C.E. 33
E.E. 16
E.E. 188
M.E. 14
111. E. 45
M.E. 77
Elective
Course No.
E.E. 27
E.E. 117
E.E. 130
E.E. 133
E.E. 189
M.E. 47
Elective
E.E. 28
E.E. 118
E.E. 190
Eng. 45
111. E. 83
Elective
GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
JUNIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM
Subject Class Lab.
Principles of Electrical Englneerlng____________ 5
Differential Equations _______________________ 3
Heat Treating Laboratory _____________________ 1 3
Thermodynamics _____________________________ 2
Applied Mechanics ___________________________ 3
Mechanics of Materlals-_______________________ 2
R.O.T.C. Elective ____________________________ 2
TotaL________________ __________ 18 3
SECOND TERM
Hydraulics ___________________________________ 3
Laboratory __________________________________ 1 7
Alternating Current Clrcults____________________ 5
Machine Shop ________________________________ 3
Instruments and Fuels Laboratory _____________ 3
Power Plant Englneerlng______________________ 3
R.O.T.C. Elective ____________________________ 2
TotaL__________________________ 15 13
SENIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM
Subject Class Lab.
Seminar _____________________________________ 1
E. E. Laboratory_____________________________ 1.5 6.5
Transmission _________________________________ 3
Radio Engineering ___________________________ 3
A. C. M?achlnery______________________________ 5
Power Plant Auxiliaries Laboratory ___________ 1 3
R.O.T.C. Elective ____________________________ 2
TotaL__________________________ 16.5 9.5
SECOND TERM
Seminar _____________________________________ 1
E. E. Laboratory _____________________________ 1.5 6.5
A. C. Macl1lnery______________________________ 3
Public Speaking ______________________________ 3
Heat Power Laboratory ______________________ _ 4
R.O.T.C. Elective ____________________________ 2
'Electlves
TotaL _________________________ _
'necommended electlv6\!.
-Credit
5
3
1.3
2
2
2
18.3
3
2.7
5
1
1.3
3
2
18
Credit
2.7
3
3
5
1.3
2
18
1
2.7
3
3
1.3
2
18
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 107
RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES
FIRST TERM
-Course No. Subject Class Lab. Credit
Cb. E. 67 Meta.lJurgy ----------------------------------- 3 3
Ee. 93 Finance ------------------------------------- 3 3
Ee. 94 Marketing ----------------------------------- 3
E.E. 49 Telephony ------------------------------------ 2 2
Eng. 63 Technical English ---------------------------- 3 3
Goo!. 41 General Geology ----------------------------- 3 3
M. E. 48 Industrial Relations -------------------------- 2 2
Pbys. 93 Spedal Problems ---------------------------- 4
SECOND TERM
C.E. 36 Engineering Economics ----------------------- 2 2
Ee. 96 Business Law -------------------------------- 3 3
E.E. 134 Radio Engineering ---------------------------- 3
E.E. 136 Radio Laborator;), ---------------------------- 1 5 2
Eng. 49 Radio Speaking --------------- --------------- 3 3
Matb. 39 Introduction to Statistical Methods _____________ 3 3
Meeb. 40 Appl!ed Mecbanlcs --------------------------- 2 2
PbYS. 94 SpeCial Problems ----------------------------- 2
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
NOTE: 4-3-5 meallS 4 hours class, 3 hours laboratory, 5 hours credit.
E. E. 2. ApPLIED ELECTRICITY. Prerequisite, Physics 28 (Physics
22 for T. E. Seniors.)
Senior T. E. and Senior Ch. E., first term, 3-0-3.
The fundam ental principles and characteristics of direct and alter
nating current machines.
E. E. 3. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY. Prerequisite, E. E.
2. Fee, $2.50.
Senior Ch. E. and Senior T. E., second term, 0-4-1.3.
The experimental determination of the characteristics of direct and
alternating current machines.
E. E. 12. ELECTRICAL MACHINES.
Senior Industrial Management, first or second term, 1-2-1.
This course is intended to f amiliarize the student with the construc
tion of electrical machines and auxiliary apparatus.
E. E. 16. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY. Prerequisite,
E. E. 87. Fee, $4.00.
Junior E. E., second term, 1-7-2.7.
108 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
The experimental determination of the characteristics, efficiency and
regulation of direct current generators and motors.
E. E. 27, 27c. SEMINAR.
Senior E. E., first term, 1-0-1.
Co-operative course, Senior E. E., first term, 1-0-.7.
A course consisting of the delivery and discussion of technical papers
in class. The papers deal with subjects of timely interest in electrical
engineering.
E. E. 28, 28c. SEMINAR.
Senior E. E., second term, 1-0-1.
Co-operative course, Senior E. E., second term, 1-0-.7.
A continuation of E. E. 27.
E. E. 49. TELEPHONY. Prerequisite, E. E. 188.
Senior E. E., first term, 2-0-2.
The principles of telephone apparatus and circuits. Carrier Cur
rents, etc.
E. E. SOc. TELEPHONY. Prerequisite, E. E. 93c.
Co-operative course, E. E. Junior Signal Corps, third and fourth
quarters, 2-0-1.3.
etc.
The principles of telephone apparatus and circuits. Carrier currents,
E. E. 56. THE MECHANICAL PLANT OF BUILDINGS.
Arch. Seniors, second term, 1-0-1.
A course dealing with the fundamentals of electrical engineering
as applied to modern buildings and including its application to simple
problems.
E. E. 6lc. APPLIED ELECTRICITY. Prerequisite, Physics 35c.
Co-operative course, M. E. Senior, first term, 3-0-2.
Some of the principles of electric and magnetic circuits, and the
applications of direct current machinery.
E. E. 62c. ApPLIED ELECTRICITY. Prerequisite, E. E. 61c, Math. 32c.
Co-operative course, M. E. Senior, second term, 3-0-2.
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 109
The elementary principles of alternating current circuits, and the
applications of alternating current machinery.
E. E. 64c. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY. Parallel or after
E. E. 62c. Fee, $3.00.
Co-operative course, M. E. Senior, third term, 1-6-2.
The experimental determination of the characteristics of direct and
alternating current apparatus and machinery.
E. E. 66c. TRANSMISSION. Prerequisite, E. E. 94c.
Co-operative course, E. E. Senior, first term, 4-0-2.6.
A course consisting of recitations and problems devoted to the study
of the operating characteristics of transmission lines, and the distribu
tion of power.
E. E. 71c. ApPLIED ELECTRICITY. Prerequisite, Physics 35c.
Senior, Civil, Textile, and Ch. E. Co-operative, first term, 4-0-2.6.
Some of the fundamental principles of direct and alternating current
machines.
E. E. 74c. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY. Prerequisite,
E. E. 71c. Fee, $2.00.
Senior, Civil, Textile, and Ch. E. Co-operative, second term, 0-4-1.
The experimental determination of the characteristics, efficiency and
regulation, of direct and alternating current machines.
E. E. 77. ApPLIED ELECTRICITY. Prerequisites, Math. 23, Phys. 28.
Junior M. E. and G. E., second term, 3-0-3.
Some of the principles of electric and magnetic circuits, and the ap
plications of direct current machinery.
E. E. 78. ApPLIED ELECTRICITY. Prerequisite, E. E. 77. Fee, $2.00.
Senior M. E. and G. E., first term, 2-3-3.
The elementary principles of circuits and the applications of alter
nating current machinery. Experiments are performed in the laboratory
with direct and alternating current machinery.
E. E. 81c. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY. Prerequisite,
E. E. 92c. Fee, $2.00.
Co-operative course, Junior E. E., first term, 1-5-1.4.
110 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
-----------------------------------------------------------
The experimental determination of the characteristics, efficiency and
regulation of direct current generators and motors.
E. E. 82c. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY. Prerequisites,
E. E. 81c and E. E. 92c. Fee, $2.00.
Co-operative course, Junior E. E., second term, 1-5-1.4.
A continuation of E. E. 81c.
E. E. 83c. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY. Parallel or after
E. E. 95c. Prerequisite, E. E. 81c. Fee, $3.00.
Co-operative course, Senior E. E., first term, 1-7-1.8.
A course consisting of experiments on single-phase and three-phase
circuits, and the characteristics, efficiency, and regulation of transform_
ers and synchronous generators.
E. E. 84c. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY. Parallel or after
E. E. 96c. Prerequisite, E. E. 81c. Fee, $3.00.
Co-operative course, Senior E. E ., second term, 1-7-1.8.
A course consisting of experiments on transformers, alternators, ~nd
synchronous motors.
E. E. 85c. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY. Parallel or after
E. E. 97c. Prerequisite, E. E. 81c. Fee, $2.00.
Co-operative course, Senior E. E., third term, 1-7-1.8.
A course consisting of experiments on single-phase and polyphase
motors, rectifiers, and transmission lines.
E. E. 87. PRINCIPLES OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. Prerequisites,
Physics 28 and Math. 23.
Junior E. E., first term, 5-0-5.
Principles of electric and magnetic circuits. The construction, char
acteristics, and applications of direct current generators and motors.
E. E. 91c. ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM. Parallel Phys. 35c, Math.
32c.
Co-operative course, Pre-Junior E. E., first term, 4-0-2.6.
The principles of electric and magnetic circuits.
E. E. 92c. PRINCIPLES OF DIRECT CURRENT MACHINERY. Prereq
uisi te, E. E. 91 c.
Co-operative course, Pre-Junior E. E., second term, 4-0-2.6.
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 111
The principles, characteristics, and applications of direct current
machinery.
E. E. 93c. ALTERNATING CURRENT CIRCUITS. Prerequisites, E. E.
91c, Math. 33c.
Co-operative course, Junior E. E., first term, 4-0-2.6.
The principles of single-phase and polyphase circuits.
E. E. 94c. ALTERNATING CURRENT CIRCUITS. Prerequisite, E. E.
93c.
Co-operative course, Junior E. E., second term, 4-0-2.6.
A continuation of E. E. 93c, and a study of non-harmonic waves.
E. E. 95c. ALTERNATING CURRENT MACHINERY. Prerequisite, E. E.
94c.
Co-operative course, Senior E. E., first term, 5-0-3.3.
A study of transformers and alternators.
E. E. 96c. ALTERNATING CURRENT MACHINERY. Prerequisite, E. E.
95c.
Co-operative course, Senior E. E., second term, 4-0-2.6.
A study of alternators and synchronous motors.
E. E. 97c. ALTERNATING CURRENT MACHINERY. Prerequisite, E. E.
95c.
Co-operative course, Senior E. E., third term, 3-0-2.
A study of induction motors and rectifiers.
E. E. 117. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY. Parallel or after
E. E. 189. Prerequisite, E. E. 16. Fee, $4.00.
Senior E. E., first term, 1.5-6.5-2.7.
A course consisting of experiments on single-phase and three-phase
circuits, and the characteristics, efficiency, and regulation of transform
ers and synchronous generators.
E. E. 118. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY. Parallel or after
E. E. 190. Prerequisite, E. E. 16. Fee, $4.00.
Senior E. E., second term, 1.5-6.5-2.7.
The experimental determination of the characteristics, efficiency and
regulation of polyphase and single-phase motors and rotary converters.
A study of thermionic rectifiers and transmission lines.
112 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
E. E. 130. ELECTRICAL TRANSMISSION OF POWER. Parallel E. E.
189.
Senior E. E., first term, 3-0-3.
Recitation and problem work devoted to the study of the construc
tion and operating characteristics of transmission lines, and the distribu
tion of power.
E. E. 133, 133c. RADIO E ' GINEERING PRINCIPLES. Prerequisite,
E. E. 188, or E. E. 94c.
Senior E. E., first term, 3-0-3.
Co-operative course, Senior E. E., first term, 4-0-2.6.
An introductory course presenting the basic principles of operation
of radio communication apparatus and electronic devices.
E. E. 134, 134c. RADIO ENGINEERING PRINCIPLES. Prerequisite,
E. E. 133.
Senior E. E., second term, 3-0-3.
Co-operative course, Senior E. E., second term, 5-0-3.3.
The quantitative analysis and design of various ty\1es of thermionic
amplifiers and of radiating systems.
E. E. 136, 136c. RADIO LABORATORY. Parallel or after E. E. 134.
Fee, $3.00.
Senior E. E., second term, 1-5-2.
Co-operative course, Senior E. E., second term, 1-8-2.
A practical course dealing with tuned circuits, filters, transmission
lines, thermionic ampl.ifiers, oscillators, detectors, and photocells.
E. E. 188. ALTERNATING CURRENT CIRCUITS. Prerequisite, E. E. 87.
Junior E. E., second term, 5-0-5.
Single-phase and polyphase circuits, non-harmonic waves.
E. E. 189. ALTERNATING CURRENT MACHINERY. Prerequisite, E. E.
188.
Senior E. E., first term, 5-0-5.
The construction, characteristics, and applications of alternating cur
rent machinery.
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 113
E. E. 190. ALTERNATING CURRENT MACHINERY. Prerequisite, E. E.
189.
Senior E. E., second term, 3-0-3.
A continuation of E. E. 189, consisting of recitations and problems
devoted to the study of the theory, construction, and operating charac
teristics of polyphase and single-phase motors and rotary converters.
For Graduate Courses see page 186 of this catalogue.
DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING DRAWING
AND MECHANICS
PROFESSOR JOHNS; ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR WEBER, IN CHARGE OF
DRAWING; PROFESSOR NARMORE; ASSISTANT PROFESSORS BROWN
AND HILL; INSTRUCTORS BOGLE, LEWIS, JACOBS, VroOSIC AND
BILYK, AND ASSISTANTS
ENGINEERING DRAWING
NOTE: 4-3-5 means 4 hours class, 3 hours laboratory, 5 hours credit.
DRAWING 5. BLUE PRINT READING.
Freshman I. M., first term, 0-6-2.
This course covers lettering, the theory and delineation of simple
orthographic projection, and blue print reading.
DRAWING 6. GRAPHIC CHARTS AND GRAPHS.
Freshman I. M., second term, 0-6-2.
A study of the theory and construction of charts and graphs used
to illustrate production and business trends.
DRAWING 9 and 9c. ENGINEERING DRAWING.
Dr. 9c. First term, Freshman, 0-6-2.
Dr. 9c. First term, Co-op., Freshman, 0-9-2.
Instruction is given in the proper use of drawing instruments and
equipment. The course covers the theory of orthographic, isometric,
and oblique projections; also a study of simple sections and methods
of dimensioning. Particular emphasis is placed on the development of
technique. Pencil drawings, only, are required.
DRAWING 10 and lOc. ENGINEERING DRAWING.
Dr. 10. Second term, Freshman, 0-6-2. Prerequisite, Dr. 9.
Dr. lOc. Second term, Co-op., Freshman, 0-9-2. Prerequisite, Dr. 9c.
A course covering the more intricate and advanced phases of ortho-
graphic projection and the conventions of machine drawing. Freehand
working sketches are drawn of machine parts and from assemblies, fol
lowed by detail pencil drawings from which tracings are made on cloth.
It is required that every student make a blue print.
[ 114]
ENGINEERING DRAWING AND MECHANICS 115
DRAWING 23. ENGINEERING DRAWING.
First term, Sophomore, M. E. and Junior Cer. E., 0-6-2. Prereq-
uisite, Dr. 10.
All the work of Dr. 25 and Dr. 26 in one term.
DRAWING 25 and 25c. ENGINEERING DRAWING.
Dr. 25. First term, Sophomore, G. E., M. E., 0-3-1. Prerequisite,
Dr. 10.
Dr. 25c. First term, Sophomore Co-op. (except C. E. and Ch. E.),
0-3-.7. Prerequisite, Dr. lOc.
The fundamentals of applied descriptive geometry. Simple intersec
tions. Elementary practical applications. Lectures, class (no outside
preparation) and drafting.
DRAWING 26 and 26c. ENGINEERING DRAWING.
Dr. 26. Second term, Sophomore, G. K, M. E., 0-3-1. Prerequisite,
Dr. 25.
Dr. 26c. Second term, Co-op., Sophomore (except c. E. and Ch. E.),
0-6-1.3. Prerequisite, Dr. 25c.
Descriptive geometry as applied to surface intersections and space
curves. Applications to structural problems. Practical layout problems
in development. Warped surfaces.
Lectures, class (no outside preparation) and drafting.
ENGINEERING MECHANICS
NOTE: 4-3-5 means 4 hours class, 3 hours laboratory, 5 hours credit.
MECH. 29. ELEMENTARY ApPLIED MECHANICS. Prerequisites, Phys.
21, Math. 23.
Junior T. E., first term, 4-0-4.
Elementary statics, kinetics, and mechanics of materials.
MECH.31. ApPLIED MECHANICS. Prerequisites, Phys. 27, Math. 23,
Math. 24, or concurrently.
E. E., P. H. E., first term, 3-0-3.
Topics of study: Elements of statics; laws of equilibrium with ap
plication to machines and structures; symmetrical and unsymmetrical
suspension of parabolic and catenary cables; kinematics and kinetics of
rectilinear and curvilinear motion of particles and bodies.
116 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
MECH. 33. ApPLIED MECHANICS. Prerequisites, Phys. 21, Math.
23, Arch. 13.
Junior Architects (option No.2), Junior Cer. E., first term, 3-3-4.
Class work, Mech. 35; Laboratory, Mech. 39.
MECH.35. ApPLIED MECHANICS. Prerequisites, Phys. 27, Math. 23,
Math. 24, or concurrently.
Junior Ch. E., first term, 3-0-3.
Topics of study: Resolution and composition of forces; Moments
of forces; General principles of equilibrium; Physical properties of
common engineering materials; Stresses and corresponding deformation
of these materials in tension, compression and shear; Transverse shear
and bending moments in beams; Centroids and moments of inertia of
plane areas; Stresses in beams, simple cases.
MECH. 36. ApPLIED MECHANICS. Prerequisites, Mech. 33 or 35.
Junior Ch. E., Junior Cer. E., and Architects (option No.2), sec
ond term, 2-0-2.
Topics of study: Stresses in beams; Deflections of statically de
terminate beams; Columns; Riveted joints; Pressurf! vessels; Shafts.
MECH. 39, 39c. ApPLIED MECHANICS. Prerequisites to class: Phys.
27, Math. 23, Math. 24, or concurrently. Prerequisite to lab.: Dr. 10.
Junior C. E., G. E., M. E., first term, 3-3-4.
Pre-Junior Co-op., second term, 4-6-4 (Mech. 39c).
For topics of study in class see Mech. 31. (Students in Mech. 31
and in class part of Mech. 39 and 39c are grouped together in the same
class without regard to course number.)
Topics of study in lab.: Composition and resolution of forces and
couples; Forces in equilibrium; Application of principles of equilibrium
to determine loads on members of roof trusses, cranes, and other simple
structures; Friction.
MECH. 40, 4Oc. ApPLIED MECHANICS. Prerequisite, Mech. 31 or 39.
Junior E. E., G. E., M. E., second term, 2-0-2.
Junior Co-op., except T. E. and Ch. E., first term, 3-0-2. (Mech.
40c.)
Topics of study: Kinetics of plane motion; work, power, and en
ergy; impulse and momentum; the general case of rotation; balancing
of rigid bodies; the gyroscope.
ENGINEERING DRAWING AND MECHANICS 117
MECH. 42. MECHANICS OF MATERIALS.
Junior Arch., Option No. 1. Prerequisite, Math. 17, second term,
3-0-3.
Topics of study: Moments and shears in simple and continuous
beams; flexure formula; a brief study of column design; resolution and
composition of forces with especial reference to trusses.
MECH. 47, 47c. MECHANICS OF MATERIALS. Prerequisite, Mech.
31 or 39, or concurrently.
Junior C. E., E. E., G. E., M. E., first term; P. H. E., second term,
2-0-2.
Junior Co-op., Ch. E., C. E., E. E., M. E., first term, 3-0-2 (Mech.
47c).
Topics of study: The physical properties of materials; Shear and
bending moment; Moments of inertia; The flexure formula; Simple
elastic curves; Torsion of circular shafts; An elementary treatment of
columns; Cylinders with thin walls under internal pressure.
MECH. 48, 48c. MECHANICS OF MATERIALS. Prerequisite, Mech. 47.
Junior C. E., G. E., M. E., second term, 3-0-3.
Junior Co-op., C. E., M. E., second term, 4-0-2.6 (Mech. 48c).
Topics of study: A more advanced treatment of elastic curves;
Slope-deflection methods applied to beams; Continuous beams; Hori
zontal shear; Combined stresses; Moving loads; Beams of constant
strength; Springs; A more advanced treatment of columns.
For Graduate Courses see page 187 of this catalogue.
DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH
PROFESSORS PERRY AND CHAPIN; ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS FOLK AND
WALKER; ASSISTANT PROFESSORS BROWN, RAINEY, COX, AJA..'C,
AND ANDERSON; INSTRUCTORS COMER, BOWDEN, HUDSON,
CRANE, LINTON, AND BAKER
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
NOTE: 4-3-5 means 4 hours class, 3 hours laboratory, 5 hours credit.
Comment on the Freshman English Course
At the opening of the school year all incoming Freshmen are re
quired to take a placement test, which is given uniformly throughout
all branches of the Georgia University System. On the basis of this
test the Freshmen are grouped into various sections according to their
indicated ability.
Every student is required to have credit for two terms of Freshman
English. Students notably deficient in the fundamentals of English com
position may be assigned to a non-credit section; and those notably
proficient may be given credit for the first term's work.
A definite number of themes is required of students during each
term. No theme is accepted which is unsatisfactory in grammar and
spelling, and no student is given credit for the course until he has ac
quired correctness in these particulars and a reasonable facility in the
use of the English language. If the student fails to receive credit for
the course, he will be required to repeat the work as often as may be
necessary to teach him to write correctly.
The schedule of each student provides for a consultation hour with
his instructor.
Students in more advanced classes whose work in composition IS
unsatisfactory may be required to take this course, as a whole or in
part, even though they have credit for the course. A "Laboratory Sec
tion" in English composition is conducted to meet the needs of such
students.
[ 118]
DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH
ENGLISH 11. COMPOSITION AND RHETORIC.
Required of all Freshmen, first term, 3-0-3.
119
The course offers a study of the basic principles of rhetoric and
composition, including punctuation, grammatical form, the correct and
effective use of words, and the structure of the sentence and the para
graph. The emphasis is placed on the application of these principles in
the student's themes.
Text: Jones, Practice Handbook in English; an approved dictionary.
ENGLISH 12. COMPOSITION AND RHETORIC. Prerequisite, English 11.
Required of all Freshmen, second term, 3-0-3.
The course is a continuation of English 11. Its main concern is
with the larger units of composition, the paragraph and the theme as
a whole, with special emphasis on the collecting and organizing of
material for the expository essay.
Text: Chapin, Walker, Ajax, Advanced Composition.
FRESHMAN COLLATERAL READING
All Freshmen are required to read each term, as an integral part
of their Freshman English course, a designated amount of collateral
reading. This collateral reading will be approximately one thousand
pages, one-third of which must be non-fiction. The books selected by
the student for reading must have the approval of the instructor. The
books are, in the main, supplied by the School Library. The larger book
collection of the Carnegie Library of Atlanta is also made available for
the use of all Tech students.
SURVEY OF THE HUMANITIES
In lieu of a study of literature during the Sophomore year there
is givfn the Survey Course in the Humanities which is a uniform part
of the curriculum of all units of the University System of Georgia.
ENGLISH 33. SURVEY OF THE HUMANITIES. Prerequisite, English
11 and 12.
Required of all Sophomores, first term, 3-0-3.
The course presents a general survey of the Humanities from the
earliest times to the close of the Renaissance. It is conducted by means
of lectures, oral ' and written quizzes, and written reports.
Text: Robbins and Coleman, Western World Literature.
120 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
ENGLISH 34. SURVEY OF THE HUMANITIES. Prerequisite, Eng_
lish 33.
Required of all Sophomores, second term, 3-0-3.
The course continues the survey of the Humanities from the close
of the Renaissance to the present. It is similar in aim and scope to
English 33.
Text: Robbins and Coleman, Western World Literature.
Collateral reading, required in both English 33 and 34, will be an
nounced by the instructor.
ENGLISH 41.* AMERICAN LITERATURE. Prerequisite, English 11
and 12.
Juniors and Seniors, first term, 3-0-3.
The course presents a general survey of American literature from
the beginning to the Civil War.
Not given 1939-40.
ENGLISH 42.* AMERICAN LITERATURE. Prerequisite, English 41.
Juniors and Seniors, second term, 3-0-3.
The course continues the survey of American literature, from the
Civil ' ?ar to the present.
Not given 1939-40.
ENGLISH 45. PUBLIC SPEAKING.
Juniors and Seniors, one term, 3-0-3.
This brief course attempts to inform the student of the principles
underlying effective informal public speaking and to furnish him with
some experience and practice in the art.
In Speech Laboratory the student will record his voice and receive
instruction in the correction of his speech habits. Fee, $1.50.
Text: Folk and Walker, Outline for Public Speaking.
ENGLISH 49. RADIO SPEAKING.
Juniors and Seniors, one term, 3-0-3. Prerequisite, English 45.
Admission by consent of instructor. The principles and practice of
? Taught In extension.
DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 121
radio speaking, including the preparation of manuscript, will be studied.
Recordings of the student's voice will be made at frequent intervals.
Fee, $2.00.
Text: Abbott, Handbook of Broadcasting.
ENGLISH 50.* ENGLISH POETRY.
Juniors and Seniors, one term, 3-0-3.
This course is designed to heighten the student's appreciatIOn of
poetry by means of a study of the basic technique of the art and of the
principal poetic forms and by readings in good English poetry.
Not given 1939-40.
Juniors and Seniors, one term, 3-0-3.
ENGLISH 51. MODERN DRAMA.
This course presents a brief study of dr~matic theory and technique,
illustrated by the work of a number of modern playwrights. The class
study is supplemented by collateral readings in modern drama.
ENGLISH 54. ELIZABETHAN DRAMA.
Juniors and Seniors, one term, 3-0-3.
Starting with a hurried review of the history of the drama, the
course proceeds to a careful study of Shakespeare, whose work fills the
larger part of the course. The minor Elizabethan playwrights and
those of the Restoration are glanced at in the class room and in the
collateral reading.
Texts: Complete edition of S hakespeal?e' sPlays; other selected
plays to be announced.
ENGLISH 61. THE ENGLISH NOVEL.
Juniors and Seniors, one term, 3-0-3.
This course comprises a brief survey of the general history of the
novel in England and an intensive study of certain representative novels
written since the time of Scott. Lectures are supplemented by extensive
parallel reading and by oral and written quizzes and reports.
ENGLISH 63. TECHNICAL ENGLISH. Prerequisite, English 11 and 12.
Juniors and Seniors, one term, 3-0-3.
This course offers special training in those forms of compOSitIOn
which are specifically demanded of the engineer. It seeks to give study
?Taught In extension .
122 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
and practice in the use of correct and effective English in business let
ters, technical papers, and engineering reports.
Text: The Engineer's 1I1anual of Euglish, Sypherd-Brown.
ENGLISH 65. BUSINESS ENGLISH. Prerequisite, English 11 and 12.
Juniors and Seniors, one term, 3-0-3.
This course offers a study of the fundamental principles of practical
composition as applied to the problems of business correspondence. The
content of the course is parallel with that of English 63, except that the
emphasis is placed upon correctness and effectiveness in the language of
business letters.
Text: College Guide to Business English, Marcoux.
COURSES IN ENGLISH IN THE CO-OPERATIVE DEPARTMENT
Eng. lIe, Eng. 12e, Eng. 33c, Eng. 34c, Eng. 45c, Eng. 63, 65c are,
in content, identical with Eng. 11, Eng. 12, En~. 33, Eng. 34, Eng. 45,
Eng. 63 and 65.
NON-CREDIT COURSES
ENGLISH 9, 10.
English 9 is designed to meet the needs of foreign students. English
10 is for students unprepared to take regular college Freshman English.
Both are non-credit courses.
THE GENERAL ENGINEERING COURSE
PROFESSOR D. P. SAVANT, Director
The degree of .Bachelor of Science in General Engineering is award-
ed on the completIOn of one of the following options:
Option No.1, General.
Option No.2, Aeronautical Engineering, page 35.
Option No.3, Engineering Physics, page 164.
The course, Option No.1, has been established for students who
wish to secure a training in engineering principles and their application,
but who do not desire to specialize in any particular branch of engi
neering.
Course No.
Dr. 25
Eng. 33
Math. 23
M.E. 16
Pbys. 21
R.O.T.C. 3
Dr. 26
Eng. 34
Matb. 24
M.E.
Phys. 28
R.O.T.C. 4
Course No.
C.E. 23
Ec. 24
Math. 136
Mecb. 39
Mech. 41
FRESHMAN YEAR
See page 34.
SOPHOMORE YEAR
FIRST TERM
Subject Class Lab. Credit
Engineering Drawing ________________________ _
Humanities --________________________________ 3
Calculus ------_______________________________ 5
M?acbine Laboratory _________________________ _
Physics -_____________________________________ 5
M:illtary or Naval lnstructlon _________________ _
TotaL__________________________ 13
SECOND TERM
Engineering Dra wing ________________________ _
Humanities __________________________________ 3
Calculus --___________________________________ 5
Wood Laboratory ___________________________ _
Phystcs ______________________________________ 5
Mllltary or Naval Instructlon _________________ _
TotaL_________ ____________ _____ 13
JUNIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM
3
6
3
5
17
6
3
. 5
11
1
S
5
2
6
1.5
18.5
1
3
5
2
6
1.5
18.5
Subject Class Lab. Credit
Plane Surveying _____________________________ 2
Engineering Economics _______________________ 3
Differential Equattons ________________________ 3
Applied Mechanics ___________________________ 3
Mechanics of Materials________________________ 2
Approved Elective ____________________________ 3
TotaL__________________________ 16
[ 123 J
3
4
3
3
4
2
3
19
124 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
GENERAL ENGINEERING 125
SECOND TERM SECOND TERM
Ch.E. 67
Eng. 63
M.E. 44
M.E. 45
Mech. 40
Mech. 48
Course No.
C.E. 153
C.E. 155
E.E. 77
M.E. 161
C.E. 33
C.E. 156
E.E. 78
Eng. 45
M.E. 47
M.E. 77
Metallurgy ___________________________________ S
Technical Engllsh ____________________________ S
Thermodynamics _____________________________ 3
Instruments and Fuels Laboratory _____________ 1 3
Applied Mechanics ___________________________ 2
Mechanics of 1I1aterlaI3________________________ S
Appr<>ved Elective ____________________________ 3
TotaL__________________________ 18
SENIOR YEAR
Option No.1
FIRST TERM
Subject Class
Framed Structures --------------------------
Reinforced Concrete -------------------------
Applied Electrlclty --------------------------
Machine Design -----------------------------
Approved Elective ----------------------------
Total---------------------------
SECOND TERM
Hydraulics -----------------------------------
Concrete Structures - -------------------------
Applied Electricity ---------------------------
Public Speaking ------------------------------
Power Auxiliaries Laboratory ------------------
Steam Power
Englneerlng ______________________
Approved Elective ----------------------------
TGtal-- ______ - - ------- - ---------
SENIOR YEAR
Option No. 2
FIRST TERM
3
3
3
5
2
16
3
2
2
3
1
3
2
16
3
Lab.
3
3
3
9
3
3
3
9
Lab.
Couru No. Subject Class
A.E. 121 Aerodyoomlcs of the
Alrplane _________________ 3
A.E. 133 Theory of Aircraft Structures-----------------
3
A.E. 141 Airplane Destll'D 1 ___________ ------------------
9
C.E. 75 1I1aterlals of Constructlon---------------------
2
E.E. 77 Applied Electricity ---------------------------
3
M.E. 57 Materials Laboratory -------------------------
1 3
Approved Elective ---------------------------- 3
TotaL __________________________ 15 12
Credit
4
4
3
6
2
19
3
3
3
3
1.3
3
2
18.3
Credit
3
3
3
2
3
1.3
3
18.3
APproved Electives: Adv. R. O. T. C., C. E. 36, Ec. 51, Ec. 96, Engr. 102, Geol.
41, S. S. 42.
OPTION No.3
The Freshman and Sophomore Years of Option No.3 are the same
as for Option No.1, except that Elementary German or Elementary
French must be taken in the Sophomore Year instead of Drawing 25
and 26.
-Course No.
Math. 136
'~!ech. 35
Phys. 101
Phys. 107
Phys. 113
'Mach. 36
Phys. 104
Phys. 110
Phys. 161
Phys. 114
JUNIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM
Subject Class Lab. Credit
DlJferential Equations ________________________ 3
Applied Mechanics ___________________________ 3
Theoretical Mec!J,anlcs ________________________ 3
Electricity and Magnetism_____________________ 3
Experimental Physics L_______________________ 1
Approved Electives __________________________ _
TotaL__________________________ 13
SECOND TERM
Applied Mechanics ___________________________ 2
Heat and Kinetic Theory
or
Light ________________________________________ 3
Intermediate Modern Physlcs___________________ 3
Experimental Physics ll_______________________ 1
Approved Electives __________________________ _
TotaL__________________________ 9
6
6
6
6
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
2
3
3
3
6
11
'Mech. 31, 40, 47, 48 may be substituted for Mech. 35 and 36, If desired.
126
Course No.
E.E. 77
Ec. 24
Eng. 63
Phys. 115
E.E. 78
Eng. 45
Phys. 116
Phys. 110
Phys. 104
GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
SENIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM
Subject Class
Applled Electricity --------------------------
Economics tor Engineers
or
Technical Engllsh --------------------
Experimental Physics IIL ____________________ _
Approved Electives ---------------------------
TotaL _________________________ _
SECOND TERM
Applled Electricity ---------------------------
Publlc Speaking ------------------------------
Experimental Physics -------------------------
Light
or
Heat and Kinetic Theory ____ ------------------
Approved Electives ---------------------------
Total ___________________________
3
1
2
3
1
3
9
Lab.
6
6
3
6
9
== Credit
3
3
3
9
18
3
3
3
3
7
19
==
In addition to the above courses. Phys. 94. Special Problems: must be taken some
time during the Junior or Senior year.
Approved Electives:
Any course In Aeronautical EngIneerIng from 100 to 299.
Any course Included In the Chemistry or Chemical Eng. curricula.
Any course in Electrical Engineering from 100 to 299.
Any course In Mathematics or Physics from 200 to 299.
Mechanical Engineering. 8 and 57.
GEOLOGY
PROFESSOR GIBSON
The work of the department of Geology is designed to give the
tudent a thorough grounding in the basic principles of Geology and
Mineralogy and their application to the particular field of engineering
the student is preparing to enter. The department has type collections
for Mineralogy and Geology; a collection of building stones and ceramic
clays; maps, charts and folios; and the usual Mineralogy laboratory
equipment.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
NOTE: 4-3-5 means 4 hours class, 3 hours laboratory, 5 hours credit.
GEOL. 36c. ENGINEERING GEOLOGY. Prerequisites, Chern. 3, 4;
Phys. 27; C. E. 21 or 23.
Pre-Junior C. E. Co-operative students, second term, 3-3-2.7.
A course in general, structural, and economic geology.
GliOL.37. ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY.
A course of lectures; elective for Juniors and Seniors, 3-0-3.
GEOL. 41, 42. GENERAL GEOLOGY. Prerequisites, Chern. 3, 4; Phys.
27; C. E. 21 or 23.
41, Juniors in C. E., Cer. E., Chern. and 1. M., first term, 3-0-3.
A somewhat detailed account of geologic processes.
42, Juniors in Chern., second term, 3-0-3.
A course of recitations and lectures in Historical Geology.
GliOL. 44. GENERAL GEOLOGY LABORATORY. Prerequisite, Geol. 41.
Junior Cer. E., second term, 0-3-1.
A laboratory course in General Geology with some map interpre
tation. Various field trips are taken during the term.
GliOL. 46. GENERAL GEOLOGY. Prerequisite, Geol. 41.
Juniors in C. E., second term, 3-3-4.
A course in Historical Geology and Map Reading.
GliOL. 51. MINERALOGY. Prerequisites, Geol. 41, 42, 44.
Seniors in C. E., Cer. E. and Chern., first term, 1-3-2.
A course in descriptive and determinative mineralogy which includes
[ 127 ]
128 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
an introduction to crystallography, blow-piping, and the determination
of important minerals and rocks by their chemical and physical prop_
erties.
GEOL. 101. ADVANCED MINERALOGY.
Crystallography stressed. 1-6-3.
GEOL. 103. PALEONTOLOGY.
Invertebrates. 3-0-3.
GEOL. 104. PALEONTOLOGY.
Vertebrates. 3-0-3.
GEOL. 105. FIELD GEOLOGY.
Theory. 3-0-3.
GEOL. 106. FIELD GEOLOGY.
Practice. 1-6-3.
GEOL. 109. STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY.
Lectures on Earth Structures. 3-0-3.
GEOL. 116. PETROGRAPHY.
Determinations and classification by microscopy. 1-6-3.
GEOL. 125. HYDROLOGY.
Underground waters. 3-0-3.
GEOL. 132. ECONOMIC GEOLOGY. 3-0-3.
A Geological and Economic study of all commercially valuable min
erals and rocks.
Junior and Senior 1. M., second term.
INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT
PROFESSOR W. V. DUNKIN, Director
This course, which leads to the degree, Bachelor of Science, provides
adequate training for those students who intend to do executive work
in industry. The first two years lay the foundation for a liberal educa
tion, with English, History, Social Science, Biology, and the basic physical
sciences. Mathematical training is given which enables the student to
master the important work in Finance, Accounting, and Statistics given
in the Junior and Senior years. Unusually strong courses are given in
Economics, Business Law, Distribution of Products, and Industrial
Organization.
CO/me No.
BioI. 45
Ec. 21
Eng. 33
Eng. 45
Phys. 21
R.O.T.C. 3
Blot 46
Ec. 22
Eng. 34
Math. 20
Phys. 22
R.O.T.C. 4
INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT
FRESHMAN YEAR
See page 34.
SOPHOMORE YEAR
FIRST TERM
Subject Class
General Zoology _____________________________ 3
Economics ___________________________________ 3
Humanities __________________________________ 3
Public Speaking _____________________________ 3
Physics ______________________________________ 3
Milltary ____________________________________ _
TotaL__________________________ 15
SECOND TERM
Vertebrate Zoology ___________________________ 8
Economics ___________________________________ 3
Humanities __________________________________ 3
Mathematics of Flnance_______________________ 3
Physics ______________________________________ 3
MllItary ____________________________________ _
Total___________________________ 15
[ 129]
Lab. Credit
4 4.3
3
3
3
3 4
5 1.5
12 18.8
4 4.3
3
3
3
8 4
5 1.5
12 18.8
130 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
Course No.
Ec. 33
Ec. 31
BioI. 51
Geol. 41
M.E. 61
M.E. 1
C.E. 36
Ec. 34
Ec. 38
Eng. 63
Geol. 132
Math. 39
M.E. 14
Course No.
Ec. 41
Ec. 45
Ec. 93
M.E. 8
M.E. 35
111. E. 152
Ec. 42
Ec. 44
Ec. 46
Ec. 48
E.E. 12
M.E. 92
JUNIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM
-Subject Class Lab. Credit
Accounting _________________________________ _ 3 3
Business Law _______________________________ _ 3
Human Physiology __________________________ _ 3
General Geology _____________________________ _ 3
Industrial Organization ______________________ _ 3
Wood Laboratory --___________________________ 3
Electives ___________________________________ _
To!aL__________________________ 15
SECOND TERM
Economic Selection R.O.T.C. Electlve _________ _
Accounting _________________________________ _
Business Law _______________________________ _
Technical English ___________________________ _
Economic Geology ___________________________ _
Introduction !o Statistical Methods ____________ _
Machine Laboratory _________________________ _
2
3
3
3
3
3
TotaL__________________________ 11
SENIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM
6
3
3
6
4
3
3
3
3
1
2
19
-
4
3
3
3
19
Subject Class Lab. Credit
Distribution of Produc!s______________________ 3 3
Indus!rial Accounting _________________________ 2 2
Corporation Finance _________________________ _
Foundry and Weldlng ________________________ _
Industrial Relations __________________________ 3
Industrial Management _______________________ 3
Electives ___________________________________ _
TotaL__________________________ 14
SECOND TERM
Distribntlon of Products _____________________ _
Investments ________________________________ _
Industrial Acconntlng _______________________ _
Statistics ___________________________________ _
Electrical Machinery ________________________ _
3
3
3
Development of American Industry _____________ 3
Electives ___________________________________ _
3
3
3
TotaL__________________________ 14 3
3
4
19
3
3
2
3
3
3
18
Electives may be chosen, subject to required prerequisites,
proval of the director.
and ap-
DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS
PROFESSORS SMITH, FIELD, SKILES, AND HEFNER; ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS
STAMY AND FULMER; ASSISTANT PROFESSORS MUNDORFF, REYNOLDS,
BALLOU, STEEN, SEWELL, AND WEBB; INSTRUCTORS HOOK, STARRETT,
SEARS, HOLTON, PHELPS, ROBINSON, GREEN AND CARROLL
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
NOTE: 4-3-5 means 4 hours class, 3 hours laboratory, 5 hours credit.
MATH. 3. ENTRANCE ALGEBRA. Freshman, first term, six hours per
week. A non-credit course for students who are not prepared to take
Math. 17.
Text: Sewell, Review 11lgebra.
MATH. 11. ADVANCED ALGEBRA. Prerequisite, Entrance Mathe
matics.
First year Co-operative course, first and second quarters, 5-0-3.3.
This course begins with a review of factoring, fractions, simplifica
tions, linear equations and quadratics, and includes the usual study of
Theory of Equations.
Text: Rosenbach and Whitman, College 11lgebra.
MATH. 12. TRIGONOMETRY. Prerequisite, Math. 11.
First year Co-operative course, third and fourth quarters, 6-0-4.
This course covers the Trigonometry as taught in Math. 17 and in-
cludes use of the Slide Rule.
Text: Palmer and Leigh, Trig.onometry.
MATH. 13. ANALYTIC GEOMETRY. Prerequisite, Math. 12.
Second year Co-operative course, first and second quarters, 6-0-4.
The course includes the analytic geometry of point, line and circle,
elementary properties of conic sections, transformations of co-ordinates,
polar and rectangular graphs, transcendental curves useful in engineer
ing and parametric representation.
Text : Sis am, l1nalytic Geometry.
[ 131 ]
132 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
MATH. 17. ELEMENTARY FUNCTIONS. Prerequisite, Entrance
Mathematics.
Freshman, first term, 5-1-5.
The course begins with a review of selected topics in algebra and in
cludes functions and graphs, advanced quadratics, variation, binomial
theorem, complex numbers and elementary theory of equations. In trig
onometry it covers the standard course. The function concept is stressed
as a means of unifying the theory, and the problems used are, to a large
extent, those of frequent occurrence in actual engineering work.
Text: Rosenbach and Whitman, College Algebra/ Palmer and Leigh,
Trigonometry.
MATH. 18. ANALYTIC GEOMETRY. Prerequisite, Math. 17.
Freshman, second term, 5-1-5.
The course includes the analytic geometry of point, line and circle,
transformation of co-ordinates, polar and rectangular graphs of tran
scendental curves useful in engineering, conic sections, and the elements
of solid analytic geometry.
Text: Sisam, Analytic Geometry.
MATH. 20. MATHEMATICS OF FINANCE. Prerequisite, Math. 17.
Sophomore, Industrial Management, second term, 3-0-3.
The course includes short methods of computation, simple and com
pound interest, equated date, compound discount, annuities, amortiza
tion, depreciation, valuation and yield of bonds, and building and loan
associations. Especial attention is given to practical problems of fre
quent occurrence in actual business transactions.
Text: Rietz, Crathorne and Rietz, Mathematics of Finance.
MATH. 23. DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS. Prerequisite, Math. 18.
Sophomore, first term, 5-0-5.
The course includes derivatives of algebraic .and transcendental
functions, simple applications of the derivative and differehtial, maxima
and minima, rates, curvature, velocity and acceleration, Newton's
method, the definite integral, and its application to plane areas, volumes
of revolution, pressure, and work, indeterminate forms and series.
Text: Smith, Salkover and Justice, Calculus.
DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS
MATH. 24. INTEGRAL CALCULUS. Prerequisite, Math. 23.
Sophomore, second term, 5-0-5.
133
This course is a continuation of Math. 23. It includes methods of
integration, exact and approximate; the applicatio.n of single and iterated
integrals to lengths, areas, surfaces of revolutIOn, volumes, pressure,
work, center of pressure, center of gravity and moments of inertia;
partial and total derivatives with application to geometry and rate
problems.
Text: Smith, Salkover and Justice, Calculus.
MATH. 31. DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS. Prerequisite, Math. 13.
Second year Co-operative course, third and fourth quarters, 5-0-3.3.
The course includes derivatives of algebraic and transcendental
functions and applications to slopes, maxima and minima, integration
of polynomicals and application to area, volume of revolution, pressure
and work.
Text: Smith, Salkover and Justice, Calculus.
MATH. 32. DIFFERENTIAL AND INTEGRAL CALCULUS. Prerequisite,
Math. 31.
Third year Co-operative course, firs t and second quarters, 5-0-3.3.
This course is a continuation of Math. 31 and includes rates, curva
ture, space geometry, indeterminate forms, series, partial differentiation
and integration of standard forms.
Text: Smith, Salkover and Justice, Calculus.
MATH. 33. INTEGRAL CALCULUS. Prerequisite, Math. 32.
Third year Co-operative course, third and fourth quarters, 5-0-3.3.
This course completes the study of integration as begun in Math. 32
and includes applications to areas, lengths, surfaces, volumes, pressure,
work, center of gravity, moments of inertia, and approximate integra
tion.
Text : Smith, Salkover and Justice, Calculus .
MATH. 39. INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICAL METHODS.
J unior I. M . Elective, 3-0-3.
An introduction to the mathematics of elementary statistics.
Text: Richardson, Elementary Statistical Analysis.
134 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
MATH. 136. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. Prerequisite, Math. 24.
Junior A. E., E. E., G. E., and Ch., 3-0-3.
Ordinary Differential Equations of first and second orders and Spe
cial types of higher order. Numerous applications to Physics and Me
chanics are given.
Text: Phillips, Differential Equations.
MATH. 136c. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. Prerequisite, Math. 33.
Fourth year Co-operative course, first and second quarters, 4-0-2.6.
The course includes Ordinary Differential Equations of first and
second orders and special types of higher order. Applications to Physics
and IVlechanics are given. Required for students in Electrical and Chem
ical Engineering.
Text: Phillips, Differen tial Equations.
For Graduate Courses, see page 188.
DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
PROFESSORS KING, DUNKIN, MASON, HOWELL AND SWEIGERT; Asso
CIATE PROFESSORS TROTTER, HOLLAND, AND HARRELSON; ASSISTANT
PROFESSOR HINTON; INSTRUCTORS CASE, MARTINDALE, HENIKA, VAN
HOUTEN, TOPHAM, FOSTER, WILCOX AND ALLEN, AND ASSISTANTS
Mechanical Engineering entails hard work, physical and mental, and
demands from the successful engineer native ability, technical training,
determination, and willingness to take responsibility. Its courses of study
are not designed to cover the entire field of technical thought and
achievement, but to impress basic principles upon the student and train
his mind to assimilate new ideas and draw correct conclusions from
given facts.
From the standpoint of theory the course in Mechanical Engineer
ing offers a thorough training in mechanics and heat engineering with
emphasis on the underlying mathematics and physics. On the practical
side the shops and laboratories provide direct knowledge of the con
struction and use of modern tools, machines and mechanical devices,
together with training in applying this knowledge to actual engineering
conditions.
Two alternative courses are offered in Mechanical Engineering. The
course in the first three years is identical for the two options, but the
first term of the senior year the student chooses General Mechanical
Engineering, or Industrial Engineering. Both options lead to the Degree
of Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering.
1. GENERAL MECHANICAL ENGINEERING OPTION.
This option gives the student a thorough training in the fundamen
tals of Mechanical Engineering, embracing Electrical Engineering, Power
Plant Engineering, Machine Design, and advanced Shop Work. This
option prepares the student for taking up any line of work in the
mechanical engineering field.
2. INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING OPTION.
This option gives the fundamental work in Mechanical Engineering
and the principles of industrial organization, which will fit the student
for entering the executive field of the industries.
[ 135]
136 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
COURSE I MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
SOPHOMORE YEAR
FRESHMAN YEAR
See page 34.
FIRST TERM
============~===============-
Course N~o:.... ____ ~S::lj;bE.je:.:c.:t~-----------:::C::.:la:.:s.:..s-=L.:;:ab::.=--~C::.r~ed~it
Dr. 23 Engineering Drawing -----------------------__ 6 2 -
Eng. 33 , Humanities ----------------------____________ 3 3
Math. 23 ' Calculus ----------------------______________ 5 5
M. E. 2 or 18 Wood or Machine Laboratory_________________ 2
Phys. 21 Physics --____________________________________ 5 3 6
R.O.T.C. 3 Military or Navy______________________________ 5 1.5
TotaL__________________________ 13
SECOND TERM
C. E. 21 Surveying __________________________________ _
Eng. 34 Humanltles _________________________________ _
Math. 24 Calculus ____________________________________ _
M. E. 16 or 2 Wood or Machine Laboratory _________________ _
Phys. 28 PhysiCS _____________________________________ _
R.O.T.C. 4 Mllltary or Navy ____________________________ _
1
3
5
5
TotaL__________________________ 14
JUNIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM
20
3
6
3
5
11
19.5
2-
3
5
2
6
1.5
19.5
Course N~o~?-=_--77~SI=jb~j~e.:..ct~-----------~C.:..I~a::.:ss~::.:L.:..a:.:b:.:. ~C~r~f~d~it~
~61 Ferrous Metallurgy ___________________________ 3 3
C. E. 75 Materials of Construction (?t1l!.) _______________ 2 2
M. E. 17 Machine Laboratory _________________________ _
M . E. 41 Thermodynamics ____________________________ _ 3
1
3
2
3
M. E. 45 Inst. and Fuels Laboratory ___________________ _
Mech. 39 Mechanics __________________________________ _
Mech. 41 Mechanics of Materlals _______________________ _
M. E. 155 Organization and ManagemenL _______________ _
Total___________________________ 11
SECOND TERM
E. E. 71 Applied ElectriCity ___________________________ 3
M.E. 1 Foundry (Mll.) _____________________________ _
M.E. 22 Heat Treating and Welding Laboratory ________ _
M.E. 41 Power Auxiliaries Laboratory __________________ 1
M.E. 58 Seminar _____________________________________ 1
M.E. 65 Power Plant Englneerlng______________________ 4
M. E. 14.0 Advanced Thermodynamics ____________________ 2
Mech. 40 Mechanics ___________________________________ 2
Mech. 48 Mechanics of Materlals________________________ 3
Total___________________________ 11
3
3 1.3
3 1.3
3 4
3
8
3
14.
2
3
19.3
3
1
3
1.3
0.3
4
2
2
3
19.6
Course No.
E. E. 78
M.E. 59
M. E. 83
M. E. 103
M. E. 161
M. E. 166
Elective
EDg.
M.E.
M.E.
M.E.
If. E.
Elective
Elective
45
60
84
162
170
COIme No.
E. E. 18
M.E. 59
M.E. 83
M. E. 103
M. E. 161
Elective
M. E. 109
Eng. 45
M.E. 60
M.E. 84
M. E. 106
M. E. 153
M. E. 156
M. E. 162
Elective
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
SENIOR YEAR
GENERAL OPTION
FIRST TERM
137
Subject Class Lab. Credit
Applied Electricity
Seminar ____________ ________________________ _
Heat Power Laboratory ______________________ _
FluId Flow _________________________________ _
M?achlne Design _____________________________ _
Internal Combustion Englne"-________________ _
R.O.T.C. Electives ___________________________ _
2
1
3
5
3
2
Total___________________________ 16
SECOND TERM
Public Speaking
Seminar ____________________________________ _
Heat Power Laboratory __________ ______ ______ _
Machine Design ____________________________ _
Refrigeration, Heating and VenUlatlon ________ _
Engineering Subject _________________________ _
R.O.T.C. Elective ____________________________ _
3
1
4
5
2
2
TotaL__________________________ 11
SENIOR YEAR
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING OPTION
FIRST TERM
Subject
Applied Electricity
Seminar ____________________________________ _
Heat Power Laboratory ______________________ _
Fluid Flow _________________________________ _
Machine Design _____________________________ _
R.O. T.C. Elective ____________________________ _
Production Plant Englneerlng _________________ _
Class
2
3
5
2
3
Total___________________________ 16
SECOND TERM
Public Speaking
Seminar ____________________________________ _
Heat Power Laboratory _______________________ _
Factory Building EqulpmenL _________________ _
Time and Motion Study ______________________ _
Management Engineering ____________________ _
Machine Design ____________________________ _
R.O .T.C. Elective ___________________________ _
3
2
1
3
4
2
TotaL__________________________ 16
3
4
3
10
4
3
3
0.3
1.3
3
6
3
2
18.6
3
0.3
1.3
5
5
2
2
18.6
Lab. Credit
3 3
0.3
4 1.3
3
3 6
10
4
3
3
10
2
3
18.6
3
0.3
1.3
2
2
3
5
2
18.6
138 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
ELECTIVES
The following courses are elective for both Industrial and General
Options in Mechanical Engineering. No course will be given to less
than eight men. Any Graduate Course may be elected either term.
FIRST TERM
==================================~-
Course No.
Ec. 21
Ec. 24
Ec. 93
Ec. 94
Eng. 63
Geol. 41
Math. 136
M. E . 49
M.E. 95
M.E. 150
M.E. 172
C.E. 61
Ec. 22
Ec. 95
Eng. 63
M.E. 50
M.E. 89 & 94
M.E. 96
M.E. 98
M. E. 148a
M.E. 150
111. E. 174
111. E. 182
Phys. 190
S"bject
EconomIcs
General EconomIcs
FInance Survey Course
Marketing
Technical EngUsh
General Geology
DIfl'erentIal Equations
Mechanical EngineerIng SpecIal Problems
Mechanical Engineering Laboratory
Legal and EthIcal Phases of EngineerIng
Steam TurbInes
SECOND TERM
Contracts and SpecIfications
EconomIcs
Accounting
Technical English
lIfechanical EngineerIng Spechtl Problems
Internal Combustion and Aeronautical EngIne Laboratory
Mechanh",1 EngIneerIng Laboratory
Steam Locomotives
IndustrIal Relations
Legal and EthIcal Phases of Engineering
Power Plant DesIgn
Motor Vehicles
HIgh Temperature Measuremente
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
NOTE: 4-3-5 m eans 4 hours class, 3 hours laboratory, 5 hours credit.
Th e follo wing courses are suitable f or undergraduate credits onll"
N ote: Course numbers fo llowed by the letter "c" are for co-opera-
tive students only.
M. E. 1. W OOD LABORATORY.
Elective either term, 0-3-1.
This course consists of instruction in the proper care and use of
wood-working tools, machines and their safe operation, in benchwork,
turning and elementary cabinet work, giving a thorough understanding
of the fundamental principles of woodwork.
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
M. E. 2. WOOD LABORATORY.
Sophomore M. E., first or second term, 0-6-2.
Sophomore Gen. Eng., first or second term, 0-6-2.
139
The practical applications are confined to jointmaking with differ
ent woods, gluing, turning and elements of finishing. The las t half of
the course deals with pattern work and the use of pattern making tools.
M. E. 5. HEAT TREATING LABORATORY. No prerequisites.
Junior E. E., first term, 1-3-1.3.
This subject includes the operations of normalizing, annealing, case
hardening (or carburizing), hardening, tempering and drawing of steels.
Tests are made of specimens of heat treated steel alloys and non-ferrous
metals as to both strength and machinability. Microscopic examinations
and various mechanical proofs are used to check up on such treatments.
M. E. 7 and M. E. 7c. FOUNDRY LABORATORY.
Junior M. E., second term, 0-3-1.
Pre-Junior M. E. Co-op., second term, 0-4-1.
This course in foundry practice consists of the elements of bench
and floor work, with projects in simple mould building, in which two
and three part flasks are used. Machine and other methods of mass
production are put through with moulding machines, core presses and
other equipment, mixing and pouring non-ferrous metals, such as brass
and aluminum. Computation of charges, and operation of the cupola
and brass furnaces are also taught.
M. E. 8. FOUNDRY AND WELDING LABORATORY.
Elective, either term.
Senior, I. M., first term, 0-3-1.
One-half of the term is spent in the foundry and one-half of the
term in welding laboratory. This course is intended to give the student
a survey of foundry practice, electric and oxy-acetylene welding, and is
taught by means of lectures as well as practice work.
M. E. 10 and M. E. lOc. WELDING LABORATORY.
Junior C. E., second term, 0-3-1.
Pre-J unior C. E., Co-op., first term, 0-3-0.7.
Senior E. E. Co-op., first term, 0-6-1.4.
In this course is given a brief survey of the whole field of welding
140 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
practice, including the fundamentals of electric arc and resistance, oxy
acetylene, forge, thermit, and atomic hydrogen arc welding.
By actual practice, the student is taught to use the oxy-acetylene
torch, the electric arc and the electric resistance spot welding equip_
ment.
M. E. lOb. ADVANCED WELDING.
Elective, 1-3-2.
This course may be substituted by the student for M. E. 10, if he
desires the added information.
This course furnishes instruction by means of lectures and labora_
tory practice, which enables the student to select proper material, ap
paratus and procedure to be able to perform, inspect and supervise
welding operations which have come to occupy such an important place
in the fabrication of machines and apparatus used in engineering. Lan
tern slides are used to show the crystaline structure and the effects of
heat upon the various metals as a result of the various procedures
in use.
M. E. 14. MACHINE LABORATORY.
Junior E. E., 1. M., second term, 0-3-1.
One hour of this course is devoted to the classroom where modern
production methods are taught by actual demonstration. The subject
of jigs, tools and fixtures used in electrical manufacturing plants are
studied. The laboratory work consists wholly of building electrical
motors.
M. E. 16 and M. E. 16c. MACHINE LABORATORY.
Sophomore M. E., T. E., G. E., first or second term, 0-6-2.
Junior M. E. Co-op., first term, 2-6-2.
Two hours of this course are spent in the classroom in a study of
the production problems that occur in modern manufacturing plants.
Time study and the design of jigs, tools and fixtures are required.
The practical work consists of projects selected for their training
value. The use of simple jigs, tools and fixtures are employed through
out the course. The sequence of operation and tools used for such opera
tions are furnished the student with standard time in which such opera
tions should be completed.
M. E. 17. MACHINE LABORATORY. Prerequisite, M. E. 16.
Junior M. E., first term, 0-3-1.
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 141
One hour of time in this course is spent in the classroom on manu
facturing methods, with special emphasis being given to various types of
gears and cam production.
The students are allowed to select various objects that will carry
out production theory in machine work.
The class is divided into groups of workmen, each having a foreman
selected from members of the class. Each foreman serves a period of
four weeks.
Each workman is furnished a complete schedule of operations, upon
which is placed the standard time for such operations, with tools used
for each operation. In the lecture and demonstration work, a study is
made of cutting speeds and feeds on each part by simple and multiple
methods which includes milling, gear cutting, cam cutting, cylindrical
grinding, internal grinding and the use of the boring mills.
M. E. 18. MACHINE LABORATORY. Prerequisite, M. E. 17.
Elective, first or second term, 0-3-1.
Continuation of M. E. 17.
M. E. 22, M. E. 22c. HEAT TREATING AND WELDING LABORATORY.
Prerequisite, Ch. E. 67. Fee, $10.00.
Junior M. E., second term, 1-8-3.
Pre-Junior, M. E. Co-op., first term, 2-8-2.3.
This course presents the principles and practice related to working,
heat treating and welding of steels, the steel making process and the
classification of steels.
The topics are discussed fully by means of lectures and demonstra
tions, assisted by lantern slides. The laboratory work is taught by
actual practice in the use of oxy-acetylene torch, electric are, resistance
spot welder, the forge, gas furnace, electric furnace, polishing and micro
photographic equipment. Physical tests are made upon welded joints
before and after heat treating.
M. E. 23c. PATTERN MAKING.
Pre-Junior M. E. Co-op., second term, 1-3-1.
This course takes up at once the subject of materials used for pat
tern making, both wood and metal. Lectures are given on pattern mak
ing, layouts and methods used in commercial shops for the rapid pro
duction of castings.
M. E. 24. MACHINE TOOLS.
142 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
1. M., elective, either term, 2-0-2.
This course presents to the student the various types of tools which
are used in manufacturing processes, their application, care and main
tenance. Tool materials, cutting speeds and general shop practice are
taught with the purpose of familiarizing the student with the most mod_
ern methods of manufacture. Inspection trips are made to manufactur_
ing plants using both old and modern methods of production.
M. E. 25. CABINET MAKING AND FINISHING. Prerequisite,
M. E.2.
Elective, first or second term.
This course includes the actual construction of a project which will
involve the fundamental principles of cabinet making, together with
finishing. The use of lacquers and other finishes , by means of the spray
gun, and brush work is taught.
M. E. 35. INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS. Prerequisite, Junior standing.
Senior 1. M., first term, 3-0-3.
Industrial relations considered as one phase of the general field of
management. An analysis and description of present-day labor rela
tions. Some elementary statistical procedure introduced.
Text: 1939-40, Yoder, Personnel and Labor Relations.
M. E. 37, M. E. 37c. KINEMATICS OF MECHANISM. Prerequisites,
all freshman drawing.
Junior T. E., second term, 2-3-3.
T. E. Co-op., first term, 3-4-3.
This course includes an analysis of the motions and forces occurring
in gearing, cams, belts, chains and linkages, and the graphical determina
tion of the velocities, accelerations and relative motions in these mechan
isms.
Text: 1939-40, Guillet, Kinematics and Mechanism.
M. E. 39c. THERMODYNAMICS. Prerequisites, Physics 35c and Math.
33c or parallel.
Junior M. E. Co-ops., first term, 5-0-3.3.
This course embraces a study of engineering thermodynamics. The
fundamental laws are developed and the properties of fluids are studied.
Text: 1939-40, Kiefer and Stuart, Principles of Engineering Ther
modynamics.
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
M. E. 4Oc. THERMODYNAMICS. Prerequisite, M. E. 39c.
Junior M. E. Co-ops., second term, 3-0-2.0.
143
This course is a continuation of M. E. 39c, dealing with tht! prac
tical application of engineering thermodynamics to air compressors, in
ternal combustion engines, vapor engines, refrigeration cycles, etc.
Text: Same as for 39c.
M. E. 41. THERMODYNA~ICS. Prerequisite, Physics 27, Math. 24.
Junior M. E., first term, 3-0-3.
This course embraces a study of engineering thermodynamics. The
fundamental laws are developed and the properties of fluids are studied.
Text: 1939-40, Kiefer and Stuart, Principles of Engineering Ther
modynamics.
M. K 43, M. E. 43c. THERMODYNAMICS. Prerequisites, Physics 27
or 35c and Math. 24 or 33c or parallel.
Junior E. E. and Cer. E., first term, 2-0-2.
Senior T. E., Option 1, first term, 2-0-2.
Junior C. E. Co-op., first term, 3-0-2.
Senior Ch. E. and T. E. Co-op., second term, 3-0-2.
Pre-Junior E. E. Co-op., second term, 3-0-2.
This brief course in Thermodynamics develops the fundamental laws
of gases and vapors and lays a groundwork for the analysis of gas and
vapor engine cycles, flow of fluids and heat transfer.
Text: 1939-40, Ebaugh's Elementary Engineering Thermodynamics.
M. E. 44. THERMODYNAMICS. Prerequisites, Physics 27 and Math.
24.
Junior C. E., second term, 3-0-3.
Junior Gen. Eng., second term, 3-0-3.
This course includes the fundamentals of engineering thermodynam
ics. The development of equations for transformation of energy of
gases and vapors is studied.
Text: 1939-40, Kiefer and Stuart, Principles of Engineering Ther
modynamics.
M. E. 45, 45c. INSTRUMENTS AND FUELS LABORATORY. Prerequisite
or parallel, either M. E. 41, 39c, 43, 43c, 44 or 44c. Fee, $1.75.
144 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
Senior Cer. E., Senior T. E., Option 1 and Junior M. E., first term,
1-3-1.3.
Junior E. E., G. E., second term, 1-3-1.3.
Junior C. E. and M. E. Co-ops., first term, 1-3-1.
Junior E. E. and Pre-Junior T. E. Co-ops., second term, 1-3-1.
Calibration of instruments; analysis of gaseous, liquid and solid
fuels; tests of lubricating oils.
M. E. 47, 47c. POWER PLANT AUXILIARIES. Prerequisite, M. E. 45,
45c. Fee, $2.00.
Senior E. E., first term, 1-3-1.3.
Senior G. E., Option 1 and Junior M. E., second term, 1-3-1.3.
Senior E. E. Co-ops., first term, 1-3-l.
Junior M. E. Co-ops., second term, 1-3-1.
Tests of apparatus used as auxiliary devices such as pumps, water
metering devices, steam calorimeters and an economy test of a steam
prime mover.
M. E. 48. INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS. Prerequisite, Junior standing.
Junior E. E., first term, 2-0-2.
Study of the development of personnel administration, employment,
personnel maintenance, industrial training and education, industrial
health, and safety.
Text: 1939-40, Yoder, Personnel and Labor Relations.
M. E. 49, M. E. 49c, M. E. 50, M. E. SOc. MECHANICAL ENGI
NEERING SPECIAL.
Senior M. E., first and second term, or either for one term, elective,
credit 1, 2 or 3 hours.
Senior M. E. Co-op., first and second term, or either for one term,
elective, credit 1, 2 or 3 hours.
This course provides an outlet for the student fitted for original or
research work. Opportunity is provided for him to determine his apti
tude along various lines of endeavor. Only those students who have
shown by their previous work that they can qualify and are in the upper
third of their class are permitted to elect this course. They may elect
any subject dealing with the field of Mechanical Engineering theory
or practice.
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
-
M. E. 53, 53c. TIME AND MOTION STUDY.
Senior I. M., first term, elective, 1-3-2.
Junior M. E. Co-ops., first term, 1-3-1 ~3.
145
This course includes the making of time and motion studies, the
alysis and interpretation of data derived from them, the derivation a~ formulae and plotting of curves for the prediction of future results.
~he use of time studies as a tool of management and their practical
application.
Text: 1939-40, Maynard and Stegemerten, Time and Motion Study.
M. E. 55c. ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT. Prerequisite, Pre-
Junior standing.
Senior M. E. Co-op., first term, 4-0-2.6.
See M. E. 155 for course description.
M. E. 56, 56c. HYDRAULIC LABORATORY. Prerequisite, C. E. 33,
33c. Fee, $1.75.
Senior C. E., second term, 1-3-1.3.
Junior C. E. Co-ops., second term, 1-3-1.
The calibration of nozzles, orifices, pitot tubes, weirs, water meters
of different types; the testing of pumps, hydraulic rams, and water
wheels; the flow of water in pipes.
M. E. 57, 57c. MATERIALS LABORATORY. Prerequisite, Mech. 47,
47c, 48 and 48c. Fee, $2.25.
Senior Arch., Option 2 and C. E., first term, 1-3-1.3.
Senior G. E., Option 2, second term, 1-3-1.3.
Senior C. E. Co-ops., third term, 1-3-l.
The testing of strength of materials ? in compression, cross bending,
hardness, shear, tension, and torsion; laboratory determination of the
stresses in reinforced concrete members and steel structures; commer
cial tests of structural materials.
M. E. 58, 59, 60. SEMINAR.
M. E. 58c, 59c, 60c.
Junior and Senior M. E., and Junior and Senior M. E. Co-op.
Believing that the student branch of the national engineering society
known as the American Society of Mechanical Engineers should have
an opportunity to meet at a regular scheduled period, one hour per week
146 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
is set aside for their use. Members hold their meetings under the d'
. f h . ffi S Irec_ tlOn 0 t elr own 0 cers. tudents who are not members of the stud
branch are required to attend the regular seminar recitation. Teh~t
t d . . h b . IS S u ent orgamzatlon as een active for a number of years and
among the first student branches organized by the parent society. Was
M. E. 61. ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT OF INDUSTRIAL
CONCERNS. Prerequisite, Ec. 22.
Junior I. M., first term, 3-0-3.
Organization and operation of an industrial enterprise. Product"
control and time study illustrations from practice. Ion
Text: 1939-40, Cornell, Organization and Management in Indust
and Business. ry
M. E. 65. POWER PLANT ENGINEERING. Prerequisites, Math. 24
Physics 27, M. E. 41 and 140 parallel. '
Junior M. E., second term, 4-0-4.
This course embraces a study of fuels and combustion, stearn boilers
furnaces, sto~ers, superheaters, coal and ash handling apparatus, chim~
neys, mechamcal draft, stearn engines and turbines, condensers, feed
water purifiers and heaters, pumps, and cost of power.
Text: 1939-40, Butterfield, Jennings and Luce, Steam and Gas
Engineering.
M. E. 66c. INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES. Prerequisite, M. E.
40c.
Senior M. E. Co-op., first term, 3-0-2.
See M. E. 166 for course description.
M. E. 68c. POWER PLANT ENGINEERING. Prerequisite, M. E. 39c.
Junior ?M. E. Co-ops., second term, 5-0-3.3.
See M. E. 65 for description of this course.
M. E. 69. THE MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT OF BUILDINGS.
Senior Arch., P . H . E., first term, 2-0-2.
A st~dy .of the principles of heating, ventilating, and plumbing, with
the applicatIOn of special problems.
M. E. 70c. REFRIGERATION, HEATING AND VENTILATION. Prereq
uisite, Thermodynamics.
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
---------------------------------------------
Senior M. E. Co-op., second term, 5-0-3.3.
See M. E. 170 for course description.
M. E. 73. HEAT ENGINEERING. Prerequisites, Phys. 27.
Senior Chern. E., second term, 4-0-4.
147
This course will embrace the fundamentals . of engineering thermo
dynamics, heat engi~es and .power plants, with liaboratory work parallel
with the classroom mstructlOn.
Text: 1939-40, Butterfield, Jennings and Luce, Steam and Gas
Engineering.
M. E. 74, 74c. HEAT POWER LABORATORY. Prerequisite either M. E.
73 or M. E. 77c parallel. Fee, $2.50.
Senior Ch. E., second term, 0-3-1.
Senior Ch. E. Co-ops., third term, 1-3-1.
Calibration of instruments, steam calorimeters, boiler testing, stearn
engine economy, stearn pumps, internal combustion engines, air condition
ing, and refrigeration machinery.
M. E. 77, M. E. 77c. ELEMENTARY STEAM POWER ENGINEERING.
Prerequisites, M. E. 43, M. E. 43c or M. E. 44.
Senior Cer. E., first term, 3-0-3.
Senior C. E., T. ,E., G. E., J unio~ E. E., second term, 3-0-3.
J umor C. E., Co-op., second term, 4-0-2.6.
Senior T. E. Co-op., second term, 4-0-2.6.
Senior Ch. E. Co-op., third term, 4-0-2.6.
Junior E. E., Co-op., second term, 4-0-2.6.
This course covers the study of fuels and combustion, stearn boilers,
smoke prevention, furnaces, stokers, superheaters, coal and ash handling
machinery, chimneys, mechanical draft, stearn engines and stearn tur
bines, finance and economics of power plants and the cost of power.
Texts: 1939-40, Butterfield, Jennings and Luce, Steam and Gas
Engineering.
M. E. 79c. MACHINE DESIGN. Prerequisite, Mech. 40c and 48c.
Senior M. E. Co-ops., first term, 3-0-2.
This course includes an analysis of motions and forces occurring in
gearing, cams, belts, chains and linkages, and the graphical determina-
148 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
tion of velocities, accelerations and relative motions in mechaniSms.
Fundamental principles underlying the design of machines are started.
Text: 1939-40, Faires, Machine Design.
M. E. 80c. MACHINE DESIGN. Prerequisite, M. E. 79c.
Senior M. ?0 Co-ops., second term, 5-0-3.3.
The fundamental principles of the design of machines is continued
and the design of machine parts of structures are taken up. Considera~
tion is given to the practical questions involved.
Text: Same as M. E. 79c.
M. E. 81c. MACHINE DESIGN. Prerequisite, M. ?0 80c.
Senior M. ?0 Co-ops., third term, 5-3-4.
The continuation of M. E. 80c which takes up the solution of many
problems in machine design and the use of graphic methods for deter_
mining stresses in machine parts. The data for many of these problems
are taken directly from existing machines.
Text: Same as M. E. 79c.
M. E. 82c. AUTOMOTIVE ENGINEERING. Prerequisites, M. E. 66c,
M. ?0 81c parallel.
Senior M. E. Co-op., third term, elective, 3-0-2.
See M. E. 182 for course description.
M. E. 83. HEAT POWER LABORATORY. Prerequisites, M. E. 43, 45,
65 or n, 140. Fee, $2.50.
Senior M. ?0, first term, 0-4-1.3.
Senior E. E., and T. E., Option 1, second term, 0-4-1.3.
Air compression, boiler testing, feedwater treatment, internal com
bustion engines, steam turbines and refrigeration machinery.
M. E. 83c. HEAT POWER LABORATORY. Prerequisite, M. E. 45c, 65c
or nc. Fee, $1.50.
Senior C. E., and M. E. Co-ops., first term, 0-4-1.
Senior E. E. Co-ops., second term, 0-4-1.
.
Air compression, coal analyses, testing of internal combustion en
gines, refrigeration machinery and economy test of a steam engine.
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 149
M. E. 84. HEAT POWER LABORATORY. Prerequisite, M. ?0 45, 65,
and 140. Fee, $2.00.
Senior M. E., second term, 0-4-1.3.
Air conditioning, air meters, fans, heat transfer, pipe friction, auto
engine, combustion efficiency and ignition analysis.
M. E. 86c. AERONAUTICAL ENGINES. Prerequisite, M. E. 4Oc.
Senior M. ?0 Co-op., first term, elective, 3-0-2.
See M. E. 186 for course description.
M. E. 87c. HEAT POWER LABORATORY. Prerequisite, M. E. 83c.
Fee, $1.50.
Senior M. E. Co-ops., second term, 0-4-1.
Senior E. E. Co-ops., third term, 0-4-1.
Air conditioning, air meters, boiler testing, refrigeration machinery,
fans, and steam turbine.
M. E. 88c. HEAT POWER LABORATORY. Prerequisite, M. E. 87c.
Fee, $1.50.
Senior M. E. Co-ops., third term, 0-4-1.
Fans, heat transfer, pipe friction, auto engine combustion efficiency
and ignition analysis.
M. E. 89. INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE LABORATORY. Prereq
uisites, M. E. 166. Fee, $2.25.
Senior elective, first term, 0-3-1.
This course involves a study of the effect on power output and econ
omy with varying engine temperatures, pressures, air-fuel ratios, etc.
M. E. 92. DEVELOPMENT OF AMERICAN INDUSTRY. Prerequisite,
Senior standing in Industrial Management.
Senior 1. M., second term, 3-0-3.
In general, the treatment covers history, including discoveries and
operations, and leaders; volume and volume increases in product; in
ternal organization; importance; legislation affecting the industry and
possible future developments.
Text: 1939-40, Glover and Cornell, Development of American In
dustry.
150 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
M. E. 94. AERONAUTICAL ENGINE LABORATORY. Parallel 186. F ee,
$2.25.
Fifth year A. E., second term, 0-3-l.
Economy and power tests of in-line and radial type engines together
with testing of fuels and lubricants.
M. E. 95, 95c. SPECIAL MECHANICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY.
Fee, $2.00.
Senior M. E., elective, 0-9-3.
Senior M. E. Co-op., elective, 0-9-2.
The work in this course consists of special laboratory problems per
taining to the student's course and selected with the approval of the
department. The purpose is to give the student an opportunity to an
alyze and effect a solution to a problem as an individual and not as a
member of a group.
M. E. 96. SPECIAL MECHANICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY. Fee,
$2.00.
Senior M. E., elective, second term\ 0-9-3.
A continuation of the work in M. E. 95.
M. E. 98, M. E. 98c. STEAM LOCOMOTIVES. Prerequisites, M. E.
40c, M. E. 140, M. E. 65 and M. E. 68c.
Senior M. E. Co-op., elective, 3-0-2.
Senior M. E., elective, 2-0-2.
A study of the steam locomotive as a power plant is made as well as
the mechanical construction and future possibilities.
The following courses are suitable for both advanced undergraduate
and graduate credit.
M. E. 103, 103c. FLUID FLOW. Prerequisite, M. E. 140, Mech. 40,
Mech. 4Oc, Mech. 39c.
Senior M. E., first term, 3-0-3, Junior M. E. Co-op., second term,
3-0-2.
This course includes the study of: Statics and dynamics of fluids j
Impulse and momention of fluids; Flow of viscous fluids through pipes,
orifices, etc., and dynamic similarity. This course includes the study of
compressible as well as noncompressible fluids. Use is made of dimen
sional analysis, and' thermodynamics.
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 151
M. E. 106. FACTORY BUILDING EQUIPMENT. Prerequisite, Junior
standing.
Senior M. E., Industrial Option, second term, 2-0-2.
A study of the principles of heating, ventilating, plumbing, fire pro
tection and water supply for industrial buildings, with the application
to special problems.
Text: 1939-40, Gay and Fawcett, Mechanical and Electrical Equip-
71lwt for Buildings.
M. E. 109. PRODUCTION PLANT ENGINEERING. Prerequisite, Senior
standing in Mechanical Engineering, and M. E. ISS.
Senior M. E., Industrial Option, first term, 3-0-3.
The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with a logical
sequence of the practical consider a tions involved in the design of a
modern manufacturing plant capable of a predetermined output. After
a series of guided tours through a variety of modern plants, the topics
of building types, machines and handling equipments, material flow, tools,
jigs and gauges will be studied.
Text: Mimeographed Notes.
Fee, $1.00.
M. E. 140. ADVANCED THERMODYNAMICS. Prerequisite, M. E. 41.
Junior M. E., second term, 2-0-2.
This course is a continuation of M. E. 41 dealing with the practical
application of engineering thermodynamics. Compressors, internal com
bustion engine, vapor engine and refrigeration cycles are studied.
M. E. 150. LEGAL AND ETHICAL PHASES OF ENGINEERING.
Senior M. E., either term, elective, 3-0-3.
This course covers the subject of contracts, patents, copyrights ' and
trademarks, agency, sales agreements, and engineering specifications.
The engineer and his relation to the law, to the public and the ethics of
his profession.
Text: Harding and Canfield, Legal and Ethical Phases of Engineer
ing.
M. E. 152. INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT. Prerequisite, M. E. 61 or
parallel.
Senior I. M., first term, 3-0-3.
152 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
The case method of instruction is used. The divisions of the sub_
ject considered are (a) Economics of Production; (b) Factors of Pro
duction, and (c) Control of Production Processes.
Text: 1939-40, Folts, Introduction to Industrial Management.
M. E. 153. TIME AND MOTION STUDY.
Senior M. E., T. E., second term, 1-3-2.
This course covers the making of time and motion studies, the an
alysis and interpretation of data derived from them, the derivation of
formulas and the plotting of curves for the prediction of future results
the use of time studies as a tool of management and their practicai
application.
Text: 1939-40, Barnes, Motion and Time Study.
M. E. 155. ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT. Prerequisite, Junior
standing.
Senior T. E., Junior M. E., first term, 3-0-3.
A course in the principles of factory organization and management.
The type of industrial organization, fundamental considerations involv_
ing production control, purchasing, production, accounting, employment
and executive control, are some of the important topics studied.
T ext: 1939-40, Cornell, Organization and Management.
M. E. 156. ENGINEERING ECONOMY. Prerequisite, Senior standing
in Mechanical Engineering.
Senior M. E., Industrial Option, second term, 3-0-3.
The economic aspects of machines are emphasized. Principles of cost
comparison are illustrated by a study of particular cases rather than
by formula. The solution of a wide variety of problems is required.
Text: 1939-40, Grant, Principles of Engineering Economy. Rev. Ed.
1938 and Problem Book by same author.
M. E. 161. MACHINE DESIGN. Prerequisite, Mech. 40 and 48.
Senior M. E., first term, 5-3-6.
Senior G. E., second term, 5-3-6.
This course includes an analysis of motions and forces occurring in
gearings, cams, belts, chains, linkages, and the graphical determination
of velocities, accelerations and relative motion in mechanisms. The
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 153
-
study of fundamental principles underlying the design of machines IS
begun.
Text: 1939-40, Hyland and Kommers, Machine Design.
M. E. 162. MACHINE DESIGN. Prerequisite, M. E. 161.
Senior M. E., second term, 4-3-5.
This is a continuation of M. E. 161 which takes up the solution of
many problems in m~chine d~sign and is used on graphic methods for
d termining stresses m machme parts. The data for many of these
p;oblems are taken directly from existing machines.
Text: 1939-40, Hyland and Kommers, Machine D esign.
M. E. 166. INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES. Prerequisites, M. E.
140, Mech. 40 and 48.
Senior M. E., General Option, first term, 3-0-3.
A study of the mechanical construction, engine cycles, ignition, fuels,
fuel feeds, combustion, vibration and balancing, and performance of
internal combustion engines with reference to aeronautical, automotive,
and industrial use.
Text: 1939-40, Taylor and Taylor, Internal Combustion Engines.
M. E. 170. REFRIGERATION, HEATING AND VENTILATION. Prereq
uisite, Thermodynamics.
Senior M. E., second term, 5-0-5.
This course is a study of the compressor, condenser, piping and ac
cessories of the refrigeration plant, and other practical applications of
the principles of refrigeration.
A study of the theory of heating and ventilation, with practical
applications to existing buildings and other structures is made.
Text: 1939-40, Severns, Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning
Fundamentals; Macintire, Refrigeration Engineering.
M. E. 172. STEAM TURBINES. Prerequisite, M. E. 65, M. E. 140.
Senior M. E., first term, elective, 2-0-2.
This course includes a detailed study of the design and operation
of steam turbines.
Text: 1939-40, Church, Steam Turbines.
M. E. 174. POWER PLANT DESIGN. Prerequisite, M. E. 65.
154 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
Senior M. E., second term, elective, 3-0-3.
This course covers the design of a power plant. Load curves are
analyzed in order that the proper type and size of steam generator
prime movers and all auxiliary equipment may be selected for the give~
requirements. Due consideration is given to the financial side of the
problem. Specifications are considered with the purpose of limiting un
certainties and approaching the standards of modern practice.
Text: 1939-40, Morse, Power Plant Engineering and Design.
M. E. 182. MOTOR VEHICLES. Prerequisites, M. E. 166, M. E. 162
parallel.
Optional Senior M. E., second term, 2-0-2.
This course takes up the general layout of cars, including a study
of clutches, transmissions, universal joints, differentials, front and rear
axles, worm drive, brakes, steering gears, controls, frames, springs, etc.,
supplemented with assigned problems of design.
M. E. 186. AERONAUTICAL ENGINES. Prerequisite, M. E. 44, or
M. E. 140, Mech. 40 and 48.
Fifth year, A. E., first term, 3-0-3.
This course deals with the latest type of aeronautical engines with
emphasis on such features as weight, economy, performance, fuels, test
ing, thermodynamics, vibration and nOise.
For Graduate Courses see page 188 of this catalogue.
DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS
Reserve Officers Training Corps
For list of instructors and staff see page 20.
The W ar Department maintains four units of the R O. T . C. In
operation. They are as follows:
INFANTRY, COAST ARTILLERY, SIGNAL CORPS, ORDNANCE
As far as practicable students are enrolled in units in which the in
struction is along the lines of their academic courses. For example only
Electrical Engineering students are ordinarily accepted for the advanced
Signal Corps course. Enrollment in the Coast Artillery unit is ordinarily
restricted to Civil, Mechanical and Electrical Engineering students.
Ordnance and Signal Corps courses are available to co-operative
students only.
COURSES
Infantry: N ational Defense Act, Obligation of Citizenship, Military
History, Current International Situation, Military Discipline and
Courtesy, Sanitation and First Aid, Organization, Map Reading and
Aerial Photographs, Infantry Drill, Leadership, Rifle Marksmanship,
Infantry Weapons, Scouting and Patrolling, Musketry, Combat Prin
ciples, Field Engineering, Military Law, Administration and Supply,
Mechanization and Signal Communication.
Coast Artillery: Basic Infantry Drill, Leadership, Army Organiza
tion, Military History and Policy, Sanitation, First Aid and Personal
Hygiene, Artillery Weapons and Ammunition, Rifle Marksmanship,
Obligations of Citizenship, Map Reading, Interpretation of Aerial Pho
tographs, Orientation, Gunnery and Fire Control for Seacoast and Anti
aircraft Artillery, Military Law, Tactics and Field Engineering.
Signal Corps: National Defense Act and RO.T.C. Regulations,
Sanitation and First Aid, Map Reading, Military Courtesy and Customs
of the Service, Military Organization, General Signal Communications,
Military History and Policy, Aerial Photograph Reading, Installation
Operation and Maintenance of Field Wire Systems, Theory of Wire
Communications, Installation-Operation and Maintenance of Radio
Communication, Theory of Radio Communication, Signal Tactics-
[ 155 ]
156 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
Combat Orders and the solution of Map Problems, Signal Corps Staff
Duties, Military Law, Interior Guard Duty, Infantry Drill, Pistol
Marksmanship, Military Administration and Supply and Leadership.
Ordnance: Ammunition and Explosives, Ordnance Material, Mili
tary Law and O. R. C. Regulation, Military History and Policy, Com
pany Administration and Supply, Ordnance Field Service, Elementary
Ordnance Engineering, Mechanization, Organization of Ordnance De
partment, Industrial Mobilization, and General Lectures.
EQUIPMENT
The United States has placed equipment valued at several hundred
thousand dollars at "Tech" for use of the R.O.T.C. This equipment
consists of .30 calibre rifles, machine guns, automatic rifles, trench mor
tars, 37 ml m guns, grenades, .22 calibre rifles and ammunition for small
bore rifle shooting, 155 ml m cannon, 3-inch anti-aircraft cannon, two
trucks, complete fire control and range finding equipment, surveying
instruments, radio, telephone and telegraph equipment, complete tele
phone equipment and all types of visual signal equipment.
BENEFITS
Each advanced course student (Junior and Senior) receives pay at
the rate of 25c per day during the time enrolled in the Advanced Course
(not to exceed two academic years) except during the six weeks sum
mer camp period when he receives seventy cents (70c) per day. The
total pay of an Advanced Course student, exclusive of allowances for
clothing, and for travel and subsistence while at camp, is approximately
$180.00.
UNIFORMS
BASIC COURSE (Freshman and Sophomore Years): The approximate
cost of the uniform is $30.00, which must be deposited with the school
treasurer upon registration. The uniform consists of cap, coat, trousers,
shirt, black cravat, and belt. In addition to the articles enumerated
above each student is required to provide himself with one pair of
serviceable tan or russet shoes and tan or brown socks to be worn with
the uniform. Each student is required to maintain his uniform in good
condition and must replace lost articles and those articles that become
unserviceable. The Government makes an allowance of $9.00 for each
of the Freshman and Sophomore years to each student who completes
the year.
ADVANCED COURSE (Junior and Senior Years): For the Advanced
Course the uniform is a standard United States Army Officers' uniform
MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 157
-
'sting of cap, coat, trousers, shirt, belt, black cravat and tan shoes. conS! ..
Th approximate cost of the UnIform will vary from $40.00 to $50.00,
d ending upon the quality of material selected by the student. The ~P~ernment allowance for the Advanced Course uniform is $29.00 for
h
0
first year and $7.00 for upkeep in the second year. With slight
t lt
e
rations this uniform constitutes a suitable reserve officers' uniform
a e d . for use after gra uatlOn.
Students are not allowed to wear the uniform except on drill days
(Tuesdays and Thursdays) or when special orders to do so are given
by the P. M. S. & T.
SUMMER CAMP
Members of the Advanced Course are required to attend camp one
romer and normally between the Junior and Senior years. All stu ~~nts going to camp receive mileage for the round trip from the school
t the rate of 5c per mile and are messed, housed, uniformed and given
a edical attention at government expense while in camp. The camp is of ~x weeks' duration and is begun about June 10th each year.
In addition to the military training that the student receives in camp
he has an opportunity to participate in healthy outdoor sports of all
kinds and in competition with young men from other colleges. A well
arranged religious program is conducted at eaeh of the several camps
by experienced chaplains.
The following college credits are allowed for Military Science and
Tactics:
REGULAR FOUR-YEAR COURSE
FRESHMAN YEAR _____________________ 3 credit hours (1.5 per semester)
SOPHOMORE yEAR ____________________ 3 credit hours (1.5 per semester)
JUNIOR yEAR _________________________ 6 credit hours (3 per semester)
SENIOR YEAR _________________________ 6 credit hours (3 per semester)
TOTAL ______________________ .18 credit hours
CO-OPERATIVE FIVE-YEAR COURSE
FRESHMAN YEAR _____________________ 2 credit hours (1 per quarter)
SOPHOMORE YEAR ___________________ . 2 credit hours (1 per quarter)
PRE-JUNIOR yEAR ____________________ 4 credit hours (2 per quarter)
JUNIOR yEAR _________________________ 4 credit hours (2 per quarter)
SENIOR yEAR _________________________ 4 credit hours (2 per quarter)
TOTAL ______________________ .16 credit hours
DEPARTMENT OF MODERN LANGUAGES
PROFESSOR CRENSHAW, ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS CAMPOAMOR AND ERVIN
The department of Modern Language offers both Elementary and
Advanced Courses in French, German and Spanish.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
NOTE: 4-3-5 means 4 hours class, 3 hours laboratory, 5 hours credit.
GERMAN
M. L. 1. ELEMENTARY GERMAN.
First term, 3-0-3.
German grammar, including the declension of nouns and adjectives,
the conjugation of strong and weak verbs, the use of prepositions, and
the word-order in the independent clause. Translation of easy German
into English and of easy English sentences into German.
M. L. 2. ELEMENTARY GERMAN.
Second term, 3-0-3.
Continuation of M. L. 1, emphasizing the use of the tense-auxiliaries
haben, sein and werden, the modal auxiliaries, durfen, konnen, mogen,
mussen, sollen and wollen, the passive voice; the separably and insep
arably compounded verbs, and the word-order in the dependent clause.
The translation of more difficult German and the acquisition of a larger
number of common household German words.
M. L. 3. ADVANCED GERMAN.
First term, 3-0-3.
Grammar reviewed in connection with translations of classical Ger
man writers and modern writers with introduction to scientific German.
Stress is laid on the acquisition of a vocabulary for speaking and writ
ing German and for translating German into English.
M. L. 4. ADVANCED GERMAN.
Second term, 3-0-3.
German syntax with special reference to the sentence structure in
connected prose. Translation of scientific German works on heat, light,
electricity, electric motors, magnetism, the steam engine and commerce.
M. L. lc, 2c, 3c, 4c. ELEMENTARY GERMAN.
Co-ops., twelve weeks each, 3-0-2 each.
[ 158]
DEPARTMENT OF MODERN LANGUAGES 159
FRENCH
M. L. 7. ELEMENTARY FRENCH.
First term, 3-0-3.
Elements of French grammar, including forms of nouns and adjec
tives; regular conjugations, use of avoir and etre as auxiliary verbs;
position of personal pronoun objects; cardinal and ordinal numbers;
translation of easy English sentences into French and of easy French
prose into English.
M. L. 8. ELEMENTARY FRENCH.
Second term, 3-0-3.
Grammar review in connection with translation; drill on the forms
of regular and irregular verbs, use of tenses, relative and interrogative
pronouns, passive voice, and the infinitive; French dictation, composi
tion and conversation.
M. L. 9. ADVANCED FRENCH.
First term, 3-0-3.
This course includes the translation of advanced literary and scien
tific French texts; exercises in connected French prose with special ref
erence to French syntax; sight translations, French dictation and French
conversation.
M. L. 10. ADVANCED FRENCH.
Second term, 3-0-3.
This course is a continuation of M. L. 9, in which the aim IS to se
cure a broader knowledge of French literature and a more accurate
knowledge of French composition, and French conversation. Texts are
taken from the more advanced works of the classic and modern French
periods, from French reviews, French newspapers and scientific maga
zines. Stress is laid on correct pronunciation with practice in the use
of ordinary daily French conversation.
160 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
SPANISH
M. L. 13. ELEMENTARY SPANISH.
First term, 3-0-3.
Spanish grammar, including forms of nouns and adjectives; the posi
tion of adjectives; the regular conjugations; the idiomatic use of estar,
haber, Iwcer, ser, and tener.
M. L. 14. ELEMENTARY SPANISH.
Second term, 3-0-3.
Spanish grammar, including the position of personal pronoun objects;
verbs with radical change; irregular verbs; use of the Subjunctive mood
in commands; the passive voice; the common idioms of everyday Spanish.
M. L. 15. ADVANCED SPANISH.
First term, 3-0-3.
This course is devoted to Spanish composition, Spanish conversation
and to the translation of the works of greater difficulty of the classic
and modern Spanish writers.
Texts: Selections from illarcon, Valdos, Ibanez, Cervantes, Isaacs.
M. L. 16. ADvANCED SPANISH.
Second term, 3-0-3.
This course is a continuation of M. L. 15, in which stress is laid on
the acquisition of the vocabulary of everyday life; Spanish composition
and Spanish conversation; the ability to write business letters in Span.
ish; fluency in translating technical, commercial and newspaper Spanish
as well as the classic and modern writers of the drama and the novel.
DEPARTMENT OF NAVAL SCIENCE AND TACTICS
Reserve Officers Training Corps
For list of instructors and staff, see page 21.
The primary object of the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps is
to provide systematic instruction and training at civil educational in
stitutions which will qualify students for appointment as officers in the
Naval Reserve; the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps will be ex
pected to supply efficient Junior Officers to the Naval Reserve and thus
assist in meeting the demands for increased commissioned personnel in
war time.
The course in Naval Science and Tactics of the Naval Reserve Offi
cers Training Corps is for four years' duration, divided into the Basic
Course and the Advanced Course.
The Basic Course consists of the first two years of the course in the
department of Naval Science and Tactics and is available only for
freshman and sophomore classes of the institution.
The Advanced Course consists of the final two years of the course
in Naval Science and Tactics, or of such shorter periods of time as may
be prescribed by the Secretary of the Navy. The Advanced Course is
available only to students who have successfully completed the basic
course and who are in the junior and senior years of the academic de
partment.
Subjects provided are grouped under four general headings.
Seamanship: Naval Leadership, Boats, Signals, Ground Tackle,
Rules of the Road, Handling and Maneuvering of Steamers, Communi
cations, Administration and Discipline, Naval Policy and Elements of
Naval Aviation.
Navigation: Piloting, Dead Reckoning, Nautical Instruments and
Publications, Magnetic and Gyro Compasses, Practice of Navigation at
Sea, including Celestial Navigation.
Ordnance and Gunnery: Landing Force Organization, First Aid,
Ships Organization and Drills, History of Development of Explosives,
Guns, Armor and Projectiles, Principles of Naval Gunnery, Fire Con
trol, Spotting and Range Keeping, Aerial Gunnery and Bombing, De
fense Against Aircraft, Torpedoes.
Naval Engineering: The course contemplates giving the Reserve
Officer sufficient knowledge of the engineering machinery of a ship and
[ 161 ]
162 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
its operation to qualify him completely for ' his deck duties. Boilers
fuels, steam engines, steam turbines, electric propulsion, auxiliaries, re~
frigeration, Diesel engines, operation and management of engineering
plant, electricity aboard ship, and naval communications.
Each student taking the advanced course will receive commuted ra
tions at the rate of approximately $7.50 a month, provided his grades
are satisfactory.
At present the total number of students enrolled in the Naval Unit
is limited to 205.
EQUIPMENT
The Government has furnished the Naval Unit at Georgia Tech
with the following equipment: rifles, pistols, machine guns, 4-inch guns
from a Destroyer, spotting boards, drill guns, etc., and equipment Con
nected therewith; a model case with sectionized types of primers, tracers
and fuses; colored prints of machine guns and depth charges; mines
and anchors; a torpedo room with sectionized torpedo, torpedo parts and
colored prints of the torpedo and its parts; a torpedo director; knotting
and splicing boards; signal flags and pennants and visual system of
communication; equipment for instruction in seamanship, navigation,
etc.; a scale model of the light cruiser U. S. S. Savannah, a ten-foot
model of the Cruiser Columbia, a replica of a ship's bridge with wheel,
compass, and pelorus for instruction in steering and compass work.
SUMMER CRUISE
(a) An annual summer cruise of from 3 to 4 weeks' duration is
usually provided. Before embarkation, inoculation against typhoid and
smallpox is required.
(b) Every member of the Naval R.O.T.C. unit is expected to take
the first cruise available if provided.
(c) One cruise is required during the advanced course.
(d) In selecting Naval R.O.T.C. students from the Freshman class
preference is given those applicants who agree to take all summer cruises
provided in the course.
(e) Members of the advanced course are entitled to pay of the
Seventh Grade ($21.00 per month) while on cruises.
The following college credits are allowed for Naval Science and
Tactics:
FRESHMAN yEAR _____________________ 3 credit hours (1.5 per semester)
SOPHOMORE YEAR ____________________ 3 credit hours (1.5 per semester)
JUNIOR YEAR _________________________ 6 credlt hours (3 per semester)
SENIOR yEAR _________________________ 6 credit hours (3 per semester)
TOTAL ______________________ .18 credlt hours
NAVAL SCIENCE AND TACTICS 163
COMPETITIVE EXAMINATIONS
Three candidates may be nominated each year by the President of
the Georgia School of Technology for eligibility for competitive exam
ination for entrance to the United States Naval Academy. Such can
didates must have completed a minimum of one year's scholastic work
in the Naval Reserve Officers' Training Corps.
Usually each year the President of the Georgia School of Technol
ogy is requested to nominate to the Major General Commandant,
United States Marine Corps, one or two candidates from the graduates
of the Naval Reserve Officers' Training Corps for appointment as Sec
ond Lieutenant, U. S. Marine Corps.
Annually the Professor of Naval Science and Tactics, Georgia School
of Technology, nominates approximately five graduates of the Naval
R.O.T.C. Unit for appointment as Ensign in the Supply Corps of the
U. S. Navy.
Graduates of Naval R. O. T. C. Units are given preferred standing
in the selection of candidates for Naval Aviation Cadets.
For detailed information regarding the above appointments write
the Professor of Naval Science and Tactics, Georgia School of Tech
nology.
DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS
PROFESSORS HOWEY, EDWARDS, AND HEROD; ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS
BORTELL, BOYD, AND ROSSELOT; ASSISTANT PROFESSORS PROSSER, EWALT
AND JOHNSON; INSTRUCTORS WHITCOMB AND WYLY
It is the aim of the department to present work in physics in such a
way that it will develop habits of accurate thinking and scientific reason_
ing, as well as give the student a thorough understanding of a body
of organized knowledge which is fundamental to all types of engi_
neering.
Students may obtain a B.S. degree specializing in Physics by taking
a B.S. degree in General Engineering, Option No.3 (see page 125).
A student who completes this course of study will be qualified to take
a position in industry as an Engineering Physicist, or to take graduate
work in Physics at a university. Students must have the approval of
the Physics Department at the beginning of the J unior Year to continue
this course of study after the Sophomore Year.
Courses which may be used in meeting the requirements for the
Master's Degree in Physics are given below and in the Graduate sec
tion, page 190.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
NOTE: 4-3-5 mealls 4 hours class, 3 hours laboratory, 5 hours credit.
Phys. 19. INTRODUCTION TO MECHANICS AND HEAT.
This course has five hours of class per week and three hours of
laboratory. Mechanics and heat are covered in an elementary fashion.
Credit in Phys. 19 may be used as a substitute for credit in Phys. 21.
Phys. 21. ELEMENTARY MECHANICS AND HEAT. Prerequisite, Math.
17. Fee, $3.00.
Sophomore Arch., T. E., and 1. M., first term, 3-3-4.
This course consists of recitations, problems and lectures. The Prop
erties of Matter, Mechanics of Solids, Mechanics of Fluids and Heat
are included in this course. A large number of numerical problems is
solved.
Text: Foley, College Physics.
Phys. 22. ELEMENTARY SOUND, LIGHT AND ELECTRICITY. Prereq
uisite, Phys. 21. Fee, $3.00.
Sophomore Arch., T. E., and 1. M., second term, 3-3-4.
[164 ]
DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 165
A continuation of Phys. 21, Sound, Light and Electricity are treated
in an elementary way.
Text: Foley, College Physics.
Phys. 27. MECHANICS AND HEAT. Prerequisites, Entrance Physics
and Math. 18. Fee, $3.00.
Sophomore, first term, 5-3-6.*
Phys. 27 and Phys. 28 (see below) constitute a complete course in
basic physics for engineers. It consists of one lecture and four recita
tions per week, in addition to the laboratory. The solution of a large
number of problems is required, the problems being carefully chosen to
illustrate and emphasize fund amental principles. In working these prob
lems, students are expected to acquire proficiency in the routine tech
nique of finding numerical solutions, but the use of formul::e as mere
computing devices without an adequate understanding of the underlying
principles is avoided. Both metric and British Engineering units are
used. The course includes some applications of the elements of the
calculus.
The laboratory work is designed to give the student practice in the
art of making precise measurements, proficiency in the manipulation
of apparatus, and a more thorough familiarity with some of the con
cepts of physics. The theory of errors in measurements is stressed
enough to give students the ability to decide under what conditions the
greater expense of more precise measurements is justified.
Text: Duff, Physics, Eighth Edition, and supplementary problems.
Phys. 28. ELECTRICITY, SOUND, AND LIGHT. Prerequisite, Phys. 27.
Fee, $3.00.
Sophomore, second term, 5-3-6.*
This course is a continuation of Phys. 27.
Text: Duff, Physics, Eighth Edition, and supplementary problems.
Phys. 33c. MECHANICS. Prerequisite, Entrance Physics; prereq
uisite or concurrently with, Math. 13. Fee, $2.00.
Sophomore Co-op., first term, 6-3-4.7.
Phys. 33c, Phys. 34c, and Phys. 35c (see below), constitute a com-
?Student. with a cla.s average below passing may be required to attend one addl
[[onal recitation per week, without credit.
166 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
plete course in basic physics for engineers, divided into three parts for
co-operative students. The three parts together are equivalent to the
Phys. 27-Phys. 28 combination described above.
Text: Duff, Physics, and supplementary problems.
Phys. 34c. HEAT AND ELECTRICITY. Prerequisite, Phys. 33c. Fee,
$2.00.
Sophomore Co-op., second term, 6-3-4.7.
A continuation of Phys. 33c.
Text: Duff, Physics, and supplementary problems.
Phys. 35c. ELECTRICITY, SOUND, AND LIGHT. Prerequisite, Phys.
34c. Fee, $2.00.
Pre-J unior Co-op., first term, 4-3-3.3.
A continuation of Phys. 33c and Phys. 34c.
Text: Duff, Physics, and supplementary problems.
Phys. 40. ACOUSTICS AND ILLUMINATION. Prerequisite, Phys. 22.
Second term, 2-0-2.
This course deals with the fundamental principles of the acoustics
and the illumination of buildings.
Phys. 50. INSTRUMENTS FOR MEASUREMENTS AND CONTROL. Pre
requisite, Phys. 28.
First or second term, 1-3-2.
This course deals primarily with the measurement and control of
temperature. In addition, certain other. topics may be included dependent
upon the course of study being pursued by individual students. These
topics include the measurement and control of humidity, photo-electric
control of color or movement, the inspection of products by X-rays, and
in general the measurement and control of the physical properties of
materials in industrial processing.
Phys. 65. ADVANCED LABORATORY. Prerequisite, Phys. 28.
Senior Ch. E., second term, 0-3-1.
Experiments of particular interest to chemical engineers.
Phys. 93-94. SPECIAL PROBLEMS. Admission to this course will be
granted by the department only to individual students.
First term, 0-4-1; second term, 0-8-2.
DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 167
The instruction will include library, conference and laboratory work
designed to give the student training in the methods of industrial re
search.
Phys. 101. THEORETICAL MECHANICS. Prerequisite, Phys. 28. Also,
Math. 136, unless taken concurrently.
First term, 3-0-3.
Phys. 101, 104, 107, and 110, together with topics in modern physics
covered in Phys. 161, constitute a comprehensive introduction to theoreti
cal physics. Free use is made of the calculus through differential equa
tions.
Phys. 104. HEAT AND KINETIC THEORY. Prerequisite, Phys. 101.
Second term, 3-0-3.
See Physics 101 for description.
Phys. 107. ELECTRICTIY AND MAGNETISM. Prerequisite, Phys. 101,
or concurrently.
First term, 3-0-3.
See Physics 101 for description.
Phys. 110. LIGHT. Prerequisite, Phys. WI.
Second term, 3-0-3.
See Phys. 101 for description.
Phys. 113. EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS 1. Prerequisite, Phys. 28.
Junior G. E., Option No.3, first term, 1-6-3.
Phys. 113, 114, 115, and 116 include class and laboratory work in
all the important branches of Engineering Physics, such as mechanics,
vibration, molecular physics, heat, electronics, electrical oscillations,
optics, spectroscopy, X-rays, etc. The calibration and use of all the com
mon mechanical, electrical, and thermal measuring instruments is in
cluded in these courses.
Phys. 114. EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS II. Prerequisite, Phys. 113.
Junior G. E., Option No.3, second term, 1-6-3.
See Phys. 113 for description.
Phys. 115. EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS III. Prerequisite, Phys. 113.
Senior G. E., Option No.3, first term, 1-6-3.
168 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
See Phys. 113 for description.
Phys. 116. EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS IV. Prerequisite, Phys. 113.
Senior G. E., Option No.3, second term, 1-6-3.
See Phys. 113 for description.
Phys. 161. INTERMEDIATE MODERN PHYSICS. Prerequisites, Phys.
28 and Calculus.
Senior Ch. E. and Junior Chern., second term, 3-0-3.
The topics treated in this course include the structure of bulk mat
ter, the structure of individual molecules and atoms, the nature of
elementary particles, the nature and properties of light and X-rays, and
related phenomena of practical interest.
DEPARTMENT OF TEXTILE ENGINEERING
The .1. French Textile School
PROFESSOR JONES; ASSISTANT PROFESSORS HILL AND CARMICHAEL;
INSTRUCTORS PHILPOTT, BRANDON, AND CAMPBELL
The Textile Department gave the first instruction in textile educa
tion in the South in February, 1899. Since that time, it has continued
to grow and serve the needs of the textile industry, which during these
years has become one of the leading industries of the South.
The course of instruction covers a period of four years, and leads to
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Textile Engineering. The course
includes a sound foundation in engineering subjects, in addition to the
purely textile branches. The work for the first three years is uniform,
but during the senior year, the student may choose one of several
options.
The course of instruction is arranged so as to combine the theoret
ical and practical aspects of the subject. The department has an excel
lent collection of textile books and periodicals which are used by stu
dents in their research work. Practical work is given in all phases of
manufacturing throughout the course, enabling the student to familiar
ize himself with all details in the construction and operation of the
various machines and processes. Yarns required in the weaving rooms
are manufactured in the carding and spinning department, thus afford
ing opportunity for performing the complete series of operations from
raW material to finished fabric.
The department was originally intended to work solely with cotton,
but since the rayon industry has become so important, the scope of in
struction has been broadened to include the theoretical and practical
study of these newer fibers.
The department offers excellent advantages to young men who in
tend entering any branch of the textile industry, and the practical results
of the course are well illustrated by the positions of trust and respon
sibility held by the alumni.
EQUIPMENT
The textile building is of typical mill construction. Its three floors,
150 x 70 feet, contain classrooms, laboratories, library, offices, and dem
onstration rooms for textile equipment.
The second floor contains machinery for picking, carding, spinning,
[ 169]
170 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
combing, tWlstmg, winding, and warping. In addition, there is a well
equipped knitting department. The first Hoor contains classroom, library
exhibit room, and the weaving department. The ground Hoor contain~
the dyeing department, testing laboratories, classrooms, slasher, opener
and cloth rooms.
The building is served by a freight elevator, is heated by steam, and
protected by automatic sprinklers. The machinery is driven by electric
power on both group and unit drives.
SPECIAL STUDENTS
Provision is made in the textile department for special students who
have had sufficient preparation and experience to meet the entrance re
quirements.
Such students may secure training in the textile subjects as offered
by this department, in conjunction with such additional courses from
other departments as will best fit them for the particular work in which
they may wish to specialize.
A schedule and arrangement based upon previous preparation and
the requirement in each case will be made upon application.
SUMMER REQUIREMENTS
A minimum of sixty days of practical work may be required of each
candidate for B.S. in Textile Engineering. This work may be done
during the year before the student is admitted or between that time and
graduation. Proper certification of this required work must be made by
an officer of the mill in which the work is done.
COURSE OF STUDY
F RESHMAN YEAR
See page 34.
Course No.
Ec. 24
Eng. 33
Math. 23
Phys. 21
T.E. 23
T.E. 39
T.E. 59
R.O.T.C. 3
Arch. 22
Chem. 13
Eng. 34
Pbys. 22
T.E. 24
T.E. 40
T.E. 60
R.O.T.C. 4
Course No.
Chem. 26
M.E. 16
Mach. 29
T.E. 21
T.E. 33
T.E. 45
T.E. 61
Cbem. 21
M.E. 31
Eng. 45
T.E. 22
T.E. 28
T.E. 34
T.E. 46
T.E. 62
TEXTILE ENGINEERING
SOPHOMORE YEAR
FIRST TERM
Subject Class
Economics ___________________________________ 3
Humanities __________________________________ 3
DUferential Calculus _________________________ 5
PhYSICS ______________________________________ 3
Fabric Design _______________________________ _
Weaving ____________________________________ _
Yarn Moanufacture. Practice __________________ _
MIlitary or Navy ____________________________ _
TotaL__________________________ 14
SECOND TERM
Freehand Drawing __________________________ _
Qualitative Analysis __________________________ 2
Humanities __________________________________ 3
Physics ___________ ___________________________ 3
Fabric Design ______________________________ _
Weaving _____________________________________ 3
Y",rn Manufacture. Practlce __________________ _
Military or Navy ____________________________ _
TotaL__________________________ 11
Organic
JUNIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM
Subject
Chemistry
---------------------------
Machine Lab. (R.O.T.C. Elective. S hrs.) _______
Applied Mechanics
---------------------------
FabriC Analysis
------------------------------
Fabric Design
-------------------------------
Weaving
-------------------------------------
Yarn Manufacture, Theory and Praetice _______
TotaL __________________________
SECOND TERM
Organic Chemistry
---------------------------
Kinematics of Mechanlsm _____________________
Public Speaking (R.O.T.C. Elective) ___________
Dyeing
--------------------------------------
Fabric Analysis
------------------------------
Fabric Design
-------------------------------
Weaving
-------------------------------------
Yarn M.anufacture, Theory and Practlce _______
TotaL __________________________
Class
S
4
2
3
12
3
2
3
2
3
13
171
Lab. Credit
3
5
3 4
3 1
3 1
3
5 1.5
17 19.5
S 1
6 3
3
3 4
3 1
3 4
3 1
1.5
26 18.5
Lab. Credit
3 4
6 2
4
3
3 1
3 3
S 4
21 19
3 4
3 3
3
3 1
3
3 1
3 3
4 4.S
22 20.3
172
Ec. 93-96
T. E. 37
T. E. 63
T. E. 83
T. E. 91
E.E.
M.E.
M.E.
2
43
45
T. E. 101
T. E. 133
Chem. 17
T. E . 168
T. E. 187
M. E. 153
M. E. 155
T. E. 168
Ec.
T.E.
T. E.
T. E.
T.E.
94
53
64
81
84
E.E. 3
M.E. 77
M. E . 83
T. E. 168
GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
SENIOR YEAR
FIRST TERM
REQUIRED OF SENIORS IN ALL OPTIONS:
Finance or Business Law (R.O.T.C. Electlve)___ 3
Jacquard Design ____________________________ _
Yarn Manufacture, Theory and Practlcc_______ 3
Dyeing ______________________________________ 3
TexUle Costing ______________________________ 2
TotaL __________________________ 11
OPTION NO.1
Applied Electricity __________________________ _
Thermodynamics _____________________________ 2
Elementary Steam Laboratory ________________ _
TotaL__________________________ 17
OPTION NO.2
TextUe Raw Mater\.als_________________________ 4
Fabric I,ayouts _____________________________ _
Total__________ _________________ 16
OPTION NO.3
Quantitative Analysis ________________________ 2
Textile Testing _______ _______________________ _
Rayon Processing ___________________________ _
TotaL_______ ___________________ 15
OPTION NO.4
Time and Motion Study ______________________ _
Organiza tion and Management ________________ _
Textile Testing _____________________________ _
TotaL__________________________ 16
SECOND TERM
REQUIRED OF SENIORS IN ALL OPTIONS :
Marketing of Textlles ____ ____________________ _
Weaving (R.O.T.C. Electlve ) __________________ _
Yarn Manufoacture, Theory and Practicc ______ _
Knitting ______ ______________________________ _
Dyeing
Total ____ ______________________ _
OPTION NO.1
Electrical Engineering Laboratory _____________ _
Elementary Steam Power Englneerlng _________ _
Fuels, Materials, and Engine Laboratory ______ _
3
1
2
Textile Testing ______________________________ 1
TotaL__________________________ 13
3
4
3
10
3
13
2
12
6
2
3
21
3
2
15
3
4
2
3
12
4
4
2
22
3
4.3
4
2
14.3
3
2
1.3
20.6
4
1.5
19.8
3
1.5
2
20.8
2
3
1.5
20 .8
3
1
4.3
1.5
3
12.8
1.3
3
1.3
1.5
19.9
TEXTILE ENGINEERING 173
OPTION NO. 2
T.E. 38 Jacquard Design ----------------------------- 3 1
T.E. 104 Standard Fabrics ---------------------------- 3 3
T.E. 134 Design and Analysls __________________________ 1 2 1.5
T.E. 168 Textile Testing ------------------------- - ---- 2 1.5
Total ___________________________ 14 19 19.8
OPTION NO. 3
Cbem. 18 Quantitative Analysis ------------------------ 1 6 2.3
T.E. 169 Testing Laboratory -------------------------- 1 2 1.5
T.E. 188 Rayon Processing ---------------------------- 2 2
TotaL __________________________ 13 20 18.6
OPTION NO. 4
Math. 39 Statistics ------------------------------------ 3 3
M.E. 156 Engineering Management --------------------- 3 3
T.E. 164 111111 Engineering ----------------------------- 1
TotaL __________________________ 16 12 19.8
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
NOTE: 4-3-5 mea/Is 4 hours class, 3 hours laboratory, 5 hours credit.
T. E. 22. DYEING.
Junior, second term, 0-3-1. Fee, $2.00.
A preliminary course in bleaching and dyeing, preparatory to T. E. 83.
T. E. 23-24. FABRIC DESIGN.
Sophomores, first and second terms, 0-3-1.
A study is made of the foundation weaves and their derivatives, to
gether with the construction of drafts and the uses for each weave.
T. E. 27-28., FABRIC ANALYSIS. Prerequisite, T. E. 23,
Juniors, first and second terms, 0-3-1. Fee, $1.00,
Instruction in the calculations of cloth analysis. Specimens of fabrics
are dissected to obtain the weave, and all other data needed to reproduce
the fabric.
T . E. 33-34. FABRIC DESIGN.
Juniors, first and second terms, 0-3-1.
The work begun in T. E. 23-24 is carried on through the more com
plex weaves, such as backed and figured weaves, ply weaves and leno
weaves.
174 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
T. E. 37-38. JACQUARD DESIGN.
Seniors (see options), 0-3-1.
The theory of jacquard designing is first studied, after which several
types of designs are made. During the second term advanced work is
undertaken in the composition of designs and the arrangement of figures.
T. E. 39-40, 45-46, 53-54. WEAVING.
T. E. 39, Sophomores, first term, 0-3-1.
T. E. 40, Sophomores, second term, 3-3-4.
T. E. 45-46, Juniors, first and second terms, 2-3-3.
T. E. 53-54, Seniors (see options), 0-3-1.
Theory and practice in the construction and operation of hand, plain,
automatic, and jacquard looms; together with slasher and cloth room
operations.
T. E. 59-60. YARN MANUFACTURE, PRACTICE.
Sophomores, first and second terms, 0-3-1.
An elementary course, preparatory to T. E. 61, combining notes,
sketches, and practical work upon machines to give a general idea of
the processes.
T. E. 61-62, 63-64. YARN MANUFACTURE, THEORY AND PRACTICE.
T. E. 61, Juniors, first term, 3-3-4.
T. E. 62, Juniors, second term, 3-4-4.3. Fee, $1.00.
T. E. 63-64, Seniors, first and second terms, 3-4-4.3. Fee, $1.00.
A course combining lectures and recitations upon the machines and
processes, with machine calculations and practical work in operating the
machines. The four-hour laboratory courses include one hour of cotton
classing, which consists of work in grading and stapling cotton according
to Government Standards and regular, standard, commercial practice.
T. E. 81. KNITTING.
Seniors (see options), 1-2-1.5.
This course is given in the form of notes, lectures, and practical
work covering the construction and operation of circular latch needle
hosiery machines, ribbers, and loopers. The methods involved in the
production of fancy knit fabrics are also considered.
TEXTILE ENGINEERING 175
T. E. 83-84. DYEING.
Seniors, first term, 3-3-4; second term, 2-3-3. Fee, $2.00.
A study of the theory and practice of dyeing, bleaching, finishing and
related operations as applied to the common textile fibers. In this course
a study of the methods and materials employed is made by means of
lectures and in conjunction with laboratory and machine application.
T. E. 91. TEXTILE COSTING.
Seniors, first term, 2-0-2.
A course in the principles and problems of textile costing. The gen
eral principles of assembling and allocating the cost of material, labor
and overhead are first studied, and this is followed by a discussion of
the cost problems of spinning and weaving mills.
T. E. 101. TEXTILE RAw MATERIALS.
Option 2, Seniors, first term, 4-0-4.
This course covers the fibrous raw materials used in the textile
industry; their production, distribution, cost, properties, uses, and meth
ods of manufacture. All fibers are discussed during the term but more
time is devoted to those of major importance-cotton, wool, rayon
and silk.
T. E. 104. STANDARD FABRICS.
Option 2, Seniors, second term, 3-0-3. Fee, $1.00.
A course designed to cover the standard fabrics of the textile indus
try-mainly those of cotton, but including some typical samples of other
materials. These fabrics are discussed as to construction, yarn counts,
methods of finishing and uses. Additional work is included in fabric
calculations and costing.
T. E. 133. FABRIC LAYOUTS.
Option 2, Seniors, first term, 1-2-1.5.
Original work in the design and construction of numerous types of
fabrics, such as shirtings, towels, handkerchiefs, etc., stressing the rela
tion of color to woven fabrics. This involves the preparation of a com
plete layout of all information necessary for the production of a fabric
including color sketch, weave, drafts, and all calculations.
T. E. 134. DESIGN AND ANALYSIS.
Option 2, Seniors, second term, 1-2-1.5. Fee, $1.00.
A study of the methods of designing and analyzing the more compli-
176 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
cated weaves and fabrics. Considerable time is devoted to the leno
weave and methods of producing it with one, two, or more sets of steel
or twine doups. Typical fabrics are analyzed for weave and all data
needed for reproduction.
T. E. 164. MILL ENGINEERING.
Option 4, Seniors, second term, 1-0-1.
This course includes descriptive materials and problems on the fol
lowing subjects: Mill Organization; Machinery Equipment and Lay
out; Costs of Mill Equipment.
T. E. 168. TEXTILE TESTING.
Seniors (see options), 1-2-1.5.
Experiments in testing various textile materials, particular emphasis
being given to physical testing of vegetable fibers in accordance with
standard testing laboratory practice.
T. E. 169. TESTING LABORATORY PRACTICE. Prerequisite, T. E. 168.
Option 3, Seniors, second term, 1-2-1.5.
Lectures and experiments dealing with the physical testing of the
rayons and synthetic fibers. A study of their properties and test meth
ods in comparison with the natural fibers.
T. E. 187-188. RAYON PROCESSING.
T. E. 187, Option 3, Seniors, first term, 1-3-2. Fee, $2.00.
T. E. 188, Option 3, Seniors, second term, 2-0-2.
Lectures and laboratory practice dealing with the rayons and syn
thetic fibers, their chemical properties and methods of processing for
textile use. In this course, attention is given also to the examination
and testing of agents and materials employed in the processing of syn
thetic yarns and fabrics. -
For Graduate Courses see page 192 of this catalogue.
UNCLASSIFIED COURSES
OR. 1. ORIENTATION.
This course is required of all freshmen during the first semester.
It begins at 8 a. m. Wednesday, September 18th (for 1940) in the
Naval Armory. Placement tests are required and instruction -is given
in regard to registration, payment of fees, medical examinations, use of
the Library, etc.
This work is continued one hour per week for the first six weeks of
the semester. Lectures are given in this course on Tech Traditions,
How to Study, Importance of College Record, etc.
ENGR. 2. INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING.
Freshman, second term, 1-0-1.
This course is to acquaint the freshmen with the various branches
of engineering and related fields , to discuss with the student the oppor
tunity in each field, and to explain how he may best prepare himself for
his chosen work. The program is carried out by means of lectures, dis
cussion, motion pictures, and laboratory visits.
EN GR. 102. ENGINEERING PROBLEMS.
Senior G. E., second term, 2-0-2.
The student is required to solve numerous problems which are rep
resentative of those types found in actual engineering practice. Special
emphasis will be placed on the mathematical formulation of engineering
problems.
1. E. 27. THE SCHOOL AND SOCIETY.
This course gives a comprehensive picture of the activities and needs
of youths and adults in the social order, particularly those served by
industrial education. Consideration is given to the function of the
school, including the principles of education, in society. An integrated
program of education with particular reference to industrial education
is formulated.
1. E. 41. METHODS OF TEACHING.
The underlying principles of the lesson procedure and actual prac
tice in planning and teaching lessons in the industrial education field.
[ 177 ]
GRADUATE COURSES
JOHN L. D ANIEL, D ean
Certain departments of the Georgia School of Technology offer
courses of a strictly graduate character, and these are described briefly
in the following pages. These subjects, numbered 200 and above, are
ordinarily offered only to applicants already holding at least the bach
elor's degree from an accredited institution, who are able to demonstrate
to the satisfaction of the departments concerned that they have the
necessary prerequisites. If lacking, these may be made up by passing
equivalent undergraduate subjects or by qualifying examinations.
Undergraduate students may not schedule strictly graduate subjects
wi thout special written permission from the head of the department and
the approval of the Dean of Graduate Courses.
Properly certified applicants may be permitt~d to enter as special
students or as intended applicants for the master's degree, under con
ditions laid down below.
DEGREES
At present only the master's degree is offered, and this may be
granted with or without designation of the major department in which
the work is done. Ordinarily the degree with designation is awarded
only to those who have the bachelor's degree in the same department.
FEES
Tuition and certain other fees must be paid at registration. The
amount will be determined by the work scheduled and the residence of
the applicant. The following rules apply: (1) For 12 or more credit
hours scheduled, full tuition as listed on pages 28, 29 of this catalogue.
(2) For schedules carrying 1 to 12 credit hours: (a) if legal resident
of Georgia, $3 per credit hour, with $10 minimum; (b) for others, $6
per credit hour, with $20 minimum. A credit hour consists of one clock
hour of either lecture or recitation, or 3 hours of laboratory, per week.
In addition to tuition fees there are charges for certain laboratories
the amounts of which will be found in the course descriptions. To cover
damage and breakage a deposit of $5 must be made with the Treasurer.
A diploma fee of $5 is charged at graduation.
FINANCIAL AIDS FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS
It is possible that some aid may be had through application to the
N. Y. A. Information regarding this may be obtained from the Dean
[178 ]
GRADUATE COURSES 179
f Men, Professor Floyd Field. Also, from time to time, certain de
o tments offer Graduate Student Assistantships to selected applicants. ~~ese positions require about ?alf-time assisting :"ork on the part of
h appointee and two years will be needed to fimsh the work for the
teter's degree. Information regarding these appointments may be had ~~~ the head of the department in which the major work is to be done.
Appointments are usually made about March 1st.
ADMISSION TO GRADUATE COURSES
Those intending to take up graduate studies should make application
f r admission and should write for an application blank as far in ad
v:nce of the opening of the session as convenient. The blank may be
had from the Dean of Graduate Courses or from ~he office of the
R gistrar. At the time the blank is returned, the apphcant should also
f :ward to the Dean of Graduate Courses a complete transcript of his
u:dergraduate record, a statement. from his Registrar of ~is relative
standing in his class, a list of subjects needed for ,graduation, a?d a
talog of his institution wherein his courses are descnbed. The apphcant ~ ,
will then be notified as to his acceptance.
At registration, the applicant must submit to the Dean of Graduate
Courses a complete proposed program approv~d by the head ~f the
major department. A form for this may be obtamed from the Registrar.
ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY FOR A DEGREE
Admission as a graduate student does not constitute admission to
candidacy for the master's degree. To obtain consideration for this
'vI'lege written application must be made to the Dean of Graduate
pn , d ' 0 d' Courses no later than February 15th of the year of gra u~tlOn. r 1-
rily the following conditions must be fulfilled to obtam favorable na . h '
ction: The applicant must have a better than average grade m IS ~ndergraduate work, and must have demonstrated his ability in grad
uate studies by at least a grade of B in subjects completed. All pre
requisites must have been completed, language requireme~ts complied
with or certified as being in progress, and any comprehensive tests re
quired must have been passed satisfactorily. A the~is topic must have
been selected and its title accepted by the Committee on Graduate
Courses.
REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION
After the applicant has been admitted to candidacy, a degree will
be recommended by the Committee upon completing the following addi
tional requirements:
a. At least two semesters in residence.
180 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
b. 32 credit hours passed with an average of at least B on all Courses
numbered 200 or above, and a grade of B or L1 on all courses num
bered 100 to 200.
c. Courses selected from not more than 3 departments.
d. 24 of the required hours to be in the major department.
e. A minimum of 15 hours exclusive of thesis to be in courses num
bered 200 or above.
f. A maximum of 13 credit hours to be allowed on thesis.
g. Any undergraduate subjects taken for credit to be in courses num
bered 100 or above.
h. A thesis in acceptable English to be completed and approved by May
15th of year of graduation.
1. Two bound copies of the thesis to be deposited in the library.
j. All financial obligations to the school must be met.
No credit toward graduation will be allowed: for subjects already
credited on undergraduate transcript; for any required because of in
sufficient preparation; or for those on a graduate level taken in other
institutions.
The thesis shall bear the approval of the instructor in charge and
two others of professorial rank, appointed by the Dean of Graduate
Courses, but who may not be in the department in which the work was
done. The Librarian will furnish a printed guide for the assembly of
the thesis and the specifications for its binding.
For further information, write to John L. Daniel, Dean of Graduate
Courses.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
The following graduate courses will be given provided a sufficient
number of students qualify:
DEPARTMENT OF AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING
NOTE: 3-3-4 means 3 hours class, 3 hours laboratory, 4 hours credit.
A. E. 200. THESIS.
The facilities of the School of Aeronautics are such as to permit
graduate students to conduct thesis res~arch in the fields of aerodynam
ics, structures, airscrews, blowers, and instruments.
A. E. 201. THEORETICAL AERODYNAMICS-PERFECT FLUIDS. Pre
requisites, A. E. 121, 122, Math. 201, 202 or equivalent. (Professor
Gail.)
GRADUATE COURSES 181
First term, 3-0-3.
Mathematical study of classical hydrodynamics covering potential
and rotational flows, the phenomenon of circulation, and the principle
of superposition of flows.
A. E. 202. THEORETICAL AERODYNAMICS-WING THEORY. Prereq
uisite, A. E. 201. (Professor Gail.)
Second term, 3-0-3.
Critical examination of existing theories of the airfoil in two dimen
sions, the monoplane airfoil, and multiplane and other interference
phenomena.
A. E. 205. THEORETICAL AERODYNAMICS-VISCOUS FLUIDS. Prereq
uisites, A. E. 121, 122, 202, Math. 201, 202, or equivalent. (Professor
Gail.)
First term, 3-0-3.
Mathematical study of the laws of similarity, laminar flow of vis
cous fluids, boundary layer phenomena, skin friction, and turbulence.
A. E. 206. THEORETICAL AERODYNAMICS-COMPRESSIBLE FLUIDS.
Prerequisites, A. E. 121, 122, 202, Math. 201, 202, or equivalent. (Pro
fessor Gail.)
Second term, 2-0-2.
Study of the effects of compressibility on the motion of bodies at
velocities in the vicinity of that of sound.
A. E. 207-208. ADVANCED AIRPLANE DESIGN PROBLEMS. Prereq
uisites, A. E. 133, 134, 141, 142, or equivalent. (Professor Schwartz.)
First and second terms, 0-6-2.
A study of advanced theoretical and experimental methods of struc
tural analysis, with applications to specific design problems.
A. E. 209. THEORY OF VIBRATIONS. Prerequisite, Math. 136 or
equivalent. (Professor Weems.)
First term, 3-0-3.
Analytical treatment of vibrations, including induced stresses, and
the reduction and isolation of vibrations, together with applications to
aircraft problems.
A. E. 213. THEORY O.F THE PROPULSIVE AIRSCREW. Prerequisite,
A. E. 121, 122, 166. (Professor Knight.)
182 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
First term, 3-0-3.
Critical examination of existing theories of the propulsive airscrew.
A. E. 214. THEORY OF THE LIFTING AIRSCREW. Prerequisite, A. E.
213.
Second term, 3-0-3. (Professor Knight.)
Mathematical analysis of the airscrew as a lifting means in connec_
tion with the autogiro, helicopter, and types of aircraft.
A. E. 215-216. GRADUATE SEMINAR.
First and second terms.
Group discussion of problems encountered In the research work of
graduate students and staff.
DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE
ARCH. 200. THESIS.
Second term.
A thesis in design is required, for which the student writes his own
program, under guidance, and completely designs the building in ques
tion, including structural design, indication of materials used, details,
etc.
ARCH. 215-216. HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE.
First and second terms, 2-0-2.
These courses consist of two seminars per week. The student does
his own research work; selects and outlines under guidance a treatise
on some phase of architectural history; and submits a written thesis
illustrated by sketches.
ARCH. 209A-209B. LIFE DRAWING.
First and second terms, 0-4-1.3.
DEPARTMENT OF CERAMIC ENGINEERING
CER. E. 200. THESIS.
CER. E. 203-204. COLLOIDAL PROPERTIES OF HYDROUS ALUMINO
SILICATES.
First term, 3-3-4; second term, 3-3-4.
The physical-chemical properties of the plastic and anti-plastic
hydrous alumino-silicates are considered. The control of plasticity, vis-
GRADUATE COURSES 183
-----------------------------------------------------
cosity, adherence, permeability, dispersion, and flocculation is studied
together with industrial applications.
CER. E. 205--CERAMIC ApPLICATIONS OF THE PHASE RULE.
First term, 3-0-3.
The Phase Rule is reviewed with particular emphasis on its appli
cations in the field of silicate technology. Cements, glass, glazes, enam
els, refractories, and other ceramic wares furnish proce~sing conditions
which yield to the application of the phase rule for techmcal control.
CER. E. 207-208. GLASS TECHNOLOGY.
First term, 3-3-4; second term, 3-3-4.
The properties of silica and the broad field of glass technology are
?ncluded. Sosman's "Properties of Silica" is the text for one semester.
The second semester is concerned with the pyro-chemical and physical
properties of the oxides, as wel~ as the glassy m:lts obtaina?le from
them. Practical processing of va no us types of glass IS taken up In theory
and laboratory practice.
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
CH. E. or CHEM. 200. THESIS.
CHEM. 209-210. SEMINAR.
The work of the Seminar consists of three distinct but closely re
lated parts:
(1) Considerable time is devoted to instruction in the use of the
chemical library.
(2) Parallel reading is assig~ed. Each student .rep?rts to. a staff
member on the content of his assignment. Opportumty IS prOVided for
free discussion.
(3) All graduate students meet weekly with the departmental staff
and present prepared papers on assigned topics in the literature. General
discussion of the topic follows.
CHEM. 220. RESEARCH.
The instruction is individual. Time and fees may be arranged in
conference with the Division Chief.
CHEM. 221-222. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY.
First and second terms, 3-0-3.
184 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
The work of this course consists of a complete review of aliphatic
and aromatic organic chemistry with a more detailed study of organic
metallic compounds, furfural derivatives, dyes, pyridine and piperidine
derivatives, and alkaloids.
CHEM. 223. ORGANIC PREPARATIONS.
First term, 0-6-2. Fee, $8.00.
Some of the more difficult organic preparations are made.
CHEM. 227. INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRO-CHEMISTRY. Prerequisite,
Chern. 158.
First or second term, 3-0-3.
A study of the fundamental concepts of electrolytic processes, elec
trode reactions, and oxidation-reduction equilibria with their practical
applications.
CHEM. 243-244. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. Prerequisite, Chern. 158 or
the equivalent.
First and second terms, 3-0-3.
These are courses of selected topics in advanced physical chemistry,
the content of the course being determined largely by the needs of the
class.
CH. E. 210. SEMINAR.
A discussion group composed of staff and graduate students, where
assigned topics from the literature are discussed, as well as research
problems in progress.
CH. E. 233-234. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY AND INDUSTRY. Prerequisite,
Ch. E. 162.
First and second terms, 3-0-3.
Advanced organic chemistry is studied along with its application to
the chemical industries. To be offered 1939-40.
CH. E . 239-240. HEAT TRANSMISSION. Prerequisite, Ch. E. 157.
First and second terms, 3-0-3.
Problems and discussions of the more complicated apparatus used
in heat transmission such as multiple effect evaporators, heat flow in
the unsteady state, and an extension of heat transmission by radiation.
CH. E. 258-259. ADVANCED UNIT OPERATIONS. Prerequisite, Ch. E.
157.
GRADUATE COURSES 185
First and second terms, 3-0-3.
Extension of distillation, gas absorption, drying, and filtration theory
and calculations and addition of economic balance.
CH. E. 260. ADVANCED DESIGN. Prerequisite, Ch. E. 160.
Second term, 1-6-3.
A continuation of Ch. E. 160.
CH. E. 271-272. ADVANCED CHEMICAL ENGINEERING CALCULA
TIONS. Prerequisite, Ch. E. 172.
First and second term, 3-0-3.
Ch. E. 172 extended.
DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING
C. E. 200. THESIS.
C. E. 201-202. CONCRETE DESIGN.
Four to nine hours per term. Fee, 1.00, each term.
Courses in the design and construction of multiple arch spans, office
buildings, fireproof residences and arch dams.
C. E. 203-204. STEEL BRIDGE DESIGN.
Four to nine hours per term. Fee, $1.00, each term.
Courses in the design of suspension bridges, draw spans, rolling and
lift bridges.
C. E. 205-206. WATER POWER DEVELOPMENT.
Four to nine hours per term.
Methods of impounding water, the selection of turbines, and power
house equipment, design of water wheels, turbines, penstocks, flumes,
draft tubes, tail races.
C. E. 207-208. HIGHWAY TRANSPORTATION AND RESEARCH.
Four to nine hours per term. Fee, $1.00, each term.
Courses in the economics of highway design and construction. Lab-
oratory research along some line of highway development.
C. E. 209. DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF AIRPORTS.
Four to nine hours per term. Fee, $1.00.
A study of ground areas, drainage, runways, location of hangars,
terminal buildings and lighting equipment.
186 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
E. E. 200. THESIS.
E. E. 201-202. ALTERNATING CURRENT AND ALTERNATING CUR
RENT MACHINERY. Prerequisites, E. E. 190, and E. E. 118.
First term, 5-0-5.
This course deals with the theory of transient phenomena and the
application of mathematical analysis to problems pertaining to circuits
and machines.
E. E. 203. LABORATORY. Parallel E. E. 20l.
First term, 0-9-3.
A continuation of E. E. 118.
E. E. 204. TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRICAL
ENERGY. Prerequisites, E. E. 130, E. E. 20l.
Second term, 3-0-3.
Overhead and underground transmission of power by means of alter
nating and direct currents. The complete solution of long transmission
lines; the stability of transmission systems; short circuits occurring in
networks; and inductive interference between transmission and com
munication lines.
E. E. 205. ILLUMINATION. Prerequisite, Phys. 28.
First term, 3-0-3.
A course dealing with the principles of illuminating engineering and
photometers. Problems of illumination for specific conditions are studied.
E. E. 206. ELECTRIC RAILWAYS. Prerequisite, E. E. 190.
Second term, 3-0-3.
A course consisting of recitations and computations of special prob
lems pertaining to modern electric railways and steam railway electri
fication.
E. E. 207. RADIO. Prerequisite, E. E. 189.
First te rm, 3-0-3.
An advanced course dealing with radio circuits and circuit elements.
This includes the mathematical analysis and design of resonant circuits,
coupled circuits, impedence matching networks, wave filters, transmis
sion lines and antennas, and thermionic vacuum tubes.
GRADUATE COURSES
E. E. 208. RADIO. Prerequisite, E. E. 207.
Second term, 3-0-3.
187
A continuation of E. E. 207, dealing with the detailed analysis of
the operation of radio receiving and transmission systems, and a study
of the factors involved in the design of numerous types of voltage and
power amplifiers.
E. E. 209. ELECTRICAL MEASUREMENTS. Prerequisite, E. E. 189.
3-0-3.
A course dealing with precise measurements of resistance, induct
ance, and capacitance at audio and radio frequencies; measurements of
e.m.f., current, power frequency, and wave form at audio and radio
frequencies; and measuring instruments, including thermal and elec
tronic types.
E. E. 210. ELECTRONICS. Prerequisite, E. E. 133.
5-0-5.
A course covering the structure and theory of operation of high
vacuum and gas-filled diodes and grid-controlled tubes, light-sensitive
tubes and cathode-ray tubes. An introduction to electron optics is in
cluded.
DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING DRAWING AND
MECHANICS
MECH. 205-206. AnvANcED STRENGTH OF MATERIALS. Prerequis
ites, Mech. 48 and Math. 136.
First and second terms, 3-0-3.
Stress concentration due to fillets and holes. Photo-elastic method
of determining stress concentration. Stresses in thick cylinders and
rotating discs. Stresses in curved bars. Beams on elastic foundation.
Temperature stresses. The theory of elastic energy. Stress analysis of
redundant structures. Elastic curves as influence lines.
MECH. 207-208. ApPLIED ELASTICITY. Prerequisites, Mech. 48 and
Math. 136.
The basic principles of the theory of elasticity with practical appli
cations. Two-dimensional problems of stress and strain in rectangular
and polar co-ordinates. Saint Venant theory of torsion. Membrane
analogy. Bending of prismatical bars. Stresses in flat plates. Stability
of members with thin walls.
188 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS
MATH. 201-202. ADVANCED CALCULUS. Prerequisite, Math. 136.
First and second terms, 3-0-3.
This course is intended to acquaint the student with methods and
theorems which will be of practical value to him in solving problems
that arise in his professional work, and will also enable him to under
stand the mathematical analysis used so frequently in technical papers
and scientific journals. The topics included are functional determinants
and implicit functions, maxima and minima of several variables, the
Cauchy-Lagrange law of the mean, uniform covergence of series and
integrals, continuity, differentiation and integration of integrals that
contain a parameter, line integrals and Green's theorem, elliptic inte
grals, the differential equations of Gauss, Legendre and Bessel, certain
partial differential equations of the second order, and the elements of
Fourier series.
MATH. 213. FUNCTIONS OF A COMPLEX VARIABLE.
First term, 3-0-3.
An introductory course with emphasis on applications.
MATH. 214. VECTOR ANALYSIS.
Second term, 3-0-3.
The elements of vector algebra and calculus, applications to geome
try and physics.
DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
M. E. 200. THESIS.
M. E. 201-202. THERMODYNAMICS. Prerequisite, M. E. 140.
First term, 3-0-3; second term, 3-0-3.
A study of general thermodynamic relations, chemical equilibrium,
thermodynamics of combustion, flow of fluids, and other practical appli
cations.
M. E. 203. FLUID FLOW. Prerequisites, M. E. 140, C. E. 33 and
all mechanics.
3-0-3.
This course is a study of the theory and applications of the proper
ties, static and dynamic, of liquids, vapors, and gases. It includes a
study of metering devices, impulse and momentum of fluids, and the
GRADUATE COURSES 189
flow of liquids, vapors and gases, in closed channels and around Im
mersed bodies.
M. E. 204. POWER PLANT ENGINEERING. Prerequisite, M. E. 65.
Either term, 3-0-3.
Design, development and special problems in modern super-power
stations.
M. E. 205. HEATING, VENTILATION AND AIR CONDITIONING. Pre
requisite, M. E. 170.
Either term, 3-0-3.
This course consists of the design of heating, ventilating and aIr
conditioning systems for industrial, commercial and residential service.
M. E. 206. DIESEL ENGINES. Prerequisite, M. E. 166.
3-0-3.
A study of compression ignition, with special engine problems, with
special reference to. the injection system, the combustion chamber and
comparison, for various purposes with other types of engines.
M. E. 207. INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE DESIGN. Prerequisite,
M. E. 166.
3-0-3.
The design of an internal combustion engine for any selected cycle
to meet certain specific conditions. The conditions may be made for
aeronautical, automotive, or industrial use at the option of the student.
Partial designs using different cycles may be worked out for compara
tive purposes. A problem in balancing in preference to a complete design
may be selected.
M. E. 209. HEAT L ABORATORY. Prerequisite, Phys. 28 and M. E.
140. Fee, $2.50.
0-6-2 to 0-9-3.
The work in this course includes the determination of heat transfer
characteristics for various types of apparatus, using gases, liquids, and
solids. It also includes such work on the flow of fluids as might be
required to suit the needs of the student.
M. E. 212. RAILWAY MOTIVE POWER. Prerequisite, M. E. 98.
Either term, 3-0-3.
A study of steam, electric, and oil locomotives, their design, develop
ment, and application.
190 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
M. E. 214. I NDUSTRIAL E NGINEERING. Prerequisite, M. E. 155.
3-0-3.
Scientific management in American industry.
M. E. 216. INDUSTRIAL SAFETY ENGINEERING. Prerequisite, M . E.
155.
Either term, 3-0-3.
A study of safety problems in industry including workmen's com
pensation laws, safety devices, education, etc.
M. E. 219. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING OF OFFICE AND I NDUS
TRIAL BUILDINGS. Prerequisite, M. E. 169.
3-0-3.
A study of such building features as heating, lighting, power, w ater
supply, sanitation and air-conditioning.
M. E. 222-223. THEORY OF MACHINES AND DESIGN. Prerequisite,
M. E. 162.
First term, 3-0-3; second term, 5-0-5.
The application of mechanics of materials followed by rational de-
sign and individual problems.
M. E. 245-246. PROBLEMS IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING.
Credit to be arranged.
This course is to meet the need of the student who has in mind a
special problem or study of his own that is worth while. (Not research.)
M. E. 248-249. RESEARCH.
Credit to be arranged.
For the solution of problems of interest to the student that may re
quire original investigation.
DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS
In addition to any prerequisites listed below, all graduate courses
in this department have the following prerequisites: Physics 27 and
28, or the equivalent; Chemistry 7 and 8, or the equivalent; Math. 23
and 24, or the equivalent.
PHYS. 200. THESIS.
GRADUATE COURSES
PHYS. 203. KINETIC THEORY OF G ASES.
First term, 2-0-2.
PHYS. 250. ATOMIC PHYSICS.
Second term, 3-0-3.
191
This course d~als with such topics as electrical discharge through
gases; photo-electnc phenomena; X-rays; spectroscopy and atomic struc
ture.
PHYS. 252. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ATOMIC PHYSICS.
Second term, 2-0-2.
This course to be taken simultaneously with Physics 250 by those
desiring more credit hours in Physics.
PHYS. 261. MATHEMATICAL INTRODUCTION TO THEORETICAL
PHYSICS. Prerequisites, Math. 136, Phys. 25.
First term, 3-0-3.
This course includes vector analysis, and introduction to tensor an
alysis; treatment of periodic phenomena with the aid of complex num
bers and Fourier series, and selected topics from Functions of Complex
Variables.
PHYS. 262. THEORE'CICAL DYNAMICS. Prerequisite, Phys. 261.
Second term, 3-0-3.
Dynamics of particles, rigid bodies and deformable bodies; wave
motion; Hamilton's and Lagrange's Equations; hydro- and aero-dy
namics; numerous applications.
PHYS. 268. THEORY OF ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM. Prerequisite,
Phys. 261.
Second term, 3-0-3.
Electrostatics and magnetostatics, including material media; direct
and alternating currents; motion of charged particles in electric and
magnetic fields; Maxwell's electromagnetic equations, and electromag
netic waves.
PHYS. 280. CONTEMPORARY PHYSICS.
First term, 3-0-3.
Topics will be selected, including wave mechanics; quantum mechan
ics; nuclear physics, etc., according to individual needs and preferences.
192 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
DEPARTMENT OF TEXTILE ENGINEERING
T. E. 200. THESIS.
T. E. 222-223. DYEING. (Professor Jones.)
First and second terms, 1-3-2. Fee, $2.00, each term.
This is a continuation of the regular course in Dyeing. Especial at
tention is given to dyeing of some of the textile fibers other than cotton
and wool. Considerable time is devoted to the accurate matching of
shades from a given sample. Time is also spent in testing the dyeings
for fastness toward various agencies.
T. E. 235-236. FABRIC ANALYSIS. Prerequisite, T. E. 136. (Profes_
sor Carmichael.)
First and second terms, 0-6-2. Fee, $2.00, each term.
A continuation of the work in T. E. 135-136, making complete an
alyses of complicated fabrics. Qualitative and quantitative tests for the
different fibers are made with mixed goods.
T. E. 237-238. T EXTILE DESIGN. Prerequisite, T . E. 36-37. (Pro
fessor Carmichael.)
First and second terms, 0-3-1.
A course of special problems in both dobby and jacquard design.
Color and pattern sketches are made and the dyehouse and loom layout
necessary together with cost estimates in production.
T. E. 253-254. POWER WEAVING. Prerequisites, T. E. 45, 46, 53.
First and second terms, 1-3-2.
An advanced course in weaving, covering a detailed study of the
mechanisms of the various types of dobby and j acquard looms, together
with problems in the design and construction of original patterns.
T . E. 263-264. YARN MANUFACTURE.
First and second terms, 1-3-2. Prerequisite, T. E. 63-64. (Professor
Hill. )
An advanced course in Yarn Manufacture, the work to include a
more detailed study of newer methods and developments in yarn manu
facture, together with problems and experiments in the production of
special yarn numbers.
DEPARTMENT OF PERSONNEL
DIRECTOR, DEAN FLOYD FIELD; ASSISTANT DIRECTOR, G. C. GRIFFIN;
ALUMNI SECRETARY, R. J. THIESEN; OFFICE SECRETARY,
MRS. W. L. GIRARDEAU
The Georgia School of Technology maintains a Personnel Depart
ment for more satisfactory adjustment of the students to college life,
and to assist them in thinking through their life problems and strength
ening their standards and ideals.
The D epartment registers all F reshmen, explains the steps neces
sary for meeting classes, gives instruction in the topics: how to study;
importance of a college record; health and hygiene; campus activities;
and discusses the technique of making proper social contacts through
churches and campus social groups.
An employment service is maintained for students who are unable
to provide their school expenses. This service provides part time employ
ment for worthy men to help pay their college expenses. It is impossible,
however, for the average student to carry a full schedule and work more
than two or three hours per day without failure in one or more subjects.
A student who must work in order to go to school should ask for a light
schedule and allow more th an four years for his degree.
By the co-operation of the Government other worthy and needy stu
dents are given part time employment which provides $ 10.00 to $15.00
per month towards their expenses. Here again it is necessary to main
tain a passing grade in all subjects in order to be continued in this work.
Every Freshman is given a personal interview after the work is
started to see if he is properly adj usted; and many of these cases are
followed up by changes in schedule, medical attention, co rrespondence
with parents or other action which may assist the student in making
progress.
It is planned to extend these conferences through the entire course
as a gu ide in choosing life work, adjusting difficulties and making proper
contacts fo r entering the industries.
This Department serves as an intermediary between the High School
and College, visiting the High Schools for interviews with prospective
students and helping them to get adjusted to college when they register.
Counsel and assistance are also given to the leaders of campus
groups, in order that they may maintain their ideals and provide con
structive and helpful activities for all interested students.
All seniors are allowed to register in this office for employment. In
terviews are arranged for them with prospective employers and records
are supplied to others which results in placing many students in posi
tions at the time of their graduation. The Alumni Secretary, in hi s
capacity as Alumni contact man, acts as a clearing house for Tech men
after graduation. Tech graduates should keep their files in this office
up to date even if they are not in line for change or promotion.
[ 193 J
SUMMER SCHOOL
THE FORTy-FoURTH ANNUAL SESSION
Nine Weeks
Executive Committee: PROFESSORS SKILES, DANIEL, AND STAMY.
CALENDAR
Registration days, July 19, 20, 1940.
Recitations begin July 22 and end September 12. Absences will be
recorded against students registering after July 22.
CURRICULUM AND TUITION
Below is a list of the courses to be given and the tuition and fees
for each course:
Arch. 1, 11. $5.00 for each credit hour of work taken.
Chern. 0 (non-credi t) ...................................................... $15.00
Chern. 3, 4 .......................................................................... 24.00
Chern. 13 .......................................................................... 20.00
Chern. 27 ................. : ........................................................ 26.00
C. E. 21 .............................................................................. 11.00
C. E. 33 .............................................................................. 15.00
Dr. 9, 10, 23 ...................................................................... 10.00
Dr. 25, 26.......................................................................... 5.00
E. E. 2, 77 .......................................................................... 15.00
E. E. 3................................................................................ 8.50
E. E. 16, 78, 117 .............................................................. 17.00
E. E. 188 ............................................................................ 25.00
Ec. 21, 51.......................................................................... 15.00
Eng. 10 (Entrance English) ............................................ 15.00
Eng. 11, 12, 33, 34, 45 .................................................... 15.00
Math. 1 (Entrance Geometry) ...................................... 15.00
Math. 3 (Entrance Algebra) ........................................ 15.00
Math. 17, 18, 23, 24 ........................................................ 25.00
Math. 20, 39, 136 .............................................................. 15.00
M. E. 16 ............................................................................ 10.00
M. E. 17 ............... _........................................................... 5.00
M. E. 22 ............................................................................ 25.00
M. E. 41, 35, 37, 77, 44, 152, 155 ................................ 15.00
[ 194]
SUMMER SCHOOL 195
M. E. 43, 140, 153 ............................................................ 10.00
M. E. 45, 46, 47................................................................ 8.00
M. E. 65 ................................................... _ ....................... 20.00
Mech. 31, 48...................................................................... 15.00
Mech. 39 .......................................................................... 21.00
Mech. 40, 47 ...................................................................... 10.00
M. L. 2, 8 .......................................................................... 15.00
Phys. 2 (Entrance Physics) ............................................ 17.00
Phys. 21, 22 ........................................................................ 23.00
Phys. 27, 28 ........................................................................ 33.00
Phys. 34c .......................................................................... 25.50
T. E. 23, 27, 37, 39, 59......................................... ........... 5.00
T. E. 81.............................................................................. 7.50
No student will be permitted to take more than 11 credit hours of
work during the summer session.
A medical fee of one dollar must be paid by each student.
The fees and tuition are due on the day of registration and are to
be paid to the school treasurer, F. K. Houston.
The school dining hall and Harris Dormitory will be open during
the summer session. The room rent in Harris Dormitory will be two
dollars per week for the eight weeks period. Application for room reser
vation should be addressed to the superintendent of dormitories.
Requests for information and applications for admission and special
courses should be addressed to the Dean, Georgia School of Technology.
STATE ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION
DIRECTIONAL STAFF
W. H ARRY V AUGHAN ............. .......... ....................... . ... . ......... .. .... . ..... . . Director
HAROLD BUNGER .............. ... . .................... . ......... . ... ......... . .... Assistant Director
MONTGOMERY K NIGHT .. . ................ .. ....... .. .................. ...... R esearch Associate
H AROLD B. FRIEDMAN ................ .... ..... ...... ..... .. ... . Faculty Advisory COuncil
C. A. JONES ............ . ................. . .................. ........... Faculty Adv isory Council
D. P. SAVANT .......... . .............................. . ...... .......... Faculty Advisory Council
ALFRED W. Scorr ........... ................. Faculty Ad'lJ isory Council (U. of Ga.)
FACULTY ASSOCIATES
R. L. HILL. ............................... . ...... . .. .... . .... .. . ...... ...... ...... .. . F aculty Associate
J. L. T AyLOR ............... . . . ... . ... . .. ..... .. .... . . . ..... . ................... ....... Fawlty Associate
1'. H. WHITEHEAD ...................................... FaClllty Associate (U. of Ga.)
A. M. SCHWARTZ .................. . . .. .......... ... ... . ...... . ..... . ...... ... . .. Faculty A ssociate
G. A. ROSSELOT .............. . .... . ..... . ......... . .. . ....... ...................... F acuity Associate
H. E. D ENNISON .. ................... ......... ....... ............................. Faculty Associate
F. W. AJAX .......................................................................... Faculty Associate
J. W. FIROR .. . .. .... ... ..... . .............. .. ................ Faculty Associate (U. of Ga.)
M. C. D AViS .......................................... ... .... . FaClllty Associate (U. of Ga. )
R. L. KE NNER .................. . .................. ........... Faculty Associate (U. of Ga.)
J. G. WOODROOF ..................... .dssociate, A gricultural Experiment Station
JESSE W. MASON ... .. .. ... . .. ........ . ........................... ............ . . . Faculty Associate
The State Engineering Experiment Station, located at The Georgia
School of Technology, is the engineering research agency of the Univer
si ty System. The purposes of this unit are to serve the industry of this
section, to develop the resources of the State, to aid in the integration of
agricultural and industrial activities, and to provide support for research
training in fundamental and applied science in the various institutions.
The Station is affiliated with the teaching organizations in order to
prompte the best interests of both research and teaching by placing re
search work in an academic atmosphere. This integration of research
with scientific teaching provides a service hitherto unavailable in the
State for industry for the development of resources, enlarges the teach
ing scope and perspective of college work, and utilizes efficiently and
economically both the available equipment and the services of experts
in different branches of science.
[ 196]
STATE ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION 197
During the year 1939-40, twenty F aculty Members, nine Research
Fellows, five Research Graduate Assistants, two Research Scholars, five
Technical Assistants and twenty-eight W. P. A. Assistants were en
gaged, either full or part time, in the prosecution of six Station prob
lems. These projects included such items as the more efficient processing
of cotton, the processing of domestic flax adapted to cotton mill methods,
the development of new type of aircraft, improvements in the properties
of rayon, new uses for the pecan and other oils, and an economic and
technologic analysis of proper industrial types for Georgia and the
southeast.
During June of each year a number of Research Graduate Assistant
ships and Scholarships are awarded for the ensuing fiscal year. These
positions carry stipends up to $650.00 for ten months of part-time work,
and are open on a competitive basis to qualified graduates of accredited
technical institutions.
The results of investigations are made available to the public throuo-h
the medium of bulletins and circulars published from time to time. T;o
circulars and four bulletins were published.
The Station is in a position to investigate problems financed by the
State alone or in cooperation with industries, governmental bureaus, and
technical foundations, as outlined in a prospectus "Supremacy Through
Research." Funds from external sources to finance co-operative inves
tigations are administered in trust by the Industrial D evelopment
Council.
EXTENSION WORK
THE EVENING SCHOOL OF APPLIED SCIENCE
DIRECTOR, R. S. HOWELL; SECRETARY, MRS. G. B. TURNER; ADVISORY
COMMITTEE, J. F. CANNON, A. A. CASE, R. S. KING
Atlanta, as a manufacturing center, has a large population of Opera_
tives, most of whom have been denied vocational training above the
average standard due to faulty apprenticeship and financial necessity.
The courses of study have been established with two purposes: First
to give men who are employed, or who seek employment in some phas~
of engineering or industry, a chance to supplement their knowledge
through evening study; second, to provide an opportunity for educa_
tional advancement for the high school student who finds it necessary
to go to work.
While the courses are not as complete as those offered in a day col
lege, the subjects offered furnish a good training in the elements of
engineering. The student who receives a certificate in any of these
courses is qualified for advancement in his life work.
FACULTY
The faculty of the Evening School of Applied Science is composed
of members of the day school faculty, with the following special instruc_
tors, who are specialists in their respective subjects.
CHARLES THOMAS BAKER 713 Glenn St., S.W.
Refrigeration
Roy EARL DAVIS 415 Linwood Ave., N.E.
Motor Analysis
R. W. EDENFIELD, A.B. 360 Washington St., S.W.
Mathematics
HENRY H. JORDAN 475 Clifton Road, N.E.
Blue Print R eading and Estimating
JAMES S. MORRIS 1931 Piedmont Road, N.E.
Radio Service
FEES
The admission fee for the various courses in the Evening School of
Applied Science is dependent upon the number of hours scheduled per
week. Three dollars of the admission fee for any course is a registration
fee which cannot be refunded.
A shop or laboratory fee is charged each student taking shop or lab
oratory work in order to cover cost of incidental supplies. The amount
of this laboratory fee varies with the nature of the laboratory or shop
work.
Projects that are constructed by the student become his property
upon payment for materials used.
[ 198]
EXTENSION WORK
CALENDAR, 1940-41
FALL TERM
Begins September 23, 1940. Ends January 24, 1941.
199
Christmas vacation: C~ass work will continue through Friday night,
December 20, 1940, and wIll be resumed Friday night, January 3, 1941.
SPRING TERM
Begins January 27, 1941. Ends May IS, 1941.
CREDIT
The following regulations, concerning college subjects taken in the
night classes have been approved by the day school.
1. F~nal ex.amina~ions shall be given in the Evening School of Ap
plIed SCience m those sutlJects in which final examinations are
given in the d~y school and a record of the term grades ~hall be
kept ?y ~he ~Irector. For a student to qualify for a day school
exammatlOn m a subject, his term grade must be "C" Or better.
2. Eveni.ng ~chool of Applied Science students who are not in good
st~ndmg . m the day school, but upon whom requirements for
bemg re-mstated have been placed, may take day school examina
tions for credit if otherwise eligible. Students who are "excluded"
will not be permitted to take the day school examination.
Pract.ically .all subj~cts of the Freshman and Sophomore years are
now available m the mght classes. By this arrangement for credit the
night college credit courses are uSl1d advantageously by High S~hool
students and others who find it necessary to take up employment. Such
students are able, during the period of employment, to pursue studies
in the night school which may be credited toward a degree.
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
J copy of the Evening School of Applied Science catalog, giving
description of courses in detail will be sent on request.
TWO-YEAR CERTIFICATE ApPLIED SCIENCE COURSES
Admission to the following two-year certificate courses requires a
high school education or some high school training with several years'
experience.
Ae.ronauti~s~ Arch.itect~re, Auto Engineering, Building Construction,
~he~llstry, elVlI .Engmee~mg, Electrical Engineering, Heating and Ven
tilating, Mechamcal Engmeering, Public Health Engineering, Radio
Structural and Textile Engineering. '
200 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
SPECIAL COURSES
These practical courses are designed fo r those men who are engaged
in similar work during the day and w ho either have not had sufficient
preparation to take one of the certificate courses, or wish a shorter
course in some special subject. E lementary courses in algebra and
geometry are desirable and available , but the student can begin the
course without having had work in these subjects.
Acetylene Welding, Aeronautics, A ir Conditioning, Applied Electric_
ity, Auto I gnition A nalysis, Blue Print Reading, Ceramic Processes,
C ity P lanning and Housing, Combustion of F~el s, C.ommercial Art,
Drawing, Electric Welding, Heating and PlumbIng, Highway Labora_
tory, Machine Shop Practice, Mathematics, Mechanics, Modern Lan
guage, Physics, Power Transmission, Radio Service, Refrigera tion, Test
ing Power Plan t Equipment , Textiles, Water Purification and Control,
Wood Working.
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
PROFESSOR T. H . Q UIGLEY, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR B ABCOCK, ACTING
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OWENS AND ASSISTANT PROFESSOR GROVES
In conformity w ith the provisions of the Smith-Hughes Act, this
department has the responsibility of training trade and related indus
tri al teachers fo r the following types of schools and classes in the State
of Georgia:
1. Evening classes in public schools and indust rial plants.
2. All day public trade schools.
3. Public and plant part-time schools.
4. Foremanship courses.
The activi ties of the department include research to determine spe
cific industrial education needs of a community, industry or plant, de
veloping courses of study to meet these needs, selection of teachers of
the required ind ustrial experience, training these teachers for speci alized
service; the deve lopment of specialized instructional m aterials for the
use of such teachers; the training of local teacher trainers in the larger
industrial centers; and the improvement of teachers in service after
placement.
Because of the specialized local character of this extension work
all activities are conducted und er special arrangements between Georgia
School of Technology, the Georgia State Board for Vocational Educa
tion , local boards of education and industri al plants. Courses and other
activities are conducted at many points throughout the state. The courses
offered are as follows :
EXTE SION WORK 201
Unless otherwise noted the following courses carry three hours credit :
1. E. 22.
1. E. 24.
1. E. 25.
1. E . 26.
I. E. 27.
I. E. 41.
I. E. 43.
I. E. 45.
I. E. 46.
I.E. 54.
I.E. 62.
I. E. 71.
I. E. 72.
I. E. 142.
I. E. 144.
I. E. 151.
I. E. 156.
I.E. 161.
I. E. 165.
1. E. 166.
I. E. 167.
I. E. 182.
I. E. 184.
EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. Prerequisite, I. E. 25.
HISTORY OF EDUCATION.
INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY.
BUSINESS PSYCHOLOGY.
PRINCIPLES OF INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION.
METHODS OF TEACHING.
COURSE PLANNING.
JOURNAL R EADING.
LESSON PLANNING.
SHOP ORGANIZATION.
METHODS OF SHOP DEMOKSTRATION.
PRACTICE TEACHING. Two hours credit.
PRACTICE T EACHING.
ORGANIZATION OF MANUAL TRAINING.
GENERAL SCHOOL ORGANIZATION.
THE TEACHING OF RELATED SUBJECTS.
VOCATION AL GUIDANCE.
THE CONDUCTING OF FOREMANSH IP CONFERENCES.
ORGANIZATION OF TR.~DE EDUCATION.
ORGANIZATION OF P ART-TIME EDUCATION.
I NDUSTRIAL PLANT SURVEYS. Two hours credi t.
THE TRAINING OF INDUSTRIAL TEACHERS IN SERVICE.
TRADE A NALYSIS.
SHORT SCHOOL FOR WATER PLANT OPERATORS
PROF. H. A. W YCKOFF, Director
The Georgia School of Technology, in cooperation wi th the State
Board of Health, conducts each year, usually in November, a Short
School for W a ter and Sewage Plant Operators. The School, which lasts
for four days, is conducted on the T ech campus and consists of lectures,
laboratory classes and demonstrations intended to give information con
cerning modern theories and practices in water purifica tion and sewage
disposal. Trips for inspection are also m ade to nearby water and sewage
plants. Instruction is given by professo rs chosen from the Tech faculty,
members of the State Board of Health, and men prominent in related
industries, who are specialists in their various fields.
202 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
MEDICAL ATTENDANCE
DR. J. L. HENRY, MISS ZELPHA STEPHENS, MRS. CLARA M. WILL
MARTH, AND MR. C. C. CRAWFORD
The Joseph Brown Whitehead Memorial Hospital has been in opera_
tion twenty-nine years, and the system instituted at its opening has been
so successful in treating the sick and conserving the health of the student
body that a similar system will be in force during the coming year.
The school physician is in charge of the hospital, assisted by a fu11_
time laboratory and X-ray technician and two registered nurses who
are in residence, thus insuring the best of care to students in case of
illness. The facilities of the hospital are open to all regular under_
graduate day students and cooperative students, either in school or work
ing. Graduate students, instructors and faculty members are not entitled
to free treatment or hospitalization except in case of emergency, but
may receive treatment upon the payment of a small fee, if facilities are
available.
For those eligible medical service is free of charge for temporary
illnesses, and includes the following: all necessary medical care and
minor surgery to clinic and hospital patients by the school physician,
nursing care and the ordinary laboratory examinations.
Free medical service does not apply to the following conditions:
major surgery, consultations, specialist's care, special laboratory exami
nations, special nurses, expensive medication, X-rays, or hospitalization
in cases of the more serious contagious diseases, or students who are
ill electing to remain outside the school hospital, the student, parents
or guardian being responsible for such added expenses.
All students who are ill are expected to be treated in the school
hospital provided that they do not prefer their own physician or another
hospital. The school hospital is open to all recognized physicians and
consultations are welcomed at all times. The basement of the hospital
has been completely remodeled for the housing of an up-to-date clinical
laboratory, physio-therapy equipment and a complete X-ray unit. The
new X-ray unit is of the latest type and capable of caring for all ordinary
X-ray examinations, including fluoroscopic studies. A moderate fee is
charged the student for all necessary X-ray work.
Students are charged seventy-five cents per day for meals while in
the hospital.
Tuberculin skin tests will be given at the regular annual physical
examination. Students showing a positive reaction will be required to
have complete X-ray examination of the chest. The fee for this X-ray
will be five dollars.
LIBRARY
MRS. J AlIlES HENLEY CROSLAND, LIBRARIAN; M ARY MINTER,
CAROLYNE ADAMS, MRS. M. D. SEABORN, JR.,
ASSISTANT LIBRARIANS
The library building, a gift of Mr. Andrew Carnegie, was formally
opened in October, 1907. In 1932, two major improvements were made
in the building. A new stack section which will house approximately
40,000 volumes was added and the basement renovated and made into a
large, well-lighted Periodical Room.
The Library contains over 45,000 bound volumes and some 5,000 un
bound pamphlets. The greater part of these which are scientific and
technical are used for study and research. The Library subscribes to
the journals of the leading scientific societies and to the foremost tech
nical and scientific periodicals in this country and abroad. These, with
over 5,000 bound periodicals, are kept in the new Periodical Room.
There is an author, title, and subject catalogue for all books and period
icals in the general and departmental libraries.
There are five departmental libraries, all under the administration
of the General Library. The more technical and highly specialized books
are kept in these libraries. The departmental libraries are: Aeronau
tics, in the Daniel Guggenheim Building, opened in 1930; Architecture,
on the third floor of the Physics Building, 1925; Ceramics, 1926, Tex
tile, 1929, and Experiment Station, 1938, in their respective buildings.
The Library was bequeathed a part of the collection of Mr. Julius
Brown. This consists of some rare and fine old volumes dating back as
early as 1473. A part of the collection of the late Governor N. E. Har
ris was bequeathed the Library. This contains some volumes on South
ern history and literature.
The Library is primarily for the use of students and members of
the faculty. All books, not reference or held on reserve, may be with
drawn for home use in accordance with the rules of the Library. The
General Library is open from 8 A.M. to 9 P.M. each week day except
Saturday when it closes at 12 M. It is closed on Sundays and regular
school holidays. Printed Library Regulations are given the Freshmen
at the beginning of the school year.
A Library fee of $1.00 per term is paid by every student.
[203 ]
THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
GEORGE T. MARCHMONT ____ ____________ __ ___________________________ ______ ------ --------Chairman
PROF. GLENN W. RAINEY--------------------------------------------Secretary-1'reasurer
W. A ALEXANDER LEWIS F. GORDON
J OSEPH T. BAYER
PROF. HAROLD BUSH-BROWN
J ACK R. DUNN
PROF. COUNT D. GIBSON
DR. LESTER RUMBLE
WARREN W. TAYLOR
DR. HERMAN L. TURNER
GEORGE WINSHIP
ADMl ISTRATION
WALTER H. MCGEE, J R. ______________________________ ____ ____ . ___________ G eneral Secretary
WILLIAM J. PROCTOR ________________________________________________________ Executive Secretary
GLADYS 1_ H AWES __________________________________________________________________ OjJice Secretary
L. DAVID LOCKERY ______________________________________________________________ Studen t Assistant
STUDENT OFFICERS, 1939-40
JOSEPH T. B AYER---- -- -------------------- ---------------------- -------------- ---------------- __ President
JACK R. DUNN------ -----------------------------------------------------------________ _ Vice-Presidcnl
WARREN W_ TAYLOR---- ____________ ______ ____ ____ ________ _________________________ ____ __ _____ Secretary
Purpose: The purpose of the Young Men's Christian Association is
to minister to the development of the moral, social and spiritual needs
of each individual in the school community. There are few organiza
tions on the campus that do not in some way come in contact with the
Y.M.C.A
"Y" Cabinet: Every student registered at Tech is a member of the
Y. M. C. A Any upper classman interested in taking an active part in
the promotion of the Tech Y. M. C. A program is invited to become a
member of the Y. M_ C_ A Cabinet. The Cabinet is organized into
committees which supervise the various social and religious activities of
the Association program. Only members of the Cabinet are eligible to
be nominated and elected officers of the Y. M. C. A. The Cabinet calls
for students with moral courage, students with a vision of a better
world and a desire to join with other students to make the Tech spirit
the spirit of friendship and Christian brotherhood.
[204 ]
YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 205
Freshman "Y" Council: The Freshman "Y" Council was founded
in 1923. All freshmen registered at Tech are invited to become mem
bers. Under the direction of its own officers and committees the Council
explores through discussion and social activities those areas of thinking
and living which provide for the highest development of personality.
Services:
1. The General Secretary is available at all times for private con
ferences with students wishing to discuss in confidence their per
sonal problems.
2. A directory of students, with name, address, telephone number,
church preference and class, is kept on file in the "Y" office.
This information is for the use of anyone desiring to get in touch
with the students.
3. The supervision and administration of the building and actlVltles
are under the direction of the secretaries. Quiet dormitory rooms
on the third floor, with comfortable accommodations, are avail
able to student roomers at nominal charges. In the basement are
offices for the student publications and a barber shop and laundry
operated primarily for students. The auditorium is used by the
alumni, Reserve Officers, young people's organizations of the
churches, the Glee Singers, and for class meetings, "pep" meet
ings, etc. The "Y" has a radio, reading room, and games in the
lobby.
4. Three handball courts and a game room in the basement of the
building are available for the recreation of students.
5. The Y. M. C. A. cooperates with the various churches near Tech
in helping Tech students relate themselves to the programs of
these churches.
6. Each year the Y. M. C. A. publishes the "T" Book-a neat,
vest-pocket size book, containing information about all activities
of the school, songs, yells, customs and traditions.
7. Through cooperation with the faculty and Tech Bible classes, a
reception is held for the freshmen.
8. The Y. M. C. A. attempts to help students find jobs.
9. In the reading room of the "Y" there are twenty-five of the best
magazines and daily papers available for the students. There is a
limited library of religious books in the lobby of the Y. M. C. A
Pamphlets on religion and religious questions are available at
all times.
10. Free stationery is available for students at the "Y" desk.
206 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
Activities:
1. During the spring of each year the annual Y. M. and Y. W. C. A.
State Conference is held. Various problems confronting the dif
ferent schools are discussed, along with topics of religious. im
portance.
2. The Southern Student Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. Conference is
held at Blue Ridge, N. C. Blue Ridge is a place for the student
to learn what is most essential in college life, and to acquire that
inspiration needed to live the fullest during his college year.
3. The Y. M. C. A. cooperates with the Athletic and Personnel De
partments in undertaking a social and athletic, and in some re
spects a scholastic, program to involve the participation of every
student at Tech. The Y. M. C. A. staff and student leaders are
active in the initiation and direction of various features of the
program. The building is always open to meetings, and the use
of all its facilities, tangible and intangible, by students and their
organizations is welcomed. Especially does the Y. M. C. A. con
cern itself with the interests of those students who are most
likely to be neglected in the school program.
4. The Music Appreciation Club and the Camera Club are spon
sored by the "Y". The former holds bi-weekly concerts of record
ings and the latter conducts snapshot contests and secures speak
ers for talks on photography.
5. In a series of discussion groups held by the Y. M. C. A. through
out the year various problems that confront college men are dis
cussed. These groups are led by competent men who are selected
from the faculty, upper classmen and religious leaders in the city.
6. The best religious, scientific, and educational motion pictures
available are shown at the Y. M. C. A. for the benefit of Tech
students.
7. Under direction of the deputation committee, groups of Tech
students carry religious and educational programs to churches,
colleges and young people's organizations in Atlanta and nearby
communities.
8. Under leadership of a competent choral director the Tech Glee
Singers hold weekly rehearsals and give concerts before churches,
schools and many other organizations in Atlanta. Several short
trips to other cities are undertaken during the year.
THE STUDENT COUNCIL
The Student Council, which was put into operation in the fall of
1922, is a group of undergraduates elected by the student body. Its
duties are to handle all matters of general student interest.
The officers and members for 1939-40 are:
C. N. MAYO, President J. F. STOVALL, Secretary
W. R. BEARD, Vice-President C. A. McKINNON, Treasurer
J. T. BAYER, JR.
W. R. BEARD
W. F. BENNETT
H. M. CONWAY
W. H. ECTOR
F. W. ALLCORN
J. L. HARRIS
J. W. BOSCH
SENIORS
C. N. MAYO
C. A. McKINNON
G. W. PHILLIPS
J. M. SENA
JUNIORS
T. N. KELL
J. F. STOVALL
SOPHOMORES
W. W. TAYLOR
J. DREW
CO-OPERATIVE REPRESENTATIVES
F. P. HUDSON
R. M. GRIFFIN J. A. HUTCHINSON
EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS
F. H. HOLZ, Editor of Yellow Jacket
R. J. WOODDALL, Editor of Blue Print
H. B. ARTHUR, President of Sophomore Class
T. C. DOZIER, President of Freshman Class
[207 ]
208 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
HONOR COMMITTEE
Faculty: PROFESSORS DANIEL, HEFNER, JOHNS
Student Body: J. T. BAYER, J. L. HARRIS, C. N. MAYO
In cases of alleged dishonesty in academic work the evidence is
examined by a committee composed of three students and three faculty
members. If, in the opinion of this committee, the evidence substantiates
the charge, the case is referred to the Executive Committee of the
Faculty for action.
THE STUDENT LECTURE AND ENTERTAINMENT SERIES
COMMITTEE
Chairman: DR. HAROLD B. FRIEDMAN
Facultl' Members: DR. RALPH A. HEFNER, DR. PHIL B. NARMORE,
DR. W. G. PERRY, PROFESSOR GLENN W. RAINEY
Student M embers : ROANE BEARD, l'vlACK CONWAY, F. P. HUDSON,
TOM KELL, CHARLES McKINNON, WARREN TAYLOR
During the school year of 1938-39 the student body voted to estab
lish a lecture and entertainment series, to begin the following year.
Under the plan adopted, each student is assessed a yearly fee of seventy
five cents and is admitted to all the features presented. (Co-operative
students pay in proportion to their benefits from the series.)
In its first year the Committee followed a policy of making the series
serve the Atlanta community as well as the student body and sold tickets
to the general public at low prices. The large seating capacity of ' the
auditorium and the use of voice amplifiers made this policy feasible.
GEORIA TECH ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
DR. M. L. BRITTAIN, Chairman
DR. J. B. CRENSHAW
PROF. FLOYD FIELD, Secretary and Treasurer
DEAN W. V. SKILES
PROF. A. H. ARMSTRONG, Faculty Chairman of Atilletics and Business
Manager
PROF. H. A. WYCKOFF
COACH W. A. ALEXANDER, Advisory Member u'ithout vote
MR. GEORGE W. MCCARTY, JR.
MR. R. T. JONES, JR.
MR. WILLIAM H. GLENN
MR. CHARLES MAYO, President of Student COllncil
MR. MACK CONWAY, Editor of Technique
MR. R. W. MURPHY, Captain of Football Team
The athletic program for the 1940-41 session is in charge of the fol
lowing staff:
COACHING STAFF
W, A. ALEXANDER, Football
R. L. DODD, Football
MACK THARPE, Football
J. R. McARTHUR, Football and Basketball
N. C. DEAN, Freshman Football and Track
R. M. MUNDORFF, Basketball and Baseball
G. C. GRIFFIN, Track and Cross Country
E. E. BORTELL, Tennis
H. E. DENNISON, Golf
R. T. MOREN US, Fencing
F. A. LANOUE, Swimming
CLAUD BOND, Trainer
[209 ]
210 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
COLLEGE ATHLETICS
College Athletics at the Georgia School of Technology are managed
by a Board of Directors consisting of six members of the Faculty, ap
pointed by the President, who is ex-officio chairman of the Board; three
alumni appointed by the president of the school; the President of the
Student Council, the captain of the football team, and the editor of the
Technique. This board aims to secure co-operation of the faculty and
students in athletic affairs, to maintain the highest standards of SpOrts
manship, to give every student an opportunity to take part in SOme
athletic activity. The liberal policy adopted by the Faculty toward ath
letics has resulted in such interest in college sports that the number
engaged in some form of outdoor exercise is very large-over fifty per
cent-and is increasing yearly.
Intercollegiate schedules are played in football, baseball, basketball,
tennis, swimming, fencing, golf, track, cross country, and rifle shooting.
H UGH INMAN GRANT FIELD
The liberality of Mr. John W. Grant, of Atlanta, whose donations
for this purpose have reached the sum of fifty thousand dollars, aided
by gifts from other friends of the institution, has provided the school
with an athletic field 900 feet long and 450 feet wide. This field has
been named the "Hugh Inman Grant Field" as a memorial to Mr.
Grant's son.
STADIUM
Upon this field has been developed a splendid U-shaped stadium 410
feet in length with locker-rooms, bath-rooms, stock-rooms, coaches' offi
ces and a running track under cover for early spring practice. The
total seating capacity, with temporary wooden stands built in on the
north end, is over 35,000. Grant Field, with its quarter mile track, and
this stadium, has been added to the equipment of the school at a cost
of $350,000.
THE ROSE B,OWL FIELD
In order to provide space for outdoor sports the Board of Directors
of the Georgia Tech Athletic Association purchased at the close of the
1928 football season a new field 455 by 980 feet within three minutes
walk of Grant Field. Thoroughly developed and equipped with modern
steel and concrete baseball stand, it provides space for two baseball
fields and three football fields. To commemorate the victory Over the
University of California at Pasadena, New Year's Day, 1929, this field
has been named "Rose Bowl Field."
THE NAVAL ARMORY
This building, financed by funds from the C. W. A., the Georgia
Tech Athletic Association, and Mr. Ferd M. Kaufman, an alumnus of
TECH ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 211
the class of 1894, extends from the end of the Eas.t stands along Tech
wood Drive to Third Street. It houses the Georgia Tech R. O. T. C.
Naval Unit, the Atlanta Naval Reserve Unit, and the offices of the
Georgia Tech Athletic Association. The main hall: on the. ground floor,
196 feet long by 60 feet wide, is used for athletiC practice and naval
drill. The remaining space is occupied by loc.kers and showers,. a fu~y
uipped naval machine shop, target room, bOller-room for manne bot!-
eq . 1 h" b'd
rs a radio room store-room for naval supphes, a comp ete s Ip s n ge,
e " h d " f and nine offices. The second floor, at the nort en, gives SIX rooms or
class work. Entrance to the building is on Third Street.
The Naval Armory satisfies a long-felt need in athletic and naval
equipment at Georgia Tech.
THE AUDITORIUM-GYMNASIUM
This new building, a combined auditorium-gymnasium-swimmin.g
001 financed by funds from the P. W. A. and the Board of Regents, IS roca~ed at the north end of Grant Field and gives th.e scho?l a much
needed assembly hall, suitable for commencement exerCises, With a seat
ing capacity of three thousand. It also affords a basketball court, 60
by 100 feet, and ample showers and locker rooms for an up-to-date
swimming pool.
TECHNICAL SOCIETIES
AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS
The Student Chapter of this organization at Georgia Tech is known
as the "Civil Crew." Its members are selected from the Senior and
Junior classes in Civil Engineering, with especial emphasis on good
scholastic standing. The activities of the Society include the establish_
ing of personal contact with practicing engineers by means of luncheons
and informal talks, the investigation of practical construction work, and
the showing of films on engineering projects.
ARCHITECTURAL SOCIETY
Architectural students are elected from the three upper classes. The
Society was organized to promote the interests of the Department and
to bring about a closer relationship between students and faculty. It
has been active in publishing illustrated bulletins of student work, ar
ranging for special lectures and exhibits, and holding meetings to discuss
subjects of professional interest.
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SOCIETY
This society is the student branch of the American Society of Me
chanical Engineers with membership optional to students of both regular
and co-operative Mechanical Engineering courses. Students interested
in Mechanical Engineering, but specializing in other branches of engi
neering, will be granted membership upon election by members of the
branch. The society is conducted entirely by the students with the aid
of an Honorary Chairman from the faculty of the Mechanical Engineer_
ing department, who is elected by the student members and approved
by the president of the national society.
Weekly meetings of the society are conducted by the students, who
either arrange programs from their own number or invite prominent
engineers and business men of experience to address them. Special trips
of inspection and an annual regional conference are features of the
proceedings.
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERS
This national organization has chartered a student branch of the
parent society at The Georgia School of Technology. Bi-monthly meet
ings take the form of lectures, motion pictures or plant visits which are
meant to give the student a better idea of the function of the chemical
engineer in modern industry.
[212 ]
TECHNICAL SOCIETIES 213
-------
ALPHA CHI SIGMA
Alpha Chi Sigma is a professional chemical fraternity founded with
the. idea of. creating ~n interes~ in .chemistry and at the same time recog
nizmg achievement 10 that SCientific branch. Its membership is drawn
from students of chemistry and chemical engineering who intend to
make some phase of chemistry their life work. At Georgia Tech this
orga~izati~n presents .industrial moving pictures, lectures, keeps up a
chemical display, etc., 10 an effort to encourage those who are interested
in chemical engineering.
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING SOCIETY
This Society is a branch of the American Institute of Electrical
Engineers.
Senior and Junior students in the Electrical Engineering Course
are eligible for membership. Original papers are presented and articles
from current electrical literature are abstracted and discussed. Lectures
are given the Society by practicing engineers.
AMERICAN CERAMIC SOCIETY
Th~ S.tudent Branch functions under ~ charter of the national society.
SubSCriptIOns to the J ourna! of the Society; addresses from practicing
engineers, faculty and students; plant visitations; the presentation of
industrial motion pictures; and the planning and execution of Student
Branch special events all aid in background building and enlarging the
perspective of the students, faculty, and local industry.
PHI PSI
Theta Chapter is the Georgia Tech local of a national textile fra
ternity, Phi Psi. Its membership is drawn from the Senior and Junior
classes, with good scholastic standing as a prerequisite. The object of
the organization is the promotion of scholarship and of interest in tech
nical matters connected with the textile industry. From time to time
motion pictures are sponsored, and men prominent in the textile field
are invited to address the society.
LOAN FUNDS AND SCHOLARSHIPS
THE LEWIS H. BECK FUND
THE LEWIS H. BECK SCHOLARSHIP FUND is a student loan fund
created by the late Mr. Lewis H. Be~k, of Atl~nta, for t~e benefit of
students who are residents of Georgia, attending Georgia School of
Technology. It is administered by a special Board of Trustees. For
information write to the office of the Lewis H. Beck Scholarships, S3~
Baker Street, N.W., Atlanta, Ga.
THE J. D. RHODES SCHOLARSHIPS
The late J. D. Rhodes left one-third of the income of the Rhodes
Building, Atlanta, for the purpose of educating ~oys at the Georgia
School of Technology. The amount of money avatlable each year will
vary, as it depends on the rentals of the Rhodes Building.
THE ADAIR AND OLDKNOW SCHOLARSHIPS
Alumni of the school have established two scholarships, to be known
as the George W. Adair and William S. Oldknow Scholarships, in
memory of these loyal Tech men, and on the same basis as the Rhodes
Scholarships.
For information concerning the Rhodes, Adair and Oldknow Schol
arships write Mr. G. C. Griffin, Assistant to the Dean of Men, Georgia
School of Technology, Atlanta, Ga.
Generous friends of the institution have established funds of vary-
ing amounts, which are used for emergency loans. .
Architects Loan Fund .............................................. $ 200.00
J. Baldwin Loan Fund............................................ SO.OO
Berry Loan Fund...................................................... 2,400.00
S. F. Boykin Fund.................................................... 100.00
J. B .. Campbell Loan Fund...................................... 1,000.00
William B. Coleman Loan Fund.......................... 420.00
Holland Coleman, Jr., Loan Fund........................ 480.00
S. C. Dobbs Loan Fund.......................................... 7S.00
Ga. Federation of Labor Loan Fund ....... ~ . . .... .. .... 800.00
The A. French Loan Fund................. ................... 1,500.00
Mrs. A. V. Gude Loan Fund.................................. 200.00
Lyman Hall Loan Fund ........... _............................. 1,400.00
J. M. High Loan Fund ........... _............................. 850.00
Dr. and Mrs. T. P. Hinman Loan Fund............ 200.00
I. S. Hopkins Loan Fund ... _................................... 30.00
Louis Gholstin Johnson Loan Fund...................... 400.00
Malta Lodge Loan Fund........................................ 800.00
Malta Lodge Fund, No.2...................................... 250.00
[214 ]
LOAN FUNDS AND SCHOLARSHIPS
Lona Mansfield Loan Fund.................................... 750.00
E. P. McBurney Loan Fund .................................... 1O,47S.00
Gayle Nimmocks Memorial (Pi Kappa Phi)...... 400.00
Scottish Rite Loan Fund.......................................... 1,000.00
Sam W. Small Loan Fund...................................... 100.00
T. W. Smith Loan Fund........................................ 26S.00
J. P. Stevens Loan Fund........................................ 5,000.00
Clark Thornton Memorial Fund............................ 362.50
E. A. Turner Loan Fund........................................ SO.OO
Mrs. Fannie B. Wright Loan Fund...................... 925.00
Class of Dr. M. L. Brittain Loan Fund.............. 500.00
Joseph M . Terrell Loan Fund....... ......................... 7,300.00
Geo. W. Adair Loan Fund....... ............................. 450.00
Thomas E. Mitchell Fund App. Annually............ 1,904.16
Student Emergency Loan Fund.............................. 3,SOO.00
Student Book and Supply Fund.............................. 1,800.00
Student Fee Loan Fund ............................................ 10,000.00
Student Supply Loan Fund ...................................... 32,000.00
Lewis H. Beck Fund-Int. on $25,000 Annually 1,500.00
Lowry Loan Fund for North Ga. Students........ 3,000.00
J osiah Dana Cloud man Fund ................................ 10,000.00
Alice Spencer Coon Loan Fund for M. E.
Students .................................................................. 4,000.00
Eugene O. Batson Scholarship Fund, Int. on ........ 10,000.00
Accumulated Interest .............................................. 2,7S9.80
21S
Applicants for loans must qualify in scholarship and character, besides
presenting evidence of bona fide need of fin ancial assistance.
TEXTILE SCHOLARSHIP
The Cotton Manufacturers' Association of Georgia has given to
Textile students a scholarship of $120 for tuition and books, and a loan
fund, not to exceed $200 annually.
ENDOWMENT FUND
From J ulius L. Brown .................................................................. $160.000.00
From Daniel Guggenheim .............................................................. lS0,000.00
From Hon. Clark Howell and Atlanta Constitution, 'VGST lS0 .000.00
From Joseph ine L. Cloud man.............................................. ........ 60,000.00
From Floyd W. McRae................................................................ SOO.OO
From George W. Forrester.......................................................... 863.57
From William S. Rankin, Class of 1903.................................... 439.75
From Louis Wellhouse Memorial Fund.................................... 2,500.00
MEDALS AND PRIZES
THE PRESIDENT'S SCHOLARSHIP PRIZE: GOLD "T"
Through the President of Georgia Tech, Gold "T's" are awarded
each year to the members of the Junior class who, from the beginning
of their courses have maintained the highest scholastic standing.
T HE HONOR SOCIETY OF PHI K APPA PHI
Among the prizes offered for scholarship by the Georgia School of
Technology is membership in the honor society, Phi Kappa Phi, to which
a limited number of seniors rep resenting all departments are elected
annually. Phi Kappa Phi is a national organization with chapters in
many of the leading universities and colleges, and wherever it has been
established it has proved a stimulus not only to scholarship but to all
round manhood.
The local chapter of Phi Kappa Phi awards annually a scholarship
cup to that member of the senior class who, on the basis of all work
taken in this institution, ranks scholastically as one of the first two stu
dents in the class.
TAU BETA PI
Tau Beta Pi is a national honorary engineering fraternity with
chapters in most of the leading engineering schools of the country. The
Alpha Chapter of Georgia offers membership to approximately twenty
five engineering students of each graduating class who can qualify ac
cording to standards of scholarship, character, loyalty, personality, lead
ership and school activities. The fact that Tau Beta Pi is the second
oldest honorary fr aterni ty in the country and numbers among its mem
bers many of our leading engineers, makes membership in the society
a coveted honor.
The local chapter of Tau Beta Pi awards annually a scholarship
cup to an outstanding engineering senior who ranks among the first
five of his class, on the basis of all scholastic work taken in this insti
tution. The selection is made by a committee composed of Tau Beta Pi
faculty members, heads of the Engineering Departments, and a repre
sentative from the faculty Committee on Honors and Prizes.
KAPPA ETA KAPPA
Kappa Eta K appa is a national professional electrical engineering
fraternity. Membership in the Zeta chapter is offered to those junior
and senior electrical engineering students possessing the requisite quali
fi cations of scholarship, character, and leadership.
In order to encourage higher scholastic attainment among students
[216 ]
MEDALS AND PRIZES 217
of the profession, the local chapter annually presents the sophomore in
electrical engineering who has the highest average, based on three terms
with an Electrical Engineering Handbook. '
PHI ETA SIGMA
Phi Eta Sigma is a freshman honor society in which any student is
eligible for membership who has made an average grade of at least
3.5 on the work o~ the first term of the freshman year. The society
awards a scholarship cup to the freshman who makes the highest aver
age for the first term.
T EXTILE SCHOLARSHIP MEDALS
A medal is awarded by the National Association of Cotton Manu
facturers to the senior in the Textile D epartment who has the highest
scholastic record from the beginning of the course.
The Cotton Manufacturers' Association of Georgia awards a medal
annually to a member of the senior textile class, based on scholarship
throughout his course, an.d for original effort in the work of the Textile
Department during his senior year.
BRIAREAN SCHOLARSHIP CUP
The Briarean Society of the Georgia School of Technology presents
annually a scholarship cup to a senior member of the society whose
scholastic average for a period of four and one-half years entitles him to
rank as one of the highest three members of the class.
FRATERNITY SCHOLARSHIP CUP
The Interfraternity Council awards annually a scholarship cup to
the chapter of that organization which makes the highest scholas tic
average.
ARCHITECTURAL MEDAL AND PRIZE
The American Institute of Architects awards each year to a member
of the graduating class a medal for excellence in architecture. The
winner of this medal, who must have a general scholastic average of at
leas t "B," is recommended to the Committee on Honors and Prizes by
the Faculty of the Department of Architecture.
A set of books is offered each year to the senior in Architecture
placing first in a special' competition. This prize is given by the Alumni
and members of the Georgia Chapter of the American Institute of
Archi tects.
ALPHA CHI SIGMA PRIZE
The Professional Chemical Fraternity, Alpha Chi Sigma, presents
annually a handbook to the junior who has made the best record in the
Chemistry or Chemical Engineering course.
218 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
A. 1. CH. E. AWARDS
The American Institute of Chemical Engineers awards a badge and
certificate to that junior in Chemical Engineering who has made the
highest record on the work of the first two years-for co-operative stu
dents the first three years.
The Student Branch of the A. 1. Ch. E. presents annu ally a hand
book to an outstanding junior Chemical Engineering student, selected by
vote of the members of the student branch.
PI TAU SIGMA
Pi Tau Sigma, National Mechanical Engineering Fraternity, elects
to membership outstanding mechanical engineering students in the junior
and senior years.
Annual awards of two engineering handbooks are made to the high
est ranking students in mechanical engineering as follows : One to a
regular sophomore based on the work of three terms and one to a pre
junior (Co-op. Plan) based on the work of four terms.
SKULL AND KEY SCHOLARSHIP CUP
The Skull and Key Society offers a scholarship cup to the sophomore
in the regular course who has made the highest average on the work
of the first three terms.
AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING MEDAL
The James Edward Oglethorpe Chapter of the Daughters of the
American Colonists presents annually a medal to the member of the
graduating class in Aeronautical Engineering who has made the highest
scholastic average, based on the work of at least three complete semesters.
A. S. M. E. AWARD
Each year the American Society of Mechanical Engineers awards
to the student delivering the best paper before the local student branch,
a trip to the spring meeting of the student branches of the A. S. M. E.
At this meeting the student has the opportunity of competing for a
further award. In addition the local student branch awards as second
prize a Mechanical Engineer's handbook.
CLASS HONOR ROLLS
Students who rank in the highest ten per cent of their respective
classes or who make a term average of 3.5 or higher are placed on the
Honor Roll, which is shown in the catalog by printing the names of
such students in italic type.
MEDALS AND PRIZES 219
MILITARY PRIZES AND TROPHIES
The A. B. Steele trophy, a handsome silver cup, the gift of Mrs.
Ray Powers and Mr. A. B. Steele, as a memorial to those "Tech" men
who made the supreme sacrifice during the World War, is awarded
annually to the best drilled company in the regiment.
The Joseph H abersham Chapter of D. A. R. presents annually a
medal to the member of the senior class who attains the highest rating
in Military Science and Tactics.
The Georgia Society of Daughters of Colonial Wars presents an
nually a medal to the Cadet Officer who attains the highest rating for
outstanding leadership.
The Reserve Officers' Association of Atlanta gives annually an offi
cer's saber to the most outstanding student in Military Science and
Tactics.
The U. S. Coast Artillery Association presents annually a medal to
the member of the Junior Class who attains the highest rating for pro
ficiency in scholarship and in Military Science and Tactics.
Two gold medals are given annually by the Army Ordnance Asso
ciation, one to the member of the senior class and one to the member of
the junior class of the Ordnance unit who attains the highest rating in
Ordnance scholarship.
The Anak Society, Georgia Tech, presents annually three medals,
one each to the Freshman in the Infantry, in the Coast Artillery, and in
the Signal Corps who attains the highest rating for proficiency in Mili
tary Science and Tactics.
The Scabbard and Blade Military Fraternity gives annually a trophy
to thOe captain of the company which wins the Steele trophy.
A medal is presented annually to each Army member of the Georgia
Tech Rille Team for proficiency in rille marksmanship.
Gold, silver or bronze medals are awarded to students who achieve
the highest individual rating. for excellence in military drill.
NAVAL R.O.T.C. MEDALS
The Georgia State Society "United States Daughters of 1812"
awards a gold medal each year to the senior in the Naval R. O. T. C.
who achieves the highest rating in Naval Science and Tactics.
The "Descendants of the Pilgrims" awards a gold medal each year
to the Naval R. O. T. C. student making the highest standing in Naval
Science and Tactics during the Basic Course.
The Anak Society awards annually two medals: one to the junior in
the Naval R. O. T. C. showing highest proficiency for the Course in
Theoretical and Practical Navigation, the other to the freshman in the
Naval R. O. T. C. showing highest proficiency in Naval Science during
his freshman year.
DEGREES CONFERRED JUNE, 1939
GRADUATE DEGREES
MASTER OF SCIF.NCE IN AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING
Alan Yates Pope
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY
John Francis Keating Lawrence Karn Yourtee
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
John Robinson Coley Paul Vasser Seydel (1938)
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING
J ames Stephens Rimmer
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL E N GINEERING
Melville Whitnel Beardsley Donald Brooks Wilcox
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Thomas James Hughes (with honor)
Cornelius Francis O'Shea (with honor)
James Howard Pines (1938) (with honor)
William Howard Beers
Robert Wesley Boyd
Vance Dodson Campbell
Marion Raymond Clark .
Robert Leslie Cornell, Jr.
John Thomson Cosby
William George Coyle, Jr.
Harvey Wilburn Criswell, Jr.
Claude Leon Daughtry, Jr.
Richard Frank Donovan
Thomas Arthur Elliott
Robert Mack Gibbs
John Rudolph Hammond, Jr.
Nathaniel Goodman Harrison, Jr.
Homer Gray Hutchinson, Jr.
Harry Jeffcoat, Jr.
Joseph Adreon Keller, Jr.
Harry Martin Lange
George Arthur Martin
Eugene Kearfott Miller, J r.
Raymond Elmo Moore
Dillard Munford
Paul Sylvester N urko
Eugene Mason Philpot, Jr.
Earl Alexander Powell, Jr.
Alfred Clare Reed, Jr.
Alonzo Richardson
Downes Lyle Russell, Jr.
Herman Saminsky
Curran Jolly Schenck
John Edgar Shipp
William Joseph Shuman
Marion Kiser Smith
Jefferson Woodrow Speck
Herbert Dean Spratlin
William Harry Tanner
[220 ]
DEGREES CONFERRED
-
Jacob McClelland Thomas
Robert Glynn Thomas
John Rowland Wyant
J ames Faust Wyatt
Hugh Dudley McDonald, Jr.
(1938)
221
Henry Cannon Tilford, Jr.
George Renzo Vanden Heuvel
George Lindsey Watt
Malcolm Hugh Westberry, Jr.
Robert Ramsey Voorhees (1938)
Rex Harry White, Jr. (1938)
CO-OPERATIVE PLAN
*Phillip Eugene Everett (with honor)
*Nat Graves McLean (with honor)
*Frederick Raymond Short (with honor)
Emanuel Harold Smith (with honor)
Thomas Frederick Brinson
*Cecil Franklin Crumbley
*John Francis Dillon, Jr.
*I vey Oscar Drewry
*Roy Chappel Fordham
*Benjamin Schoppaul Goodwin
William Walton Keith
*John Nowlin McClain
*Lucius Loring Pitts
*Madison Post
John Tal Richardson, Jr.
Shelley Elmer Rule
* John Albert Swint
Cornelius Bullard Thomas
Richard Sollar Turner
Bernard Lilse Mathews (1938)
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
Frank Garcia Lopez (with honor)
William Merritt Pope, J r. (with honor)
William J ames Warnock (with honor)
Fred Littleton Alexander
J ames Aleck Alexander
Alfred Ameen
Charles Francis Baker
Milton Robert Binns
Irving Stuart Bull, Jr.
Matthew James Burger
J ua'n Antonio deCardenas
Leonard David Ecker
Harold Julius Freedman
William Franklin Gray
Thomas Jefferson Grogan, Jr.
Ernest George Gruters
J oseph Wallace Henderson
Benaj ah Woodfin Hinton, Jr.
Harris Holt Hooker
Hugh Bennett Hutchins
Henry Ives Jehan
Donald McLeod Leslie
Hubert Gordon Morgan
Orlando Andres Rodriguez-Jorge
Armando Antonio Salcedo
.Offlclal diploma Is withheld untl! R.O.T.C. Camp Is completed.
222 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
Rency Floyd Sewell, Jr.
William Scandrett
Joseph Samuel Slicer, Jr.
Sidney Rousseau Smith
Sidney Taylor Smith
Marvin Beutell Snipes
Sergio Antonio Sob redo
J efferson Woodrow Speck
Frank Russell Strate
William Douglas Stroud
John Curtis Thomson, Jr.
Jerry Bolton Tullis
Raleigh Osborn Worrell
CO-OPERATIVE PLAN
*John Clinton Abrams, Jr. (with honor)
*Harold Jesse Crumly (with honor)
*Edward Reid Flynt (with honor)
Charles Stuart Perry, Jr. (with honor)
*Harold Winston Adams
*Robert Lee Adams
*Karl Alten Bevins
*Arthur Melvin Brown
*Eugene Vincent Fontaine
*Clarence W. Graves, Jr.
Pierce Hammond, Jr.
William Francis Hunter
Rufus Llewellyn Hutto
Dana Lucian Kilcrease
* James Arthur Lasseter
*Eugene Carr Manning
Clyde Edward Miller, Jr.
*Howard Bernard Plummer
*John Ryscuck
*William Roscoe Shook, Jr.
*Charles Clifton Smith, Jr.
*Arthur Gordon Swan
*Carl Harwell Williams
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING
Lucian Jefferson Harris, Jr. (with honor)
Ralph DeLoach Beall Hugo Luis Muris
Charles Luther Belcher, Jr. John Smith Pace, Jr.
J ames Leon Brooks, Jr.
Arthur Wolfe Browning
Richard Louis Creamer
Howard Keeling Faber
Samuel Hall Fowler
Robert Frazier Head, Jr.
Milton Williams Howard, III
Gerald Johnson, Jr.
John Howard McGrann
Hiram Watson Rainey, Jr.
Charles Rieff Shoemaker, III
Frank James Skundale
William Gay Thrash
Roy Julian White
William Laws Calley (1938) .
Manuel Margarito Cortes (1938)
John Uhl Nixon (1938)
?Ottlclal diploma I. withheld until R.O.T.C. Camp Is completed.
DEGREES CONFERRED
Co-OPERATIVE PLAN
Marvin George Mitchell (with honor)
Lawrence Julian Gaissert *Sidney Lanier McFarland
*Lucius Hannon, Jr. George Elton McKinney
William Randolf Harris, Jr. Glen Henry Peavy
Thomas William Kerby, Jr. James Harold Walker
Davis Royall Luck Charles Ralph Wolff, Jr.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN TEXTILE ENGINEERING
Floyd Edward Busbee William Beeks Sears
James Edward Craig James Alford Stapleton
Preston Harley David Leslie Rufus Woodworth
Henry Cary Dunson Saul Yabrow
David Judea Goldstein John Logan Chivington (1938)
Woodrow Gay Ingram Homer Vernon Cook (1938)
William Beverly Johnson Nathaniel Lee Hightower (1938)
William Green Lee, Jr. Holcombe Mathurine Verdery, Jr.
William Noel McGibony (1938)
Frederick Funston Phillips
Walter Jefferson Rountree, Jr.
Terrell Harrison Wilkinson, Jr.
(1938)
CO-OPERATIVE PLAN
Irvin Barnett
*Richard Larkin Hearn
King Dick Henry
Dan Moss
Wilbur Rush Otey, Jr.
*Louis Harley Warlick, Jr.
Werner Fred Ziegler
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY
Alfred George Rossow (with honor)
John William Dillard Harvey Louis Silver
Harry Manny Marx
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
William Jeffery Alfriend, Jr. Hedrick Cheverton, Jr.
John Arden Bretz, Jr. J ames Elmo Corr
Robert Harding Byers William Cecil Dabney, Jr.
?Otrlclal diploma Is withheld until R.O.T.C. Camp Is completed.
224 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
Cecil Bennett Estes, Jr.
Alberto Garcia-Tunon
Joseph Olai Stensland
Mirko Joshua Tuhy
Albert Perdue Yundt John Clayton Jacobs
Darling Luther Johnston
William Calvert M cConnell
Robert O smalov
James Edward Gilbert (1938)
Willi am Denson Hughs, Jr. (1938)
Francis Lee Shackelford, Jr.
( 1938) William Richard Penn
Charles Christy Rippberger George Nichols Spring, Jr. ( 1938)
CO- OPERATIV E PLAN
*Paul Eugene Atwood (with honor)
Davis Alexander Bragg, J r. (with honor)
*George Owens H askell, J r. (with honor)
*Franklin Tillou Waltermire (with honor)
John Augustus Greer, Jr.
Rufus Jefferson Herring
Benjamin Leightman
Ernest LeRoy McClintock, Jr.
Gerard Eareckson Murray
Frank Stone Osborne, Jr.
Pascal Moran Rapier
Milton Raymond Siegel
William Ross Stevens, Jr.
B ACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE
Martin Amorous Goette, .T r.
Allen Clark Hudson
Thomas Morgan Lewis
J esse Lee Morrison, J r.
John Charles Wheeler
BACHELOR OF SCIEN CE
Lawton DeLany Geiger (with honor)
J ames Bowden Addy John Daniel Shafer
Max E. F. Borges-Recio J ames Ward Simms
Mac Alfred Cason Leonard Frend Thornton,
Howell Edward Cobb John Linwood Walker, Jr.
J esse Lee Morrison, Jr.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CERAMIC ENGINEERING
Rufus Eldridge Camp Paul Merrick Potter, Jr.
Holt Buff Grace
Dorrah Lee Nowell, Jr.
Jo Morgan Teague, Jr.
Robert Brewer Williams
Jr.
DEGREES CONFERRED 225 ----------------------------------------------------~
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING
Ernest Lee Joiner, Jr. (with honor)
Walter Herman Kleven (with honor)
Woodrum Elliott Woolwine (with honor)
Lamar Edgar Binion David Sloan Lewis, Jr.
John William CurrY John Vincent Norton
Donald Roger Eastman, Jr. Richard Earnhardt Roberts
Thomas Gardner Hill (B. of A.E.) George Elliott Smith
Jerry Hoffer Isaac Anderson Stanton, III
Frederic Charles Jones Alfred Nash Williams
Robert Elwood Lee Alan Milton Y opp
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN GENERAL ENGINEERING
Harmon Scott Tolbert Robert Daniel Ballenger (1938)
William Johnson Underwood Joseph Pitts Byrd, III (1938)
Jaime Alberto Vendrell Benjamin Hill Spurlock, II (1938)
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT
Joseph Edward McKinney (with honor)
Edward Morris Vinson (with honor)
Lester Fauver Anderson, Jr. John Barber Gaston
Herman Bailey Chester Gavin, Jr.
Raymond Gaston Behm J ames William Greene
Oliver McN air Bell J ames Augustus Haynes
Thomas Jacob Berry BerYl Ricky Headrick
Royce Lee Brandon
Ned Howell Brisendine
Mac Hazlehurst Burroughs, Jr.
Henry Williams Bynum
Samuel John Carson
Paul Francis Cosgrove, Jr.
Dick Downing Elliott
Edward Clark Fambrough
Jack Gleason Fleming
Collins Moore Flynt
Timothy McBride Furlow
Edward Burns Irwin
Dan Johnson
Luther Reese Johnson
Roy Theodore Johnson
Thomas Richard Jones
William Clement Lee, Jr.
Archie Robert Lewis
Carl Philip Lindsay
Charles Riggs Long
Charles Raymond Lundy
Harold Lem McCommon
.Oftlclal diploma is withheld untU R.O.T.C. Camp is completed.
226 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
-----------------------------------------------------
Olivette Colby McLean, Jr.
William Marion Miller
William Weatherly Moore
Virgil Wesley Mourning
John Richard Neves, Jr.
Jason Thomas Pate
Jack Brewster Pearce
Eddie Hewlette Pitman
Walter Eugene Pritchard, Jr.
George Taliaferro Rickett
D'Imer Frederick Ridings, Jr.
Lt..On Joseph Rosenberg
Raymond August Seifert
Thomas Fletcher Sims, Jr.
Eugene Branson Slaten
George Boone Smith, Jr.
Ian Fraser Stalker
Joel Franklin Stone
J ames Edward Teaford
William Ashley Verlander
Calvin George Voorhis
F rank Alvin Walker
John Andrew Waltman
David Comfort Watkins
Archie Cowan Watson, Jr.
Robert Lee Watson
Grant Heard Weaver
Edward Benjamin Welch, Jr.
Lewis Alfred Wolf
Oliver Amos Wright
Thomas Richard Allen (1938)
Pat Munroe (1938)
Clement Hugh Renfroe (1938)
Smith Blythe Thomas (1938)
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
Walter Seward Butler, Jr. (with honor)
SCHOLASTIC HONORS AND PRIZES, 1939
Phi Kappa Phi Senior Cup--A. G. Rossow.
Tau Beta Pi Senior Cup--F. T. Waltermire.
Briarean Society Senior Cup-F. T. Waltermire.
J11Ier. Inst. Architects, M edal-A. C. Hudson.
Natl. Assoc. of Cotton Manufact urers, Medal-W. G. Lee.
Cotton Manufacturers of Georgia, M edal-J. A. Stapleton.
Jlpha Chi Sigma Award-W. C. G. Saeman.
Kappa Eta Kappa, Award-R. C. Cheek.
Pi Tau Sigma, Awards-W. L. Shipman, C. C. Davis.
Jm. Inst. Chern. Eng'r., Award-W. C. G. Saeman.
Jm.Illst. Chern. Eng'r., Student Branch, Award-J. H. LaRoche.
Phi Eta Sigma Freshman Cups-B. Masterton, W. M. Pardee.
J. E. Oglethorpe Chapter D. A. C., Award-E. L. Joiner.
Skull and Key Award-J. F. Cook.
Fraternity Scholarship Cup-Sigma N u.
Elected to Phi Kappa P Iti: J. C. Abrams, Jr., W. J. Alfriend, Jr., D. A.
Bragg, Jr., M. M. Cortes, W. G. Coyle, Jr., H. W. Criswell, Jr.,
P. E. Everett, E. R. Flynt, A. Garcia-Tunon, L. D. Geiger, L. J.
Harris, G. O. Haskell, Jr., T. J. Hughes, H. G. Hutchinson, Jr.,
J. C. Jacobs, F. G. Lopez, J. E. McKinney, N. G. McLean, M. G.
Mitchell, C. F. O'Shea, C. S. Perry, Jr., W. M. Pope, A. G.
Rossow, F. R. Short, G. E. Smith, E. M. Vinson, F. T. Waltermire
W. J. Warnock, Dr. D. H. Ballou, Dr. J. H. Howey, Dr. F. H:
Steen, Dr. Paul Weber.
Elected to Tau Beta Pi: W. J. Alfriend, Jr., H. W. Bronson, G. B.
Cauble, H. W. Criswell, Jr., W. C. Dabney, Jr., J. Drew, P. E.
Everett, L. D. Geiger, H. B. Grace, R. M. Griffin, R. S. Haggart,
L. J. Harris, G. O. Haskell, Jr., T. J. Hughes, H. G. Hutchinson,
Jr., J. c. Jacobs, V. W. Johnson, E. L. Joiner, E. B. Kneisel, H. M.
Lange, J. H. LaRoche, W. G. Lee, Jr., T . M. Manley, W. N. Mc
Gough, N. G. McLean, M. G. Mitchell, J. L. Nunes, C. F. O'Shea,
C. S. Perry, C. E. Person, W. M. Pope, J. B. Press, A. G. Rossow,
E. L. Scanling, G. E. Smith, W. D. Stroud, J. B. Stubbins, J. M.
Teague, Jr., W. G. Thrash, F. T. Waltermire, D. B. Williams,
S. Yabrow, A. P. Yundt, H. S. Bandy (June, 1940), W. F. Bennett
(June, 1940).
Winners of Gold "T" 1939: W. F. Bennett, H. W. Bronson, Jr.,
J. Drew, C. D. Flanigen, III, F. B. Gailey, L. B. Gay, R. M.
Griffin, J r., R. S. Haggart, J r., I. Hornstein, M. Klein, E. B.
Kneisel, J. H. LaRoche, J. W. Lemon, R. B. Levin, F. G. Lopez,
J. L. Nunes, W. C. G. Saeman, H. S. Saffir, E. L. Scanling, J. B.
Stubbins.
[227 ]
ACCREDITED HIGH SCHOOLS, GEORGIA LIST, 1939
NOTE :-A star before the name of the school indicates that it h
been placed on the Southern List of Accredited Schools as well as ~s
Group I of the Georgia list. Group I represents the best schools in teac~~
ing staff, equipment of l.abhoratory, library, and building. Group II rep_
resents those schools whlc do not meet all of the standards required for
Group I. _
Abbreviations: . Ac., Acade~y; C., Conso.lidated; Co., County; Com.,
Commerce; H., High; In., Institute; Pr., Private; S., School; Sem., Sem_
inary. The expression "High School" is understood where the name of
the town only is given.
Schools for girls only are omitted from this list.
Abbeville, I
Acworth, I
Adairsville, II
* Adel: Sparks-Adel, I
Adrian, I
Alamo: Wheeler Co., I
Alapaha, II
*Albany, I
Alma, I
Alpharetta, I
Alvaton, II
Ambrose, II
* Americus, I
Anthony, I
Appling: Leah, II
* Arlington, I
Arnoldsville, II
*Ashburn, I
*Athens, I
Atlanta:
*Boys H. S., I
Com. H. S., I
*Fulton H. S., I
*Marist, Pr., I
*N. Fulton, I
Peacock S., Pr., II
*Tech H. S., I
*Univ. S., Pr., I
*W. Fulton, I
Attapulgus, II
Augusta:
*Richmond Ac., I
Austell, II
Avera, II
Avondale, I
Baconton, II
*Bainbridge, I
M t. Pleasant, II
Pine Hill, II
Baldwin, I
Barnesville:
*Gordon In., I
Barney, II
Bartow, I
Barwick, I
Baxley, I
*Blackshear, I
Blairsville, I
*Blakely, I
Union H. S., II
*Blue Ridge, I
Bluffton, II
*Blythe, I
Bogart, II
Bonaire, I
Boston, I
Bostwick, II
Bowdon, I
Bowman, I
[228 ]
Braselton, I
Bremen, I
Bridgeboro, II
Brinson, II
Bronwood, I
Brooklet, II
Broxton, II
Brunswick:
*Glynn Ac., I
Buchanan, II
Buena Vista, I
*Buford, I
Butler, I
Byromville, II
Byron, I
Cadwell, II
Cairo, I
*Calhoun, I
Sonoraville, II
*Camilla, I
Hopeful C. S., II
*Canton, I
*Carrollton, I
*Cartersville, I
Carnesville:
Franklin Co., I
Cassville, II
Cave Spring, I
*Cedartown, I
ACCREDITED HIGH SCHOOLS 229
*Chamblee, I Dacula, II
Chatsworth, I Dahlonega, II
Chattanooga Valley, II Dallas, I
Chauncey, I *Dalton, I
Chester, II Valley Point, II
*Chickamauga, I Damascus, II
Chipley, I Danburg, II
Clarkston, II Danielsville:
Clarksville, I Madison Co., I
*Claxton, I Danville, II
Clayton: Darien, II
Rabun Co. H. S., I Davisboro, II
Clermont: Chatta- ?Dawson I
hoochee Ac., Pr., I Dawson~ilIe, II
Cleveland, I Dearing, II
Climax, II *Decatur, I
Clyattville C. S., II S. W. DeKalb, II
*Cochran, I Demorest, II
Cohutta, II Diffie:
Colbert, II W. Bainbridge, II
College Park: Dixie, I
*Ga. Mil. Ac., Pr., I Doerun, I
Richardson, II Donaldsonville II
Collins, II *Douglas, I '
*Colquitt, I Douglasville, I
Columbus ?Dublin, I
*High School, I Dudley, II
Jordan H. S., I Duluth, II
Comer, I
.Commerce, I
Concord, I
*Conyers, I
Coolidge, II
*Cordele, I
Cornelia, I
*Covington, I
Livingston, II
Crawford, II
Crawfordville:
Stephens In., I
Cumming, I
Cusseta, I
*Cuthbert, I
EastonolIe:
*Stephens Co., I
Eastman, I
East Point:
*Russell H. S., I
*Eatonton, I
Edison, I
*Elberton, I
Centerville, I
Nancy Hart S., II
Rock Branch, II
Ellaville, I
Ellijay: Gilmer Co., I
Elmodel, II
Emory Univ.:
*Druid Hills, I
Enigma, II
Epworth Sem., Pr., II
*Evans C. S., I
F ace ville, II
Fairburn:
Campbell H. S., I
Fairmount, II
Fayetteville, I
*Fitzgerald, I
Flowery Branch, I
Folkston, I
Forrest Park, -II
Forsyth, I
*Fort Gaines, I
"'Fort Valley, I
Franklin:
Heard Co., II
Centralhatchee, II
Franklin Springs, II
*Gainesville, I
*Riverside Ac., Pr., I
Airline, I
Lyman Hall, I
River Bend, II
Garfield, II
Gay-Oakland, II
Georgetown, I
Gibson, I
Gillsville, II
Girard, I
Glenville, I
Glenwood, II
Good Hope, II
Gordon, I
Gore, II
Grantville, I
Graves, I
Gray, I
Grayson, II
*Greensboro, I
230 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
---------------------------------------------------------
Greenville, I
*Griffin, I
Spalding Co., I
Guyton, I
Hahira, I
Hamilton, I
Mountain Hill, II
Hampton, I
Harlem, I
*Hartwell, I
*Hawkinsville, I
Hazelhurst, I
*Hepzibah, I
Hiawassee:
Towns Co., I
Hilltonia, II
Hinesville:
Bradwell In., II
Hilton C. S., II
Hiram, I
Hoboken, II
*Hogansville, I
Homer: Banks Co., II
Homerville, I
Ideal, II
Ila, I
Irwinton:
Wilkinson Co., II
*Jackson, I
Jakin, II
Jasper: Pickens Co., I
Jefferson:
Martin In., I
Jeffersonville:
Twiggs Co., I
Jersey, II
*Jesup: Wayne Co., I
Jonesboro, I
Kibbe
Montgomery Co., II
Kingsland, II
Kite, II
*Metter, I
Midville, II
Milan, II
LaFayette, I Milledgeville:
*LaGrange, I *Ga. Mil. ColI., I
Rosemont, II *Millen, I
Lakeland, Lanier Co., I Milner, I
Lakemont, I Molena, II
Lake Park, II *Monroe, I
*Lavonia, IN. Walton, I
*Lawrenceville, I *Montezuma, I
Leesburg, I *Monticello, I
Leslie: Union, I Moreland, II
Lexington: Morgan, I
Meson Ac., II Morganton, I
Lincolnton, I Morven, I
Lithonia, I *Moultrie, I
Logansville, I Mount Berry:
*Louisville, I *The Berry S., Pr., I
Ludowici, I *Mount Vernon: Brew_
Lula, II ton Parker In., Pr., I
Lumber City, II Mt. Zion Sem., Pr., I
Lumpkin: Mystic, II
Stewart Co., I
Lyerly H. S., II
Lyons, I
Macon:
*Lanier, I
*Madison, I
*Manchester, I
Manor, II
Mansfield, I
*Marietta, I
R. L. Osborne, II
Marlow, I
Marshallville, II
Maxeys, II
Mayesville, I
McDonough, I
McRae-Helena, I
Workmore, II
Meigs, I
Menlo, II
Nahunta, II
N ashville, I
Naylor, II
Nelson , II
Newington, II
*Newnan, I
Newton, II
Nicholls, II
Nicholson:
Benton, II
Norcross, I
*N orman Park
Pr., I
Oak Park, II
Oakwood, II
Ochlochnee, I
Ocilla, I
Odum, II
*Oglethorpe, I
In.,
ACCREDITED HIGH SCHOOLS 231
-------.------------------------------
Omega, II
Oxford:
*Emory Ac., Pr., I
Palmer-Stone, II
Parrott, I
Patterson, II
Pavo, II
Pearson, I
Pr., I
Model School, I
Coosa, II
Roopville, II
Rossville, I
Lakeview H. S., I
Royston, I
Rutledge, II
*Pelham, I Sale City, II
Pembroke: Sandersville, I
Bryan Co., I Sardis, I
*Perry, I Sasser, I
Pinehurst, II Sautee:
pineview, I N ac. Valley, II
Pitts, I *Savannah, I
Plains, I *Benedictine, Pr., I
Portal, II Screven, II
Porterdale, II Senoia, I
powder Spgs., II *Shellman, I
John McEachern, II Shiloh, II
Preston, II Smithville, I
Pulaski, I Smyrna, I
*Quitman, I
Rabun Gap:
*Rabun Gap-N ac.,
Ray City, II
Rebecca, II
Register, II
Reidsville, II
Rentz, II
Reynolds, I
Rhine, II
*Richland, I
Ringgold, II
Roberta, I
Rochelle, I
Rockmart, I
Rockingham, II
Rocky Ford, II
*Rome, I
*Darlington Ac.,
Fitzhugh Lee, II
Snellville, II
Social Circle, I
Soperton, I
I Sparta, I
Springfield, I
Stapleton, II
Statenville, II
*Statesboro, I
Nevils, II
Statham, II
Stilmore, I
Stilson, II
Stone Mountain, I
Summertown, II
*Summerville, I
Summit:
Emanuel Co., I
Sumner, II
Surrency, II
*Swainsboro, I
Sycamore, I
*Sylvania, I
Jackson, II
Sylvester, I
Talbotton, I
*Tallapoosa, I
*Tallulah Falls, I
*Tate, I
Taylorsville, II
Temple, II
*TenniIle, I
*Thomasville, I
Thomaston:
*R. E. Lee In., I
*Thomson, I
*Tifton, I
Tignall, I
Toccoa Falls In., II
*Toccoa, I
Toomsboro, II
Trenton: Dade Co. , I
Trion, I
Tucker, II
Turin: Starr, I
Unadilla, II
Union Point, I
*Valdosta, I
*Vidalia, I
Vidette, I
Vienna, I
Dooly Co. H. S., II
Villa Rica, I
Wadley, I
Waleska:
Reinhardt Ac.,
Pr., II
Waresboro, II
*Warrenton, I
Warwick, I
*Washington, I
232 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
Watkinsville, I
Waverly Hall, II
*Waycross, I
W acona, I
*W aynesboro, I
Ways C. S., I
Western, II
West Green, II
*West Point, I
Whigham, II
White Oak:
N. Camden, I
Whitesburg, II
Willacoochee, I!
*Winder, I
Winterville, I
Woodbury:
*Meriwether Co., I
Woodcliff:
Bay Branch H. S.,I!
Woodland, I
*Wrens, I
Wrightsville, I
-
Yatesville, II
*Young Harris, Ac.,
Pr., I
Zebulon, I
ALPHABETICAL ROLL-1939-40
ABB"RBVIATlONS: A- Architecture; AE-Aeronautical Engineering'
Ch_Chemistry; ChE-Chemical Engineering; Cer E-Ceramic Engi~
neering; CE-Civil Engineering; Co-Co-ops in Engineering ; E- Elec
trical Engineering; En-Engineering unclassified ; G--Graduate stu
dents; GE-General Engineering; 1M-Industrial M anagement ; M
Mechanical Engineering ; PHE-Public Health Engineering; T-Tex
tile Engineering; 5-AE-Fifth year Aeronautical Engineering; 5-A
Fifth year Architecture; I rr-Irregular. The numeral preceding the
abbreviation indicates the class year of the student.
Students whose names are printed in Italic type and starred rank in
the highest ten per cent and constitute the honor rolls of their respec
tive classes.
*Jarons, Leroy Albert ....................... .1 En .................................... Savannah
*Jbbey, Ted Ha1Tis ........................... .3 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Abelson, Herbert Marcus ............... .2 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Abercrombie, Milton Bewley .......... 2 M .............................. Bristol, Tenn.
Abislaiman, Alberto Laura ............. .3 E .............................. Havana, Cuba
Adair, Glenn ..................................... .2 1M ..................................... .Atlanta
Adams, Alfred Bernard ................... .2 ChECo ............ St. Petersburg, Fla.
Adams, Edward Bowie ................... .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Adams, John Phillips, J r .................. .1 En .......................... Columbia, S. C.
*Jdams, Jack Wilhite ....................... .2 ChE .................................... Tignall
Adams, James William ................... .2 CE ...................................... Atlanta
Adams, Samuel Fred ........................ 2 E .................................... Cedartown
Adams, Samuel J ohn ....................... .2 1M .................................. Columbus
Addison, William Porter, Jr ........... 5 TCo .................................. Rossville
Addy, James Bowden ....................... .5 A ........................................ Decatur
*Jderhold, Robert .............................. 3 IM .................................. East Point
Aebersold, Robert Charles .............. 3 ChE .................................... Atlanta
Aenchbacher, Arthur Eugene ......... .2 GE ...................................... Atlanta
Aenchbacher, Hubert Elmore, J r .. .2 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Ahern, Lawrence Richard, Jr......... G-ChE .............. Bridgeport, Conn.
Aiken, George Arnold ..................... .3 M .................................... Newborn
Aiken, Hobert Wilt .......................... 2 A. ........................... Asheville, N. C.
*Jizpuru, Joe ..................................... .1 En ................................ Tampa, Fla.
Albert, Joseph .................................... 4 CerE .................................... Metter
Alderman, Robert Gordon ............. .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Aldred, Richard Frank ..................... .2 E .................................... Statesboro
Aldrich, Clare Aaron ....................... .5 MCo .......... Oglethorpe University
Alford, George Jefferson, J r ........ .1 En ................................ Silver Creek
Algeo, Robert Franklin ................... .3 1M ...................... Henryetta, Okla.
Alhadeff, Charlie ............................. .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
[233 ]
234 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY REGISTER OF STUDENTS 235
-
Allcorn, Frank Walter .................... 3 1M ...................................... Atlanta
*Allen, Arnold Benjamin .................. ! En ...................... New York, N. y
* A lien, A [bert J oseph ......................... .1 En ........................................ Atlant~
Allen, Carson Seymour .................... 2 M .?.? ............... ? .................... Atlanta
Allen, Dale TreadwelL. ................... 2 M ........................................ Atlanta
Allen, Grover Cleveland ................. .2 ChE. ....................... Biltmore, N. C.
Allen, George J ackson ................... .4 ChE .................................. Savannah
* A lien, fam es Roy ......... .................... .1 En ........................ Ontario, Canada
Allen, Robert Lewis.......................... G-M .................................... Atlanta
Allen, Robert Stuart........................ Irr ........................................ Atlanta
* Allen, Samuel D oyle .......................... ! En .................................... Savannah
Allen, Thomas Bostwick ................. .2 1M ............... ; .................... Savannah
Allen, Thomas James, J r ................ .1 Co ........................................ Atlanta
* Allison, fames Robert ..................... .2 GE ...................................... Atlanta
Allred, Larry Phillip ........................ } En .................... Bryson City, N. C.
Almand, Charles Frederick ............. .2 A .......................................... Atlanta
Almand, Henry Grady, J r .............. .2 1M ......... :? ...... ? ..... ?? ............. Atlanta
Almand, Paul Edward ..................... J 1M ........................................ Macon
Almand, Richard Henry, J r ............ .1 Co ........................................ Atlanta
Almon, Samuel Loring ..................... .2 ChECo .............. Birmingham, Ala.
Alonzo, Dominguez Bernardo ....... .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Alsobrook, Benjamin Russ .............. 5 MCo .................... Tallahassee, Fla.
Altobellis, Julian Arthur ................. .3 A .......................................... Atlanta
Armstrong, Hugh Humphrey ......... .2 MCo ................................ Savannah
Armstrong, James HaL. ................ .3 MCo .................................. Atlanta
Armstrong, Law Lamar .................. l En .................................. Selma, Ala.
Armstrong, Morris Warren ........... .! En ........................................ Atlanta
Arnold, George Moore .................... l En ................................ N orfolk, Va.
Arnold, Julian, J r ............................ .2 TCo ............................ DouglasviIle
Arnold, Johnnie John Robert .......... 2 E ............................ Baldwyn, Miss.
Arnold, Lacy Hyman ........................ ! En .................................... Norwood
Arnold, Robert EarL. ....................... 5 ECo ?? ................................ N orwood
Arnold, Roy Madison ..................... .3 1M .................................. Norwood
Arrendale, Thomas Augustus, J r .. .1 Co .......................................... Tiger
Arthur, Harry Baker ........................ 2 1M ...................................... Albany
Arthur, Harry W allace .................... l En .......................... Salisbury, N. C.
Arthur, William Hayne, Jr ............. } En .......................... Asheville, N. C.
Ashbaugh, Bernard David ................ 4 M .............................. Clarkton, Mo.
Ashby, William Bacon ...................... 4 M .................................. Miami, Fla.
Ashe, Henry Byron ........................... .1 En .......................... Stone Mountain
* A thearn, Mitchell Lee ...................... 2 E .......................................... Atlanta
Attanas, John George ........................ 3 ChECo ............ Ulster Park, N. Y.
Atwell, Locke .???.?.? ............................ 1 En .................................. SeIma, Ala.
Augustine, David CarL. .................. .3 E. ......................... J acksonviIle, Fla.
*Austin, William Raymond ............... .! En .................... Wallingford, Conn.
* Averett, f ack M onroe ...................... 3 E ...................................... Columbus
Altsheler, Joe .................................... 1 En ........................ Hopkinsville, Ky.
Amiguet, Carlos ............................... .2 A .............................. Havana, Cuba
Avery, William Homer ................... .! En ........................................ Atlanta
*Awtrey, Robert King, fr ?................ } En .................................... Marietta
Amiguet, Rene Louis ....................... .2 A .............................. Havana, Cuba Aycock, Benjamin Jackson .............. } 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Andel, Henry Leroy ......................... .! 1M .................................... Lithonia
Anderson, Arnold McCord ............. .4 CECo ................ Lewisburg, Tenn.
Aycock, William Lawrence ............. .3 GE. ..................... Lincolnton, N. C.
Ayres, Marion J ordan ..................... .1 En ...................................... Decatur
Anderson, Bert CeciL. ..................... 2 M ........................................ Atlanta
Anderson, Crawford Sharpe, J r ..... 3 M ...................................... Decatur
Ayres, Noble Brawnson .................. 3 E .......................................... Atlanta
Bachler, Dudley Francis .................. 4 A .......................................... Atlanta
Anderson, John Englebert, J r ....... ..4 E .................................. Tampa, Fla.
Anderson, Raymond Albert ............. .2 GE. ................... Woodstock, Conn.
Badal, Michael J onathan ............... .1 En .......................... Elizabeth, N. J.
Baggarly, Olin J oseph ..................... .2 M ........................................ Atlanta
Anderson, Richard Clement ............ 4 M ........................................ Atlanta *Bagwell, Charles Ernest ................. .! En ........................................ Toccoa
Anderson, Thompson GulL ........... .! IM .............. Mount Hope, W. Va.
Andrews, Charles F ort ................... .2 E .......................................... Macon
Andrews, James Thomas ............... .2 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Anthony, James Thaddeus, Jr ........ .! IM ...................... So. Orange, N. J.
Bailey, Bruce Shaw .......................... 3 ChE ...................... Houston, Texas
Bailey, Paul Baxter .......................... 3 MCo .................................. Augusta
Bailey, Ray Eugene ......................... .3 T ................................ Hixson, Tenn
Baird, Harry Sifton .......................... 2 M ........................................ Atlanta
* Apple, Lee Saylor ............................. .! Co ............................ N atchez, Miss.
Archer, Derrek Stuart ..................... .2 M ............................................ Rome
*Argo, Wesley Breeden ..................... .2 ChECo .................. .......... Americus
Argudin, Bernardo ManueL. ......... ! En .. : ....................... San Juan, Cuba
Arias, George Anthony ................... .2 M ........................ Camaguay, Cuba
Baker, William Lisman ................... .2 M ........................ Tallahassee, Fla.
Baldini, Gino Joseph ....................... .2 ChECo .................. Princeton, N. J.
Baldwin, Lee Guerry ....................... .2 E .......................................... Atlanta
Bales, Gerald Roach ....................... .2 M .......................... Park City, Utah
*Ballard, Wiley Perry ....................... .3 ChE .................................... Winder
Armistead, Walter Moore ............. .! 1M ...................................... Atlanta Ballengee, Carl Benton .................. ..4 CECo ............ Huntington, W. Va.
Armstrong, Arthur Morgan ............ 2 1M ...................................... Atlanta Bandy, Elmer Griffin ....................... .4 ECo ............................ Sanford, Fla.
236 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
--
REGISTER OF STUDENTS 237 -----------------------------------~
Bannister, John Murfin .................... 1 En ....................................... .Atlanta
Baran, Victor Joseph Roman .......... 3 ChECo .................. Stamford, Conn
Barfield, Howa~d Pen~ington .......... 2 M .................................. Ft. Bennin~
Barfield, MarvlO Damel... .............. .2 ChECo ............................ Louisville
Barge, Otis Alvin, Jr .............. , ....... .3 A .......................................... Atlanta
Barker, Charles William. ............... 2 E. ........................... Columbia, S. C.
Barkovitz, Abraham Baruch ............ 4 ChE. ............................... Hayti Mo
Barnard, Alfred ................................ G-Ch ........................ Skyland, N. C:
Barnard, Grandy Bernard, J r ........ .2 E .......................... Clarksdale, Miss.
Barnes, Larry Benton ..................... .2 T .................... Chattanooga, Tenn.
Barnett, William Halbert ................ 4 A ........................ Petersburg Tenn
Barney, Guy Hiram, Jr .................. .1 En .............. West Hartford: Conn:
Barouch, Robert ................................ ! En ...................... New York, N. Y.
Barrett, Pleasant Warren ............... .1 Co ........................................ Atlanta
*Barrett, Robert Curtis 2 ChE. ............... St. Petersburg, Fla.
Barrow, James Eliott... ................... 3 M .................................... Matthews
Bartha, Steve ..................................... .4 M .... Sea Cliff, Long Island N Y
Bartlett, Joseph Straley ................... .3 IM ....................... .Asheville,' N: C:
Barton, Hugh Hester ..................... .2 E .............................. Williston, Fla.
Bassett, Lyman Earle ..................... .1 Co .................................. Cedartown
Bastedo, Charles Wesley ................. .1 En .................. West Orange, N. J.
Batchelor, Emory Nix ...................... 3 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Bates, Charles Holt, Jr ................... 4 ECo ...................... Nashville, Tenn.
Bates, Charles Richard. .................. .2 IM ........................ St. Elmo, Tenn.
Batson, John Harry ........................ 4 CECo ................ Lumberton, Miss.
Batton, Richard Hardy ............ : ....... l En ........................................ Macon
Bell, Carl Hamilton ........................ 2 1M .................................... Decatur
Bell, Harry Sanders, J r .................. .1 En ...................................... Elberton
Bell, James Franklin, J r ................ .1 En .................................... East Point
Bell, John Oliver.. ............................ 2 IM ............ San Juan, Puerto Rico
Bell, J. Thomas, Jr ......................... 2 CE. ......................... Live Oak, Fla.
Bell, Warren Burke ........................ 4 E .................................... Hephzibah
*Beller, William Sterne ................... .3 M ............ Woodmere, L. I., N. Y.
Bellows, Rembert Pressley .............. l Co ...................................... Decatur
*Benator, Josiah Victor ...................... l 1M ..................................... .Atlanta
Bennet, William Baker .................... 3 ChECo .............................. Cordele
Bennett, Charles Elias .................... 2 E ........................ Greensboro, N. C.
*Bennett, William Francis.. .............. 4 M ................................ Dothan, Ala.
Benton, William Addison 111 ........ 2 M ........................ J acksonvilIe, Fla.
Berg, Harold...................................... G-CE ................................ Decatur
Bergen, William Petty .................... l A ...................................... Savannah
Bergstrom, Andrew RusselL .......... 2 GE ..................................... .Atlanta
Brrnard, William Bekker................ G-E .................................. Marietta
Bernardo, Everett.. ............................ 2 M ................................ Tampa, Fla.
Bernstein, Bertram Philip ................ 2 CE. ....................... Brooklyn, N. Y.
Berry, Charles Clymer .................... 3 1M ...................... Harriman, Tenn.
Berry, Charles Kinsel... .................. .2 E .: .................................... Columbus
Berry, David Randolph ................... .3 M .......................................... Rome
Berry, Gordon Chalmers ................ l Co ....................................... .8myrna
Berry, Maynard Lee ........................ 4 E ......................................... .Atlanta
Berry, Preston Etheredge ................ l IM .............................. Norfolk, Va.
Berry, Paul Trawick ....................... .1 En .................................... Columbus
Bawer, Leon 1.. ................................. 1 En .................... Miami Beach, Fla. Berry, Ralph Marion. ...................... .4 ChE ................................... .Atlanta
Bayer, Joseph Thomas, J r ............... 3 E .......................... N ashville, Tenn. Berry, Reuben Mastin, J r .............. .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Bayliss, Alfred Wettermark ............ 3 M ....................................... .Atlanta
Bazemore, William Sanders ............ l En .................................... Waycross
Beals, John Clarence ........................ 3 IM .................... St. Augustine, Fla.
Berry, Walter Lee ............................ 1 Co ............................ Bessemer, Ala.
Bestor, George Clinton .................... 4 IM .......................... Clewiston, Fla.
Bethea, Charles Fuller ................... .l Co ....................................... .Atlanta
Beals, John Thomas ....................... .3 IM ...................... J acksonville, Fla. *Bethune, John Lee, Jr .................... .1 En ....................................... .Atlanta
Beard, William Roane ................... .4 1M ..................................... .Atlanta Bethune, Manning Kirk .................. S MCo .................................... Macon
Beaumariage, George Nestor, J r ... 3 ChECo .................. Bridgeville, Pa. Beutell, Joe Marion, Jr ................. 3 1M .............................. Thomasville
Beaumont, Walter Albert.. ........... .3 1M ...................................... Atlanta *Bier, John William .......................... 1 IM ................ Webster Grove, Mo.
Becht, Robert Edward .................... 2 M ........................................ Atlanta Biggers, William Pease, J r ............. 2 1M .................................... Decatur
Beck, William Elmo ........................ 3 ECo .................................. Savannah
Becker, Harold Martin ................... .1 En .......................... Norwich, Conn.
Biggerstaff, Edward Daniel, Jr ....... 5 MCo .................... Memphis, Tenn.
Billias, Mike George ........................ 3 ChECo .......... Daytona Beach, Fla.
*Bedinger, Walton Everett, Jr ......... 3 CE .................................... Savannah Billups, James Otis .......................... 4 GE .............................. Norfolk, Va.
Beers, Robert EarL .......................... 4 1M .................................... Newnan Bindewald, William Joseph ............ 1 En ....................................... .Atlanta
Beeson, Henry DeWitt .................... 2 IM .............. Winston-Salem, N. C. Birch, Walter Ellis ......................... .1 Co ........................................ Macon
Behen, John Plank ............................ 2 M .......................... Cloverport, Ky. Bird, John Dexter ............................ 3 M ........................................ Metter
Belcher, Clarence Edward .............. 2 CE ...................................... Atlanta
*Belcher, Charles Luther, Jr........... Irr ...................................... Atlanta
Bird, William Edward Stockton ... .1 A ........................ Worcester, Mass.
Bird, William Wiley ....................... .1 En ............................ , ......... Valdosta
238 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY REGISTER OF STUDENTS 239
Birdsall, John WilbuL. ................... 4 CE ...................................... Decatur
Birdsall , Paul Everett ...................... 3 M ....................... ............... Decatu
B~rnn, Richard Roland ................... .2 M .................. Maxwell Field, Ala~
Blssinnar, Robert Eugene ................ 2 E ........ ?.?? .......... ?? .................. Atlanta
Bivans, Ernest Walter .................... 2 ECo ??????????????????????????.??? ........ Macon
Black, Donald Miller ...................... 2 Ch ....................... .] acksonville FI
E ' L Black, Eugene, Jr ............................. 3 ........................ New York, N. Y
Black, Farish Cleveland ................. .2 ChE .................................... Atlant~
*Black, H enry Simon ........................ 4 ECo .................................. Americus
Blackman, John Berkley .................. 2 A. ......................... Darlington, S. C
*Blackshear, Perry Lynnfield ........... .! En ........................................ Atlant~
Blackwell, Samuel Hoyte, J r ........ .1 En .................................... Columbus
Blair, Floyd Franklin ..................... .2 E ???????????????????????? .... ??? ............. Tifton
Blank, John J ackson ........................ l En .................................. Silvertown
Blanton, Eugene Talmadge ........... .2 E ...................................... Talbotton
Blanton, Leonard Lewis.................. G-Ch ...................... LaFayette, Ala.
Blaylock, William (Billy) Henry . .1 En .............................. Dallas, Texas
Bliss, William CoghiIL .................. .4 M .............................. Fairfield, Ala.
Block, Daniel ................................... .! En .......................... Brooklyn, N. Y.
Blount, George Chisolm ................. ) En ??????? .. ? .. ??? .. ? .. ???.? ............... Atlanta
Bowden, Hugh Woodruff ................ 4 1M ...................................... Atlanta
*Bower, Harry Carlyle .................... 4 ChE .................................. Shellman
Bowles, Homer Reuben, J r ............ .1 Co ............... ............................... Gay
Bowles, Paul J ames ........................ 1 En ............................ Richmond, Va.
Bowman, J ames Henry ................... .2 M ...................................... Decatur
*Boyer, Floyd Jam es.. ........................ 4 M ............................ Billings, Mont.
Bozeman, John Woodrow ............... ,3 E. ................. Cristobal, Canal Zone
Bracey, John Alston ........................ l A ................................ Thomasville
Bracey, Richard MonseL. ............... 2 E .................................. Thomasville
Braddy, Minton Venner.. ................ 2 A .......................................... Atlanta
Bradford, Jack Charles ................. .l 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Bradley, Joe Alexander ................... ,] E .......................................... Buford
Bradley, William Thomas .............. l Co ............................ Aliquippa, Pa.
Branch, Bill Osley ........................... .! 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Branch, J ohn ...................................... 4 ChE .................................. Sale City
Brandon, David Langley .................. 2 M ................................ Thomasville
Brannen, Francis Mather.. ............. .4 ChECo ............................ Savannah
Braun, Edwin Erich ........................ l En .................................... Savannah
Bray, Robert Wells .......................... 2 M .......................... Cheshire, Conn.
Brennan, William Johnson............ G-Ch .......................... Sumter, S. C.
*Blumberg, Marvin William ............ 4 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Bobbitt, Russell Edwin .................... 4 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Bretz, Richard Harris ...................... 4 ChE ............................ College Park
Brewton, Joseph Cleveland ............ l Co .................................... Savannah
Boccieri, Stephen Vincent.. ............. .2 M .......................... Brooklyn, N. Y.
Bodenheimer, Louis Charles .......... 3 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Boeckman, Thomas Vaughan .......... l Co ...................................... Augusta
Boggus, Jewell HilL. ....................... l 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Bohannon, Charles P ....................... 4 MCo .............................. Moreland
Bohannon, Jack HaL. ..................... 4 ECo .................................... Atlanta
Brick, Meyer ...................................... 3 E ................................ Marion, Ark.
Bridges, Fred Thomas, Jr ............... 2 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Bridges, Howard Leon, J r ............... 3 M ........................................ Atlanta
Bridges, Robert Berner.. .................. 2 CerE .................................... Albany
Bridges, Thomas Elisha .................. 2 PhE .......................... Anniston, Ala.
Brinkman, Richard Orme ............... .3 1M ........................................ J asper
Bohannon, Sam Bailey ...................... 3 M ........................................ Atlanta Brinson, Robert Schley .................... 3 ECo ................................ Columbus
Bohannon, William Dooly, Jr ......... l Co .................................... Moreland Bristol, Frank Milton ...................... 2 CerE .................................... Atlanta
Boling, Harry SteeL. ....................... 4 1M ...................................... Atlanta Broach, Raymond Adolph ............... .1 En .......................................... Rome
Bollinger, Everett Richard ............. .2 ChE .................................... Atlanta
Bolton, William Maddox ............... ,3 1M ........................................ Griffin
*Broadwell, James Eugene ............... .2 M ........................................ Atlanta
Brock, Jack Forrest.. ........................ 2 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Boman, James Cleo .......................... l Co .......................................... Chula *Bronson, Horace Williams, Jr ....... 5 ChECo ................................ Macon
Bonn, Robert HallowelL. ............... 4 A ............................ Baltimore, Md. Brooker, James Warren .................. l Co ................................ Tampa, Fla.
*Booker, Forester ................................ l 1M ...................................... Atlanta Brooks, Eugene Estes ...................... 4 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Boor, Lloyd Lowe Schaffer .............. 2 ChE. ................... Cumberland, Md.
Boote, Robert Oscar ........................ 5 ChECo ................ J acksonville, Fla.
Boroughs, Charles William ............ 2 A .......................................... Atlanta
Bosch, Johnnie William .................. l En ........................................ Atlanta
Boswell, Benjamin Clifford, J r ..... 2 ChECo ............................ East Point
Both, Harold ...................................... 4 MCo .................... Brooklyn, N. Y.
Brooks, Grady William, J r ............. 2 M ........................................ Atlanta
Brooks, Lawrence Cornelius.......... G-Ch ................ Washington, D. C.
Brooks, Thomas Price .................... 4 1M ........................................ Macon
Broward, Hoyt Edward .................. 5 MCo .................... J acksonviUe, Fla.
Brown, Daniel Newton .................... l En ........................................ Atlanta
Brown, Heckle Heyward ................ 2 CE .................................. Fitzgerald
Bottenfield, Baird Funk .................. 2 ChE .......................... Fairfield, Ala. Brown, Jesse Carlton...................... G-E .................................... Atlanta
Bounous, Edwin Philip.................... G-AE ...................... Valdese, N. C. Brown, John Shillard ...................... l En ........................... 'Orange, Texas
240 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY REGISTER OF STUDENTS 24!
-------------------------------------------------------~
Brown, John Winston ...................... 1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Brown, Keith Stanley ...................... 5 ChECo ................ Blackfoot, Idaho
Brown, Lucius Lamar ..................... .2 M ........................................ Atlanta
Brown, Paul Woodman .................. 1 En ............................ St. Louis, Mo.
Brown, Thomas Haldane ................ 1 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Brownell, Alfred Wishart... .......... .1 Co .......................... Ft. Meade, Md.
Browning, Leonard Larkin ............ 1 Co .............. Winston-Salem, N. C.
Bruce, James Crawford ................. .1 Co ....................................... .Atlanta
Busbee, Greer Albert, J r ................. 3 CECo ................ Birmingham, Ala.
Bush, Robert Monroe ...................... 2 GE ...................................... Atlanta
Bussey, Carl Winton ....................... .1 En ....................................... .AtIanta
Butler, Doyle Phillips ...................... 4 1M . .................................... Marietta
Butler, Frank Kennedy ................... .2 CE .................................... Savannah
Butler, John Byron ......................... .1 Co .................... Highland City, Fla.
Butts, David Thomas, Jr ................ .3 1M ............................ Milledgeville
Butts, Henry Harvey ..................... .1 En ........................................ Pickard
Bruce, James Yates, J r .................. .1 Co .................................... Savannah
Bruce, Robert Newton ................... .1 Co .......................... Memphis, Tenn.
Bruda, Jack Guild ........................... .1 En ............................ Pensacola, Fla.
Byerley, Thomas Evans .................... 3 M ....................................... .Atlanta
Byrd, Cohen Buster.. ........................ 3 E ...................................... Stillmore
Cacciola, Angelo Walter.. ............... .1 En .................... Long Island, N. Y.
Brumbelow, Lundy Brooks ............. .1 En ....................................... .Atlanta * Caffey, Loch/in Willis.. .................... 2 CE ................................ Ft. Benning
Brumby, John Thomas ................... .1 En .................................... Marietta Ca.hill, James David ........................ 3 1M ........................................ Albany
*Brunson, Bob Curran, Jr ............... 2 MCo ............................ Miami, Fla. Cain, John H ardison ........................ 5 CECo .............................. Savannah
*Bryan, Morris Marion .................... 3 T ...................................... Jefferson Calderon, Frank John ...................... 1 En ...................... New York, N. Y.
Bryant, Charles Weatherly, J r ...... .1 En ........................................ Atlanta Caldwell, Earle Gillespie ............... .2 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Bryson, Harry Sommers .................. 4 ECo ........................................ Rome Caldwell, Lan HarriIL .................. .2 GE ...................... Cramerton, N. C.
Bryson, Rhett Bennett.. .................... 2 GE. ............................. Dothan, Ala.
Buck, Robert EarL ......................... 2 CECo .......................... Tampa, Fla.
Buckner, Howard Albert, J r ......... 2 M ........................................ Atlanta
Bulbin, Frederick Lewis ................. .3 ChECo ........................ Miami, Fla.
*Bull, Frank James.. ......................... .l A. ..................... Chattanooga, Tenn.
Bullock, Richard Gould .................... 4 MCo .................. Birmingham, Ala.
Bunger, John William ...................... 2 M ................................... .LaGrange
Bunn, Giles Featherston, Jr ........... 4 E .................................. Montezuma
*Calhoun, George Milton ................ 3 ChECo ................................ AtIanta
Cameron, Byron Riggs ...................... 4 M .......................... Cranford, N. J.
Camp, James CleIL ........................ .2 CE ........................................ Ellij ay
Camp, Sidney Lamar.. ...................... 2 M .................................... GreenviIIe
Camp, Walker Hiram ..................... .2 ChECo .............................. Sylvester
Campa, Ferdinand Joseph ................ ! Co .......................... Mineola, N. Y.
Campbell, George Bennett.. ............ 1 Co ...................................... Decatur
Campbell, Ian Eugene, J r ............... 2 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Bunn, John Porter.. ........................ 2 MCo ................................... .Atlanta Campbell, John Francis ................... .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Burbach, Charles Richard .............. 2 M .................................. Chicago, Ill. Campbell, John Owen ..................... .3 E .......................................... Atlanta
*Burg, Gerald William ..................... .1 En .............................. Passaic, N. J.
Burgess, Jack ................................... .4 GE ...................................... AtIanta
Campbell, Stephen CampbeIL ....... 2 E .......................................... Atlanta
Campen, Marvin Thomas ................ 5 ChECo ................................ AtIanta
Burkhalter, George Bradley ............ 3 E .............................................. Rome Cann, James Ferris, J r ................... 3 1M .................................... Savannah
Burnes, Hugh Sydnor ..................... .3 T ............................................ Rome Capehart, DeWitt Farris ................ 2 ECo .............................. Rocky Face
Burnet, Robin Grier ........................ 4 GE ....................................... .Athens Capouya, Albert Isaac ...................... 3 ChE .................................... Atlanta
Burnett, Edwin Moore .................... 4 E. ............................. Ft. Oglethorpe Carden, William Thomas ................ 1 IM .................. Chattanooga, Tenn.
Burns, Harold Glen ........................ 4 MCo ...................... Magnolia, Ark. Cargile, Archibald Macdonald ....... .3 E ...................... St. Augustine, Fla.
Burpo, Howard L ............................. 3 IM ................................ Jenkins, Ky. Carl, Robert Arthur.. ...................... 4 M .......................... Springfield, Mo.
Burr, Edward Adrian ..................... .1 Co ................................ Goulds, Fla. Carll, Don Kenneth .......................... ! En .............................. Quantico, Va.
*Burr, Richard K ............................... 4 ChE ........................... .Lincoln, Neb. *Carlson, Allen CarL ........................ 2 M ........................ Montclair, N. J.
Burroughs, Charles Eugene ............ 3 IM ........................ Brandsville, Mo. Carlton, Charles Cofer.. .................. 1 Co ...................... Ducktown, Tenn.
Burroughs, Ike L ............................ .2 CECo .......................... Danielsville Carlyle, Julian Warner.. ................ l Co ........................................ Buford
Burroughs, Sidney Moise ................ 1 1M ..................................... .Atlanta Carmichael, Ben Willingham. ........ .3 ChE .................................... Atlanta
Burroughs, Swinton McIntosh ........ ! En .................................. Brunswick Carmichael, Robert Lyons .............. 2 E .......................................... J ackson
Burt, Frank McAllister ................. .4 MCo .......... No. Birmingham, Ala. Carnes, Charles William ................ 4 ChE .................................. Eastman
Burton, Richard Garnett ................ 2 M ....................................... .Atlanta Carpenter, Albert Pinson ................ 2 CerE ................................... .Atlanta
Burton, Thomas SamueL ................ 1 En .................................... Smithville Carpenter, Clyde Pershing .............. 2 ChECo ...................... MilledgeviIIe
242 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY REGISTER OF STUDENTS 243
Carpenter, Robert Edwin .............. ..4 M ... ?????????????????????? ............... Atlanta
Carran, John Alfred........................ G-AE ????????????????????? ....... ...... Atlanta
Carrigan, Theodore Stuart ............. .2 CE ...................................... Augusta
*Carruthers, Joe Stutz, Jr .............. .! Co .................................. Brunswick
Carson, Alfred Lamar .................... 2 M .............. ?? .. ????? ... .............. Smyrna
*Carter, Charles Faulkner, Jr ........ .! En ......................... ......... East Point
Carter, Edgar Vernon ..................... .3 T ........................... .. ............. Atlanta
Carter, William Joseph IIL ......... .4 GE. ................... Washington, D. C.
Cary, Norman Miller ...................... 3 M ............................ Alexandria Va
Cash, Roy Lamar ............................. .2 M .................................... East Poin~
*Cason, Mac Alfred .......................... 5 A ???????????????????????????? .............. Atlanta
Cassell James RoberL ................... 2 CE. ......................... Baltimore Md Castag~etta, Harold Ignatius, J r .. .1 En ...................... N ew York, N. Y:
Cathey, Vance LeRoy ...................... 1 En ........................................ Atlanta
*Cauble, Gordon B ........................... 5 MCo .................................. Atlanta
Cavenaugh, David ElL. ................... 5 ECo .................................... Atlanta
Cavette, Neil MotL ................... ... .3 IM ........................ Memphis, Tenn.
Caye, William Cassius .................... 1 En ? .. ? .................................... Atlanta
Cely, Tom Loyd, J r ......................... 2 ChECo ............... .} acksonville, Fla.
Center, George Hagood, J r ........... 2 M ........................................ Atlanta
Centorbe, Joseph Kenneth ............ ..4 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Choquette, Roy Francis ................... .3 MCo ............................ Chicago, Ill.
Christian, Arthur Howard ............. .3 ChECo ............................ Columbus
Christian, Raymond Louis .............. 1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Christian, Thomas Richard ............ 5 ECo ................................ Columbus
Chupp, Emmett Warren, J r ........... 1 En .......................................... Sparta
Clapp, Edgar Louis... ...................... .l 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Clapp, Edwin Marcus, J r .............. .4 ChECo .................................. Byron
Clapp, Tim .......................................... 2 M ....................................... Atlanta
Clark, Arthur Henry ..................... .! Co ........................... .Lakeland, Fla,
Clark, Colton Reynolds ................... .2 A ........................................ Decatur
Clark, George Strickland ................ 1 1M ................................ Greenville
Clark, George William .................... l Co .................................. Perry, Fla.
Clark, Jack CampbelL................... G-AE ................................. Atlanta
Clark, John Leonard ....................... .2 IM ...................... Wilmington, Del.
Clark, John Will.iamson .................. 2 GE ...................... Waynesboro, Va.
Clark, Leon Lewls ........................... .2 CerE .............................. Brunswick
Clark, N elm Bayard ....................... .2 M ...................... Washington, D. C.
Clark, Thomas Lansing ................. .2 CE. ....................... Sunburst, Mont.
Clark, William Howard ................. -4 ChE .................................... Atlanta
Clarson, Reuben Ewald, J r ........... --4 CE. ................. St. Petersburg, Fla.
Claussen, Henry Herman ................ 3 CE ...................................... Augusta
Chalenski, Arthur Abdon ............... .3 MCo ................. .} ersey City, N. J.
Chambers, Douglas White ............. .! 1M ............................. .Thomasville
Chambers, James Edwin .................. 2 M ........................................ Atlanta
Chamlee, Charles King ................... .2 CerE .............................. Adairsville
Chambless, Henry Inman ................ 2 PhE ................................ Waycross
*Champion, Ernest Maxwell, Jr .... .! 1M ................................ Brunswick
Chan, Robert EarL ........................ j ChECo ............................ Savannah
Clay, Jim Price ................................ 3 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Cleary, Lawrence Douglas .............. 3 MCo .......................... Nutley, N. J.
Cleaveland, Pitman Boron .............. 1 Co .................................. LaGrange
Cleckley, John Treutlen ................. -4 ECo .................................... Augusta
Clegg, Edward Thomas .................. 2 E. ........................... Belleville, N. J.
Clelland, James RoberL ................. 4 M ........................................ Atlanta
Clemens, Marion Alvin .................... 2 M ............................ Bradenton, Fla.
Chandler, Harold Charles .............. 2 1M ...................................... Atlanta Clements, Richard Lucius ................ 2 M .................................... Troy, Ala.
Chandler, William Raymond .......... 1 En ...................................... N ewnan Cleveland, Giles Patterson .............. 2 T ...................... Spartanburg, S. C.
Chaplin, Beni amin Verner ............. .2 ChE .................................... Atlanta Cliett, Robert Lee ............................ 3 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Chapman, Donald John .................. 3 MCo ........................ Clifton, N. J.
Chapman, Ernest Wilbur ............... A E ........................................ Conyers
Chapman, John Clayton .................. 2 E .......................................... Atlanta
Clift, Jack Thomas .......................... 3 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Cline, Jack Lee, J r ........................... l 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Clinkscales, Robert StewarL ......... .3 E ........ ~ ................................ Atlanta
Chastain, Theron Zolly .................... 2 CECo .......................... Miami, Fla. *Cobb, Columbus Asbury .................. 3 TCo .............................. Cedartown
Cheek, John SewelL ....................... 3 E .................................... Gainesville Cobb, Howell Edward .................... 5 A .......................................... Athens
*Clzeek, Robert Clzase ........................ 4 ECo .................................. Savannah *Cochran, Cleveland Ward .............. 1 Co ........................ J acksonville, Fla.
Cheney, Alfred Montgomery, Jr ... 2 ChECo ...... San Juan, Puerto Rico Cochran, John Lamar ...................... 2 M ........................................ Atlanta
Cheney, Frank Colly ........................ 2M .. ........................................ Atlanta *Cochran, Robert Puette, Jr ............. 3 T .............................. Newton, N. C.
*Clzeney, John William .................... ..4 E .......................................... Macon Codding, Leroy Emerson, J r ........... l En .............................. Keene, N. H.
Cherry, John Wesley ...................... ..4 A .......................................... Atlanta Coe, Albert Pellett, J r ..................... l En .................... Chattanooga, Tenn.
*Childers, George Henry ................. .2 MCo ................ Miami Beach, Fla. Coe, William GranL ..................... .2 ECo ............................ Orlando, Fla.
Chipley, H unter Dixon .................... 2CE. ........................... Lynchburg, Va. Cohen, Sidney .................................... 1 En ........................ Philadelphia, Pa.
Chisholm, Tim Barnard ................. .2 ChECo ....................... .Thomasville Cohn, Richard Gerald ...................... 4 ChECo ............................ Savannah
244 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY REGISTER OF STUDENTS 245
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Coit, Burton Camot, Jr ................. 2 M .......................... Washington P
Coke, John Dunlavy ....................... .2 E. ................................. Guthrie' K a.
Cole, Ben Gaston .............................. 5 ChECo .................... Candler N ~.
Cole, Madison Filmore .................... 3 T .... J ????????????????? ? ??? ??????????????? :M~co~
Coleman, Edward Clarke, J r ......... 3 E. ......................... Coffeeville, Miss.
Coleman, James Edgar .................... 4 1M .................................. Ft. Gaines
*Coleman, William Albert ............... .2 E ................................ Orlando, Fla.
Collier, Henry Latimer ................... .3 1M ???????????? .. ??.?.?.?.? .............. Atlanta
*Collier, Jena Cuthbert II ................ 4 1M ................................ Barnesvme
*Collier, Robert Edward .................. 2 GE. ................... Ft. Worth, Texas
Collins, Harry Floyd ........................ 2 ChECo .............. Birmingham, Ala.
Collins, James Estes ....................... .2 M ...................................... Fairburn
Collins, John Francis ....................... .! En .......................... Bradenton Fla
Collins, Joseph J epson ..................... .2 1M ...................... J acksonville: Fla:
Collins, Jack Wolcott ...................... 2 1M .................................. Doraville
Colvin, Walker Owens .................. ..4 1M ................................ Lincolnton
Combs, Gordon ................................. .5 ChECo .................. Donelson, Tenn.
Comer, Frank Eugene ...................... 1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Commander, Jack Brown ................ 2 M ........................................ Atlanta
Commins, Louis Shelly .................... 3 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Commins, Terrell Drewry .............. 1 En ........................................ Atlanta
*Condon, Jack George ..................... .4 ECo ...................... Freeport N y
Coniglio, Tony .................................. 1 Co ............................... .Tam~a, 'Fla:
Conley, James Owens ...................... 1 En ????????.??.??.? ...................... N ewnan
Conley, Walter Robertson, Jr ....... 4 ChECo ...................... Alamo, Tenn.
Conner, Eldred Allen ..................... 2 ChE ............................ Bartow, Fla.
Conners, Joseph Ellis ..................... 2 E. ..................... Chattanooga, Tenn.
Conoly, James Reese ........................ 1 Co .................................... Sylvester
Conway, Hobart McKinley, J r ..... 4 GE ...................................... Atlanta
Cook, Earl Pope, Jr ........................ .3 E .................................... LaGrange
Cook, Edward Smith, Jr ................ 3 E .......................................... Atlanta
Cook, Henry Grady, Jr .................. .! En ........................................ Atlanta
Cook, Harold Ray ........................... .! En .......................................... Lyerly
Cook, Jack Fulton ........................... .3 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Cook, N. Winston ............................ 1 En .................................. Porterdale
Cook, Oscar Emory .......................... 1 Co .................................. West Point
Cook, Paul Peniston .......................... 1 En ...................................... Newnan
Coppock, Johnstone Lewis ............. .2 CE .................................. Columbus
Corbitt, James Allen ....................... .3 T .................................... Brunswick
*Cork, Spencer Maddox ................... .l Co ........................................ Macon
Corry, J ohn ........................................ 1 En .......................................... Tifton
*Corry, William .1dair ...................... 4 T .................................... Barnesville
Corser, John Fredric. ....................... 2 E ............................ Vienna, Austria
Cosgrove, Dan Brosnan ................... .l A ???????????? ............................. .Atlanta
Cosper, William Roy, Jr ................. 4 M ........................................ Atlanta
Cothran, James Robeson .................. 3 CE ...................................... Atlanta
Cotten, William Warren ................. .3 ChE .................................... Atlanta
Couch, Harold Kennan ................... .3 M ............................ Magnolia, Ark.
Coughlin, Edward James ............... .! Co ............................ Pompano, Fla.
*Counts, William Edward ............... .! En ........................................ Atlanta
Coursen, Lewis Vincent. ................... 3 ChE. ........... Pompton Plains, N. J.
Courter, Ray Dudley ....................... .! En ........................................ Atlanta
Courtney, Chester Carroll, J r ........ .3 1M ...................... J acksonville, Fla.
Couvillon, Richard Edward ........... .! En ........................ Santa Ana, Calif.
Covey, Leland Sumner ..................... .! Co .................. Daytona Beach, Fla.
Covington, Ernest ............................. .2 Ch ........................................ Atlanta
Covington, Wayne Rinehart ........... .3 MCo .................... Longview, Texas
Cowan, Clement Heidt ................... .! En ........................................ Griffin
Cowan, Robert LeRoy, Jr .............. .! En ....................................... .Atlanta
*Cowart, Frank P ?.............................. 4 ECo ................................ Columbus
*Cowles, Albon Chase, Jr ................ .3 M ........................................ Decatur
Cox, Charles DanieL. .................... .2 ChECo .............. Birmingham, Ala.
Cox, DeCarr Covington ................. .2 E ....................................... .v aldosta
Cox, Robert Marion ........................ 1 En .................................... Ft. Gaines
Cox, William BoswelL. ................... 3 GE. ............................... Miami, Fla.
Cox, William Skidmore, II1.. .......... 4 ChE .................................... Atlanta
Coyne, Ernest Sylvester .................... 2 MCo ........................ Croton, N. Y.
Crane, Charles Albert ...................... 1 Co .............................. Quantico, Va.
Crane, Hubert Hammond, 11.. ........ 2 A. ....................... Ft. Worth, Texas
Crang, John Ray, J r ......................... 1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Cranks haw, Lawrence ...................... 2 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Crasnow, Samuel Springer ............. .! En ........................................ Atlanta
Crawbuck, Robert Hulbert .............. 1 En .............................. Passaic, N. J.
Crawford, Julius Patterson ............ 1 Co .......................... Memphis, Tenn.
*Cooley, Jam es Glass ........................ 3 1M .......................... Lawrenceville Crawford, William Bogan ............. .! En ........................................ Atlanta
Coons, Hal, J r .................................. .! Co ................................. .] asper, Ala. *Crocker, Barton Blair ...................... 4 ChECo ................................ Atlanta
*Cooper, Albert Henry ...................... 4 TCo ................................ Columbus Crockett, Stuart Howe .................... 1 Co .......................... Bradenton, Fla.
Cooper, Edward PauL ................... .! Co .................................... East Point Cromartie, George Graham, Jr .... .2 E. ....................... Maplewood, N. J.
Cooper, Robert J ames ..................... .! IM .................. Chattanooga, Tenn. Cromartie, William Douglas .......... 2 CE ...................... J acksonville, Fla.
Cooper, William Henry ................. .2 M ........................................ Augusta Cromer, William Collier .................. 4 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Cope, Claude Lewis .......................... 1 En ............................ Tenafly, N. J. Crook, James Park .......................... 1 1M .......................... Pittsburgh, Pa.
246 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY REGISTER OF STUDENTS 247
-Crosby, Caleb Pickens... .................. .3 1M .................................. Chamblee
Crosby, David Arnold ..................... .1 1M ??????????????????????????? ............. Albany
Crossfield, Robert Hanson .............. 4 M .. ?? .. ?.?????????????? .... ??? ............. Griffin
Crosswell, Horace Alfred ............... .3 1M .??? .. ???.??? ........ ?? ............... Atlanta
Crouch, George Edgar ..................... .2 CECo ??????????????????????.?? ............... Gay
*Crowder, George Anthony .............. 4 CECo .......................... Tampa, Fla.
Crowe, Dewey Edward ................... .3 MCo ............. .Johnson City, Tenn.
*Crowell, Ch ester Arthur .................. 2 A ........................................ Cordele
Crowley, Thomas Spencer.. .............. 3 E .......................................... Atlanta
Cruger, Robert Wight... .................. .1 En ...................................... Decatur
Crumley, Robert Morris .................. 4 1M ...................................... Atlanta
*Crlltchfield, Paul Washington ......... .1 En ...................................... Decatur
*Clldlipp, Charles LaForrester ........ 3 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Culpepper, Richard Lee .................. 4 MCo ................................ Savannah
Culter, William Pace ........................ 2 MCo ........................ Louisville, Ky.
Curley, James Barron ...................... 3 T .................................... West Point
Curry, Charles Birney ...................... 2 A .......................................... Atlanta
*Cllrry, Edwin Francis.. ................... .2 ChECo ...................... Orlando, Fla.
Curtis, Frank Mann ....................... .! En .................. Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
Cushing, Robert Glenn .................... 4 M .................................. Commerce
Czegledi, Charles .............................. 2 M .......................... Paulsboro, N. J.
Daitch, Israel Isadore ...................... 4 T ................................ Waynesboro
Davenport, Merritt BralI... ............ .3 E .......................................... Atlanta
Davidson, George ............................. .3 PHE ........ Port Glascow, Scotland
Davidson, Joe E., J r ........................ .1 En .................................... Ft. Valley
Davidson, Robert Eugene ................ 5 AE ................ Point Pleasant, N. Y.
Davie, Jesse William ........................ 2 ChECo ............ West Blocton, Ala.
*Davie, Marshall C., lr .................... .2 ECo .................. W est Blocton, Ala.
*Davis, Craig Carlton ..................... .3 M ........................................ Atlanta
Davis, Clayton J ay ............................ 3 E ................................ Orlando, Fla.
Davis, Ellis Bostick .......................... 2 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Davis, Edwin Thorpe ...................... 3 M ................................ T ampa, Fla.
Davis, Frank Cox ............................. .2 ChE ................................ Columbus
Davis, Jack Bradshaw ..................... .! IM .................................. East Point
Davis, Joseph Edward ...................... 4 E ........................ Summerton, S. C.
Davis, Joe Ollin ................................ l En .......................... .. ........ Savannah
Davis, Logan Douglas, J r .............. .3 MCo .................... Palm Beach, Fla.
Davis, Louis Elkin ............................ 4 M .......................... Brooklyn, N. Y.
Davis, Robert Leslie ....................... .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Davis, Sidney Leonard ...................... 2 M .................... Atlantic City, N. J.
*Day, Thurman Oscar ...................... 4 MCo .......................... Norfolk, Va.
Deal, Wayman Ray .......................... 3 ECo ............................ Sandersville
Deas, Alvin Rutherford .................. 2 ChE .................................... Atlanta
DeBardelaben, James RusselL.. .... .2 GE ...................................... Atlanta
Dallas, Park Andrew, J r ................. 4 M ....................................... .Atlanta DeBorde, Herbert Douglas ............ l Co .................................... Savannah
Dalton, John Bartlett.. ................... .1 En ........................................ Atlanta deCastro, Jose Fernandez ............... .4 ChE .......................... H avana, Cuba
Dalton, Oscar Davis, Jr ................... 1 1M ................................... .valdosta Decker, Paul Herman, J r .............. .4 1M .................. .......... Laurel, Miss.
Dames, Ralph Joseph, Jr ................. 4 M .......................... Arlington, N. J.
*D'Amico, Edward Alber!.. .............. 3 MCo .................................. Elberton
DeFriece, Frank William, J L_ ...... l En .............................. Bristol, Tenn.
deGive, Louis Philippe .................... 4 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Danforth, Edward C. Bulloch, IlL3 M ...................................... Augusta *Deixler, Laszlo .................................. 4 M .............................. Havana, Cuba
Daniel, Benjamin SewelL.. ............... 3 ChECo ................................ Chipley
Daniel, J ames Fleming, IIL .......... 1 A. ......................... Greenville, S. C.
De} on, Edward William ................ 2 M .................... Short Beach, Conn.
DeLany, Judson William ............... .2 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Daniel, Robert John........................ G-M .......................... Norfolk, Va.
Daniel, William Gray ..................... .2 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Dell, Robert Clifford, J r ................ .l En ...................................... Decatur
Demen:, Edward Houstoun ........... .l En ........................................ Atlanta
Daniel, Zack Fort.. ......................... .2 1M ..................................... .Atlanta deMontmollin, James Mellon ........ 3 ECo ................ ............ Clinton, S. C.
Daniell, Enoch Lonzo ...................... 1 En ........................................ Atlanta Dempster, Malcolm Roscoe ........... .l En ........................................ Atlanta
Daniell, Hampton J ack .................... 4 E ...................................... Villa Rica Dendy, Fred Henry, J r ................... 2 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Daniels, Thomas Jefferson.............. G-ChE ........................ Tatum, Tex. Dennard, John Sanford .................... l En .............................. College P ark
Danna, Dominic ................................ 3 ChE .......................... St. Louis, Mo. Denney, Riley Clyde ........................ l En ............ West Palm Beach, Fla.
Daragan, James C .......................... .2 CE .......................... Danbury, Conn. Dennington, Frank William ........... .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Darby, J ack Watson ........................ 3 1M ...................... J acksonville, Fla. Dennis, John Cobb, Jr .................... .! A .......................................... Macon
Darden, Wilson Partridge ............. .1 En ................................ Hogansville Denson, Lloyd Anson ........................ l En ........................................ Macon
Darrow, George Richard ................ 1 Co .............................. Florence, Ala. *Denton, Frank Lester ..................... .3 ECo ...................................... Macon
Dasher, Benjamin Joseph, Jr ......... G-E ...................................... Macon Denton, J ames Grady ...................... 2 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Daugherty, William Kenneth........ Irr.. ........................ Newbern, N. C. DeShon, Ray Marvin ...................... 3 MCo ............................ St. Joe, Mo.
Daughtry, George W. E. ................ 4 MCoE ................................ Macon Dewey, John Lyons ......................... .3 ChECo ............ St. Petersburg, Fla.
248 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY REGISTER OF STUDENTS 249
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DeWitt, Philip Doddridge .............. 4 M ...................... Panama City FI
Dickinson, William Lawrence ....... .3 M .................... Gatun, Canal' Zo a.
Dickson, Robert RusseIL ............... 1 En .......................... H untsville Al ne
Dieckman, Robert William ............ 2 M ........................ New York 'N y'
gWard, Robert Bascome ................ 2 E ........................................ Dec~tu;
1 lard, Samuel HarweIL ............. .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Dillon, William Emory ................... J En ........................................ Atlanta
Dinkins, Patrick Candler, Jr ........... 2 E .......................................... Atlanta
Dinning, Leslie Fay ......................... .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Divine, Cyrus George ...................... 2 MCo ................................... .Albany
Dixon, Lloyd BonnelL ................... 1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Dodd, Richard Euclid, Jr ................ .3 MCo .................. Lake Wales Fla
Dodd, Robert 0., J r ........................ .l En .......................... Hinton, W. Va'
Dodgen, James Edward .................... 2 ChECo .................... Anniston Ala'
Dodson, Boykin Robinson .............. ..4 IM ...................................... Atlant~
Donlan, John Edmund .................... 1 En .......................... Park Ridge III
Dooley, Ralph Edward .................... 3 MCo .................................... Maco~
Doriot, Henri .................................... 1 Co .............................. Bristol, Tenn
*Dorsey, Sam Erwin ......................... .3 E ................................ College Park
Doss, William NevitL .................. .1 En .......................................... Rome
Doster, Thomas Edwin .................... 4 CE ........................ Lancaster S C
Dougherty, Jack DeLaney .............. 2 1M ...................................... Atl~nt~
Doughty, David Winston ................ 3 MCo .................................. Atlanta
Doyle, Joseph Patrick, J r ............... 3 ECo .................................. Savannah
Dozier, Thomas Calbeck ............... .l En ........................................ Atlanta
Drake, William Oscar ..................... .! Co ................ Scotland Neck N C
Draper, Norman Claflin ................. .l En ........................ Knoxville: T~nn:
*Dressin, Samuel Aaron ................... .l En .......................... Brooklyn, N. Y.
Drew, John ........................................ 5 ChECo ........................ Miami, Fla.
Driscoll, Sidney Porter, Jr .............. .2 1M .................................. Savannah
Drummond, Robert Rhodes ............ 3 M ............................ Stuttgart. Ark.
Ducoffe, Arnold LioneL ................. .! En ...................... Montreal, Quebec
Duggan, John Tanner.. .................... 4 ChE .................................. Warthen
Dukes, Clifton Abraham .................. 2 T ........................................ Decatur
Dukes, James Henderson .............. ..4 CerE .................................. Decatur
Dumas, John Hicks .......................... 2 GE .......................... Talladega, Ala.
Dunaway, Ben Ellis, J r ................... 2 ChECo ...................... Orrville, Ala.
Duncan, Conrad Howard ................ 5 ChECo ............................ Valdosta
Dunn, Harry Wade .......................... 2 MCo .............................. Fitzgerald
Dunn, Merrel RusselL .................. .! 1M .................................. LaGrange
Dunson, Jarrell Ridley, J r ............. 4 T .................................... LaGrange
Duran, Castro Luis Maria .............. 3 T ............................ Colombia, S. A.
Durden, Joseph Crump, Jr ............. 4 ChECo ............................ COlumbus
Durkin, William Vincent ................ 3 M .................................... Savannah
.Dusenbury, Millard R~ese .............. 4 ChE .............................. Brunswick
DuTeil, Claude FranClS .................. 2 CECo .............. Chattanooga, Tenn.
Dutton, Donnell Wayne.................. G-AE ................................. .Atlanta
Duus, Andreas, Jr ........................... 1 Co .............................. Bogota, N. J.
Dye, Harold Anthony ...................... 4 CerE .................................. Atlanta
Dye, William Mercer ...................... 1 A .......................................... Atlanta
Dyes, Alvin Berry ............................ 4 ChECO ............................ Ft. Valley
Dyke, Henry Elmer, Jr .................. .3 E .................................... Selma, Ala.
Dykes, Aubert Cleveland, J r ......... 4 CE ................................ Farmerville
Dykes, Osborne J efferson ............... .3 M ............................ Shreveport, La.
Dzamba, John Robert.. .................... 4 M ............................ Bayonne, N. J.
Eads, Edward LanceloL ................ .1 En ................................ Chicago, Ill.
Eagar, Harry Douglas ..................... .2 ChECo ............ Chattanooga, Tenn.
Eager, George Bruce ........................ 2 M ..................................... ,V aldosta
*Eagleton, Godwin Arthur ................ 5 CECo .................. Stroudsburg, Pa.
*Earnest, Joseph Hammond, Jr ...... .1 En ....................................... .Atlanta
Earnest, William Mark ................. .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Ebdon, William Lee ......................... .1 En .................... Gatun, Canal Zone
Eckis, Robert Wayne ........................ 4 E. ................... Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
Ector, Charles Lamar ..................... .! Co .................................. Leeds, Ala.
Ector, Hugh Haley ......................... .l En .................................. West Point
Ector, William Howard .................. 4 1M ................................ West Point
Edelblut, Carl Meyer ...................... 2 ChE .................................... Augusta
Edelblut, Walter Joseph, J r .......... .! En. ......................... Ft. Myers, Fla.
Edge, Halbert Lulan, Jr ................. 1 En ............................ Raleigh, N. C.
Edge, Philip Marcellus, Jr ............ .2 M .......................... Charlotte, N. C.
Edwards, Austin Southwick ........... .3 M ......................................... .Athens
Edwards, Dan Miller ..................... .1 En ............................ Lake City, Fla.
Edwards, Emory Howel, J r ........... 2 A .......................................... Atlanta
*Edwards, Joe Ellison ........................ 2 CerE .................................... Macon
Edwards, John Quincy, IIL ............ 2 IM .................. Washington, D. C.
Edwards, Paul Stephens .................. 2 ChE .......................... Gadsden, Ala.
*Edwards, Ralph Leo ....................... .! Co ....................................... .Atlanta
*Eichhorn, Delmas Fairbanks.. ........ 1 Co .......................... Baltimore, Md.
Eidson, William Blanchard ............ 3 CE ...................................... Atlanta
Eidson, William Bruce .................... 1 En .............................. Ways Station
*Einstein, Harry ................................. .2 M .............. New Brunswick, N. J.
*Eiseman, Fred Samuel, Jr .............. .1 En ....................................... .Atlanta
Elam, Stanleigh Friend ................... .3 ChE ............................ Ashland, Ky.
Elder, John Thomas ........................ 3 M ...................................... Scotland
Elfrink, William David Mayes ..... .! En ........................................ Atlanta
Ellington, John Edward ................. .3 ECo ...................................... Edison
Ellington, J. PauL .......................... .! En ............................ Crawfordville
Elliott, James Carter ..................... J En .................................... Mansfield
250 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY REGISTER OF STUDENTS 251
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*Elliott, Marvel Artis ....................... .2 ECo .................................... Zebulon
Elmore, Glenn VanNess.................. G-Ch .................... Topeka, Kansas
Ely, James Robertson ...................... 4 E ........................................ Decatur
Emery, Joseph HiIL ....................... 4 1M .................................. Savannah
Emmons, Morton Arnold, J r ........ .2 E .................................... Kodak, Ky.
Endress, Richard EarL ................... 1 En ........................ Hamburg, N. Y
Engel, Joseph Anthony ................... .3 M .................................... Savannah
Englehart, Francis Augustus, J r ... _3 E .? ........................................ Atlanta
English, Robert Henry, J r .............. .1 En .................... Washington, D. C
Engram, Robert Curtis .................... 1 En ...................... Lake Worth, Fla:
Ensign, Oliver Phelps, J r. ............... .1 En ...................................... Forsyth
Epperson, George Barnum ............. .1 Co ................................ Tampa, Fla.
Epstein, Edward, J r ......................... 3 Cer ~ .................................. Atlanta
*Epsten, Stephen Hexter ................... .1 En .?? ..................................... Atlanta
Erickson, Paul Herbert .............. _ ... .1 Co .......................... G arwood, N. ].
Espy, John Lee .................................. 1 Co ...................................... Cordele
Estes, Louis Collier ......................... .! En ...................................... Decatur
Fell, Charles Linwood ...................... 3 M .......................... Westfield, N. J.
Felton, Andy Pearson ..................... .1 En ................................ Miami, Fla.
Ferguson, Roy Washington ............ 3 M ........................................ Atlanta
Fergusson, William Wallace .......... l En .............. H endersonville, Tenn.
Fernandez, Antonio Guillermo ...... l En .......... ...................... Tampa, Fla.
Fernandez, Herbert Walter.. ......... .1 En .................... Ozone Park, N. Y.
Fernebok, Joseph .............................. 1 En .......................... Brooklyn, N. Y.
Ferrer, Federico Vicente ................. .3 M ............................ Santiago, Cuba
*Ferris, William Darius, lr ............. 3 1M .................................... Decatur
Ferst, Alvin Meinha:dt, J r ............. 2 M ........................................ Atlanta
Fey, George Fredenck ................... .3 E .......................................... Atlanta
Fields, Joseph J ames ........................ 2 M ........................................ Atlanta
Fields, Reuben Elbert... ................... 5 ECo .................... Society Hill, S. C.
Figg, Warren Stephen ...................... 2 ChECo ............................ Savannah
Finkelstein, Robert Louis ................ 2 E. ....................... N ew York, N. Y.
Finn, John Douglas .......................... 2 M ................................ ........ Atlanta
Fiori, Louis Anthony ........................ 2 T. ...................... ......... Clifton, N. J.
Estes, William Barney .................... 4 1M .............................. Douglasville
Etheredge, Edwin Ball ................... .1 En .................. Staten Island, N. Y.
Evans, Belton O'N eaL .................. .2 CE ...................................... Clayton
Evans, Fred Wilburn, J r ................. 2 PHE .................................. Atlanta
Evans, Harry Gunn .......................... 3 CECo ............ San Antonio, Texas
Evans, James Duggan ...................... 3 ChECo .............................. Clayton
Evins, William Hammock ............. .3 A .......................................... Atlanta
Ewald, John Benton ........................ 2 GE. ................... Washington, D. C.
Ewen, Douglas George .................... 5 ChECo ...................... Lyman, S. C.
Ewing, Curtis Thaxston .................. 2 ChECo ................................ Atlanta
Ezzard, Thomas Mixon ................. .2 Ch ...................................... Roswell
*Fisher, Lloyd losephus .................... 2 M ........................................ Atlanta
Fitts, William Francis ..................... .3 CoE. ................... Ridgewood, N. J.
Fitzgerald, Thomas Witt, J r ......... 2 M .............. .......................... Atlanta
Fitzpatrick, James Pruett.. .............. 3 1M ...................................... Macon
Fitzpatrick, Wesley Harris, J r ...... .1 En ........................................ Austell
*Flanigen, Cameron Douglas.. .......... 4 M .......................................... Athens
Fleming, Howard Hughes ............. .2 M ........................................ Atlanta
Flemister, Harry Armstrong .......... 4 E ............. ............................. Atlanta
*Fletcher, D elbert Van ...................... 5 ChECo .......... Tarpon Springs, Fla.
Fletcher, Henry Merritt... .............. .2 M ........................................ J ackson
Fletcher, Phillip David .................... 3 1M ........................ Appalachia, Va.
Fain, Edgar McArthur.. .................. 4 1M ...................................... Doerun *Florence, Harold N eal.. .................. 2 1M ................................ Cedartown
Falk, David Beauregard ................ ..4 ChECo ............................ Savannah
Falks, Jack Bansley .......................... s A-G .................................... Atlanta
Fambro, George William ................ 4 MCo .............................. Fitzgerald
Fannon, Marcy Barat.. ................... .4 M ........................................ Atlanta
Flowers Gewin Walter.. ................ 3 ChE .................................. Norcross
Fogle, Jerome Wiggins .................... l IM ........... ~ .................. Aurora, Mo.
Folger, Alvin Gray ........................... .2 M ...................................... Decatur
Foote, George Post.. ........................ 4 A .......................................... Atlanta
Farmer, James Gordon ................... .2 MCo ................................ Stellaville Ford, Aris Clarke ............................. .1 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Farmer, Quentin Boyles .................. 2 M ........................................ Austell Ford, George Pratt.. ...................... ..4 Ch .......................................... Alma
Farris, James Christie .................... ..4 ECo ................................ Columbus Forker, Raymond Anthony ............. .4 IM .......... Hempstead, L. I., N. Y.
Faulkner, Al J erold ......................... .1 1M ..................... .} acksonville, Fla. Fornara, Johnnie Serafino .............. l A .......................................... Atlanta
Faustini, Albert John ........................ 1 Co .................... Miami Beach, Fla. Forney, Adrian Kenneth.................. G-AE ................................ Augusta
Faw, James Enoch, Jr .................... .4 MCo ................. _ ... Westfield, N. J.
Feagin, James Wingfield ................ l Co .................................... Savannah
Forrer, John J acob ......................... .3 M ............................ Richmond, Va.
Forrest, Richard Eyre ...................... 3 T ............................ Lansdowne, Pa.
Feagle, James Albert, J r ................ .2 CE .................................. Fitzgerald
Feagles, Robert West... ................... 2 MCo .......... Oklahoma City, Okla.
Forsythe, William John .................... 4 CE. ....................... Brooklyn, N. Y.
Fort, William G. S .......................... .5 ECo .................................. Cornelia
Featherston, Charles Nicholas ....... .2 1M .......................................... Rome Fortenberry, William J ackson ........ l En .................................... Clarkston
Fein, Marvin James ........................ 2 E. ....................... New York, N. Y. Foster, Franklin Marx.................... Irr ...................... Nicholasville, Ky.
252 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY REGISTER OF STUDENTS 253
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Foster, Joseph Hudson, Jr ............. 4 T ........................................ Roswell
Fowler, Carl Campbell, Jr ............ .1 Co ...................................... Decatur
Fowler, Carl Elwood, J r ................. 2 ChECo .......................... Brunswi k
Fox, Carl Louis, J r ......................... 4 Ch ....................................... .Atlan~a
Francis, William Dayton ............... .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Francisco, Edward Elsworth, Jr .... .1 En ...................... Little Falls, N. J
Frank, Herbert] acob ...................... 5 CECo .................. Ridgewood, N. i
Freeman, Carroll Newton, J r ........ .3 1M ...................................... Atlant~
Frey, Ralph Darwin .......................... 4 M ...................... Saxtons River, Vt
Fricke, William Alexander ............. .! Co ...................... Birmingham, Ala'
Friedsam, Alvin ................................. .1 En ................................ Chicago Il\'
Frisch, Samuel ]oseph ..................... .! En ........................ Clementon N i
*Fry, Robert Joseph ........................... .! En ...................... Lake Charies 'La'
Frye, Robert Spencer.. ..................... .2 CerE .................................. Atiant~
Fryer, James William, Jr ............... 4 IM ........................ Nashville, Tenn.
Fullenlove, John J unius .................. 3 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Fuller, Herbert Kaufman ................ 4 TCo .............................. West Point
Fuller, ] oe H unnicutt... .................. .1 1M ..................................... .Atlanta
Fulmer, John Riley, J r .................... .2 ECo .................................... Augusta
Fulton, Wilbur DulL. .................... .3 ECo ............ Winston-Salem, N. C.
Garst, Robert Ernest.. .................... 3 MCo ........................ LouisviIle Ky.
Gaskins, Edwin Derring ................. .2 M ....................................... .AI~paha
Gattas, ] ose ...................................... 1 En ........................ ] acksonville, Fla.
Gaubis, Leonard Louis .................... 3 GE ........................ Westfield, N. J.
Gay, Joseph Thomas ....................... .! Co ...................................... Quitman
*Gay, L ewis Benjamin ...................... 4 E .......................................... Atlanta
Gayle, Sidney Alexander .................. 2 T ........................ High Point, N. C.
Gayler, Cecil Winston...................... G-Ch .................. So. Irondale, Ala.
Gaymon, Harold Tanner.. .............. 3 MCo ............................ Bartow, Fla.
Gegan, Ambrose Joseph, ]r ............. 4 M ...................... Jersey City, N. J.
Geiger, Quenton Prevatt.. ................ 3 ECo .................... J acksonville, Fla.
Gelders, Morris Victor .................... 5 ECo ................................ Fitzgerald
Gennari, Jervis ] oseph .................... 3 ECo ........ West Stockbridge, Mass.
Gentry, Joe MansfieId .................... 2 ECo .................................... Atlanta
Genualdi, Benj amin Frederick ........ l En ............................ Summit, N. J.
George, Carroll Hitchcock .............. 3 T ........................................ Vinings
George, Paul Eugene ........................ 2 M ........................................ Vinings
Gershen, Irvin J ack .......................... 2 PHE ...................... Elizabeth, N. J
. Getchell, Carl Folsom, Jr .............. .1 IM .............................. Auburn, Me.
Geyer, Leo Alvin.............................. G-AE ..... , ............ Rochester, N. Y.
Fulton, William Luther, J r .......... ,4 GE .................................. Savannah Gheesling, Henry Carlton, J r ......... 4 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Fultz, Bennett Marion ................... .3 1M .................................. Cloudland
Funderburk, Horace Boyce, ] r ..... A CECo ............................ Bainbridge
Funderburk, ] oe CarmichaeL. ....... 4 ChECo . .......................... Bainbridge
Funk, William Henry ..................... .2 ChECo ........................ Tampa, Fla.
Gibbons, Harry Meikleham ............ 5 TCo ........................................ Rome
Gibbs, Robert Irwin, J r .................. .3 ChE ..................................... Atlanta
*Gibeling, Alfred H arding ................ 2 MCo .............................. East Point
Gibeling, Robert Walter .................. 3 A. ..................................... East Point
Furcron, Wycliffe Sharpe ............... .2 M .......................... The Plains, Va.
*Futrell, Taylor Morgan .................. 2 ECo .................. Union City, Tenn.
Gibian, Richard .................................. 3 1M .................... Montgomery, Ala.
Gibson, John Ramsay ........................ 4 M Co ................ St. Petersburg, Fla.
Gahagan, Luther HowelL. ............ .2 ChE ................................ Savannah Gibson, William Carson .................. 4 1M ...................................... Atlanta
*Gailey, Charles Malcolm ................ 2 A .................................... Dunwoody
*Gailey, Franklin Bryan .................... 4 Ch .................................. Dunwoody
Gaines, Henry Augustus ................. .2 ChECo .......................... Gainesville
Gibson, William Claude ................. .3 T .......................................... Griffin
Gifford, William Oscar .................... l En .............................. College Park
Giges, Melvin Horace ...................... 4 PHE .................. New York, N. Y.
Gaines, John Gregory ...................... 4 ChE .......................... St. Louis, Mo. GiJI, Roger LowelL. ...................... .2 ChE ...................... Greenville, S. C.
Gaines, William Lawrence ............. .2 MCo .................................... Macon GiIlenwater, Joe Barron .................. S MCo ........................ Bristol, Tenn.
Gale, Thomas Rogers .................... ..4 ECo ............................ Waverly, Va.
Galindo, GabrieL.............................. IrrCerE .............. Panama, Panama
GiIli1and, John Robert.. .................... l Co .............................. College Park
Gillon, Elam Randolph, J r ............. 2 M .................................... East Point
Gammill, William Reed .................. 3 M .............................. Camden, Ark. Gilman, Julian Addison, Jr ............ .2 M ............................ Richmond, Va.
*Gardner, Frank Hugh, Jr ............... 4 ChECo ............ Hattiesburg, Miss. Gilmer, Clarence Lee ...................... 4 1M ..................................... .Atlanta
Gardner, Jack A. .............................. 2 CE ............................ Anderson, Ind. Gilmore, John .................................... 4 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Garland, ] ack Courtney .................. 2 CE .................................. Columbus Gilpin, Hugh McReynolds .............. 2 ChE .................... BluefieId, W. Va.
*Garner, Howell Dougla!.. .............. 1 Co .............................. Sanford, Fla. *Ginsburg, Ambrose M ..................... 2 M ........................ Lewisburg, Tenn.
Garner, Hugh Manson ................... .3 ECo ............................ College Park
Garner, Thomas Edwin ................ ..4 A ........................................ Decatur
Glover, C. Van Cortlandt, J r ....... 2 E ......................................... .Atlanta
Goerlitz, Joseph Julius .................... 3 M .......................... St. Joseph, Mo.
Garrard, Oscar J ulian .................... 4 M ...................... Miami Beach, Fla. Goforth, Roger Williams ................ l En ........................................ Atlanta
Garrison, William Ernest.. ............. .3 MCo .............................. Covington Goldenberg, Myer Stoney ................ l En ........................ Mattapan, Mass.
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Gonchar, SoL .................................... 2 GE .................................. Savannah
*G ooch, Fred P eary ........................... A MCo ...................... Pittsburgh, Pa.
G oodgame, James Hamilton .......... 5 ChECo ...................... Camden, Ark.
Goodloe, William Lester ................. .1 1M .................................... Valdosta
Goodman, Charles Mason .............. 3 1M ............................ Orlando, Fla.
Goodman, William Marcus ........... .5 ChECo .................. Memphis Tenn
Goodroe, Ray .................................... 2 ECo ................................ C~lumbu~
Gordon, John RusseIL ..................... 3 IM .............. Winston-Salem, N. C.
*Goree, Churchill Pomeroy IIL ..... .3 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Goree, Robert Wilson ..................... .1 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Gorman, Allan Ross ....................... A 1M .............................. Chicago, Ill.
Gostin, Sommers J essup ................. .1 Co ........................................ Macon
Gould, Vernon ................................. .1 En ................... ................. East Point
Goza, John VirgiL ........................... 2 E .... ???????????????????????? .............. Atlanta
Grabbe, John Christian .................... l 1M .. ? ...... ?.?.??? .. ?? .. ???.? ........... Atlanta
*Gri/!eth, James Wiley ..................... .2 1M ...................................... Winder
Griffin, Clinton Furman .................. l En ........................................ Atlanta
Griffin, Donald Baade ...................... 5 ChECo .............. Birmingham, Ala.
Griffin, Henry Clay ......................... .3 E .......................... Montevallo, Ala.
Griffin, Joseph Frank, J r ................ .1 En .................................... Savannah
Griffin, Louis, Jr ............................ .3 CECo ....... ......................... Augusta
Griffin, Raymond Marion, J r ........ .5 CECo .............................. Savannah
Gri ffith, Richard Fisher... ... ............ 3 CECo .................. Kansas City, Mo.
Grill, Louis Franklin ..................... .2 MCo ...................... Baltimore, Md.
*Grods ky, James Wilbur ................. .! En ........................................ Atlanta
Groom, Joe Martin ......................... .2 E .......................................... Atlanta
*Gross, Frederick Charles ............... .2 CE ...................................... Atlanta
Grossman, Frank David .................. 5 ChECo .......................... Brunswick
Grubb, William Clay .................... ..4 M ........................................ Atlanta
Guerin, Richard Eugene ................. .3 E .......................................... Atlanta
*Grace, Walter 1 asper IIL ............. .2 M ........................................ Macon *GII/!ey, David Leon .......................... l Co ......... ............................... Climax
Graf, Edward ................................... .3 M ............................ Palisade, N. J.
Graham, Frank A. ........................... .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
*Graham, G eorge H enry, 1r .......... o3 ChE ...................... _ ............. Atlanta
Guidi, Raymond John ...................... l En ........................ Scarsdale, N. Y.
GuiII, George Porter ....................... .3 ChECo ......... ..... Union City, Tenn.
Guimares, Albert Fordham ........... .! Co ........................................ Atlanta
Graham, John Thomas ................... o3 ECo .............................. Tampa, Fla.
Granberry, Shorter Rankin ........... .1 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Guinn, James Cook, J r ................... l 1M ............... ................. LaGrange
Gunn, Fred Allyn ............................. .3 ECo .......................... .......... Genola
Graves, Albert Dale ........................ 4 CoCE. ................... Springfield, Mo. Gunn, Graham Lee ......................... A M .......... .. ................ Crawfordville
Gray, Edward Darlington .............. 2 ChECo ................ Wilmington, Del. Gunter, Robin Baum ........................ l En ........................................ Griffin
Gray, Frank Aird ........................... 03 M ....................... .J acksonville, Fla. Gunther, Donald Harrison .......... ..4 T. ................... Poughkeepsie, N. Y.
Gray, John Lawrence ...................... 5 ChECo ............................ Columbus Guskind, Silvan Sidney ................... .2 ChE. ................... Jersey City, N. J.
Gray, John William ......................... .1 En ........................................ Atlanta Gwaltney, Eugene Cleveland, J r .... A M ........................................ Macon
Greaser, Robert Weber ................. .1 En ................................ Altoona, Pa. Hach, Charles .................................... 2 Ch ................................ T ampa, Fla.
Green, Elmer Lamar ............ _ ........ 5 MCo .................................... Macon *H aelele, Carll ohn ........................... J MCo .............. Staten Island, N. Y.
Green, James Thomas ....... ............... 3 E. .................... .J efl'erson City, Mo. Haeger, John Ralph ........................ ..4 1M ...................... Avondale Estates
Green, Malcolm J ohnson ............... .1 En ........................................ Atlanta Hafley, Bruce Winston ................... .2 A .......................................... Atlanta
Green, Theodore Eugene ............... A 1M ...................................... Atlanta Hagan, Crandall HaIL .................. .3 1M ...................... J acksonville, Fla.
Greene, Charles Hamilton ............. .1 Co ........................................ Cordele Hagan, John Luther ....................... .3 ChE .................................. Savannah
Greene, Fred HerberL .................. ..4 MCo .......................... Somerset, Ky. *Hagedorn, Arthur, 1r ...................... .4 E. ................................... West Point
*Greene, Kendall ............................... .1 Co ................................ Miami, Fla. *H agedorn, P hillip ............................. .2 1M ................................ West Point
Greene, Palmer Gibson ................... o3 ECo .................................... Cordele Hageny, Mark ConwelL ................. 4 E ............... ........................... Atlanta
*Greene, T errell E verhart ................ l En ........................................ Atlanta , *Haggart, Robert Stevenson, 1r ...... A CE ................ .............. Norfolk, Va.
*Greene, William Carl ................ , .... .3 ECo ........... ............. .. Somerset, Ky. *Hagood, Nesbitt Ward, lr ........... ..4 IM ........................ Hartford, Conn.
Greer, Lovic Pierce, J r .................. .2 ECo .................................. Valdosta Hague, Harold James, J r .............. J E .......................................... Atlanta
Greeson, Richard OrvaL .............. .2 M .................................. Cedartown Haigler, William Cole ...................... 2 M .................................. Miami, Fla.
Gregory, Francis Allison ................. .1 Co ........................................ Atlanta *Hainlin, Albert Wellington ............ l Co ................................ Miami, Fla.
Gregory, Joseph E. .......................... 4 E .............................. Pembroke, Ky. Hale, Franklin Grant ...................... l Co .............................. McColI, S. C.
*Gregory, Warren Collins ............... o3 Ch ........................................ Atlanta Hale, Stephen Cutler, J r ................. 4 M ........................................ Atlanta
Gribble, James Thomas, Jr. .......... Irr ...................................... Atlanta Hall, Ben Harrison .......................... 3 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Grier, William Winfield .................. 2 IM ........................ Charlotte, N. C. Hall, James Richard ........................ l Co ............................ Clewiston, Fla.
256 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY REGISTER OF STUDENTS 257
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Hall, Kenneth Raymond .................. 3 M ........................................ Atlanta
Hall, Lu.m. Chamble.ss ..................... .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Hall, Wilham TernlL. ................... 5-A. ........................... Nashville, Teno
Hamarat, Metin Recep.................... G-M .................... Istanbul, Turke;
Hamby, Walter Strauss .................. 3 IM ...................... Copperhill, Tenn
Hames, Paul Berry ......................... .1 Co ........................................ Atlant~
Hames, William Charles .................. 3 1M .................................... Decatu
*Hamilton David Downing .............. 3 T .......................................... Dalto~
Hamilton, David Pierce .................. 2 GE .................................... Augusta
*Hamilton, loseph Starke, lr ........... 4 A ......................................... .Atlanta
Hamilton, Stuart Adams, J r ........... 2 M ........................................ Atlanta
*Hamlett, Frank Robertson .............. 3 E .................................. Tampa FI
, a.
Hammer, Helmut Ernest ................ 2 ChECo .......... Elizabethton, Tenn.
*Hammersla, William Edward, lr ... l Co ....................... .Jacksonville, Fla.
Hammett, Charles Edgar ................ 2 M ._ .................................... .Atlanta
Hammett, Manley Huie ................. .4 M ....................................... .Atlanta
*Hammond, 101m Gullette ................ l Co ...................... Winter Park, Fla.
Hammond, James Withers .............. 4 T ............................................ Rome
Hamrick, Joseph Thomas ................ l Co .................................. Carrollton
*H analzan, I ames Ross ..................... .3 1M ........................... ~ .......... Atlanta
Hancock, John Karow, J r ............... l En ........................ J acksonville, Fla.
Hand, Stanley SamueL ................... l En .......................... Arlington, N. J.
*Haneline, Carl Douglas .................. 2 M ...................... Clarksville Tenn
Hankinson, Thos. Wm. Edmund ... .1 Co .......................... Portmo~th, Va:
Hanner, Rickford James .................. 2 ChE. ..................... Charlotte, N. c.
Hannon, George Franklin .............. 2 CE ............................................ Atco
Hansell, William Albert, J r .......... .2 CE ...................................... Atlanta
Hansen, Raymond Milton .............. 3 MCo .......................... Kenmore, Ky.
Hansen, Warren PauL. .................. .2 ChE ................................ Brunswick
Hara, Edward Ewald ..................... .3 M .......................... Drexel Hill, Pa.
Hard, John Stewart ......................... .3 1M ................................. , .... Atlanta
Hard, Straiton, J r ............................ .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Hardaway, Hugh Ernest ................. .1 Co ........................................ Atlanta
Hardin, Walton ............................... .2 CerE ............................ W ashington
Hardison, John Wesley ................... .3 MCo ................................ Ft. Valley
Hargrett, Haines Hilsman .............. 4 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Harman, Luther Hubert, Jr ........... l Co .................................. LaGrange
Harrell, Irving Jackson, Jr ............. 4 MCo ............................ Bainbridge
Harriman, Dean Emerson, Jr ......... 5 ECo .............................. Tampa, Fla.
Harris, Burton Roy .......................... l En ...................... New York, N. Y.
Harris, John Wyatt ......................... .3 CECo ...................... Windsor, Mo.
Harris, Lloyd Webb ....................... .1 En .................................... Marietta
Harrison, Albert Edwin .................. S ECo .................................. Hartwell
Harrison, Charles Walston, Jr ...... .1 En ...................... New York, N. Y.
Harrison, Earnest Robert................ G-M .................................... Atlanta
Harrison, Hunter Craycroft .......... 2 1M ............................ Dallas, Texas
Harrison, Robert Edward .............. 4 A .............................. Martin, Tenn.
Harrison, Stanley Richmond ......... .1 Co ???????????? ........................... .Atlanta
Harriss, H ayden HaIL .................. .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
tHort, David Anderson ................... .4 M .............................. Leonia, N. J.
Harter, Robert Jackson .................. 4 MCo ................................. .Augusta
Hartlein, Roy Frederick, J r .......... .1 Co ...................... Birmingham, Ala.
Harvey, Andrew Frank ................... .1 En .............................. Tupelo, Miss.
Harvey, Robert GlenweIL ............ .2 M ........................................ Atlanta
Harwell, Alfred Walter .................. 3 M .................................. Ensley, Ala.
Haskell, Blanton Winship ............... .3 MCo .................................... Macon
Hausmann, George Finley .............. l En .............................. Leonia, N. J.
Hawkins, Albert Taylor. ................ .4 ChECo ................ W aynesboro, Va.
Hawkins, Glenn John ...................... 1 Co ........ Forrest Hills, L. I. N. Y.
Hay, Paul Pitts ............................... .1 Co ....................................... .Atlanta
Hayes, Edmund Anthony, Jr ........... 4 CE. ........... New Brunswick, N. J.
Hayes, Robert Steele, Jr ................. 1 1M .................................... Decatur
Haymans, W alter Harold ............... .4 1M .................................. Savannah
thynes, Benjamin Carlisle, J r ....... 1 En ...................... Short Hills, N. J.
Haynes, Charles Cannon ................. .1 En .......................... Columbia, Miss.
Hays, Glenn Bare ............................. .4 Ch ........................ Etters, P. O. Pa.
Hays, William Walter, J r ............... 2 ECo ........................ Trenton, Tenn.
Hearn, James Tolbert ..................... .1 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Heatherly, J. Edwin .......................... 3 CE. ............................... Akron, Ohio
Heatwole, James Walter ................ 5 ChECo ............ Elizabethton, Tenn.
*Heckman, David Allen ................... .3 M .................. Glen Gardner, N. J.
Heckman, Edward Corbette, J r .... .1 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Hedrick, Harold Nelson ................. .1 Co ................................ Tulsa, Okla.
Heffernan, William Hughes ............ 4 E ........................................ Augusta
Heidler, Charles Drew .................... 3 M ........................................ Atlanta
Heinz, Henry Charles, J r .............. .3 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Heitzer, Paul Donald ...................... 1 Co .......................... Coraopolis, Pa.
*Helin, Walter Engleberthe .............. 3 MCo ...................... Teaneck, N. J.
Helton, Bernard Lamar ................. .2 CerE ............................ Sandersville
Henderson, William Bennett .......... 3 CECo .................... Memphis, Tenn.
Harris, Durward Gates .................. 3 M .......................... Syracuse, N. Y.
Harris, Gilliam Garret .................... l En ................ Murfreesboro, Tenn.
*Harris, Henry Bullard ................... .4 CE ............................ Raleigh, N. C.
* Harris, I ames Lee ........................... .3 A .............................. Richmond, Va.
Hendon, Roy Bailey .......................... 2 1M ................................... .Acworth
Henig, Seymour Izaak ..................... .4 M ............................ Newark, N. J.
Henley, Richard Gregory ............... .2 E .......................................... Smyrna
Hennigh, Clifford Emerson .............. 3 T .................................. Cedartown
258 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY REGISTER OF STUDENTS 259
- -Henry, Stanley J ulian ...................... 1 En .???.? .... ?? ... ? .... ????? ............... Atlant
Henslee, Lewis W allace .................. 1 Co ...................................... Atlant~
H ensler, Homer Henry, J r ............. 4 A .................................... Ada, Okl
*Herb, Jack Robert ............................ 1 En .......................... Johnstown p a.
Hermes, Robert Peter.. ................... .2 M .............................. Bradford p a.
*Hermes, T17illiam H enry ................. .2 1M ............................ Bradford' p a.
Heros, Reinaldo Cadrecha ............. .1 En ............................ Havana C' ba.
, u a
Herren, Cecil EarL. ......................... 2 IM ................................ Lanett, Al
H erring, Henry Henderson............ G-Ch .............................. Rockma:~
Herron, Arthur Marvin .................. 4 TCo .................................... Duluth
Herzog, Richard Blum ................... .3 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Hester, Robert J oseph ..................... .l En ........................................ Atlanta
Heston, Charles N orman ................ 1 Co ....................... .] acksonville FI
, a.
Heubeck, John .................................. 2 M .......................... Baltimore, Md.
*H eycey, Stephen George .................. 5 ECo ........................ Bayonne, N. J
Hibbard, Charles, J r ....................... 2 Ch ........................................ Atlant~
Hicklin, William James, J r ............ .3 CE ...................... J acksonville, Fla.
Hicks, Gordon CrowL. ................... 2 ChE .................................... Atlanta
Hicks , Hiram Marion ...................... 3 ECo ............................ Lincoln, Ala.
Hiegel, James Anthony .................... 3 A. ....................... Winter Park, Fla.
Higham, Harrison ............................ 2 GE .................... Maplewood N J
Hightower, Robert Henry .............. 2 1M ...................................... .'.Dubli~
Hilburn, John Presley ...................... 1 Co ................................ Tampa, Fla.
Hill, Douglass Pay ton ...................... 1 En .................................... Marietta
Hill, Henry Cooper.. ........................ 5 MCa .................................... Winder
II Ie William Leonard .................... 2 M ...................... Honolulu, H awaii H~II~day, George Hiram, J r ......... 4 ChE ............................ Laurel, Miss.
Holland, Ralph Griffen .................. 3 CE ........................................ D allas
Holley, Robert L~nn ........................ 2 A .......................................... Atlanta
Holliday, Frank Rlchard .................. 2 M ........................................ Bogart
*Hol/iman, P erry Bassett .................. 3 ChE .................................. Unadilla
*Hollis, Ardell O 'Connor ................. .1 Co ........................................ M acon
Hollis, Charles Burton .................... 3 M ........................................ Macon
Holloman, Sam Wood ...................... 1 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Holloway, D avid Byers .................. 1 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Holly, George J ame.s, J r ................. 2 IM .................. Elizabethton, Tenn.
Holmes, Fulton ElllOtt.. .................. 1 Co ................................ Sanford, Fla.
Holmes, John Graham .................... 1 Co ................................ Ensley, Ala.
Holmes, John J acob ........................ 2 ChECo ...................... Fairfield, Ala.
Holmes, John Parham ..................... .1 En ........................................ Macon
Holmes, William Henry .................. 1 1M ...................................... Atlanta
IIolston, Walter Eugene ................. .2 ECo .................................... Augusta
IIolt, Edward Clarence .................... 2 MCo ...................................... Byron
Holt, Riley Albert.. .......................... 2 T ........................................ Decatur
Holt, William Watson, J r ............. 3 M ........................................ Atlanta
Holz, Forrest Henry ........................ 4 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Honnell, Martial Alfred.................. G-M .................................. Atlanta
Hood, Charles William ................... .l En ........................................ Atlanta
*H ook, William Thomas.. ................ 5 M-Co .......................... Mexico, Mo.
Hooker, Jeff Hart.. ......................... .4 M .............................. Paducah, Ky.
Hill, Thomas ...................................... 2 ChE .................. Waynesville, N. C.
*Hiltz, Robert Grover ...................... 2 ECo ................ Chattanooga, T enn.
Hinds, Boyd Walker.. ...................... 1 Co .......................... Baltimore, Md.
Hinds, Joseph Edwin ........................ 1 En .................... Garden City, N. Y.
Hinton, Charles Vernon .................. 3 MCo .................................... Atlanta
Hirsch, William Irwin .................... 3 A. ........................... Brooklyn, N. Y.
*Hite, John Preston .......................... 2 ChE ........................ J ackson, Miss.
Hobbs, Charles Augustus ................ 4 E .......................................... Atlanta
Hochmuth, Milton Samuel Von ...... 1 Co ...................................... Augusta
Hock, Robert Carmody .................. .. 2 MCo ............................ Miami, Fla.
Hodge, Frank Charles ...................... 1 En ................ J efferson City, Tenn.
Hodge, James Anderson .................. 3 M .............................. Dames Ferry
Hodges, Sam Norwood, J r ............. 1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Hooper, Chessley Flavil, J r .......... .2 E .................................... Cedartown
Hooper, Maurice Fred ................... .3 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Hope, Harold William .................... 2 CECo .................................. Atlanta
*I1opkin, Arthur McMurrin ............ 3 ECo .............. Salt Lake City, Utah
Hopkins, John Martin ...................... 4 CE .................... Morristown, N. J.
Horn, Leonard Harold ................... .1 Co ........................................ Atlanta
Horne, Gerard Fowler.. .................. 2 CECo .............. Chattanooga, Tenn.
Horner, Howard SamueL. ............. 1 En ........................ Bridgeton, N. J.
Horner, Leonard LeRoy, J r .......... .3 E .......................................... Atlanta
*Hornst ein, Israel .............................. 5 ECo ............................ Omaha, Neb.
*I1ornstein, Joe S .............................. .3 ChECo ...................... Omaha, Neb.
Hornibrook, Davis Cummins .......... 1 En ........................ Avondale Estates
Horton , John .................................... 3 ECo ................ North Logan, Utah
Hoehl, William Sidney .................... 3 CE .................... Coral Gables, Fla.
Hoffer, Jerry, Jr............................... G-AE ........................ Camden, S. C.
Hogan, William Joseph 111.. .......... 4 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Hogg, James Vanderbilt.. ................ 4 M ...................... Amsterdam, N. Y.
Hogge, William Edward ................. .1 En ............................ Santiago, Cuba
Holder, Floyd Pierson ...................... 2 ECo ...................................... Macon
Horton, James Ulysses .................... 2 E .......................................... Atlanta
Horton, Reese Hearn ...................... 1 Co .................................... Americus
Horwood, Edgar Miller.. ................ 2 M ...... Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Hoss, Eugene Lane .......................... 3 ECo .................................... Atlanta
Hoss, Frank Vernon ........................ 1 Co ........................................ Atlanta
Houston, David Osman .................. 3 E .......................... J acksonville, Fla.
260 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY REGISTER OF STUDENTS 261
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-*Howard, Anderson Lee, Jr ............ .1 Co .. ???.?????????????? .................. Cochran
*H owes, Leroy Knowlton ................. .2 GE. ..................... Springfield, Mass
Hoyle, Royce Augustine, J r .......... .2 CE .................................... Savannah
Huckabee, Walter England ........... .3 1M ............................... .Thomaston
Hudson, Frank Parker .................... 4 ChECo ................................ Macon
Hudson, Richard Hall, Jr ............... 1 Co ................................ Paris, Tenn
Hudson, Robert Hartfield .............. 4 ChECo ............................ Waycros~
Huff, Albert Burney ....................... .4 ChE ???????????????????????? .. ?? ............ Rome
Huffman, Robert Wendell, J r ...... .3 ChECo ?????????????????????? .......... Atlanta
Huggins, Harwell Steed ................ ..4 CE ...................................... Atlanta
Huggins, James Andrew ................. .! En ????????????????????????????? ........... Atlanta
Hughes, James Warren ................. .3 1M .......................... Anderson, Ind.
Hughes, Marvin Lynn ..................... .3 A. ........................... Blytheville, Ark.
Huie, Edward Lynn .......................... 4 1M ??????????????????????????? ......... Morrow
Hulbert, Donald Clark .................... 4 CECo .................. San Diego, Calif.
Hume, Alfred Shepard ................... .4 E .................................. Miami, Fla.
Hume, Gilbert Edward ................... .2 ChE .................... San Diego, Calif.
Humphrey, James Howard ............ 3 A .? ........ ?? .. ? ..... ???? .. ? ............... Atlanta
Humphreys, William Charles ....... .2 GE ........................ Bradenton, Fla.
Hungerford, Hugh Dales ............... .2 M ...................................... Augusta
Hunt, Harry Duff ........................... .2 GE ??????????????????????????? ........... Atlanta
*Hunt, Homer Harris ...................... 5 MCo .................... J acksonville, Fla.
Hunt, John Carver ......................... 2 CECo ?????????????????.? ............ .Yaldosta
Hunt, John Irby ............................... .1 En ???????????????????? .................... Atlanta
Hunt, Willis Bennett ........................ 2 M .......................... Blytheville, Ark.
Hurst, Sam Thomas, Jr ................... 3 A. ................................... Fort Valley
Huson, John William ...................... 2 E ................ Cristobal, Canal Zone
*/vcy, Henry Reese ........................... .2 GE ........................................ Tifton
Ivey, Ira Lew ................................... .2 1M ........................ Stone Mountain
Ivey, John Randolph ........................ 4 M ....................................... .Atlanta
J achens, Richard Henry .................. 1 Co .................................... Savannah
Jackson, Bruce ................................. .3 ChE. ................. Matewan, W. Va.
Jackson, Dallam Rivers, Jr .......... .! En ....................................... .Atlanta
Jackson, John Esra .......................... 3 T .................................. Blackshear
Jackson, Royce Alfred ..................... .2 CE ...................................... Winder
Jackson, William Morgan ............. .2 CECo ....................... .] effersonville
Jacob, Walter Joseph .................... ..4 IM .......................... Trenton, N. J.
Jacobs, Ned Buron ......................... .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Jacobson, Bernie Leon.ard ............... .1 En .................. Winter Haven, Fla.
Jacobson, Herbert Remhold............ G-CE .................................. Atlanta
Jaffe, Max ......................................... .! Co ............................ Arverne, N. Y.
J amison, Frank Dugger .................. 3 1M ...................................... Atlanta
*]a1llison, William Edward ............ ..4 1M ............... ! ..... . . ...... .. ...... . Atlanta
January, William McMurray ....... .3 M ............................ Trenton, Tenn.
Jarrell, Rembert LufL ................... .2 Ch .............................. Thomasville
Jarriel, John Henry ......................... 2 E .......................................... Collins
Jay, Philip Clayton, J r .................... .1 En .................................. Fitzgerald
Jeffcoat, Harry, Jr........................... G-M .................................. Augusta
Jefferies, Jimmie Stocker ............... .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Jeffers, Ulie Hamilton, Jr .............. .1 En ............................ Ft. McPherson
Jemison, William Fishburn ........... .! Co ................................... : .... Lorane
Jenkins, Donald Carter .................... 2 ECo .......................... Mulhns, S. C.
Jenkins, Harry Farmer .................. ..4 T .................................... Rockmart
*]enkins, Hugh Ingles ....................... 2 CE .................................... Savannah
Huston, Myron Alfred .................... 2 M ........................................ Macon
Hutcheson, John Duard .................. 4 M ................................ Douglasville
Hutchins, Samuel Fred .................... 2 MCo ................ Coral Gables, Fla.
Hutchinson, James Atticus, J r ....... 4 MCo .............................. Moreland
Hutchinson, William Huber ........ ..4 M .................... Deep Water, N. J.
Huth, Herman Gay ........................ ..4 M ........................................ Atlanta
Hutto, Clifton Elonzo ................... .4 ECo .................................. Savannah
Inestroza, Carlos Alberto ................ 4 CE
San Pedro, Sula, Honduras, C. A.
*Ingram, Benjamin Mason ............... .2 MCo ........................ Florence, Ala.
Ingram, Dent Benj amin .................. 1 En ................................ Miami, Fla.
Ingram, Lewis Riviere ................... .2 CECo ............................ Bainbridge
Innes, Theodore John, Jr .............. 2 MCo .............. Raton, New Mexico
Inserni, Orlando Enrique ............... .1 En .............. San Juan, Puerto Rico
Irwin, George Raney ........................ 1 1M ............... : ...................... Atlanta
Iskrzak, Anthony John ................... .3 MCo .......... Wmdsor Locks, Conn.
Ison, Robert Lindsey ........................ 4 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Jenkins, William Frederick ............ 4 1M .................................. Columbus
Jett, Shelby ....................................... .1 En .................... San Antonio, Texas
Joe, Albert .......................................... 1 En ...................................... Augusta
*] ohns, Carol Norman ..................... .! En ........................................ Atlanta
Johns, Quinton Roy .......................... 2 M .................................. Miami, Fla.
Johns, Robert Henry ....................... .1 En .................. Brightwaters, N. Y.
*]o/mson, Allan Barrett .................... 2 CerE. ........................... Chicago, Ill.
Johnson, Charles Chichester ......... .1 Co ...................... Punta Gorda, Fla.
Johnson, Drew lLiddeIL ................ .4 1M .................... : ................. Atlanta
Johnson, David Robertson ............. .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Johnson, Edgar Dunson .................. ..4 ECo ................................ LaGrange
Johnson, Mercer Harris ................. .3 E .......................................... Siloam
Johnson, Raymond Arthur, J r ......... 3 M ........................................ Macon
Johnson, Royster Heywood, J r ..... 2 IM ...................... St. Joseph, Mich.
Johnson, Robert Linder, Jr ............. 5 CECo .................................... Rome
Johnson, Shelton Morris, J r .......... .2 ChE .................................... Atlanta
*]ohnson, Verne Wesley .................... 4 M .......................... Bragg City, Mo.
262 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF T ECHNOLOGY REG ISTER O F STUDENTS 263
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---------------------------------------------------------
J ohnson, William Edward .............. 1 Co ............................ P ensacola, Fla.
Johnson, Will Osteen ______________________ 2 ChE --------------------------------Columbus
Johnston, David White __________________ . .2 ChE ------------------------------------ Atlanta i :~;:::;: r:~,:~l~;:I,~l~ ?....??? ! !~~ ??..?..?.???....?..??.?????.?....?.??.. ~~:::
Johnston, James Shuttleworth ________ 2 M ________________________ Greenville, S. C
J ohnston, Robert SamueL ____________ .3 M Co -------------------------------- __ Atlant~
Johnston, W illiam MarshaIL ____ .A E -------------------- -- ---- -- --------------Atlanta
J oiner, Henry D oherty ____________________ 2 E --------------------------------------____ Athens
J oiner, William Rufu5.. ________________ . .2 M ---------------- -- ---- -- ----------------Atlanta
J oIly, Herbert H enry, J f.. ______________ .2 A ------------------------------------------Atlanta
J olly, Linton DanieL ______________________ .2 1M ------------------ ------------------ Decatur
J olly, William Martin ____________________ 1 1M --------------------------------------Atlanta
J ones, Alyn Richard ________________________ A CE ----------------------------------------Griffi n
J ones, Bobby J erome ______________________ . .! En ----------------------------------------Atlanta
J ones, Charles Merkle______________ __ ____ Irr -------------- -- -------------------- __ Atl anta
J ones, Edward LeRoy ____________________ A GE ------------------------------------ __ Atlanta
J ones, George G regory __________________ . .! Co ----------------------------------------Atlanta
J ones, J ohn Hardin, J r .. ________________ .3 1M ________________ Chattanooga, Tenn.
J ones, J ohn PauL __________________________ .1 En -- --------------------------------------Atlanta
J ones, J . T urner ____________ .: ________________ 4 T ------------------------------ ------------Canton
J ones, Lary Gordon ________________________ __ 1 En------------ ____________________ __ ____ Red Oak
J ones, Leslie Mangum ____________________ 3 E __ __ __ ____ __________________ __ Farmville, Va.
J ones, Richard Elvin ________________ ____ __ . .2 M Co ____________________ North East, Md.
J ones , Robert W esL ________________________ 3 PHE ------------------------ ----Cedartown
J ones, T om Moore ________________________ . .2 ECo -- ---- -------- ---- ------ --------------Macon
J ones, W illiam Arch, J r. ______________ . .! Co __________________________________ Sturgis, Ky.
J ones, William Charles __________________ . .! En ________________________________ N orfolk, Va.
J ones, William Lee, J r .. ______________ .A E ---------------------- ------------ __ Statesboro
J ones, Woodrow N athanieL ________ .1 Co -- ------------ --------------------Bainbridge
J onsson, Gustaf ________________________________ 3 IM ____________________ Rutherford, N. J.
J ordan, Carlisle Alwin __________________ . .! En ---- -------------------- ---------- ------Atlanta
* J ordan, George Was iz ington, Jr . __ . .! Co -------------------------- ----------Savannah
J ordan, Henry H unter.. __________________ 1 A -------------------------- ----------------Atlanta
J ordan, Harry Sheppard, J r. ____ ______ 3 ChECo -------------- -------- ----------Atlanta
J ordan, Joe W illiam ________________________ 3 Ch ------------------------------ -- ____ __ __ Dublin
J ordan, Wex W ilbur, J r .. ____ __ ____ __ __ .3 CE ------ ---- ------ -- ------ -- -------- ---- --Dublin
J oyner, Hugh Haralson __________________ 2 1M -------------- ---------- ---------- ____ Atlanta
J uhan, Quinley Dorsey __________________ __ 1 En ________________________ __ Stone Mountain
J usti , Charles Raine, J r. __ ______________ . .2 CerE -------------- ---- -------- ------ __ Atlanta
Kahdy, G eorge AssiL ____________________ .! En ---- ---------- -- ------ ______ __ ________ __ Macon
Karnack, Harry J oseph __________________ A ChE -- -- ---------- ---- ---- ________ ______ Atlanta
Kane, J ohn Brady __________________________ __ 1 En ______________________ __________ ______ __ Atlanta
Kane, Vincent Allen ________________________ 1 1M ----------------------------------____ Atlanta
Kaplan, A. N. __________________________________ . .2 T ------------------ ________________ Miami, Fla.
Karapin, Peter PauL ______________________ .2 M ____________________________ Fair Oak, Pa.
Karnes, Thomas CampbelL __________ .2 M ____________________________ CoviQgton, Va.
Kauffman, Sewell Thomas ______________ 3 I M ______________ Webster Groves, Mo.
Kauffman, William PorteL __________ .A IM ______________ Webster Groves, Mo.
Keen, Lehman M cGrath ____________ __ . .! En -------------------------- ______________ Dublin
Kehr, George SteeL __________________ __ __ .2 ChE. ______ .Cleveland Heights, Ohio
Keifer, Thomas H enry ______________ ____ __ 1 En ________________________________ Ashland, Ky.
Kell, Thomas N ance ________________________ 3 1M ____________________________________ Decatur
*Keller, G eorge Adam ________ : ____________ .1 En ____________________________________ Savannah
Kelley, Milton Eugene ____________________ . .3 1M ______________________________________ Atlanta
Kelly, John William ______________________ . .2 M ______________________________ 0 rlando, Fla.
Kelly, Leo Willi am __________________________ 3 ChE ____________________________________ Atlanta
Kelly, Richard J oseph ____________________ . .! En ________________________________________ Atlanta
Kelly, Taliaferro Bryan, Jr .. ----------. 1 Co __________________________ Asheville, N . C.
Kemp, William M arion ________ __ ________ . .! En ________________________________________ Atlanta
Kemper, Norman Willi am __________ __ __ 2 MCo __________________________________ Atlanta
Kempton, Robert Stanley ________________ 2 ChE. ______________ __ __ .Worcester, Mass.
Kendrick, Garland Lee __________________ . .3 M __________ __ __________________ Arlington, Va.
Kendrick, Tom Franklin __________________ 2 ChE. ________________________ .Laurens, S. C.
Kenimer, Robert Lee ______________________ . .2 E ______________________________________ Cleveland
Kennedy, Walter J amerson ____________ 1 En ____ __ ____________ __ ____ J acksonville, Fla.
Kennedy, William Redding ____ __ ______ . .3 MCo __________________________________ Augusta
Kenyon, Thomas N eaL __ ______________ . .2 ECo ------------------. -1 acksonville, Fla.
Kerby, Wilford Dixon ____________________ 4 E ____________________________ __ ____________ Atlanta
Kernaghan, Sylvian Henry, J r. __ __ __ 3 ChECo ____________ Hattiesburg, M iss.
Kerr, Thomas Alexander.. ______ __ ____ __ 2 ECo ____________________ Birmingham, Ala.
Kersey, Robert Noel, J r . __ ______ ____ __ . .2 M __________________________________ Largo, Fla.
Kesler, Stanley, J r .. ____ __ ____________________ .3 M --------------------------------------J efferson
Kessler, Roy Melvin ____________ ____ ______ A T __ __ ______________________ __ ______________ Atlanta
*Kestler, Emory Joseph ______ __ ______ __ ____ 1 Co ____________________________ St. Lbuis, Mo.
Ketchey, Charles Franklin __ __ ________ A ECo ________________ W inter H aven, Fla.
Keyserling, Monroe Phillip ____ ______ __ 1 En __ __________ __ ____________________ D ale, S. C.
Kiel, Robert Whiteman __ __ ______________ . .2 ChE. ______________ .St. Petersburg, Fla.
Kilgore, Hoyt Eugene ______ __ __ ________ __ . .! IM __________________ Chattanooga, Tenn.
Kilgore, William Huey __ ________ __ __ ____ . .3 M __________________________________ .Villa Rica
Killiam, David Edwin ______ __ __ __ ________ __ l En __ __ ____________ __ __________ . .Tyler , Texas
Kilpatrick, Charles William ________ . .2 T ________________________ __ ______________ Atlanta
Kimbrough, Robert Landon __ __ ______ . .3 A ________________________________ .Guthrie, Ky.
Kinard, Lawrence Henry __ __ ____ ______ . .2 GE __ __ ______ __ __________________ __ ______ Atlanta
Kincaid, Carroll Wilson __ ______________ . .! Co ________________________ M cKeesport, Pa.
King, Hal Foster. __________ __________ ____ __ __ .1 En __ ________________ __ ______________ ____ Cusseta
King, Joseph Henry ________ ____ __ ____ __ __ ____ 3 M ____ __ ________________________ Anniston, Ala.
264 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
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REGISTER OF STUDENTS 265
-~:~:: ) ~~~ ~~:~~d.~~:::: ::: :: :: : :::: ::: ::~ rEMC??O?? ?:.:.:.:.:.:.::::::::::::::::::::.:.:?.?.~.?.? .~.?~.? .. ~D?~e~cl~antu~r?
King, Norris Frampton ................... .2
* Kingsbury, Ralph N orman ............. .1 En ........................ M attapan, Mass
Kinnach, John Addy ........................ l En ........................ Memphis, Tenn:
Kirkland, Jean Elmo, J r ................. 2 GE ..... ????.????.??? .................... Atlanta
Kirstein, Alvin Ewald ...................... 3 E. ........................... Asheville, N. C.
Kitchens, Charles Dillon .............. ..4 CE ................................ Warrenton
Klebold, Robert SamueL .............. .2 A .......................................... Atlanta
Klein, Maurice ................................ ..4 ChE .................................... Augusta
*Kneisel, Edmund Bixby .................... 4 T .......................................... Atlanta
Kneisel, John Frank ....................... .2 GE ...................................... Atlanta
*Koebley, Albert Victor, Jr ............... 3 MCo .................................. Decatur
Kolakowski, Henry ErnesL. .......... .3 M ........................................ Atlanta
Kolb, Ray Melin ................................ 3 M ................................ Chicago, Ill.
Konowitch, Jerome ............................ l En ........................ Wildwood, N. J.
Korten, Bruce J ack .......................... l En ......................... .Y onkers, N. Y.
Korycinski, Peter Francis ................ 2 M .................... Schenectady, N. Y.
Kozlowski, Hillard ......................... .1 En .......................... Thornhurst Pa
Krafka, Joseph Franklin IIL. ........ 2 M ...................................... Au~st~
Krauss, Daniel Richard .................... 4 1M ................................ BrunsWick
Krauss, Otto Edmund ...................... 2 M .................... St. Petersburg, Fla.
Kreitzer, William Rutherford ....... .2 GE ........................ Savannah Beach
Kresser, Donald Clarke.................. Irr ............................ Boston, Mass.
*Krieger, Robert Lyman .................... l En ............................ Ft. Oglethorpe
Kuhn, James (Jim) ........................ 1 IM .............. East Bleckley, W. Va.
Kuniansky, Milton ........................... .2 1M ...................................... Atlanta
*Kuniansky, Raymond Louis ............ l En ........................................ Atlanta
Kurrle, Christian .............................. 2 M ............................ Baltimore, Md.
Kurtis, Alan Abraham ...................... 2 MCo .................. New York, N. Y.
Kutsche, Stuart Farnsworth ............ l Co ................ Grand Rapids, Mich.
Kutsche, William F. Blake ............ l En ................ Grand Rapids, Mich.
LaBoon, Joe Thaddeus ................... .2 MCo .................................. Newnan
LaBorie, George Ralph .................... 2 M ....... ~ ........... Spencerpor~, N. Y.
Lacefield, William Randolph .......... 5 ECo .......................... Florence, Ala.
Lacerenza, Joseph Anthony ........... .4 CE. ....................... Brooklyn, N. Y.
Lackey, Dalton Eston ..................... .4 IM ............ Barium Springs, N. C.
Lalor, Charles Kirwin .................... 2 GE. ............................... Miami, Fla.
Lamas, Andrew Charles .................. 2 T ...................................... Savannah
Lamas, Ted George ........................ 1 En .................................... Savannah
Lamb, Hal Willi am .......................... 2 IM .................. Chattanooga, Tenn.
Lamont, William Alexander.. ....... .1 Co ........................................ Atlanta
*Lampert, Seymour ........................... .1 En ............................ Dumont, N. J.
Lance, Robert Louis ........................ 3 Ch .................................. Gainesville
George Luke, J r ..................... l Co .............................. Aliquippa, Pa.
Lane, Norman Edward ................... .4 CE. ................... Chapel Hill, Tenn.
Lanf
e
, rd Horace Whaley ................ 2 CerE .................................. Atlanta Lan 0 , I
Lang, Robert Mc~onald, J r .......... .2
2
IMM ................ S ........ A .......... : .. .ATt anta
L Roy Harnson........................ .. .................. an ntomo, exas
Langen' walter Daniel Franklin ..... .4 ECo ................. .Twin Falls, Idaho * ange ' ?
Langley, James Max ........................ 3 M .......................... Memphls, ~enn.
Lankford, William Cotesworth ...... l En .......................... ?k .... :ii .... J;ftocn
L eW John Jacob, Jr .................... .1 En ...................... Moc SVI e, . .
L
ar
n' Edward Hightower ........... .2 T ................................ College Park arge ,
L R he James Hughlett ............. .4 ChE .............................. Cocoa, Fla . ? a oc , LaRoe, Edward Terhune ................ 4 ChECo .............. Greensboro, N. C.
Laseter, Joel Brand .......................... 4 1M .................................... Decatur
Lathem, George Wood .................... 1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Lathem, Louie Page .......................... 2 M ... : .................................... Atlanta
L ubly Charles Safford ................. .2 PHE .................................. Atlanta
La n' James Eugene ..................... .2 MCo .................. Birmingham, Ala. Lau~h~on Warren Preston .......... ..4 CE. ............... No. Hampton, Mass. L~~terba~h, Adolph Edwin, J r ...... .1 En .......................... Bartonville, !ll.
Lawler, Henry Hilliard ................. .! En ........................ Clarksdale, MISS.
Lawrence, Louis ................................ 4 M ................................ Norfolk, Va.
Lawrence, Seaborn Evans ................ 3 ECo ........................................ Ocilla
Lawrence, Tom Frank ................... .2 M ........................................ Atlanta
Lazenby, James Milton ................... .3 MCo .................................. Decatur
League Joseph Choate ................... .! A .......................................... Macon
L Blan~ Alphee Francis .................. 2 M .................... Miami Beach, Fla.
L:bo J~lian Irvin ........................... .! En .......................... Memphis, Tenn.
Leck~one, Robert Elmer.. ............... .3 1M ............................ Canton, Ohio
LeClair William Frank ................. .! En ........................................ Atlanta
LeCra~, Carter Buck.. ................... 2 1M ...................................... Atlanta
LeCraw Charles Stockard, J r ....... 4 1M ...................................... Atlanta
*Ledbett:r, Selman Alfonzo, Jr ...... .4 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Ledford, Gerald Edward ................ l Co.... .. .......... Daytona Beach, Fla.
Ledusky, John Peter.. ..................... .3 M .................... N ew Haven, Conn.
*Lee, Asa Bell, lr ............................... 5 TCo .................... Great Falls, S. C.
*Lee, Ben Herman ........................... .3 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Lee, Carlton Levi .............................. 2 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Lee Owen Clinton ........................... .2 M ...................................... Augusta
Lee: Robert Edward ........................ 3 1M .......................................... Rome
Lee Sydney Smith, Jr ..................... 4 E. ................................. Norfolk, Va.
Leedy, John Stratton ........................ 2 GE ...................................... Atlanta
LeFevre, Stanley Dart.. .................. l En .............................. Abington, Pa.
Legg, Milton Franklin .................... 4 IM ...................... Henderson, N. C.
Leitch, David Kirkwood, Jr .......... .1 En ........................................ Toccoa
266 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY REGISTER OF STUDENTS 267
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*~emon, J o~zn. William ...................... 4 PHE .................................. Atlanta
emon, Wilham Lane ..................... .2 ECo .................................... Smyrna
Lenhart, Albert Curtis .................... 1 Co ...................... Monongahela P
Lennard, William .............................. 3 CerE P'lh a.
Lennox, D avid Alexander .............. 2 M .... ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::A~la~:
*Lenz, Jos e Carlos .............................. 3 M ............................ Havana, Cuba
t~:~:~: ~~~~~d ::~~~~~~:::::::::::::::::: ~~E .. ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::g~~:~~:
Lester, James Beaman ................... .4 ECo .................................... Conyers
Lester, P almer Barefield ............... .2 GE .................................. Savannah
Letson, William Far~er ................. .4 A ...................................... Norcross
Leudemann, John Alvm ................... .2 M ........................ St. Albans N y
*L M?l ' . ev, I ton ....................................... .4 CECo ................ Youngstown Ohi:
Levi, Charles Isadore ..................... .2 GE. ........................... Annisto~ Alao
*Levin, Robert Brllce ......................... .4 IM ................................ Miam{ Fla'
Levine, Morton Leonard ................ l A ................................ Passaic 'N J'
Lew~s, Cla~ Hogan .......................... 2 ChE. ................... Clarksville,' T~nn:
LewIs, DaVid Gawley ...................... 1 En .................................... Columbu
Lewis, Donald Macdonald .............. l En .................. Daytona Beach FI S ~L . F k D . , a.
.. ew~s, ' ran avls ............. ............. 1 En ........................ Tallahassee, Fla.
Lew~s, James Carlton ..................... .2 1M .................................. Columbus
Lew~s, James Malcolm ................... .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
LewIs, Jesse Mead ............................ 2 M .............. .................... Ruston La
Lew!s, M.arion Thompson ............. .2 1M .................................. Col~mbu~
Lew~s, Ohver Kenneth, J r .............. .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
LewIs, Robert Porcher.. ................ ..4 1M ............................ Rockford III
L!bbe, Herman Henry .................... 4 E .......................................... Atiant~
L~?htner, Thomas HulL.................. G-Ch .............. Maxweiton, W. Va.
Lllpfert, James Crane ...................... 1 En .................................... Ft. Valley
*L~lentltal, Walter B enjamin 1 En .................................. Brunswick
Lim, Isabelo Pantangco .................... 4 1M ............................ Manila P I
Lindgren, Edgar Florentin ............. .3 1M ...................................... Atla?nt~
Lindgren, Ray William .................... l Co ................................ Miami, Fla
Lindley, Sam Pierce, J r .................. .3 M ........................................ Smyrn~
L!ndsay, Charles Sidney ................. .2 A ........... ............................... Atlanta
Lmdsay, Leroy Dewey ...................... l CO ............................ Springfield III
Link, Chester Valentine ................ ..4 A .................................. Chicago' Ill'
Linkous, Floyd J oseph ..................... .l Co ...................................... De~atu;
Lippincott, Harvey Holmes ............ 2 M .................... Moorestown N J
Lisenby, John Travis ........................ l Co ................... ..... N orwood ' N . C?
Littlefield, Robert Paul, J r ............ .l En ....................................... :Atl~nt~
Livingston, Edward Ernest ............. .4 CECo ........................ MiIledgeville
Lockery, James Edward ................. .2 M ........................ Central City, Ky.
Lockery, Lee David .......................... 3 l\1 .... , ................... Central City, Ky.
Lockhart, James Hamilton .............. 3 E .......................................... Atlanta
Lockman, Chalmers David .............. 3 IM .............. Hendersonville, N. C.
Lockman, William Stuart IIL ...... 4 IM .............. Hendersonville, N. C.
Loder, Neill Jerome, J r .................. .2 ECo ................ Chattanooga, Tenn.
Loftus, Kenneth Burr, Jr ............... ! En .................. Daytona Beach, Fla.
Logan, Walter Wells ....................... .l IM ........ _ ........ Chattanooga, Tenn.
Lohlein, Frank .................................. 1 Co ............................ Dumont, N. J.
Lohmann, Benjamin Harry ............ l En ........................ Fernandina, Fla.
Lokey, Ben Frank ............................ 4 ChECo ........................ Georgetown
Lomax, AHa ...................................... 1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Lombana, Louis AdeL. ................... 4 M ............................ Havana, Cuba
Lombardo, Charles Thomas ............ 4 M ............................ Westerly, R. I.
Long, Eugene Robert, J r ................. 2 ChE. ........................... Roanoke, Va.
Long, William Byron ........................ l En .............................. Tupelo, Miss.
Long, William Francis .................... 5 MCo ........................ Camden, Ark.
Longino, Walter Bruce ................... .3 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Lopez, Bennie Francis ...................... 4 ChE ............................ Tampa, Fla.
Lord, Robert Charles ...................... 2 M .......................... Pittsfield, Mass.
Loret de Mola, Melchor Alberto .... 3 E .............................. Havana, Cuba
Lott, George Agnew ........................ 3 GE. ........... New York City, N. Y.
Low, Avery Cobb, Jr ....................... 2 M ...................... Wilmington, N. C.
Lowe, William .................................. 3 M ........................................ Albany
Lowery, Andrew Armstrong ......... .2 M ................................ Manchester
Lowry, Benjamin Stanley, J r ......... 4 ECo ......................... .] ackson, Miss.
Lowry, Herbert Land ..................... .3 M ....................................... .Atlanta
Lugo-Vina Rafael Jose .................... ! En .................... Santa Clara, Cuba
Luis, Roberto Luis ............................ 2 CE .............. Pina Camaguey, Cuba
Lumsden, Walter Branham, J r ....... 3 M .................................. Nacoochee
Lynch, Charles Peter, J r ................. l 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Lynch, John DeYoung ...................... l En ................................ Union, N. J.
Lynn, Arthur Wayne ........................ 2 T ...................................... Marietta
Lyons, Sam Augustus ........................ l 1M ...................................... Atlanta
MacCullen, Allen, Jr ....................... l En .................... Washington, D. C.
*MacDollald, Herron Martin, Jr .... .4 IM ........................ Charlotte, N. C.
MacDonell, Alexander Henry ....... .4 M .................................... St. Marys
MacGregor, Richard Vale .............. l En ................................ Tampa, Fla .
MacIntosh, Lawrence Hudson ...... 4 A .............................................. Adel
MacIntyre, Daniel Irwin ............... .4 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Mack, Francis Murray.................... Irr ...................................... Atlanta
*MacKenzie, George N elson, Jr ..... 3 M .................... Chattanooga, Tenn.
Mackey, John Curtis ........................ 2 T ...................... Ware Shoals, S. C.
Maclin, John Clare .......................... ! Co .......................... Shreveport, La.
MacManus, Ernest Duke ................ 2 1M ...................................... Atlanta
MacMorland, Edward Elliott ........ 3 M .......................... Alexandria, Va.
I
?
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MacN abb. Malcolm ....................... .1 A .......................................... Atlanta
Madden. John Fred ......................... .2 ECo ...................... Columbia. Miss.
Maderra. James Thomas ................ 1 Co ................................ Thomaston
Maddux. Richard Henry ............... .1 En ........................................ Macon
Magill. Francis William ................. 2 CE .............................. Thomasville
Mahoff. Andrew Alexander ............ 4 GE. ............... Santa Monica. Calif.
Mahoney. William Cone. J r ........... 2 M ........................................ Atlanta
Majeski. Alexander John ................ 1 A. ....................... Waterbury. Conn.
Makredis. John Damon .................... 2 M ...................... New York. N. Y.
Malone. George Hurst.. ................. .1 En ......... : ............................. .Atlanta
Masterton. Bruce .............................. 2 ChE. ................... Santa Cruz. Calif.
Mathews. Charlie J oe ...................... 4 E .................................... Statesboro
Mathieu. Horace Joseph .................. 2 M .................. New Bedford. Mass.
Matson. Albin GustaL ................... .1 En ................................ Ware. Mass.
Matte. Paul J oseph .......................... 2 M ........................ Knoxville. Tenn.
Mattox. William Leckie ................. .1 En ....................................... .Atlanta
Mauldin. Henry Walter. J r .......... .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Mauney. George Stevenson ............. .3 E ...................................... Cleveland
Maxwell. Robert McAlpine ........... .1 En .............................. N orris. Tenn.
May. Roby deWitt.. .......................... 2 ChECo .... Watl\uga Valley. Tenn.
Malone. James Comer.. .................. 4 M ....................................... .Atlanta Mayfield. Allen Douglass ................ 4 ChE ................ San Antonio. Texas
Malone. Ralph Glenn. J r ................. 1 En ............................ Havana. Cuba Maynard. William Pinckney ............ 4 MCo ................................ Waycross
Malone. William Thomas ............. .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Malvestuto. Frank Stephen .............. 1 En ...................... Coral Gables. Fla.
Mayo. Charles Norris ...................... 4 1M .................................. Waycross
Mayo. Henry Gray ......................... .2 1M ........................ Portsmouth. Va.
Manley. Bryan Sewall. J r .............. .1 Co ................ Murfreesboro. Tenn.
Manley. Matthew Henry H ........... 4 ChECo ................................ Griffin
*Mayo, Joseph Britton ...................... 4 IM ........................ Portsmouth. Va.
Mazzacca. Alfred John ................... .1 En ...................... Rutherford. N. J.
*Manley, Theodore Manson .......... _S ECo ...................................... Griffin McAuley. Sheridan Forschler.. ....... .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Manry. William Fillmore III.. ...... 3 1M ..................................... .Atlanta McCaa. Edgar Allen ....................... .3 IM .................. Port Gibson. Miss.
Manzanilla. Joseph J usto ................ 3 M .............................. Havana. Cuba McCaa. Nelson Eugene .................... 3 E. ..................... Port Gibson. Miss.
Marchbanks. Glenn Henry. J r ....... 2 A .......................................... Atlanta McCabe. Sydney Walker.. .............. 1 En ...................... Washington. D. C.
Marchman. Henry. Jr ....................... 3 ChE .................................... Camilla McCallum. Robert Ernest.. ............. .2 IM ...................... Henderson. Tenn.
Marcin. Walter Joseph ................... .1 IM .................. Binghamton. N. Y. McCarty. Albert Francis ............... .3 CECo ........ St. Albans. L. I.. N. Y.
Marquette. Julius William .............. S MCo .......................... Mexico. Mo. McCarty. John Ottley ...................... 1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Marshall. Daniel Victor. J r .......... .1 En ........................................ Atlanta McCarty. James Weldon ................. .4 T ............................ Lubbock. Texas
Marshall. Jack Alexander. J r ......... 1 En ........................................ Atlanta McCarty. LeRoy Pearce .................. } En .............................. Tupelo. Miss.
Marshall. Wirt Edwin. J r .............. .3 1M .......................................... Rome
Martin. Arthur Carwile .................. 2 E ......................................... .Atlanta
McClanahan. David Newton .......... 3 ChE ...................... Columbus. Miss.
*McClearen, Donald Lyles ............... .5 MCo .................... Nashville. Tenn.
Martin. Charles Norris. J r ............. 4 1M .................................. East Point McCleskey. Walter Scott... ............. 2 CE .... : ............................... Waycross
Martin. David Bryce ........................ 1 En .............................. Dallas, Texas
Martin. Hugh Wilson ...................... 3 1M ................................ Thomaston
Martin. Ivan Hill. Jr ....................... 2 MCo ...................... Lynchburg. Va.
McClure. Arthur Bruce ................. .! En .............................. Canton. N. C.
McClure. Daniel Edward ..... ~ .......... 1 Co ...................... Harrisville. N. H.
McClure. Edward Wayne ................ 1 A ................... Ft. Lauderdale. Fla.
Martin. John Alston ....................... .1 En ....................................... .Atlanta
*-Martin, Laurence Freeman ............ 4 ECo ................................ Joplin. Mo.
McClure. Hoyt Lafayette ............... .2 ECo .................................... Atlanta
McClure. Milton Richard .............. 4 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Martin. Roy Allen ............................ 3 ECo ................................ Cocoa. Fla.
Martin. Robert William ................. .1 En ............................ Sandusky. Ohio
McComb. Henry Emerson .............. 3 CE .............................. Milledgeville
McCown. Marion Ryan .................. 2 ECo ...................... Charleston. S. C.
Martinson. Raymond Arvid ............ 4 MCo ........ Northport. L. I.. N. Y.
Marvin. Harry Norton .................... 1 En ....... _ ..................... Sarasota. Fla.
Marvin. Kenneth Tackabury ......... .2 ChE .......................... Sarasota. Fla.
+McDaniel, Edwin Dale .................... S ECo ........ New Smyrna Beach. Fla.
McDaniel. John Eugene. Jr ........... 2 CE ........................ Memphis. Tenn.
McDonald. Alvin Arnold ............... .! 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Mason. J ames Fred .......................... 2 M ........................................ Atlanta McDonough. John Wright.. ........... .2 M .............................. Dallas. Texas
Mason. Robert Edwards .................. 4 M .............. Laurelton. L. I.. N. Y.
Massengale. Gordon Bonner ............ 4 CerE .................................... Atlanta
Massey. George Whatley ................ 2 T .......................................... Atlanta
Massey. Irvin McDowelL. ............... 4 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Massey. Joseph Tooke ..................... .2 M .......................................... Macon
McDuffie. Robert Iverson ................ 1 En ...................................... Decatur
McFulan. David Charles ................ 2 A ................. Hendersonville, N. C.
McGarity. Henry Clay ................... .3 MCo .................................... Atlanta
McGaughey. Howell Mapp. J r ..... 4 T .................................... Dunwoody
McGaughey. Roy Dorsey. J r ........... 2 CE ........................................ Atlanta
270 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY REGISTER OF STUDENTS 271
McGaw, Sidney Gray, J r ............... l En ............ ? ..... ????? ................. Atlanta
McGee, Edward Allen ...................... l A .................................... Carrollto
McGinty, Robert Franklin ............. .2 1M ...................................... Atlant~
*MeGough, Wilson NewtOlI ............ 4 GE. ....................... Texarkana, Ark.
McGowan, J ohn ................................ 2 ChE ...................... Waynesboro Pa
McGraw, Charles Tyrous ............. .2 Cer E .................................... Atiant~
McGuire, Edwin Ambrose .............. 1 En ........................................ Atlanta
McGuire, Thomas Buchanan ......... .2 M ................................ Sebring, Fla.
*MeGuire, William PatrieL ............ 3 M ........................................ Decatur
*111' cIntosh, Claude H oward .............. 2 ChECo .............................. Augusta
McKamy, Thomas Knox .................. 3 MCo .............. Chattanooga, Tenn.
McKay, Edward Nixon .................. 3 A ............................................ Rome
McKee, George Henry, J r ............ ,4 E .......................................... Atlanta
McKenzie, Frank Ellis ...................... 1 En ........................................ Atlanta
McKinney, Jack Lewis .................... 1 1M ...................................... Atlanta
McKinney, Marion O'Dell, J r ....... 2 GE .................. Chattanooga, Tenn.
*MeKinnon, Charles Alexal1der ...... 4 1M ...................................... Atlanta
McLain, Warren Clifford, J r ........ ,3 ChE .................................... Decatur
McLain, William Richard ................ 4 ChECo .................. Huntsville, Ala.
McLaney, George, Jr ...................... .! En .......................................... Rome
*McLarty, William lackson .............. 4 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Merryman, Ralph E......................... G-ChE. ................... Gallatin, Tenn.
Metcalf, Harvey Marion ................ 2 E .......................................... Albany
Metcalf, Raymond Oscar.. .............. 4 Ch ........................ Westminster, Vt.
Metzger, Donald MacKaye ............ ! En ............................ Ft. McPherson
"Miehalezewski, Frank Walter ........ 2 M ............................ Newark, N. J.
Milford, James Ralph ..................... .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Millard, Maydwell Henderson ...... l En ........................................ Atlanta
Miller, Frank Alexander, J r ......... 3 ECo ...................................... Atlanta
Miller, Frank DeLaFontaine, J r ... 4 1M ...................................... Atlanta
~Miller, Fred Patterson ................... .1 En .................................... Columbus
Miller, George Ericson ................... ,3 CECo .................................. Atlanta
Miller, Herbert.. ............................... .1 En ...................... New York, N. Y.
Miller, Howard CeiL ..................... .1 Co ........................ Avondale Estates
Miller, John Alexander .................... 3 A .......................................... Atlanta
Miller, Sebastain Geisreiter.. ......... ,3 A .......................................... Atlanta
Miller, Samuel Lee .......................... l Co ........................................ Atlanta
Miller, William Jones ..................... .! Co .............................. Fairfax, S. C.
Milligan, Harry Chapman .............. 2 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Milling, Roy Edison, J r ................... 2 CerE .................................... Atlanta
Mills, Ralph Evans, J r ..................... 2 CECo .................................... Hilton
Mingledorff, Frank Crum ................ 4 CECo ................................ Douglas
McLendon, Samuel Cheney .............. 1 En ........................................ Tignall Mitchell, Bryan Burdette ............... ,3 T ........................................ Decatur
*McLeod, Charles Alexander .......... ! En ... ; ................................ Savannah Mitchell, Blake EarnesL ............... .2 M ...................................... Hampton
McLeod, Charles Roderick ............. .2 M ...................................... Pineview Mitchell, Edwin Thomas ................. .2 CerE .................................. Decatur
*McJl1ahon, Everette Keith .............. 2 ChE ...................... Wichita, Kansas Mitchell, Floyd .................................. 1 1M .................... Tullahoma, Tenn.
McN eill, Hector McAllister.. ......... .2 T .............................. Florence, S. C. Mitchell, George Senie ................... .2 M ........................................ Atlanta
McNenney, Eugene ............................ 2 M .................................. Tampa, Fla. Mitchell, Ralph Waymon ............... .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
McNulty, Frank Martin .................. 2 CE ...................................... Dawson Mitchell, William Wilson ............... .4 1M ........................................ Macon
*lvleRae, Donald Murdoeh ................ 5MCo .................................... Douglas Mixon, George Edward .................. 3 1M .......................................... Ocilla
McRae, Farquhar .............................. 2 CE .................................... Savannah Molnar, Atlas Huckabee .................. l En ...................................... Cuthbert
McRae, Fred Hampton .................... 1 En ........................................ At!anta Monaghan, Eric Julian, J r ............. 2 M .......................... Philadelphia, Pa.
McRae, Grady Malcolm .................. 3 M ........................................ Augusta Monck, John George ...................... 2 CerE ...................... Brooklyn, N. Y.
McWhite, George Edwin ................ 2 M ........................................ Arlanta Monsport, Eugene John ................... .2 M ........................ Bridgeport, Conn.
McWilliams, William Reese .......... 3 M .......................................... Dalton Montaldo, John Stanley .................. 4 PhE ........................ Ossining, N. Y.
Meadow, Francis J ackson ............... .1 Co ................................ Danielsville Moody, James Epps .......................... l En ........................................ Atlanta
*iv!eagher, Areh W ........................... l Co .......................... Whitwell,Tenn. Moody, William Franklin ................ 3 ECo ...................... Little Rock, Ark.
Meeks, Charles Edward .................. 2 TCo ................................ Blairsville Mooney, Jack OpaL ........................ 4 CECo .................................. Atlanta
Meeks, Jack L ................................... 4 ChECo ............................ Bb:irsville Moore, Alton Edison ....................... .l En ........................................ Atlanta
Mehaffey, Marshall J ames .............. 4 T .................................... Lanett, Ala. *Aloore, Charles Binford .................. ! Co .............................. Amory, Miss.
Meier, George Henry ...................... 2 M ........................................ Smyrna Moore, Carl Gordon ........................ l Co ...................... West Newton, Pa.
Merkey, Richard Edward ................ ! En .................................. Miami, Fla. Moore, Edward Alfred .................... 2 MCo .............. Daytona Beach, Fla.
Merrill, James Campbell, J r. .......... 4 1M ...................... J acksonville, Fla. Moore, Gary Garner ........................ ! En ........................................ Atlanta
Merritt, Norman Arlie ................... .2 ChECo .............. Ft. Worth, Texas Moore, Hugh CampbelL. ............. ..4 ECo ............................ White Plains
Merritt, vVarren George ................ 3 E .................................... Greensboro Moore, Hugh McVay ...................... 2 ECo ...................................... Tifton
272 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY REGISTER OF STUDENTS 273
Moore, James Pleasants .................. 4 M ........................ T ahlequah Old
Moore, Joe RiddelL. ....................... 3M Co ..................................... .Atlan~
M oore, Oliver Pitt~an ....... _ .......... .3 1M ................................. .LaGrange
M oore, Robert Juhan ...................... ! Co ................... ................. Covington
Moore, W illiam W allace ................ ! En .................................. Barnesville M ora, Raul Galvan, J r .................. .2 M .................... St. Petersburg, Fla.
Moreira, Renan ................................. .! En ........................ Camaguey, Cuba
*Morgan, Albert Rufus, lr ............... 5 CECo .................... Columbia S C
Morgan, Forrest Adams ................. .2 ECo .................................... lUI~nt~
Morgan, Joseph Warner.. ................ 4 A ...................................... W aycross
Morgan, Ted Harrison, J r ............. 2 ECo .................................... Atlanta
Morgan, William Watts, J r .......... .2 M ........................................ Atlanta
Morris, Atticus J ames, J r .............. .1 En ................................ College Park
Morris, Charles Mace ...................... 3 T ...................................... M arietta
Morris, George Wendell ................. .! En ........................................ Atlanta
Morris, John Blooming .................... 3 M .................. Carlsbad, N. Mexico
Morris, Merritt Eugene ................. .! En .......................................... Sparta
Morris, Paul Mayes ........................ 2 ChECo ............................ M arietta
Morrison, Clarence Rudisill ............ 3 E ............................ Hickory, N. C
Morrison, Harold Gibson ............... .1 En .................. Winter H aven Fla'
*ltlorrison, Norman lames, lr ........ .2 E. ....................... Chevy Chase' Md'
Morrison, Roy Clay, J r .................. .2 E .......................................... A~lant~
Morriss, Grover WendelL .............. 5 TCo .................................. Norcross
Morriss, Paul Vernon ...................... 1 En ...................................... Norcross
Morrow, H arry Kenneth ............... .! En .............................. Dormont Pa
Morrow, Richard DanieL. ............... 1 En ...................................... De~atu;
Morton , P aul Ammon ..................... .2 E .......................................... Atlanta
Murphy, D avid Joseph .................... 2 A .......................................... Atlanta
Murphy, Fred Michael, J r .............. .3 M ........................................ Atlanta
Murphy, J ames LeRoy, J r ............... 2 ChECo .................................. Tifton
Murphy, J oseph Robert... ................. 1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Murphy, Newell Barnard ................ 1 En ............................................ Trion
Murphy, Pascal H erman, J r ........... 2 E .............................. Etowah, Tenn.
Murphy, Robert Wiley .................... 4 1M .......................................... Jesup
Murphy, William Gregory .............. 2 E .......................................... Atlanta
Murray, Charles Taber, J r ........... 3 ChECo .................. Columbia, S. C.
Murray, George Phillip, Jr ............ .3 1M ...................................... Atlanta
*lJ,!urray, Harry Ernest.. ................. .1 En .................................. Crewe, Va.
*Murray, Ronald M cGregor ........... .3 E ...................................... Columbus
Murray, Thomas Monroe .............. 2 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Murray, William Frank ................. .1 Co ................................... ..... Bremen
Murrow, Samuel Joseph, J r .......... .5 ECo .................................. Savannah
Musgrave, Forest Melvin ............... .1 En ................................ Tampa, Fla.
Musgrave, William J ackson ............ 5 ECo ...................... Lake Mary, Fla.
Myers, Charles Frederick ................ 4 M ............................ Rockledge, Fla.
Myers, Vance Askew ........................ 3 ChECo ............ Brownsville, Texas
Myrick, Robert Lee .......................... 3 M ........................................ Atlanta
Nadeau, Arthur Rhuben .................. l En ............................ Newark, N. J.
Nading, Alexander Montgomery .... 3 IM .............. Winston-Salem, N. C.
Naegeli, Charles A. .......................... 3 GE. ....................... M aywood, N. J.
N alley, Gordon, J r ........................... 1 En ........................................ Atlanta
"Napier, Edward D ankey .................. 2 ChE ...................................... Macon
Narkates, Howard Eugene .............. ! Co ...................... Birmingham, Ala.
Neal, Charles Minchin, J r ............. 5 MCo ................................ Columbus
Moses, J ack ........................................ 1 1M ........................................ Vidalia Neas, Lucas M cCaw ........................ 2 E. .................. .] ohnson City, Tenn.
Motlow, Jack Daniel, J r ................. 4 TCo ........................ Lynchburg, Va.
Mott, Cyril Robert... ...................... .2 CE ........................ M emphis, Tenn.
Neel, Howell Heard ....................... .2 M ................................ Thomasville
Neely, Lester Marlin, Jr ................. 3 E. ................................. Marion, Ala.
Mount, Eldridge Milford, J r ......... 4 ECo ................................ Statesboro Neely, Lindsay Miner ...................... 4 E .................................. College Park
Mountcastle, William Randolph .... 1 En ........................................ Smyrna
Moyer, James Warren .................... 1 En ................................ Chicago, Ill.
Muerth, Albert Martin .................... 2 1M .................. Chattanooga, Tenn.
Neidhardt, Carl Richard ................. .1 A ..................... Chattanooga, Tenn.
Neill, Robert Deaver.. .................... l En ................................ Seneca, S. C.
Neisius, William Vincent... ............. 5 ChECo ................................ Atlanta
Muir, Robert CampbelL. ................. l En ........................................ Atlanta Nelson, Frank Harold, Jr .............. .! En ........................ Charlotte, N. C.
Mulling, Eugene Gregory ............... .2 M .......................... Ft. Monroe, Va. Nelson, Harry Burton ...................... 4 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Mumma, Harlan Leslie, J r ............. 3 IM ........................ Brooklyn, N. Y. Nelson, Richard Marion .................. 4 PHE .................................... Atlanta
Mumma, John Rathbone ................. .2 IM ........................ Brooklyn, N. Y. Nettles, Jack Edward ...................... 4 CE ...................................... Atlanta
Mundy, Reuben Wallis .................... 3 ChE ................................ Jonesboro Neuner, Cyrus Milton ..................... .2 M .................................. Barnesville
Munn, Arthur NeiL. ....................... 2 1M ...................................... Atlanta Neves, Roy Foster ............................ 1 En .................................... Ft. Gaines
Munroe, Richard Clagette .............. 2 1M .............................. Quincy, Fla. N ewborg, David Sidney ................... .2 E. ....................... N ew York, N. Y.
Munroe, William Donald ............... .2 M .................................. Quincy, Fla. Newby, David Henry ........................ 3 ECo .................... Birmingham, Ala.
Munson, Lloyd Emery ...................... 3 M .................................. Miami, Fla. Newell, Robert Olin ....................... .3 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Murphey, Billy Burns ..................... .! En ...................................... Newnan Newman, Donald Robinson ............ 1 En ........................................ Atlanta
274 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY REGISTER OF STUDENTS 275
~ ::::~', ~~;o~~d L~:~:~:':::::::::::::: ! ~E??~~:~~~:~~~:~~~~~.?~~~~~~~~~.?~~~~~~~?S~:le:~~~
Newman, James Gardner ................ 2 GE ................................. .LaGrange
Newsom, James young ................... .! En .................................. Union Point
N ewton, Frank Edward ................. .2 M ........................................ Atlanta
Newton, William George .. .............. 2 ChECo ............ Chattanooga, Tenn.
Ney, Robert William ........................ 1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Nicholls, Augustus Hoke ............... .2 ChE. ........................... lthaca N Y
Nichols, Daniel Shirley ................... .! Co ............ Harper's Ferry, 'w. 'Va:
ickell, Donald Holt ..................... .3 E. ........................... Ft. Myers, Fla.
Nifnecker, Leonard David .............. 2 GE. ..................... F t. Worth, Texas
*Oster, Robert H oward .................... 4 M .............................. Swissvale, Pa.
Ostrom, Charles Theodore ............. .2 GE. ................. Garden City, N. Y.
O'Toole, RoberL ............................. 4 E .................................. Deland, Fla.
Ouzts, John Andrew ....................... .3 M ....................................... .Augusta
*Overstreet, Edward Kinchley IIL2 E ..... _ ................................. Sylvania
Overstreet, John Franklin ............... .! Co .................................... Savannah
Overstreet, Robert SamueL .......... ..4 MCo ................................ Savannah
Owen, Edward PowelL ................. 1 En ................................ Miami, Fla.
Owen, Robert J ohn .......................... 1 En .............................. Portland, Me.
Owen, Steve Clements, J r .............. .3 MCo .............................. Woodbury
Owen, William RusselL ................ .2 ChE. ........................... Verga, N. J .
Nigro, J ames ...................................... 3 M .................... .............. Ft. Benning
Nisbet, J ohn LaWaIL .................. .3 T. ............... Winston-Salem, N. C.
Nishikawa, George Reizo ................ 2 A ....................... New York, N. Y.
Owens, William Bruckner.. ........... .5 MCo .................................. Decatur
Ozier, Richard Paul, J r .................. .2 M ........................ Somerville, Tenn.
Pace, William Wilkinson 111.. ........ 4 1M ........................................ Albany
Nix, Roy CarL ................................ .3 ECo ........................... ..... Cleveland
Nixon, Freeman Walker.. ................ 2 M .................................... Savannah
Nolan, Hubert Lester ...................... 5 MCo ................................ Rockmart
Padgett, Sam Finley .......................... 4 CE ...................................... Atlanta
Pafford, Jeff Wilcox ....................... .3 A ......... White River Junction, Vt.
Page, Paul Francis .......................... 1 IM .......................... L aconia, N. H.
Norman, James Marshall, J r ........ .2 GE ...................................... Atlanta Pair, Robert Henry ......................... .2 PHE .................................... Atlanta
orman, Richard Marks .............. ..4 M .................................... Columbus Palmer, Byron Herbert, J r. ............ 2 M ........................................ Atlanta
North, Donald Christopher, J r ..... ..4 CE ........................ Clearwater Fla
Northup, William Hazard .............. 3 M ............................ Pensacola: Fla:
Palmer, Robert Brown ................... .2 IM .................... M ap1ewood, N . J.
Palmer, Wallace Walter.. ............. .2 E .......................................... Atlanta
Notareschi, Don Joseph .................. 1 En .............................. McIntyre, Pa. Palmour, William Crenshaw.......... Irr .............................. College Park
*Nunes, Jos ep h Leon .......................... 4 CerE .................................. Atlanta Pardue, Daniel Gibson ................... .2 IM ................ Murfreesboro, Tenn.
Nunnally, William Branch .............. ! En .......................................... Rome *Parham, Troy Hilliard, Jr ............. 4 ChECo .................. Asheville, N. C.
N unnelee, Walter Irby, J r ........... ..4 ChE .................................... Atlanta Paris, Walter Edwin ....................... .4 CE ........................................ Atlanta
utt, Thomas Add ......................... .! Co ....................................... .J ackson Parker, Albert Sidney ..................... .3 1M ........................................ Millen
O'Barr, Tom Bayard ........................ ! Co .................................. Chile, S. A Parker, Eli EmanueL .................... .2 ChECo ...................... Sumter, S. C.
O'Callaghan, Richard Hayes ......... .2 1M ...................................... Atlanta Parker, Fred Lee ............................ ..4 CECo ............................ Cedartown
Odom, William EarL ..................... ! En .................................. Thomaston Parker, William Shelley ................. .2 GE .................................... Norcross
Oglesby, Redding Garrett ................ 3 ECo .................................... Atlanta *Parks, Edward Schley ...................... 3 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Ohberg, Olof Ernst .......................... 1 En ...................... New York, N. Y. Parks, Lloyd Elwin.......................... G-Ch .................... Lexington, N. C.
O'Keefe, Frank Lewis ..................... .2 A ......................................... .Atlanta Parks, Oattis Elwyn ......................... .3 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Olcott, George Potts III.. .............. 2 M .................... East Orange, N. J.
Olen, Steve ......................................... .! En ........................ Somerville, N. J.
Olive, Dixon Raines .......................... 2 PHE .............................. Talbotton
*Parks, Richard A1Ithony .................. 1 A .......................................... Atlanta
Parks, Tom Alvin .............................. 1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Parks, William Allen ........................ 3 ChE .................................... Atlanta
Oliver, Charles Thomas ................. .! En ................. ......... Brooklyn, N. Y.
Oliver, Edward Purse ...................... 3 M ........................................ Decatur
Parmenter, Bruce William ............. .! En ........................ Riverhead, N. Y.
Parnell, James Eugene .................... 1 Co .......................... McComb, Miss.
Oliver, Ferdinand DanieL ............. ! Co .................... Chattanooga, Tenn. Parnelle, Francis Wallis .................. 3 M ...................................... Savannah
Oliver, Gilbert George ................... .! A ................ Port-Au-Prince, Haiti Parr, John Marion ......................... .3 GE .................................. Savannah
*O'Neal, Bruce ................................... .3 ECo ...................... Huntsville, Ala. Paschal, Caraker Denham ............... .2 A ........................................ Decatur
Oquendo) Raul Augusto ................. .4 M .......................... Sta. Clare, Cuba Paschal, Lloyd Etheridge, J r ........... 1 En ........................................ Atlanta
*Ormond, Ale>"ander Clark .............. 4 M .................................... Savannah Paschal, William Avner .................? l 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Orr, George Edward ........................ 3 ChECo ............ Chattanooga, Tenn.
Orrin, Robert Carlton ..................... .4 CE .............................. Palatka, Fla.
Passarello, Nicholas J ohn ................ 1 En ........................ N orthvale, N. J.
Pate, Sam Gordon, J r ....................... 3 M ........................................ Atlanta
276 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY REGISTER OF STUDENTS 277
Patten, Allen Judy ........................... .5 ECo ........................ Newbern, N. C
Patterson, Hubert ........................... .3 MCo .................... Birmingham, Ala:
Patton, Charles Otis, J r ................... 4 IM ........................ Rock Hill, S. C
Patton, Mitchele Albert Nevin, Jr. Irr .......................................... Rom;
Paulin, Basil George ........................ 1 Co ........................................ Atlanta
Paulk, John Henry ............................ 3 1M ............................ Willacoochee
Paxton, Hugh Wallace ................... .2 M ................................ HoUston Pa
Peace, Thomas Lee ......................... .1 Co ........................................ Atiant~
*Peacock, Cassius Lee ........................ 3 ChECo ................................ Atlanta
Peacock, Glenn Fortson .................... 3 ChECo ............................ Columbus
Pearce, Henry Whitman, J r .......... .2 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Pearce, Thomas J efferson ............. .1 En .................................. Gainesville
Pearman, Horace Capelle ............... .2 GE. .................... , .... Syracuse N y
Pease, Harry Houston ................... .2 TCo .................................... Coh~tt~
Pieringer, Charles Francis .............. l En .............. West Coxsackie, N. Y.
Pilch, Charles J ohn .......................... l Co .............................. Olyphant, Pa.
piper, James Richard ........................ 2 M .............................. Richmond, Va.
piperas, Nicholas, J r ........................ .2 M .................... N ew Haven, Conn.
pippen, Macon Crawford ................ 1 1M ................................ Ensley, Ala.
pippen, Tom Sykes ........................... .4 1M ...................... Birmingham, Ala.
Pirog, Eugene Leonard ................... .3 IM ...................... Greenfield, Mass.
Pitman, Richard Dixon .................... 1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Pittard, James McCurdy, Jr .......... .2 MCo .............................. Monticello
Plaster, Ralph Augustus .................. 2 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Platter, Henry Van Every .............. l En ........................................ Atlanta
Platzman, Paul Morton ................. .1 En .......................... Brooklyn, N. Y.
Plaxico, Monroe Livingston ............ 3 GE ...................................... Atlanta
Pocius, Clarence F........................... Irr .................................... Hapeville
Peck, Robert Calvin ......................... .2 IM .............................. Roanoke, Va.
Peeples, John Randolph ................... .3 CECo ................................ Augusta
Pendleton, Charles Roberts ........... .1 Co ........................................ Macon
Penn, Charles Orman ........................ 2 MCo .................................. Douglas
Penney, Walter. Marvin ................. .2 M .............................. Decatur, Ala.
Perez, Juan Augustin ........................ l En .................. Pinar-del-Rio, Cuba
Perkerson, Louie N eil... ................... 3 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Perkins, Charles Louis ................... .3 IM .................................. Clarks, La.
Perritt, William Otho, J r .............. .3 GE ............................ Florence, Ala.
Poer, George William ..................... .1 En ....................................... .Atlanta
Pollard, Warren Randolph, Jr ....... l En ........................................ Atlanta
Ponce, Sergio Pedro ......................... .2 IM ................................ Miami, Fla.
Ponder, Charles Henderson ........... .3 T .......................................... Griffin
Ponder, William Thomas ............... .! En ........................................ Canton
Pool, Victor Ray ................................ 3 ECo ........................ Elk City, Okla.
poole, James Parrott ....................... .2 ChE .................................. Americus
Poolos, Nick ...................................... 1 En ....................................... .Atlanta
poor, Albert Franklin, Jr ................ .5 MCo .............................. Woodstock
Perry, Edward Vincent, J r ............ .1 En .................... East Orange, N. J.
Perry, George Robert ...................... 2 T ........................ Maplewood, N. J.
* Perry, Howard Raym ond ............... .5 ECo .................................. Arlington
*Person, Charles Edwin, lr .... : ........ 5 MCo .................................... Atlanta
Porter, Howard Eugene .................. 5 CECo ................ Chesterfield, S. C.
Porter, James Tinsley ..................... .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Post, Ernest Richard ........................ l Co ........................ Port Richey, Fla.
Potter, Wayne Frederick ................. .2 ECo ........................ Grays Lake, Ill.
Peterfreund, Lawrence .................... 1 En .............................. Bronx, N. Y. Potts, Irwin Lawrence ..................... .1 En .................................... Savannah
Peters, Charles Kesmodel... ............ .! Co ................................ Biloxi, Miss. powell, William Evans .................... 4 E .......................................... Atlanta
Peterson, Lewis Elmer ................... .! En .................. Stone Harbor, N. J.
Peterson, Richard Joseph ............... .2 M ...................... Washington, D. C.
Power, Charles Henry .................... 3 ChECo .............................. Decatur
Power, Dixon Douglas ................... .! A .......................................... Buford
Petty, Charles Harold, J r ............... 1 En ........................................ Atlanta Prator, John William ..................... .! En ....................................... .Atlanta
Petway, William Ernest ................. .3 M ........................................ Atlanta Prendergast, Earle Wynton ............ 4 E .......... , ............................... Atlanta
Pfeifer, John Leo .............................. 3 ChE. ................... Little Rock, Ark. Presson, Lawrence Stewart ........... .2 M ............................ Monroe, N. C.
Pharr, Robert Heard ..................... .4 T .................................. Washington Preston, John Gray.......................... G-E .................................. Marietta
Phillips, Edward Lemoine ................ 3 ChE. ....................... Corning, N. Y. Price, Edmund Janes, Jr ................ .2 CE. ......................... Ventnor, N. J.
Phillips, George William ............... .4 ChE ...................... Woodward, Ala.
Phillips, James Lewis, J r ................ .2 M ........................ Birmingham, Ala.
Phillips, Weller Abner ..................... .2 ChECo .......................... Miami, Fla.
Philpot, John Arthur ....................... .! En .......................... Nashville, Tenn.
Price, Hugh KendalL .................... .! En ....................................... .Atlanta
Price, Hugh McNatt ...................... l En ........................................ Vidalia
Price, Oscar Monfort, J r ............... 4 ChE .................... Birmingham, Ala.
Price, William Alexander ............... 2 1M ........................................ Atlanta
Piazza, John Peter ........................... .2 ChE. ........................... Bronx, N. Y.
Picco, John Francis, J r .................. .4 CE .......................... Brooklyn, N. Y.
Pi cozzi, Gabriel James ................... .2 M .............................. Summit, N. J.
Pieper, Edward Miller ................... .3 M .............................. St. Louis, Mo.
Pries, Ralph William ....................... .4 M ........................................ Atlanta
Prince, Richard Edward ................. .2 M ................................ N orfolk, Va.
Pritchard, Raymond Ralston ......... .2 GE ...................................... Atlanta
Pritchett, James HilL ..................... 1 En ........................................ Atlanta
278 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
REGISTER OF STUDENTS 279
Prothro, Robert King ....................... .2 ChE ...................................... Griffin
Pryor, Luther McBride .................. ! Co ...................................... Dougl
as Pryor, Robert McBride ................... .2 CE .................................... Moultrie
Pryor, Shepherd Green I1L .......... J E ...................................... Fitzgerald
Puckett, Charles Cofer ................... .! En ........................................ Atlanta
Puckett, Preston Gregory ................ ! En ........................................ Atlanta
Puig, Rafael Antonio ...................... ..4 M .............................. Havana, Cuba
Pullen, Walter Hudson ................... .2 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Pulliam, Charles Smith ................... .2 ChECo ................ Hillsboro, Texas
Pundick, Boris ................................... .2 M ........................ New York N y
Pupulidy, Alexander.. ........................ 2 CerE. ............ .Astoria, L. L' N? y'
Purinton, Harold Garland .............. l Co .................. West Bowdoin, :Me:
Quandt, Adam George, Jr ............... ! En .................... Wethersfield Conn
Quarles, James Eugene ................... .2 M ........................................ Smyrn~
Quigg, Byard Gordon ..................... .2 1M .......................................... Rome
*Quillian, Hugarwyn ......................... .3 CECo ............ Daytona Beach, Fla.
Quillian, James Wylie, J r. ............. J CECo ............ Daytona Beach, Fla.
*Quinn, William Gervaise, fr ........ .! Co ........................................ Atlanta
Rabin, David ..................................... .2 M .... Rockaway Beach, L. L, N. Y.
Racey, Ralph Ernest .......................... 4 M ........................................ Atlanta
Raettig, Alvin Ernest, J r ................. 4 M ........................................ Decatur
Ragan, Alexander Timothy .............. ! Co ................... : .................. Augusta
Ragsdale, Harry Wilkerson ........... J E .......................................... Atlanta
Raine, Thomas Willan ................... .2 IM ...................... Alderson, W. Va.
Rainey, Benajah LeRoy .................... 3 T ?????? ? ........................... Buena Vista
Rainey, Henry Frederick ................. .2 CECo ................................ Ellaville
Ralston, John Moore ....................... .2 ChECo ............................ Savannah
Rambo, William Stanley .................. 2 ChE .................................... Atlanta
Ramirez, Joseph Guillermo ............. J M .............................. Havana, Cuba
Ramsaur, Stokes ............................... .2 T .......................... Greenville, S. C.
Ramseur, Richard MacMillan ........ ! En ........ ; ............... Greenville, S. C.
Randman, Myron .............................. 1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Rankine, Christopher Allen Nisbet Irr ............................ Rahway, N. J .
Ransom, Eugene Mayson, J r. .......... 2 T .......................................... Atlanta
Ra ulerson, John Derieux, J r ........... 1 En ................................ B artow, Fla.
*Ravenel, Bruce Walker, Jr ............. 4 ECo ........................ Columbia, S. C.
Raynes, Julian J acob ....................... .3 PHE .................................. Augusta
Rea, Lathan Walker ........................ 3 E. ........................... Charlotte, N. C.
Read, Chase Broadwater, J r. ........ 3 MCo .................... J acksonville, Fla.
*Rebeske, Jolm Joseph ...................... l En .................................... Ft. Screven
Redd, James Thomas...................... G-ChE .................. Beaverdam, Va.
Redmond, Vincent Gaylord.............. G-AE. ............. O gdensburg, N. Y.
Redwine, Bradley Lewis ................. .2 M ........................................ Atlanta
Reed, Clifford Eugene, J r .............. .2 E ................................. ... Swainsboro
Reed, Richard C ................................ .! Co .......... North Tarrytown, N. Y.
Reeve, Charles Phillip, J r. ............. J E ........................................ Calhoun
Reeves, William Henry, J r ............ .2 CE .................................. Perry, Fla.
Regish, Michael Leo ........................ l Co ................ East Hampton, Mass.
Reid, Robert Morris ......................... .2 E ................................ : ......... Ro~ell
Reid, Thomas John .......................... ! En .......................... Ehzabeth, . J.
Reisman, Carl ................................... J 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Reisman, Robert DanieL ................. ! En ........................................ ~tlanta
Renwick, Erle Bingham .................... ! Co .......................... Kents. Hill, Me.
Repilado, Francisco .......................... ! En ........................ San DIego, Cuba
Respess, James Leonadus, J r ......... 2 1M ...................................... Atlanta
*Reuel, Norman Charles ................. .4 ChE. ................... St. Albans, N. Y.
Rey Andrew Nicholas ..................... .2 E ......................................... .Atlanta Rey~olds, Robert Craver.. ........... ..... 2 E. ....................... Binghamton, N. Y.
Rhoad Hal Jennings ........................ ! En ........................................ Atlanta
Rhode: Robert Edwin ..................... .2 ChECo ......................... .] oplin, Mo.
Rhudy Paul Archer ......................... .2 MCo ........................ Elk Creek, Va.
Rhyne: Paul Conrad, J r .................. .4 A. ....................... Lincolnton, N. C.
Ribble George William ................. .3 MCo .................................... Atlanta
Rice, Charles Crowley ..................... .! 1M ...................................... Atlanta
*Richards, Charles Philip .................. 4 1M ...................................... Atla?~a
Richards, Floyd Delma ................... .2 ChECo ?????.?.?? .............. IVoIcCaysv~1 e
*Richards, John Francis.. ................. .! Co ................ Ocean Spnngs, MISS.
Richards, Stephen Malone ................ ! Co ................................... : .... Atlanta
Richardson, Edmond Thompson ..... .2 A ............................ N ashVille, Tenn.
Richardson, Ned West ...................... ! En ........................................ Atlanta
*Richmolld, Gus, Jr ........................... l En ........................................ ~tlanta
Richmond, J ames Frank ................. .3 1M .......................... Ft. McP erson
Richmond, James Kenneth ............... .3 ECo ...................................... Atlanta
Ricks, Thomas J esse ............. ........... 4 ECo ...................................... Guyton
Riddle, Cornelius Griffith ............... .! En ........................................ Atlanta
Ridley, Robert Lee ......................... .3 1M ...................................... At~anta
Rigdon, James Wesley ..................... .2 E ............................................ TIfton
*Riley, L eo AI/red ............................. .! En .......................... Taunton, M~s.
Rinehart, Robert Lloyd ................... .2 ECo .............................. Allport, a.
Rivers, William J acocks ................. .3 M .......................................... Albany
Roach Alfred Ralph .......................... 4 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Roach: Charles Stowers .................. 4 E .......................................... Atlanta
Roane, George Douglas ................... .2 E ................................. ......... Atlanta
Robbins, Charles Marion ................. .! En .......................... : ..... : ..... Savann~h
Roberson, Robert. EarL ................... ! Co ........................ BlrmIngha~, ~ a.
Roberts, Fred Miller................... ..... G-Ch ........................ St. LOUIS, o.
Roberts, Milton Emmette ............... .! Co .................................... Savannah
Roberts, Ormond J oseph ................. .2 T .................... Chattanooga, Tenn.
280 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY REGISTER OF STUDENTS 281
Roberts, Oscar Leland (Lee) ....... .! Co ................................ Tampa Fla
~obertson, Gay Auphrick, J r .......... .2 E ......................................... .A~lant~
obertson, Horace Luke ................. .3 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Rob~son, C~rl Washington, J r ....... 4 M .................................... Savannah
Robms, Alvm Gerald ........................ 1 En ............ Rockville Center N Y
Robinson, Byron Oswald .................. 1 En ............................ Sa'van'n h' ........ a
Rocamora, Leon :r;>avid ................... .3 M ........... : .............. Asheville N C ~odier, Martin William, J r ............ .3 T ......................................... :Atl~nt~
R oepe{, William He~ry .................... 1 Co ........................................ Atlanta
oese , Thomas LOuis ..................... .! En .................................... Savannah
Roessler, Carl Adam ....................... .3 MCo .................................... Atlanta
Rogers, John Theron, J r ................ .3 M .............................. Eastma ........ n
~ogers, Ro~e:t Fur~an .................... 1 En ...................................... Morrow
ogers, W.Ill.lam Blshop .................. 1 En ........................................ Atlanta
~ogers, WIlha~ L~e ........................ 3 1M ................................ Gainesville
ogge, John Fnednch ..................... .2 M ...................... Binghamton N y
Roland, Robert Lee................. ......... Irr ........................................ Atl~nt~
Roper, Grady Wayne ........................ 2 CE ........................................ Albany
Rorden, Arthur William .................. 1 En .............. Queens Village N Y
R W?ll? D I ' . ose, I lam oug as ................... .! En ........................................ Atlant~
Ross, Donald Strong ....................... .3 ChECo .................. Topeka, Kansas
Ross, Harry Grafton ....................... .! En .......................... Marmora N J
R H J k 2C ' ..
. oss, arry ac son........................ E. ............................... Tampa Fla
Ross, James Waters.......................... G-Ch ............... .Island Creek' Md' ~oss, R~y~ond ':Villiam, J r. ........ ..4 M ........................................ Atlant~
055, Wilham Chfford ..................... .2 MCo ...................... Baltimore Md
Rowland, Charles Grecnlee ........... .2 M ...................................... Sav'annah
Roy, John Curtis .............................. 4 1M ................ Charleston W Va
R b k N ' . . u ac, orman ................................ 1 Co .............................. Omaha Neb
Rubin, Samuel Sanford ...................... 1 En .......................... Y onkers N Y'
*Rucker, Egbert Darnell ................. .! Co ........................ Dycrsburg' Tenn'
R d I h Ph?l? B k ' . u 0 p, I IP ur e ..................... .1 A .......................................... Atlanta
Ruman, Joseph ................................. .2 E ........................ M t. Holly N J
Runyon, Norman Ernest .................. 1 En .......................... Audubon' N' J'
R b F'l ' .. uppers urg, m ey .......................... 1 En ................................ College Park
Russell, Robert Mahlon ................. .2 CECo .................................. Macon
Russo, Felix Ralph ............................ 1 En ........................ Brooklyn N Y
Rutherford, Rabun Frank ................ 1 Co ...................... Montgom~ry 'Ala'
Ryan, Frederick Francis ................. .2 MCo ...................... Brooklyn N Y' R F P , .. yan, orrest at ............................ 4 A .......................................... Atlanta
*Rybert, Thomas Frederick, Jr ...... .1 En .............. : ......................... Atlanta
Ryckeley, Alfred Edwin ................... .! 1M ...................................... Atlanta
*Sadenovsky, Raymond Morris ........ l En .......................... Harrison N J
*Saeman, Walter Carl George .......... 5 ChECo .................... N orlina' N' C? , ..
*Saffir, H erbert Sey mour .................. 4 CE. ....................... Brooklyn, N. Y.
"Saffold, Thomas Franklin ................ 4 ECo .................................... Atlanta
Sale, Stanley Alexander. ................... 1 En ........................ J acksonvillc, Fla.
Samoden, Edward Walter ................ 5 ChECo ............ New H aven, Conn.
Sampson, James Nicholas ............... .5 CECo .................................. Atlanta
*Sams, William Taylor ...................... 4 ECo ...................................... Atlanta
Sanders, Charles Robert ................. .2 IM ...................... Birmingham, Ala.
Sanders, Donald William ................ 4 ChE. ......................... Bessemer, Ala.
Sanders, Edwin Johnson, Jr ........... l A. ................................... Miami, Fla.
Sanders, Robert J ackson ................. .2 1M ..................... .] acksonville, Fla.
*Sanderson, William Robert ........... .3 CerE. ..................... St. Gabriel, La.
Sandhagen, William Bernard .......... 1 Co .................................... Peoria, Ill.
Sands, Jack Edwin ........................... .3 TCo ................................ Columbus
Sargent, George Thomas ................. .! En ........................................ Atlanta
Saul, David ....................................... .2 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Saums, John MerrelL. .................... .2 CECo .................... Plainfield, N. J.
Saunders, Richard Robertson, J r .. .2 ChE. ..................... Reidsville N. C.
Savage, Harry Clifton ..................... .2 ChE .................................... Atlanta
"Savage, Reuben Thor/zton ............... .! En ........................................ Atlanta
Savini, David Owen ....................... .1 A .......................................... Atlanta
Sawyer, Stephen Alexander ............. .2 ChE .......................... Anniston, Ala.
Scamell, Vincent Anthony ................ 2 ChE. ........................... Nutley, N. J.
Scanlan, J ames Michael Taylor ..... .! En ............................ Bellaire, N. Y .
"Scanling, Edward LeRoy ..... ............. 4 PHE .................................... Atlanta
Scarborough, William Whitfield ... .2 1M .............................. Thomasville
Schaefer, Regis J oseph ..................... .2 GE .......................... Pittsburgh, Pa.
Schenck, Eugene Lewis, J r ............ .3 CECo .......................... College Park
Schlesinger, Clyde Page, Jr ............ .3 ChECo ............ Chattanooga, Tenn.
*Schmidt, Edward Jacob ................... .1 En .......................... Malvern, N. Y.
Schmitter, Bernard Milard .............. 4 CECo .................... Fairview, N. J.
Schneider, Charles Robert ............. .! Co .................................... Americus
Schneider, Winslow McCrummen .. 2 E ........................ Montgomery, Ala.
*Schoonmaker, John J oseph ............. .2 ChE. ..................... Kingston, N. Y.
Schotanus, William MitchelL. ...... .3 M ........................................ Atlanta
Scott, John Evans ............................. .1 En ........................ Charlotte, N. C.
Schottler, George Henry ................. .3 M ............................ Baltimore, Md.
Schreeder, John MarveL. ............... 4 PHE .................................. Atlanta
Schreeder, William Blauvelt ......... .3 PHE .................................... Atlanta
*Schreider, Ernest J ackson ............... .1 En .............................. Portland, Me.
Schrenell, Ralph Irwin ..................... .1 En ............................ Newark, N. J.
Schroeder, Frederick Eugene .......... 4 T .......................... Greenville, S. C.
Schroeder, George Colton ............... .1 Co .................. Daytona Beach, Fla.
Schuder, Rollie Melton, J r ............ .2 M ........................................ Atlanta
*Schulherr, Kurt Egon ..................... .2 Ch ........................................ Atlanta
282 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY REGISTER OF STUDENTS 283
*Schulze, Robert Allison .................... 3 ChE .................................... Atlanta
Schulze, Van Vliet ........................... .! Co .............................. Croton, N. Y
"Schwahn, Frank Jam es ................... .! En ................ Richmond Hill, N. y'
Schwarcz, Richard SamueL.. .......... .2 A. ....................... New York N y'
Schwartz, Howard Kenneth ............ ! En .................................. Mia.:ni 'Fla'
Schwartz, Sidney ............................... .! En .................... N ew Haven. Conn'
Sconyers, Junius Walbert.. .............. 4 M ................................ Malden, Mo:
"'Scott, Edward Francis ...................... 2 A .................................. T ampa, Fla.
Scott, John Earle, J r ....................... 3 T .......................................... Atlanta
Scott, James Franklin ...................... 3 M ........................................ Atlanta
Scott, Owen Oliver.. ....................... ,4 T .................................. Union Point
Scruggs, ' John Franklin .................... 3 1M .................................... Valdosta
Sculnick, Simon Herbert.. ................ ! En ...................... N ew York N y
Seacord, Charles Lynn, J r ............... 2 GE ...................................... 'Atl~nt~
Seale, William Bradley .................... 4 PHE .................................. Atlanta
Seay, Robert Leon ............................ 4 CE ...................... Birmingham, Ala.
Shenk an, Marshall PauL.. .............. .2 ChECo .............. Coral Gables, Fla.
Sheppard, Joseph D avis ................... .! En .................................... Savannah
Sheram, Frank Louis ........................ 3 MCo .......................... College Park
Sherard, Robert Winburn ................ ! En ........................................ Atlanta
Sherertz. Herbert J ackson .............. 4 IM .............................. Roanoke, Va.
Sheridan, Thomas Emmett.. ............ 4 M ............................ Bessemer, Ala.
Sherman, Robert James .................... ! En ........................................ Atlanta
Shero, Sidney Soloman ..................... .! En .......................... Brooklyn, N. Y.
Sherrill. J ack.. .................................... 4 ChECo .............. H attiesburg. Miss.
Sherrod, Charles Anthony ................ 3 M ........................ Covington, Tenn.
Shipley, Reed Edwin .......................... 3 Ch ....................... , ................ Atlanta
Shipley, Vernon McCoy, J r ............ .3 A ...................................... Savannah
Shipman, Willi am Len ...................... 4 MCo .................... Dyersburg. Tenn.
Shirley, John William ..................... .! En .............................. Tupelo, Miss.
Shoemaker. Frank Ogle , J r. .......... ..4 ChE ........................ Berkeley, Calif.
Shonnard. Clarence W aldron .......... 2 ChECo .............. Ridgewood, N. J.
Seay, William Reynolds .................. 2 E .......................... Birmingham, Ala.
See, Samuel David ............................ 4 ECo ................................ Louisa, Ky.
*Segal, SauL ....................................... .1 En .......................... Roxbury, Mass.
Segall, Bernard E., J r ....................... 4 M ............................ Shreveport La
Segrera, Pedro Enrique .................. ..4 ChE .......................... Havana. Cub~
Seiferth, Ralph Werner.. .................. 3 GE ............ West New York N J
Sellers, Lamar, J r ............................ .! A .......................... Clarksdale: M'iss:
Sena, John MichaeL.. ....................... 4 CE ........................ H ar tford, Conn.
Shoop, Robert Alan ......................... ,3 1M ...................... Birmingham, Ala.
Shuff, John Winfred, J r .................. .3 M ........................ Birmingham, Ala.
Sibley. Charles Fred ......................... .2 1M ........................................ Griffin
Sibley. Hubert Oscar.. ...................... 3 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Silver. Sidney ...................................... 3 E .......................................... Atlanta
Silvis, Donald Gene ......................... .! En .......................... Massillon, Ohio
Simerly. Ozro Edward .................... ! Co ........................ Hampton, Tenn.
Simmons, William Reed ................. .! Co ................................ Halls, Tenn.
Sessoms, Frank Sirmans .................. 5 MCo .................................... Cogdell
Sessoms, George William ................ ! En ...................... St. Augustine. Fla.
Settle, Ezra Smith, J r ..................... 2 M ........................................ Jackson
Sewell, Daniel Evans ....................... .! Co ........................................ Atlanta
*Sewell, William Richard ................. .l En ........................................ Atlanta
Sexton. Eugene Preston .................... ! En ................................ N orfolk. Va.
-"Shackelford, Jolin Cooper ................ 2 CE ........................ Greenville. S. C.
Shamhart, Wilmer Harry, J r ......... 4 ChE .................... Rockwood, Tenn.
Simms. Arthur Benjamin .................. 2 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Simms, J ames Ward .......................... 5 A .......................................... Atlanta
Simms, Richard Lee .......................... 2 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Simons, Taveau Mitchell, J r ......... 4 CerE .................................... Atlanta
Simpson. 'William McGee ................ 2 A .................................... Brunswick
Sims, William Howard .................... 3 GE ............................ St. Louis, Mo.
' Singer, Paris George ........................ 2 GE .................................. Columbus
Sinica. John, Jr ................................ .3 M .......................... Red Bank. N. J.
Shannon, Henry Bascom, J r ........... 2 1M .................................. East. Point
Sharshon, Walter SamueL.. ............ .2 ChE .................... Flemington, N. J.
Shatzen, Maxwell Louis, J r ........... 2 Ch ........................................ Atlanta
*Shaw, Edward Harrison ................. .2 ChECo .............. Coral Gables, Fla.
Shaw, Gene ........................................ 3 GE .................... Ft. Worth, Texas
Sisco. William E............................... G-Ch ............................ Sturgis. Ky.
Skalwold, Robert Norman .............. 4 M-Co ............ Bound Brook, N. J.
Skelton. Parke .................................... 2 E ........................................ Hartwell
Slaght. Edgar Clive .......................... 2 ChECo ............................ Brooklyn
Slikas. Charles Anthony .................. 3 ChE .................................. Brooklyn
Shawver, Paul Ross .......................... ! Co .................. Huntington. W. Va.
Shearer, Charles Forrest.. ................ 2 ECo ................ Huntington. W. Va.
Shearouse, Lee Alan .......................... 4 CerE ................................ Savannah
Sheetz, Francis Bond, J r ................. l A ............ J acksonville Beach. Fla.
Small, Artie Harcourt IIL ............ 4 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Small, Millard Thomas .................... 2 M ........................................ Atlanta
Smith. Alfred Quinton ...................... 2 1M ........................................ Atlanta
Smith, Anderson Quillian ............... .3 CE ................................ Barnesville
Sheffield, W alter Harris .................. 3 PHE .......................... Cedar Springs
Sheldon, Brooks .................................. 3 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Sheldon, Robert Wilson ................... .1 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Smith, Bert ....................................... .3 CE ...................................... Atlanta
Smith, Bert Winton .......................... 2 ECo .................................... Decatur
Smith, Charles Elry ......................... .! 1M ........................................ Atlanta
284 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY REGISTER OF STUDENTS 285
Smith, Eugene Alvan ....................... .3 ECo ???.?? .......................... East Po '
Smith, Everand Dale ....................... .1 Co ............................ Lawrencevi;~t
Sm~th, Edward Rupert... .................. .2 1M ...................................... Atlant:
Smith, Edward Stanley ................... .1 Co ............................ Monson Ma
*Smith, Frederick Harvey, 11' .......... .3 E. ................. Cristobal, Can~l Zo~s.
Smith, Frank Wilson ........................ 2 ECo .................................. Elberto~
Sm~th, George William .................... l En ........................ Arlington, Mass.
Smith, Harry Clay ........................... .2 ChE. ................... Ocean City N J
Smith, Houston Dixon, Jr ............... 4 1M .................................. Coiumbu~
Sm~th, Hillyer Seab?rn ................... .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Smith, Joshua D ameL................... G-Ch ...................... Madison Miss
Smith, Jack Gillespie ...................... ..4 E. ......................... H aynes Ci~y Fla'
Sm~th, James Pendergrast .............. 4 1M .................................. Sav~nnah
Smith, Jackson Stocks ...................... 2 E. ......................... Bronxville N. Y
Smith, John Strother.. ...................... 5 ChECo .............................. Mariett~
~m~~, f.aswellHKin~ ... J ..................... 1 En .......................... Lebanon, Tenn.
mit, 10 ton arns, r ................ .1 En .................................... Covington
Smith, Monroe Jerome, J r ............ .3 T .......................... Brookline Mass
Smith, Ned Nolan ............................ l En .................................... C~lumbu~
Smith, Paul H .................................. .1 Co ...................... Haynes City Fla
Smith, Roy Fowler ............................ 4 CE .................................. Talbotto~
Smith, Richard Henry ..................... .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Smith, Robert Lofton ........................ 1 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Smith, Richard Newton .................... 1 Co ........................................ Macon
Smith, Robert Victor ........................ 1 A ...................... Charleston, W. Va
Smith, William Clair.. ...................... 3 1M ...................................... Newna~
S 'th W'll' G 'bb J ml, I lam I s, r ............... 4 ChE. ................... Lake Worth Fla
S 'h WI' H ' . mit, y Ie o~eIL .................... .1 En .................................. LaGrange
Smoot, J ames Reld ........................... .1 A .................................... Woodbury
Snooks, Bartow Randolph ................ 4 1M ......................................... .Ailey
Snyder, John Franklin ..................... .2 Ch ........................ J acksonville Fla
S b I ' . o e son, Lester Leo ....................... .1 En ............................ Newark, N. J .
Solakian, Aress Vahakan ................. .1 En .............................. Bronx, N. Y.
Solomon, IsraeL ............................... 4 ChECo ...................... Camden, Ark.
Solomons, Philip .............................. ..2 1M .................................... Savannah
Sortore, Arthur Emerson .................. 2 GE ...................... Avondale Estates
Souther, George Luke, J r ............. _2 M .......................................... Macon
Souther, Joseph Maurice ............... .1 En .......................... Biltmore, N. C.
Spangler, Howard Edmund ............ 5 ChECo .................. Bradenton, Fla.
~~:~~!~r R.RN'!:;~: : ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::=~ !" ':::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::=~~~.~~~g~~~
Speakes, Charles Cooke .................... 1 En ................................ Benoit, Miss.
Spears, John Wilson, J r .................. .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Speed, Andrew Biset... ..................... 2 E. ................. Grosse Pointe, Mich.
Spell, Richard Evans ........................ 2 M .......................... Charleston, S. C.
Spell, William Arthur, J r ............... 4 T ' .......................................... Atlanta
Spencer, John Edward ..................... .2 Co ................................ Palatka, Fla.
Spencer, Robert EarL .................... .! Co ................................ Palatka, Fla.
Spencer, William Arnold .................. 2 M .......................... Caroleen, N. C.
Spitko, John Edward ....................... .! En ..................... : ...... Bridgeport, Pa.
Sprayberry, James PauL ................ .3 1M ..................... .] acksonville, Ala.
Spreen, Russell William .................. 2 M ................................ Nutley, N. J.
Spurlock, A. D .................................. .3 M ........................................ Dawson
Spurway, Jesse Everitt.. ................. .! En ........................ Galveston, Texas
Stafford, Robert McKinley .............. 3 ChECo .................. Salisbury, N. C.
Stall, Robert Jennings, J r ............... 4 MCo ................................ Savannah
Stapleton, Christian William ......... .2 M ...................... Glen Ridge, N. J.
Starnes, Thomas Lowe, J r ............... 2 M .................... Winter H aven, Fla.
Starr, Francis Joseph ....................... .! En ........................................ Macon
Staton, Albert Hammond ................ 3 ChE .................................... Atlanta
Stauverman, Edward, J r ................. 4 ChE .................................... Atlanta
Steed, Henry CallieL ..................... .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Steele, William Irvin, J r ................ .1 Co ........................ Statesville, N. C.
Steeves, Roy Talmage...................... Irr .......... Wolfville, N. S., Canada
Stimer, Theodore George ............... .3 CE ........................ Elmhurst, N. Y.
Stein, Wilbur ...................................... 1 IM ........................ Elizabeth, N. J.
Stephens, Albert Thomas .................. 3 1M ...................................... Atlanta
*Stephens, H enry Edward ................. .2 MCo .................................. Fairburn
Stephens, Lloyd Howard .................. 3 ChECo ...................... Lyman, S. C.
Stephenson, James Elmer ................ 1 Co .................................. Mt. Vernon
Stern, Lewis Friedman ................... .1 En ...................... New Orleans, La.
Steudel, Robert Warren ................. .2 IM ................................ Chicago, Ill.
Stevens, Charles Robert ................. .1 En ...... Tucuman, Argentina, S. A.
Stevens, Henry Dana IIL ............. .1 1M .................................... Savannah
Stevens, Thomas Edmund, J r ........ .2 T ...................................... Savannah
Stevens, William J ohnson .............. ..4 E. ................... Yonges Island, S. C.
Stewart, Frank Marion III.. ......... .2 M ............................................ Gray
*Stewart, George Howard ............... ,3 GE ................................ Cedartown
Stewart, Hunter Williamson .......... 3 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Stewart, Robert Bolling, J r ............ .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Stewart, Ralph' Stephens .................. 3 PHE .................................... Atlanta
Stiglets, John Alva, J r .................... .1 Co .................... Hattiesburg, Miss.
Stitt, James Edward ........................ 2 M ........................................ Smyrna
St. John, Milton Wilcox, J r .......... .1 En ............................ Pittsburgh, Pa.
Stockbridge, Derry Lamar, J r ........ .1 Co ........................................ Atlanta
Stockdale, Walter Graham .............. 4 ChE .................... Birmingham, Ala.
*Stoops, Robert Saunders.. ............... 3 M .......................... Philadelphia, Pa.
*Stopinski, Frank William, 11' .......... .2 M ........................ Middlesboro, Ky.
286 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY REGISTER OF STUDENTS 287
Storer, Stacy Steward ..................... .5 MCo ............................ Douglasville
Stott, Ernest Eugene ....................... .2 CerE.............................. Atlanta *~::::::: ;~.;:! # ::~k::::::::::::::::::::::::j in .:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::~~~~:~
Taylor, Wilbur Asher.. ................... .2 M ........................ Bridgeport, Conn.
Taylor, Walter Eugene .................. 3 1M .................................... Cuthbert
Taylor, Warren Watson ................. .2 A. ........................... Tarboro, N. C.
Teague, William Benjamin ............. .3 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Stradtman, George Washington ... .2 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Stratton, Edward EarL ................... 1 Co ???????????.? ... ? ....................... Cordele
Stribling, George ToL .................... .1 En ............ Point Pleasant, W. Va.
Strickland, Fred Eager ..................... .2 E .???????? ................................... Griffin
Strickland, Glenn Geza ................... .3 CE .. ?.?.??.??.???? .. ? ..................... Duluth
Strickland, Henry Richard .............. 4 M ...................................... Concord
Strickland, Roy Evans, J r. ............ ..4 IM ........................ Clearwater, Fla.
Strickland, Robert Mercier.. ........... .1 En ............................ Beacon N y
Strozier, George Clabourn ............. .1 En ..................................... .'Ne~na~
Stuart, Willard Thomas .................. 3 M .............................. Groton, Conn.
Teat, James Ira ............................... .5 TCo ...................................... Athens
Tenenbaum, Henry Louis ............... .2 ChECo ............................ Savannah
Tennison, Jack Craig ....................... .2 IM ........................ Texarkana, Ark.
*Tharpe, Jam es Benjamin ............... .1 En ........................ Tallahassee, Fla.
Tharpe, William Mathews.. ........... .! En .................................... Arlington
Thibadeau, Robert Murray ........... .! En ........................................ Atlanta
Thies, Austin Cole ............................ 1 En .......................... Charlotte, N. C.
Thomas, Charles Lodge ................. .! 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Thomas, Edward HiIL ................... 4 T .......................... Nashville, Tenn.
Thomas, Francis Irvin ................... .3 1M .............................. Paris, Tenn.
Stubbins, Joseph Briggs ................... .4 E. ......................... Birmingham, Ala.
Stuntz, Robert PauL ..................... ..4 M ...................... Bartlesville, Okla.
Thomas, John Boyd ......................... .! En ........................................ Atlanta
Thomas, James Tate ........................ 2 M ........................................ Dalton
Sturgis, John Robert ....................... .3 ChE .................................... Atlanta
Sturm, Frederick Wingate ............. .2 M ............................ Appalachia, Va.
Thomas, William Bernard ............. .3 M .................... St. Petersburg, Fla.
Thompson, Auburn Edward ........... .! En .................................... East Point
Sturrock, James Parker.. ................. .2 GE. ........... West Palm Beach, Fla.
Sudderth, William Lewis ................ 1 En .................................... Norcross
Thompson, David HyatL. ............... 4 GE. .................... .Little Rock, Ark.
Thompson, Edward Alexander.. ..... .2 E .......................................... Atlanta
Suddeth, James Allen ..................... .2 1M ...................................... Atlanta Thompson, George Luther.. ........... .! En .................................. Thomaston
*Sullivan, "Vilbert Lawrence ............ 4 ECo .................................... Atlanta *Thompson, John Fraser .................... 2 Ch ........................................ Atlanta
Sulzbacher, Joel, J r ........................ .4 M .......... .................................. Rome Thompson, Joel William ................. .2 M ........................ Charleston, S. C.
Suttles, Roland Cortez .................... 1 IM .............................. College Park
Sutton, George Mack, J.r ................ .5 ECo ...................................... Tifton
Sutton, Shelton Beverly ................... .3 CE ........................................ Vidalia
*Tho11lpson, Malcolm Francis.. ....... .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Thompson, Robert Maurice, J r ..... 3 CE ........................ Clearwater, Fla.
Thompson, William Allen ............. .2 E .......................................... Atlanta
Swarthout, Gerard, J r .................... .1 Co ........................................ Atlanta
Swint, James Millard ...................... 1 En ............................. 'Orchard Hill
Thomson, Quentin RoberL. .......... .4 M ...................... Lake Charles, La.
Thomson, William Conner.. ........... .3 A ........................................ Decatur
T aaffe, Gordon ................................. .1 En ........................... .Leesburg, Fla. *Thorington, Luke .............................. 1 En ........................ Middlesboro, Ky.
Tabachnick, Herman Solomon ........ 3 ChE. ......................... Camden, N. J.
Talley, Thomas Pound .................. ..4 GE ...................................... Symrna
Thornton, James Otis ...................... 2 GE ...................................... Atlanta
Thornton, Otis Brooks .................... 1 En ................................ Union Point
Tanner, Ralph MarshaIL ............... 4 T .......................................... Atlanta Threlkeld, Mercer Lane ................. .! En ........................................ Atlanta
Tapp, William Roy, J r ..................... 1 A ............................ Powder Springs
Tarleton, Morris Edward .............. 2 ChECo ............................ Allen, Ala.
*Thresher, Harold H ayward.. .......... 3 IM .................... Miami Beach, Fla.
Tift, Amos Chapman, J r ................. 1 En .......................................... Tifton
*Tate, Roscoe Charles.. ................... .3 MCo .................................. Broxton Tighe, Harold Francis ...................... 1 Co ................ Martin's Ferry, Ohio
Tatum, Harold Barnett.. ................ 1 En ................................ Tampa, Fla. Tillman, Robert Franklin ............... .3 T .................................... Carrollton
*Tayior, Alfred Boyce ....................... .3 E .............................. Richmond, Va. Timoney, Edward Don ................... .2 MCo ........ Long Island City, N. Y.
Taylor, Bayard J oseph ................... .1 Co .............. Richardson Park, DeL Tisdale, Thomas William ................ 3 A. ........................... N ashville, Tenn.
*Tayior, Charles Alvin ..................... .2 CECo ........ DeFuniak Springs, Fla. Todd, Percy ErnesL ...................... ..4 M ............................ Havana, Cuba
T aylor, Evan Augustus, J r ............ .2 T .......................................... Adrian Tolve, Leon Alfred .......................... 5 AE ...................................... Atlanta
Taylor, Frank Abe ........................... .2 M .......................... Meridian, Miss. Topolnicki, Theodore SamueL ..... 2 CECo .................... Baltimore, Md.
Taylor, Grover Carlyle, J r. ............ 3 ECo .............. Rocky Mount, N. C. Toy, Rogers Bockover.. ................... .4 CE ...................................... Atlanta
Taylor, George Robert Ian ............ 2 T .... Cen. Mirando, Oriente, Cuba *Trammell, Richard J oseph ............. .2 M ........................................ Atlanta
Taylor, Joseph HuberL. ................ .2 ECo ................................ Waycross Trawick, James Frank ................... .3 M .................................. Miami, Fla.
288 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY REGISTER OF STUDENTS 289
Traylor. Lucius Henderson ........... .3 MCo .............................. LaGrange
Treadway. Joe EarL. ....................... 4 1M .................................. Columbus
*Trenholm, John BollUn ................... .2 M .................................... Savannah
Treder. Erwin Richard. J r ............ .2 CE. ............. Queens Village. N. Y.
Tribbett. Murray Clayton. Jr ......... 2 M ........................ Chillicothe. Ohio
Tribble. Joe Clarke .......................... 4 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Tribble. Joe J ames ............................ 3 M ........................................ Atlanta
Trigg. Locke Hickman ................... .1 En .............. ~ ........... Scarsdale. N. Y.
Trimmer. Rea Hoffman .................. 1 Co .......................... Westfield. N. J.
Tripp. Jack Lyman ......................... .3 E ...................... St. Petersburg. Fla.
Trobaugh. Eugene Rowe ................. .3 GE. ............................... Tampa. Fla.
"Trombetta, Frank Joseph ............... .2 CECo ...................... Baltimore. Md.
Trombetta. Salvatore J oseph ......... .2 CECo ...................... Baltimore. Md.
Troutman. James Edward .............. 5 ChECo ............ Mooresville. N. C.
Truan. Alfred Winstanley ............. .l En .............. Queens Village. N. Y.
Trussell. James Irwin ...................... 4 M ........................................ Atlanta
Tubb. James Richardson IIL ........ 3 1M ............................ Sparta. Tenn.
*Tucker, James Thomas .................. 4 E ........................................ Decatur
Tumlin. James Willard .................. 1 Co ........................................ Atlanta
Turnbull. Robert William .............. 4 PHE .......................... Canton. Ohio
Turner. Charles Edward ............... .2 CE .............................. Summerville
Turner. Clifton Perry. J r ............... 4 1M ..... : .......................... Thomaston
Turner. Dennis Trippe ................... .l En .............................. Milledgeville
Turner. Lawrence Guy .................... 1 En ........................................ Smyrna
Turner. Ralph Augustus ................. .2 ChE ........ South Pittsburgh. Tenn.
Turner. Russell Godwin. J r .......... .1 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Turner. William Bradley ............... .1 En .................................... Columbus
Tutt. William Swift ......................... .3 M ...................................... Elberton
Tutwiler. William Stanhope. Jr .... .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Tyler. John William ........................ 4 MCo .............. New Rochelle. N. Y.
Tyler. Robert Christie ...................... 1 En .................................. Miami. Fla.
Tyson. Wilson Jackson ................... .2 E .......................................... Atlanta
Ugalde. Hermann Herrera .............. 2 M ........................ Costa Rica. C. A.
Underwood. Joel Curry .................... ! En ........................................ Atlanta
*Underwood, Perry Carroll ............. .1 Co .................................... Moultrie
*Underwood, TFilliam J ohnson ........ 5 AE ...................... Kansas City. Mo.
Urquhart. William Leonidas .......... ! 1M .............................. Norfolk. Va.
VanArsdale. Harold Charles ......... .3 CE. ......................... Plainfield. N . J.
VanBuren. Hiram H ....................... 4- A ............................ Columbus. Ohio
VanBuskirk. Edwin RusselL. ......... 3 GE ...................... Fairhaven. N . ].
*Vanden-H euvel, Theodore R ........ .2 M .................. Staten Island. N. Y.
VanHook. Jack Kent.. ...................... ! Co .................................... St. George
VanHorne. Jack Dudley .................. 3 E ...................... Binghamton. N. Y.
*VanNess, Jerrold Earle ................. 2 ECo .............................. Miami. Fla.
VanNielen. Nicholas ........................ 2 GE. ........... Palatine Bridge. N. Y.
VanNorde. Peter J ack .................... 1 En ...................... Maplewood. N. J.
VanValkenburgh. Franklin B ........ .2 CE. ...... .Little Neck. L. I.. N. Y.
VanValkenburgh. James F ............ .2 ChECo .................. Asheville. N. C.
VanVoorhees. Edward Burnette ... .! En ........................ Nashville. Tenn.
Varagona. Joseph J ames .................. 4 M ........................ Birmingham. Ala.
* Varga, Steven Alexander ............... .! En ............................ Pittsburgh, Pa.
Varner. John Edward ..................... .! En .................................... Hapeville
Vasilenko. Nicholas ......................... .1 En ............................ Garfield. N. J.
Veal. John Worth ........................... .! 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Veatch. Raymond Wesley. J r ......... 3 Ch ........................................ Atlanta
Venable. James J enkins ................... .2 IM ...................... Birming?am. Ala.
VerNooy. Burton .............................. 2 M .................. Poughkeepsle. N. Y.
Vest. Rushin Alexander.. ................. .2 M .................. Mt. Pleasant. Tenn.
Villageliu. Alberto Emilio .............. ..4 E ...................... : ....... Ha~ana. CU.ba
VonSon? Fred Adolf .......................... l En ........... : ...... BIs. MexIco. MexIco
Voorhies. Edwin Springer ............... .3 MCo .................... Nashville. Tenn.
~Voyles, James Homer, Jr .. ............ .3 GE ............................... : .... Morrow
Wachter. Howard Lee ................... .! En .......................... Baltlmore. Md.
Wachter. Robert EarL. ................... 1 A ............... Prairie du Chien. Wis.
Waddell Guilford Thomas. J r ...... .2 CECo ...................... Concord. N. C.
Wade. Arthur Lamar.. .................... 2 M .................................. Miami. Fla.
Wadsworth, John William ............. .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Wadsworth. Paul Kay ..................... .3 1M ........................ Cleveland. Ohio
'Wagner Julian Francis .................. 3 E .......................................... Atlanta
Wagner: Joseph Patton .................... 2 M ................................ McCa~sville
Wagnon. Leo Albert... .................... .5 MCo ................................ QUItman
Wait Joseph William ..................... .1 Co ........................................ Atlanta
Wait~. Charles Thomas. J r ........... 4 E .................................... Gainesville
Waits. Richard Tillman. J r ............ .1 En .................................... Clarkston
Waldrip Jesse Howard ................. .1 En ........................................ Adanta
Walker,' Cornelius Francis ............. .3 M ........................ J acksonville. Fla.
'Walker, Frederick LeVerne ........... .2 CerE .................................. Decatur
Walker, James Harold .................... 3 E .......................................... Atlanta
Walker. John Howe ........................ 1 En ........................................ Atlanta
*Walker, folm Moore ....................... .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Walker, Joseph Pau!... .................... .1 En ........................ Birmingham. ~a.
Walker, John Wyeth ...................... ..4 E ............................................ C~trO
Walker. Peter Gautier.. ................. .1 En ...................................... Madlson
Walker, Robert Enochs ................... .2 ChE ........................ Henderson. Ky.
Walker, Robert Stuart. Jr .. ............ .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Walker. Thomas Brooks ................. .1 En .................................. Crewe. Va.
Walker Warren Allen ................... .1 Co ........................................ Atlanta
Walker: Washington Edwin ............ 3 ECo .................... Birmingham. Ala.
290 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY REGISTER OF STUDENTS 291
Wall, Robert Edwin .......................... ! En ........................ Avondale Estates
Wallace, Charles W illiam ............. .! 1M ...................................... Atlanta
W allace, Robert Bridge, J r ............ .! En .............................. Clearfield Pa
W allin, Sven Eric .............................. l En .............................. Swissvale: Pa:
W allis, Edward Bullock.. ................ .2 M ............................ Lexington Ky
W allis, Jefferson H aygood .............. ! IM .............................. College 'Park
Walters, William Gerald ................ 2 ChE ...................................... Martin
Walthall, William Lee .................... ! Co .................................... Moreland
Walton, Edmund Spencer ............... .! En ...................... Montgomery, Ala.
Walton, Millard Ingram, Jr. ......... .2 MCo ................................ Eatonton
W alton, Norman J ames ................. ,3 CE ...................... Brandenburg, Ky.
Wanamaker, Walter George ......... .2 M .............................. Buffalo N y
W ansley, Joseph Shelvyn ................. .! En .................................. Li;col~to~
Ward, Henry Owen .......................... 2 M ........................................ Atlanta
W ard, William Cleveland, Jr ......... 4 IM .............................. Tryon N C
W ard, William HewitL. ................ .! En ........................... .Lakela~d, ina:
*W are, Joseph Lane ......................... .2 E .................................... Fitzgerald
Ware, William Arthur, Jr ............... 4 T. ........................... Tuscumbia, Ala.
Warner, Hugh Asbury ...... ............. .! En .................... Chattanooga, Tenn.
Weissenberger, Eric George .......... ..4 E .......................... Berlin, Germany
Weissenberger, W alter George ...... 2 ChE. ..................... Berlin, Germany
*f{leissman, Clem .............................. ..4 M ............................ Newark, N. J.
Wengenroth, Edgar Roy ................. .! En ............ West Englewood, N. J .
Wenz, Louis Edward, J r ................. ! En .................... Roselle Park, N. J.
Werbin, J acob David ...................... 2 M ........................................ Atlanta
Werk, Jack Keith .............................. ! En ........................................ Atlanta
West, John Edward ......................... .! Co .......................... Memphis, Tenn.
West, Robert Stokes ........................ ! Co .............................. Ripley, Tenn.
West, William Preston ................... .! 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Westbrook, Cecil Leon .................... 2 MCo .............................. Gainesville
WestbrOok, Robert William ........... .3 M .......................... Zanesville, Ohio
Weston, Thomas Isaac ................... .! En .......................... Columbia, S. C.
Wharton, Thomas J esse .................. 3 ECo .. : ................................. Atlanta
Whatley, William .............................. l En ........................................ Atlanta
Wheby, Earl Melvin. ...................... .4 IM ............... ..... Princeton, W. Va.
Whelchel, Wade Hampton ............. .! En ................................ Murrayville
Whiddon, Oslin David ................... .2 TCo ...................................... Tifton
Whitaker, Frank Allen .................... 3 ChE ................................ Waycross
Warnock, Parks R., Jr .................. .2 M ........................................ Atlanta
Warnock, Robert Burdick.. .... ...... ..4 M Co .................................... Atlanta
Warren, Thomas Nightingale ....... .4 1M ........................................ Macon
Whitaker, John Gregory .................. 4 TCo .................................... Atlanta
White, Maurice Hamilton, J r ...... 2 ChE. ............... Olive Branch, Miss.
White, Rex Harry, J r.. ..................... G-M ........................ Pensacola, Fla.
*Warrick, Jam es Edward ................. ,3 M ........................................ Blakely
Waterman, Ray Sidney .................. _2 MCo .............................. Peoria, Ill.
Waters, Herbert Lemar ................. 2 1M ................................ Cedartown
Watkins, Terrell Clark ................. .! Co ............................ Eldorado, Ark.
White, Wenham Cannon .................. 4 MCo .................................... Atlanta
White, William Forrest ................. 2 ChE. ................... Upper Darby, Pa.
*Whitehead, Fred William ............... 2 IM ................................ Miami, Fla.
Whitehill, Sam Milliken, J r ............ .3 ChE. ......................... Nowata, Okla.
*Watson, Fraughtman Lane ........... .! 1M ...................................... Atlanta Whiting, George Luther. ................ .1 Co ........................................ Martin
Watson, Theodore Hoffman ......... .2 M ....... .Twenty-nine Palms, Calif. Whitlock, Ralph Winston. .............. 2 1M ........................................ Atlanta
Watt, William Augustin, Jr .......... 2 M ................................ Thomasville Whitmer, Charles Fordsham ........ ..4 MCo ............................ Oregon, Mo.
Wear, John Francis ........................ _3 IM .................... Binghamton, N. Y. Whitmire, Charles Nathan, J r ...... .! Co ........................................ Griffin
Weatherford, Robert.. ..................... .3 1M .................... Munfordville, Ky.
Weaver, George Washington ........ ..5 CECo ...................... Pulaski, Tenn.
Whitney, Sheldon MaxweIL ........ ,3 I~ .................... Miami Beach, Fla.
*Widerquist, Vernon Roberts ......... .l En. ......................... Ft. Myers, Fla.
Weaver, Henry Thomas.. ............... 2 M ................................ Sebring, Fla. Wilcox, Allan LeRoy ........................ 4 M ................................ Ty!er, Texas
Weaver, Julian Holt.. ...................... 5 CECo ................................ Decatur Wilcox, Kenneth Knight.. ................ 3 M ............................. 'Orlando, Fla.
Webb, George Irving ...................... _2 E ................................ L1anerch, Pa. Wild, John James ............................ 2 E .......................... Lynbrook, N. Y.
Webb, Robert Crenshaw .................. 4 ECo .......................... Lakeland, Fla. Wilder, Charles Crisp, J r ............. 3 MCo ................................ Hapeville
Weber, Theador Frederik.. .......... _! A. ................. North Adams, Mass. Wilder, Clarence Lee .................... 2 ECo ...................................... Macon
Webster, James Warren ................ -2 T .......................................... Atlanta Wilder, John Granville .................. 2 GE ........................ Memphis, Tenn.
Weddington, Jim Ray .................... -2 M ........................ Birmingham, Ala. *Wilhelm, Robert Oscar ................... .l Co ............................ Baltimore, Md.
Weeks, Felder Seigler ...................... 2 A .................................... Perry, Fla. *Wilkins, Grover Cleveland, Jr ..... 3 CE ............................ Dallas, Texas
W eibel, John George ...................... ..3 1M ...................................... Atlanta Wilkins, James Milligan .................. 2 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Weinrich, Stanley Irving ............... _l En ............................ J amaica, N. Y. Wilkins, Leonard ............................. 5 ChECo .................. Memphis, Tenn.
Weishaupt, Thomas John ............. _3 CE .......................... Kittanning, Pa. Wilkins, Roscoe Lee ........................ _3 IM ........................ Alexandria, Ala.
Weiss, George William ................. _l En ...................... Rocky River, Ohio Wilks, Ira Edwin ............................ _4 GE .................................. LaGrange
292 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY REGISTER OF STUDENTS 293
Willey. Leonard TayloL ................ 2 MCo ................ St. Augustine Fla
Williams. Arte Dewey ...................... ! Co .................................... Sav~nnah
Williams. Barclay ScotL ............... 3 M .???.??????? .... ? ......... ????? ............. Rhine
Williams. Daniel Binkley ................ 4 M .......................... Boonville. N. C.
Williams. Edwin Kyle ..................... .2 MCo ......... ~ ............ Henderson. Ky.
Williams. James Ambrose ................ 3 CE ...................................... N ewnan
Williams. John Anderson ................ 2 ECo .................................... Atlanta
Williams. John PauL ..................... ! Co ?.?????????????????????????.?.???? ........ Ocilla
Williams. John Thomas ................. .! En .................................. West Point
Williams. Lewis Harper ....... _ ......... .2 E .......................................... Winder
Williams. Louis Owens .................... ! En .. -............... ...................... Atlanta
Williams. Meadow Seifert. J r ...... J T. ................................... West Point
Williams. Paul Callaway ............... .! Co .???????.?? .... ? ............ ?? .............. Rome
*Williams, Sidne.v Wheeler ............. .2 E .......................................... Atlanta
Willien. Robert Martin .................... ! En ........................ Indianapolis. Ind.
Willis. Albert Gambrille. J r ........... 3 M ...... ....... : .............. Concord. N_ C.
Willis. David Ellery ......................... .3 MCo ........................... .Tampa Fla
Willis. Henry David ........................ 3 E. ....................... Montgomery: Ala:
Willis. J ack ........................................ 2 ECo ............................ Ensley. Ala.
Willis. Ralph Holland .................... -2 M ........................................ Atlanta
Willner. Lewis ................... __ ......... .3 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Wilmot. Charles Lee ....................... J E .......................................... Atlanta
Wilson. Albert Robert ................... .! A ..... .................. Greensboro, N. C.
Wilson, Glen Arthur ....................... .! En .......................... Westfield, N. J.
Wilson. Joseph Butler ......... ............. 4 ChECo .............................. Augusta
Wilson, Joseph Felton ...................... 4 E ........................................ :.Atlanta
Wilson. John Harrison. J r ............ .3 M ........................................ Atlanta
*Wilson, John Loyd, Jr .................... j ECo ......... .................... .Liggett. Ky.
Wilson. Joe Mack ........................... .1 En .................................... Marietta
Wilson. James Young. J r .............. .4 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Wilson. Mercer E ............................. 2 CECo ................... .............. .Atlanta
Wilson. Robert Elmer ..................... J GE .................. St. Petersburg. Fla.
Wilson. William Henry ................. .3 M .................... Chattanooga, Tenn.
Wilson. Wilbe Radford. Jr ............ .2 MCo .................... Charlotte. N. C.
Winchester. Thomas Harrison, J r .. .1 Co ........................................ Macon
Winfree. Douglas Woodson ........... J 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Winkelman. Valentine ..................... .! En ........................................ Atlanta
Winn. Edward Gartly ..................... .2 MCo ...................... Memphis. Tenn.
Winne. Ward Irwin ....................... .3 ChECo .................. Arlington. N. J.
Winship. Herring. J r ....................... 5 ChECo ................................ Macon
Winslette. Clifford Brown ............. .2 E ...................................... Eatonton
Winters. Richard Harrington ....... J E .......................................... Austell
Winton. Melbourne Lee .................. 3 E ................................ Bushnell. Fla.
Wise. George Edward ..................... .1 En ................. : .............. Fayetteville
Wofford. William RusselL .......... .2 A .......................................... Atlanta
Wohlford, James Gordon ............... .4 ECo ................................ Dante. Va.
Wolcott. Ben HaIL ........................ .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Wolford. James Kenneth ............... .5 MCo ........................ Bristol. Tenn.
"Womack, James Milton .................. ! 1M ...................................... Decatur
Wood. Burton Land .......................... ! En .................... Washington. D. C.
Wood, Charles Rowe ....................... A I M .......................... Raleigh. N. C.
Wood. Earnest HarwelL .............. .1 A ......................... Cedar Bluff. Ala.
Wood. Howard Lee .......................... ! En ................................ Clarkesville
Wood. Robert Everson.................... In .................................... Marietta
Wood. Thomas Miller. J r ............. 2 M .......................................... Macon
Wood. William Brown .................... 4 M .............................. Jasper. Tenn.
Woodard. Kenneth Burton ............. .1 En ...................... So. Orange. N. J.
Woodard, William Kenneth ......... .. .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Wooddall. Robert Jerome. J r ......... 4 M ...................................... F airburn
Woodruff. PauL ................................ 2 1M .................................... Decatur
Woods. James Douglas. Jr ............ .1 Co .................... Hattiesburg. Miss.
Woods. Wilder Wilson .................... 4 1M .................................... Savannah
Woolfolk. Albert Sidney ................. .1 1M .................................. Columbus
Worley. Conly W .? J r .................... .1 Co .................................. Ensley. Ala.
Wray. Charles Whitfield ............... .1 En ....................................... .Atlanta
Wright. Charles William ............... J CECo ................ Watervliet. N. Y.
Wright. Felix Hardeman ............... .3 ChE ................................ Covington
Wright. George Albert .................... 4 IM .................... Coral Gables. Fla.
*Wright, Hugh Emmett ................... .3 Ch ........................................ Atlanta
Wright. Harry Ralph ..................... .3 ChE .................................... Atlanta
Wright. James EarL ....................... 2 T .................................. Lanett. Ala.
Wright. James Smith ..................... .1 En .................... E. Cleveland. Ohio
Wright. Malon Orrville ................. .) CECo ............ Winter Garden, Fla.
Wright. Theron Edwin ................... J A ........................................ Decatur
Wright. Warren Kenneth .............. ..3 E ................ : ..... Saxtons River. Vt.
Wrigley. Clarence William ........... .2 GE ...................................... Atlanta
Wrye. William Florin. Jr .............. .2 E ........................ Birmingham. Ala.
Wyckoff. Charles Franklin ............. .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Wylie. Joseph Clarence. Jr ............ .! Co ............................ Spindale. N. C.
Wylly. Alexander ............................. .3 M .............. Englewood Cliffs. N. J.
Yancey. Richard H unter ................. .3 M ........................................ Atlanta
Yarbrough. Jack ............................... .! En .................................... Columbus
Yarn. David Homer ......................... .1 En ........................................ Atlanta
Yates. Presley Daniel. J r ................. 3 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Yon. Waymon Eugene ..................... .1 En ...................................... Decatur
Youmans. Tump Stephen ................ 4 MCo .................................... Tifton
Youmans. Tom Y oung ................... .2 M Co .................................... Tifton
Young. James Sterling ..................... .3 E. ................. Winston-Salem. N. C.
294 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
Young, Oscar Lamar.. ...................... 4 1M ...................................... Atlanta
Zagarella, Anthony .................. .......... l En ........................ Brooklyn, N. y.
Zamborsky, Nicholas Alden ........... .4 ChE. ........................... Clifton, N. J.
*Zeigler, George Edward, lr ........... 4 MCo .......................... Thomasville
Zelinski, John Ward ........................ 1 En .................... Washington, D. C.
Zemek, Melville Mason .................. 4 E ................................ Nutley, N. J.
*Ziegler, Walter H erbert.. ................ 5 MCo .......................... College Park
" Ziegler, William Ralph ................... .3 IM .............................. College Park
Zimmerman, Charles L................... G-Ch .............. .................... Atlanta
Zimmerman, Donald Scheel, J r .... .2 M ........................................ Atlanta
By MAJOR DEPARTMENTS
Aero Engineering .................... 10
Architecture .............................. 102
Ceramic Engineering .............. 29
Civil Engineering .................... 137
Chemical Engineering ............ 194
Chemistry................................ 35
Electrical Engineering ............ 253
General Engineering ................ 73
Industrial Management .......... 372
Mechanical Engineering .......... 457
Public Health Engineering...... 22
SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT
By CLASSES
Graduate Students .................. 41
~:\o:rss .. :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 1~~
Pre-Juniors .............................. 113
Sophomores .............................. 749
Freshmen .................................. 840
Irregular .................................. 22
Total College Day Courses .. 2678
Evening School ....................... .1185
Summer School ........................ 730
Total .................................... 4593 Textile Engineering ................ 80
Less duplicates ......................... 785 Unclassified .............................. 914
Total Net Enrollment ....... .3808 Total ................................... .2678
[295 ]
GRADUATES BY DEPARTMENTS AND BY YEARS
DEGREE
B.S. in Arc.
B. Arch.
B.S. in A.E.
B.S. in Cer.E.
B.S. in tChem.
B.S. in Ch.E.
B.S. in c.E.
B.S. in Com.
B.S. in E.E.
B.S. in G.E.
B.S.
B.S. in I.E.
B.S. in LM.
B.S. in M.E.
B.S. in T.E.
TOTAL B.S.
B.C.S.
Master of Sci.
Prof. Degrees
TOTAL DEGREES
Certificates
/
189011900 1910/1920119301 1 1 1
189911909 19191929 1936 1937 1938 1939 Total
*1911 43 117 131 8 4 303
1936 1 3 5
1932 76 14 15 17 12~
1927 13 24 1 6 44
1909 1 13 1 10 1 7 4
1903 16 23 91 201 28 37 30 437
1902 26 80 341 258 20 29 30 7
26
1919 2 337 330 84
1898 9 91 255 492 445 40 669 44 61 1437
1923 157 3 2 4 3 16
1917 4 92 215 41 11 11 3/
1922 3 3 4
1937 10 54 64 126
1890 94 101 216 344 362 46 63 65 1298
1901 62 47 147 104 20 34 22 43
1
103 297 68321352163 230 306 318 623~
1916 26 124 171 321
1925 18 64 3 13 7 105
1914 5 17 10 3 35
29 49 153 55
6696
286
NOTES: The M.S. Degrees. Profession.l Degrees and Certific h bo
d
' . , tes S OWn a Ve are
IStnbuted among the departments as follows:
(I) M .S., in C.E., 24; in Chern., 15; in Ch.E. 15? in Com I? ? E E
" ,,0, ,In . 0' 13; in
M.E., 13; ID T .E., 3; ID A.E., 7; in I.E., 2. Not designated, 13.
(2) Professional Degrees: C.E., 14; Ch.E., I; E.E., 8; M.E., 11; T.E., 1.
(3) Certificates: Arc., 43; C.S., 38? I E I? M T C 14? M TIT E
' ? 0, , ?? OJ , ? 0, ; ? OJ 189.
ABBREVIATIONS: A.E.-Aeronautical ? Cer E -Ceraml?c? Ch E --ch . I
. . ' . . . ,.. emlca; C.E.-
Civil; E.E.-Electrical; G.E.-General? M.E.-Mechanical? T E -T iI E .
. " " ext e ngl-
neermg; Arc.-Architecture; Chern --Chemistry? Com --co B C
" . . ,. mmercej. .S.-
CommercIal SCIence; G.S.-General Science; I.E.-Industrial Education.
M.T.C.-Motor Transport; M.T.-Manual Training. '
'Dales In lhis column show the year when lhe degree was llrst conferred.
tThls degree was not given from 1929 to 1935.
r 296 J
GENERAL INDEX
PAGE PAGE
Dining Hall ................................ 32
Dormitories ......................... .30, 31
Drawing ..................................... .114
Economics and Social
Science .................................... 97
Electrical Engineering ................ l05
Engineering Drawing and
Mechanics ............................. .114
Endowment Fund ....................... .215
English ........................................ 118
Enrollment ................................. .295
Entrance Requirements .............. 26
Examinations ....................... .26, 32
Expenses ......................... .28, 29, 30
Experiment Station .................... 196
Extension Work .......................... 198
Faculty and Instructors............ 9
Accredited Schools ..................... .228
Admission Requirements ............ 26
Aeronautical Engineering .......... 35
Alumni ....................................... .296
Architecture ................................ 39
Athletics ..................................... .209
Beck Loan Fund ....................... .214
Biology ........................................ 51
Board of Regents .................... 4, 24
Calendar .................................... 2
Ceramic Engineering.................. 56
Chemical Engineering ................ 69
Chemistry .................................. 62
Civil Engineering ........................ 75
Committees of Faculty........ ...... 5
Co-operative Plan ...................... 83
Courses and Degrees .................. 24
Fees ............................................ 28
French, A, Textile School... .... .169
General Engineering ................. .123
Degrees Conferred ................... .220
Department of
Aeronautical Engineering ...... 35
Architecture ............................ 39 General Information .................. 22
Biology .................................... 51 Geology ...................................... 127
Ceramics .................................. 56 Grading ...................................... 33
Chemistry and Chemical Graduates ................................... .220
Engineering ........................ 62 Graduate Courses ..................... .178
Civil Engineering .................. 75 Grant Field ................................. .210
Co-operative Plan .................. 83 High Schools ............................... .228
Economics and Social Holidays ...................................... 2
Science ................................ 97 Honor Committee ..................... .208
Electrical Engineering ............ 105 Honors and Prizes ..................... .227
Engineering Drawing and Industrial Education .................. 200
Mechanics ......................... .114 Industrial Management ............ 129
English .................................... 118 Lecture Series ............................ 208
Geology .................................. 127 Library ....................................... .203
Mathematics .......................... 131 Loan Funds ................................. .214
Mechanical Engineering ....... .135 M aster of Science ...................... 179
Modern Languages ............... .158 Mathematics .............................. 131
Personnel ................................ 193 Mechanical Engineering ............ 135
Physics .................................... 164 Mechanics .................................. 115
Public Health .......................... 51 Medals ....................................... .216
Textile Engineering ............... .169 Medical Attendance ................. .202
[297 ]
298 GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY
PAGE PAG!!
Reports ........................................ 33
R. O. T . C ................... 30, ISS, 161
Scholarships ............................... .214
Societies, Engineering ................ 212
Student Council .......................... 207
Summer SchooL ......................... 194
Textile Engineering .................... 169
Tuition and Fees ........................ 28
Unclassified Courses .................. I77
Units, Required for
Military Prizes ......................... .219
Military Science ................. .20, 155
Mitchell Loan Fund ................. .215
Modern Languages ................... .158
Naval Science ....................... .21, 161
Night SchooL ............................. 198
Officers of Administration........ 6
Personnel .................................... 193
Phi Kappa Phi.. ......................... .216
Physical Examination ................ 29
Entrance .................................. 26
Water Plant SchooL .............. .201
Whitehead Memorial
Physics ........................................ 164
Prizes ......................................... .216
Public Health ........... ................... 51
Hospital ................................. .202
Withdrawal ................................ 33
Regents .................................... 4, 24
Register of Students ................. .233
Regulations ...... " ........................ 26 Y. M. C. A ................................. 204
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