Home > From brd@dynamite.com.au Tue Dec 1 00:02:53 1998

From brd@dynamite.com.au Tue Dec 1 00:02:53 1998

From brd@dynamite.com.au Tue Dec 1 00:02:53 1998
From: brd@dynamite.com.au (Bernard Robertson-Dunn)
Date: Tue, 01 Dec 1998 10:02:53 +1100
Subject: Mega service deals outmoded?
Message-ID: <3663241D.6E45E008@dynamite.com.au>

Fin Review
http://www.afr.com.au/content/981201/inform/inform1.html

Mega service deals outmoded
By Emma Connors

Westpac has undertaken a $20 million rejig of its desktop services,
but a lack of enthusiasm for outsourcing mega-deals means the
Commonwealth Bank of Australia is likely to remain the only major
bank to spin off its information technology services.

<snip>

While such caution is at odds with the strategies being pursued by
the Federal Government and both of the major telcos, there is
international precedent for avoidance of the outsourcing mega-deal,
according to PA Consulting.

"In the UK wholesale outsourcing of IT is being abandoned, long-term
contracts are being torn up and legal activity is on the increase,"
said PA Consulting's UK-based group head of computers and
telecommunications, Mr Peter Copping.

<snip>

<brd>
Lurking Link Lawyers, take note.
</brd>

--
Act in haste and repent at leisure;
Code too soon and debug forever.
-- Raymond Kennington

Regards
brd

Bernard Robertson-Dunn
Canberra Australia
brd@dynamite.com.au

From DTebbutt@acp.com.au Tue Dec 1 03:47:14 1998
From: DTebbutt@acp.com.au (Dan Tebbutt)
Date: Tue, 1 Dec 1998 12:47:14 +1000
Subject: 'Logic bomb' arms race panics Russia
Message-ID: <199812010148.MAA08690@boomer.anu.edu.au>

interesting yarn, esp in the context of our own Defence orgs becoming so
heavily standardised on MS.

>It does make Open Source Software rather attractive,
>from a defence perspective.

true. it also shows how the US will dominate the world in the 21st century
not by the power of The Bomb™, but through controlling the IS platforms that
everyone (defence forces included) uses. the unreliability of MS technology
could almost be seen as a Trojan horse for the US security agenda.

>Already secret army research departments in Russia and America are
>racing to perfect "logic bombs" and computer viruses designed to
>create havoc in an enemy country by destroying computer networks
>controlling weapons systems, financial transactions and even
>traffic.

someone mentioned Arthur C Clarke yesterday.... this scenario plays an
interesting role in "3001 the Final Odyssey"

dant

From brd@dynamite.com.au Tue Dec 1 04:13:18 1998
From: brd@dynamite.com.au (Bernard Robertson-Dunn)
Date: Tue, 01 Dec 1998 14:13:18 +1100
Subject: Oz - Silicon Valley or nuclear waste dump?
Message-ID: <36635ECE.D8F6B7FC@dynamite.com.au>

http://www.afr.com.au/content/981201/inform/inform2.html
Start ordering the Ferraris: Australia has what it takes to become a
high-tech frontier like Silicon Valley in the 1970s, according to
one of the Valley's best authorities.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/98/12/01/981201_36.htm
Anti-nuclear campaigners in Australia say they have obtained a video
which promotes Australia as the best site for an international
nuclear
waste dump.

Hot chips for dinner, all day every day!!!

--
Rather than earn money, it was Thoreau's idea to reduce his wants so
that he would not need to buy anything.

As he went around town preaching this ingenious idea, the
shopkeepers of Concord hoped he would drop dead.
-- Richard Armour.

Regards
brd

Bernard Robertson-Dunn
Canberra Australia
brd@dynamite.com.au

From tonyb@netinfo.com.au Tue Dec 1 06:33:26 1998
From: tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Tue, 1 Dec 1998 16:33:26 +1100
Subject: Culteral cringe?
Message-ID: <v02110109b2892fbbda12@[203.37.43.24]>

>Date: Tue, 1 Dec 1998 14:58:17 +1100 (EST)
>From: owner-all@minister.dca.gov.au
>X-Authentication-Warning: edison.dca.gov.au: majordom set sender to
>owner-all using -f
>subject: New Ministerial Media Release
>Sender: owner-all@minister.dca.gov.au
>Precedence: bulk
>Status:
>
>The following Ministerial Media Release is available at:
>
>http://www.dcita.gov.au/cgi-bin/trap.pl?path=3392
>
>Clinton recognises Australia's leading E-Commerce role
>The Minister for Communications, Information Technology and the Arts,
>Senator Richard Alston, today hailed the historic Australia-United States
>"Joint Statement on electronic Commerce" as an important step toward global
>cooperation on electronic commerce and other information economy issues.
>
>Terry O'Connor, Minister's office

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From leni@moniker.net Tue Dec 1 10:10:05 1998
From: leni@moniker.net (Leni Mayo)
Date: Tue, 01 Dec 1998 19:10:05 +1000
Subject: Culteral cringe?
References: <v02110109b2892fbbda12@[203.37.43.24]>
Message-ID: <3663B26D.66D8E1A4@moniker.net>

Strikes me as an interesting signal to how the traditional blocs might line up
on net issues. Simplistically, my take was that Australia was navigating an
independent path somewhere between Europe and US. Interesting to see how that
evolves and whether the US-broker-into-Asia strategy delivers domestic benefits.

Somewhat cynically, the
> key policy principles of private sector leadership, minimal
> government intervention and self regulation where possible.
is fine-sounding rhetoric but seems to translate into inaction when a
US-government contractor registers > 50% of the world's domain names and the
dispute-resolution around these names is decided in the US.

Bottom line is that Washington remains the Rome to which all roads lead while
Brussels and Tokyo watch with interest.

Leni.

Tony Barry wrote:

> >Date: Tue, 1 Dec 1998 14:58:17 +1100 (EST)
> >From: owner-all@minister.dca.gov.au
> >X-Authentication-Warning: edison.dca.gov.au: majordom set sender to
> >owner-all using -f
> >subject: New Ministerial Media Release
> >Sender: owner-all@minister.dca.gov.au
> >Precedence: bulk
> >Status:
> >
> >The following Ministerial Media Release is available at:
> >
> >http://www.dcita.gov.au/cgi-bin/trap.pl?path=3392
> >
> >Clinton recognises Australia's leading E-Commerce role
> >The Minister for Communications, Information Technology and the Arts,
> >Senator Richard Alston, today hailed the historic Australia-United States
> >"Joint Statement on electronic Commerce" as an important step toward global
> >cooperation on electronic commerce and other information economy issues.
> >
> >Terry O'Connor, Minister's office
>
> . . . . . . . . . .
> Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
> . . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
> tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
> +61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397
>
> http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry

--
Leni Mayo Ph: +61 3 9428 5530
Fax: +61 3 9428 5902
Moniker Pty Ltd E-mail: mailto:leni@moniker.net
Internet Domain Names WWW: http://www.moniker.net
Free net surveys, polls and votes http://www.votebot.com



From richard@auscoms.com.au Tue Dec 1 23:58:02 1998
From: richard@auscoms.com.au (richard@auscoms.com.au)
Date: Wed, 02 Dec 98 08:58:02 +1000
Subject: Culteral cringe?
Message-ID: <9812029125.AA912549504@mail.auscoms.com.au>


Which includes the immortal line:

>Australia agrees with the US - the acknowledged world leader in electronic
>commerce - on key policy principles of private sector leadership, minimal
>government intervention and self regulation where possible.

The last remaining role for Australia's public sector: letting the minister take
credit for inaction!

Richard Chirgwin

____________________Reply Separator____________________
Subject: Culteral cringe?
Author: <tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry)>
Date: 1/12/98 16:33

>Date: Tue, 1 Dec 1998 14:58:17 +1100 (EST)
>From: owner-all@minister.dca.gov.au
>X-Authentication-Warning: edison.dca.gov.au: majordom set sender to
>owner-all using -f
>subject: New Ministerial Media Release
>Sender: owner-all@minister.dca.gov.au
>Precedence: bulk
>Status:
>
>The following Ministerial Media Release is available at:
>
>http://www.dcita.gov.au/cgi-bin/trap.pl?path=3392
>
>Clinton recognises Australia's leading E-Commerce role
>The Minister for Communications, Information Technology and the Arts,
>Senator Richard Alston, today hailed the historic Australia-United States
>"Joint Statement on electronic Commerce" as an important step toward global
>cooperation on electronic commerce and other information economy issues.
>
>Terry O'Connor, Minister's office

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry







From me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au Wed Dec 2 01:51:48 1998
From: me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Wed, 2 Dec 1998 11:51:48 +1100
Subject: IMPORTANT NET REPORT
Message-ID: <v0211010cb28a38f728f2@[203.37.43.24]>

>From Net News 01 December 1998

IMPORTANT NET REPORT
President Clinton today released a major government report designed to
promote e-commerce,
and reaffirmed that the private sector, not government, should lead
Internet efforts. The
president directed the Commerce Department to work with the Federal
Communications
Commission for increased private investment in high-speed networks, and
asked Secretary
of State Madeleine Albright to push the spread of e-commerce in developing
countries. Said
Clinton: "Today we are drawing up the blueprints for a new economic age,
not for starting
big institutions, but for freeing small entrepreneurs. We have the honor of
designing the
architecture for a global economic marketplace." Clinton�s speech is at
http://www.whitehouse.gov/WH/New/html/19981130-19675.html and the full
report is at http://www.ecommerce.gov/

_______________________________________________________
mailto:tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Ningaui Pty Ltd
mailto:me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au | GPO Box 1680
http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry | Canberra ACT 2601
Phone +61 2 6241 7659 | AUSTRALIA



From me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au Wed Dec 2 01:51:46 1998
From: me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Wed, 2 Dec 1998 11:51:46 +1100
Subject: COUNTRY NET
Message-ID: <v0211010bb28a38de2318@[203.37.43.24]>

>From Net News 01 December 1998

COUNTRY NET
The latest Australian Rural Internet Report by research company APT Strategies
( http://www.aptstrategies.com.au ) shows 80% of rural Internet users
access the Net
several times a week 52% are involved in a virtual community, and 18%
have bought goods and services online.

_______________________________________________________
mailto:tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Ningaui Pty Ltd
mailto:me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au | GPO Box 1680
http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry | Canberra ACT 2601
Phone +61 2 6241 7659 | AUSTRALIA



From me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au Wed Dec 2 01:51:56 1998
From: me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Wed, 2 Dec 1998 11:51:56 +1100
Subject: 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL
Message-ID: <v0211010db28a39eb623c@[203.37.43.24]>

Odd. Many sites block Hotmail beacuse of the spam. I wonder how many
_active_ acounts there are.

Tony

>From Net News 02 December 1998

30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL
Microsoft says its free email service, Hotmail, now has 30 million users,
adding a
staggering 20 million this year. Microsoft bought Hotmail a year ago. See
http://www.hotmail.com

_______________________________________________________
mailto:tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Ningaui Pty Ltd
mailto:me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au | GPO Box 1680
http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry | Canberra ACT 2601
Phone +61 2 6241 7659 | AUSTRALIA



From kelso@melbpc.org.au Wed Dec 2 03:57:27 1998
From: kelso@melbpc.org.au (Kelso)
Date: Wed, 2 Dec 1998 13:57:27 +1100
Subject: COUNTRY NET
In-Reply-To: <v0211010bb28a38de2318@[203.37.43.24]>
Message-ID: <000901be1d9f$7f252960$249e0ccb@kelso>

Hey there, 80%, 52% or even 18% of a very small number could be an exceedingly insignificant quantity! I tried their home page but found out even less than what Tony barry alluded to. So what's the real message from the APT Strategies Report? Would someone kindly give a snapshot summary to the Link masses (who I suspect can't afford to buy expensive reports), referencing the rural results to those of metro users AND relating both to the relative population bases?

Regards

Ross Kelso

> -----Original Message-----
> From: owner-link@www.anu.edu.au [mailto:owner-link@www.anu.edu.au]On
> Behalf Of Tony Barry
> Sent: Wednesday, 2 December 1998 11:52
> To: link@www.anu.edu.au
> Subject: COUNTRY NET
>
>
> >From Net News 01 December 1998
>
> COUNTRY NET
> The latest Australian Rural Internet Report by research company
> APT Strategies
> ( http://www.aptstrategies.com.au ) shows 80% of rural Internet users
> access the Net
> several times a week 52% are involved in a virtual community, and 18%
> have bought goods and services online.
>
> _______________________________________________________
> mailto:tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Ningaui Pty Ltd
> mailto:me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au | GPO Box 1680
> http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry | Canberra ACT 2601
> Phone +61 2 6241 7659 | AUSTRALIA
>
>
>


From marghanita@ramin.com.au Wed Dec 2 05:12:21 1998
From: marghanita@ramin.com.au (M. da Cruz)
Date: Wed, 02 Dec 1998 15:12:21 +1100
Subject: 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL
References: <v0211010db28a39eb623c@[203.37.43.24]>
Message-ID: <3664BE25.1CC2@ramin.com.au>

Tony,

There are at least three vast categories of potential Hotmail users:

i)People without access to a personal computer who rely on Internet
Cafes and Libraries.

ii)Travellers to avoid lugging equipment around and roaming dial up

iii)Workers with Internet Access who need personal Email.

I can believe the figure, though like hits to a site it would be useful
to analyse the data for non-active accounts.

Marghanita
--
Marghanita da Cruz
Principal Consultant
Ramin Communications
http://www.ramin.com.au
Tel: (+61) 0414-869202



From kgeisel@actonline.com.au Tue Dec 1 18:59:36 1998
From: kgeisel@actonline.com.au (Karin Geiselhart)
Date: Wed, 02 Dec 1998 04:59:36 +1100
Subject: SCI'99/ISAS'99
Message-ID: <3.0.5.32.19981202045936.007adde0@pop1.actonline.com.au>

>CALL FOR PAPERS
>5th International Conference on INFORMATION SYSTEMS, ANALYSIS AND SYNTHESIS:
>ISAS'99
>
>Orlando, Florida (USA)
>July 30 to August 3, 1999
>http://www.iiis.org/isas/
>
>MAJOR THEMES
>
>� Information Systems Development
>� Information Systems Management
>� Management Information Systems
>� Virtual Engineering
>� Mobile Computing
>� Emergent Computation
>� Communication Systems
>� Message and signal processing
>� Human Information Systems
>� Education and Informatics
>� Computing Techniques
>
>ACADEMIC AND SCIENTIFIC CO-SPONSORS
>
>� WOSC: World Organization on Systemics and Cybernetics (France)
>� The Centre for Systems Studies (UK)
>� Systems Society of Poland
>� Society Applied Systems Research (Canada)
>� Slovenian Artificial Intelligence Society
>� Simon Bolivar University (Venezuela)
>� Italian Society of Systemics
>� ISSS: International Society for the Systems Sciences (USA)
>� ISI: The International Systems Institute (USA)
>� IFSR: International Federation of Systems Research (Austria/USA)
>� IEEE/Latinamerica
>� Cybernetics and Human Knowing: A Journal of Second Order Cybernetics and
>Cybersemiotics (Denmark)
>� CUST, Engineer Science Institute888 of the Blaise Pascal University
(France)
>
>ORGANIZED BY THE IIIS: The International Institute of Informatics and
Systemics.
>
> More details can be found at the Conference web page
> (http://www.iiis.org/isas/) or a detailed Call for Papers could be
>requested by
> e-mail (nacallao@ telcel.net.ve). Answers to specific questions can be
> requested also by e-mail.

kg


PhD student
Faculty of Communication
University of Canberra
http://student.canberra.edu.au/~u833885/home.htm

From sandied@vicnet.net.au Wed Dec 2 07:00:23 1998
From: sandied@vicnet.net.au (Sandie Downey)
Date: Wed, 02 Dec 1998 17:00:23 +1100
Subject: 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL
In-Reply-To: <3664BE25.1CC2@ramin.com.au>
References: <v0211010db28a39eb623c@[203.37.43.24]>
Message-ID: <3.0.3.32.19981202170023.00719b08@gateway>

At 03:12 PM 12/2/98 +1100, M. da Cruz wrote:
>Tony,
>There are at least three vast categories of potential Hotmail users:
>
>i)People without access to a personal computer who rely on Internet
>Cafes and Libraries.

This is true, as I travel around Victoria teaching the Internet I sign up at least 30 people a day to hotmail. Use of it for tourists is so great at public libraries across Victoria that many tourist are being refused entry to public libraries. One only has to sit at the state library victoria to see how many people come in just to check their email.
I even have a training manual developed by Vicnet on how to use hotmail.
If you do not use your account for a period of 3months iit is deleted.

regards
Sandie solo in Freemantle.


Sandie Downey
Skills.net Roadshow Co-ordinator
http://cf.vicnet.net.au/skillsnet/
Phone 0411 738 407 or 018 842 619



From ggm@dstc.edu.au Wed Dec 2 07:03:02 1998
From: ggm@dstc.edu.au (George Michaelson)
Date: Wed, 02 Dec 1998 16:03:02 +1000
Subject: 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL
In-Reply-To: Your message of "Wed, 02 Dec 1998 15:12:21 +1100."
<3664BE25.1CC2@ramin.com.au>
Message-ID: <12556.912578582@dstc.edu.au>


I hear varying stories about how viable Hotmail is from Europe, slow nets
and for large volume mail users.

Anybody want to comment on that?

-George
--
George Michaelson | DSTC Pty Ltd
Email: ggm@dstc.edu.au | University of Qld 4072
Phone: +61 7 3365 4310 | Australia
Fax: +61 7 3365 4311 | http://www.dstc.edu.au



From bpa@iss.net.au Wed Dec 2 07:56:36 1998
From: bpa@iss.net.au (Brenda Aynsley)
Date: Wed, 02 Dec 1998 17:26:36 +1030
Subject: 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL
References: <12556.912578582@dstc.edu.au>
Message-ID: <3664E4A4.8FDB18CC@iss.net.au>

George Michaelson wrote:

> I hear varying stories about how viable Hotmail is from Europe, slow nets
> and for large volume mail users.
>
> Anybody want to comment on that?
>

why the focus on hotmail, there's got to be a new "free" email services
coming on line somewhere in the world almost every day of the week?

I have several myself, but probably use them infrequently so what does the
30mil hotmail user figure tell us? It tells me that over a period of time
(2+ years) 30 million people have registered with hotmail. I seem to recall
at the time of microsoft's acquisition the number was around 10million thus
it would seem since then, 20 million new addresses have been created. Gee I
didnt realise Microsoft had that much pull with internet users (how does one
denote tongue in cheek smiley?)

Of course having "agents" sign up 30 people a day all over the world would
certainly help. :-)

Can I put in a plug, at this point, for http://www.ozbytes.net.au/ and their
aussie offering at http://webmail.ozbytes.net.au/ ?

cheers
brenda

--
Brenda Aynsley - http://www.iss.net.au/bpabio.html
Phone:+61 8 8357 8844 Fax:+61 8 8373 3829 Mobile:+61 412 662 988
Internet Support Services Australia Pty Ltd (ACN 069 346 327)
Education, Web site development and Support Services



From acreed@netspace.net.au Wed Dec 2 08:43:01 1998
From: acreed@netspace.net.au (Adam Creed)
Date: Wed, 02 Dec 1998 18:43:01 +1100
Subject: 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL
In-Reply-To: <3664E4A4.8FDB18CC@iss.net.au>
References: <12556.912578582@dstc.edu.au>
Message-ID: <3.0.5.32.19981202184301.00974570@pop.netspace.net.au>

At 17:26 02/12/98 +1030, you wrote:
>Can I put in a plug, at this point, for http://www.ozbytes.net.au/ and their
>aussie offering at http://webmail.ozbytes.net.au/ ?

Another interesting service I spotted a week or so back was
ThatWeb (from a Singapore company): <http://www.thatweb.com/>

You can access email from your normal service provider's account
anywhere in the world for free on the Web. Saves the hassle
sometimes of adjusting roaming settings, paying for roaming or using
a separate freemail account for travelling.

I think it has some limits such as the protocols it supports and difficulties
with mail servers behind firewalls, but for your every day account..

Adam Creed


From russell_ashdown@hotmail.com Wed Dec 2 08:47:05 1998
From: russell_ashdown@hotmail.com (Russell Ashdown)
Date: Tue, 01 Dec 1998 23:47:05 PST
Subject: 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL
Message-ID: <19981202074706.5392.qmail@hotmail.com>

On a recent business trip to Europe, I kept in contact with my clients
by going to the "BIBLIOTEEK" (library) in Holland and Belgium and found
no such "slowness" evident on the systems I used. I did however find
slowness in the "fillers" (queues) of people waiting to get access to
the terminals. In one case in Brussels I had to wait for an hour to get
to a terminal. Luckily, they had an English book section, so I had a
read while waiting.

In all, I visited six libraries where I was charged anything from 400BFR
(about $1.50) to 5 Guilders (about $5.00) for a half hour session.

I must say in passing that Win'95 and Netscape (seems to be the browser
of choice for the European libraries I visited) look very strange in
other languages. I found that although I thought I knew these programs
very well I was making simple point-and-shoot mistakes with the mouse.

I did notice that many other users were also accessing email systems.

Russell Ashdown
Ashdown Communications Management Pty Ltd

Telephone: +61 7 38 299 299
Facsimile: +61 7 38 299 399
Mobile: 0418 535 199 (International: +61 4 1853 5199)
eMail: Russell.Ashdown@Ashdown.net.au
Russell_Ashdown@hotmail.com
Web Site: http://www.ashdown.net.au


On 2 Dec 98, at 16:03, George Michaelson wrote about:
Re: 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL

> I hear varying stories about how viable Hotmail is from Europe, slow
nets
> and for large volume mail users.
>
> Anybody want to comment on that?
>
> -George
> --
> George Michaelson | DSTC Pty Ltd
> Email: ggm@dstc.edu.au | University of Qld 4072
> Phone: +61 7 3365 4310 | Australia
> Fax: +61 7 3365 4311 | http://www.dstc.edu.au
>


______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

From bje@cygnus.com Wed Dec 2 08:50:39 1998
From: bje@cygnus.com (Ben Elliston)
Date: Wed, 2 Dec 1998 18:50:39 +1100 (EST)
Subject: 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL
In-Reply-To: <3.0.3.32.19981202170023.00719b08@gateway>
Message-ID: <Pine.LNX.3.95.981202184937.21940E-100000@moshpit.cygnus.com>

> This is true, as I travel around Victoria teaching the Internet I sign
> up at least 30 people a day to hotmail. Use of it for tourists is so
> great at public libraries across Victoria that many tourist are being
> refused entry to public libraries. One only has to sit at the state
> library victoria to see how many people come in just to check their
> email.

I know--I did this myself when I was holidaying around Europe. I stopped
off in a lovely old library in London.

It's kind of sad to think that people do this. They aren't stopping to see
what else might be there to take in at the library.

Ben


From bje@cygnus.com Wed Dec 2 09:13:44 1998
From: bje@cygnus.com (Ben Elliston)
Date: Wed, 2 Dec 1998 19:13:44 +1100 (EST)
Subject: 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL
In-Reply-To: <3664E4A4.8FDB18CC@iss.net.au>
Message-ID: <Pine.LNX.3.95.981202191109.22016D-100000@moshpit.cygnus.com>

I'm curious about how people forsee the management of email addresses in
the future. For example, I have techical documentation floating around
the net with the domain name of my past employer as my email address. The
only reason I get mail to this address is that they're so kind to forward
it to my personal address.

I've found that I partially solved this by acquiring a net.au domain name
in 1994 and using that. If I ever move ISPs, I take the domain name with
me. Others have solved it by registering id.au domains, which I think is
entirely sensible.

Surely this has become an issue for a lot of people? (Not to mention the
fact that it just becomes an administrative burden to manage zillions of
addresses and to make sure they're still being forwarded to the one
place).

Ben


From ramin@consult.com.au Wed Dec 2 09:59:59 1998
From: ramin@consult.com.au (Ramin Marzbani)
Date: Wed, 02 Dec 1998 19:59:59 +1100
Subject: COUNTRY NET
References: <000901be1d9f$7f252960$249e0ccb@kelso>
Message-ID: <3665018E.3AF7446C@consult.com.au>

Greetings from a freezing London~!
APT are a small one-person-ish outfit run by a guy who does a whole
bunch of things.
I think the comments made in the post are very fair :-)
Ramin

Kelso wrote:
>
> Hey there, 80%, 52% or even 18% of a very small number could be an exceedingly insignificant quantity! I tried their home page but found out even less than what Tony barry alluded to. So what's the real message from the APT Strategies Report? Would someone kindly give a snapshot summary to the Link masses (who I suspect can't afford to buy expensive reports), referencing the rural results to those of metro users AND relating both to the relative population bases?
>
> Regards
>
> Ross Kelso
>
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: owner-link@www.anu.edu.au [mailto:owner-link@www.anu.edu.au]On
> > Behalf Of Tony Barry
> > Sent: Wednesday, 2 December 1998 11:52
> > To: link@www.anu.edu.au
> > Subject: COUNTRY NET
> >
> >
> > >From Net News 01 December 1998
> >
> > COUNTRY NET
> > The latest Australian Rural Internet Report by research company
> > APT Strategies
> > ( http://www.aptstrategies.com.au ) shows 80% of rural Internet users
> > access the Net
> > several times a week 52% are involved in a virtual community, and 18%
> > have bought goods and services online.
> >
> > _______________________________________________________
> > mailto:tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Ningaui Pty Ltd
> > mailto:me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au | GPO Box 1680
> > http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry | Canberra ACT 2601
> > Phone +61 2 6241 7659 | AUSTRALIA
> >
> >
> >

From scott@doc.net.au Wed Dec 2 10:03:59 1998
From: scott@doc.net.au (Scott Howard)
Date: Wed, 2 Dec 1998 20:03:59 +1100
Subject: 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL
In-Reply-To: <3664E4A4.8FDB18CC@iss.net.au>; from Brenda Aynsley on Wed, Dec 02, 1998 at 05:26:36PM +1030
References: <12556.912578582@dstc.edu.au> <3664E4A4.8FDB18CC@iss.net.au>
Message-ID: <19981202200359.B24793@marvin.doc.net.au>

On Wed, Dec 02, 1998 at 05:26:36PM +1030, Brenda Aynsley wrote:
> I have several myself, but probably use them infrequently so what does the
> 30mil hotmail user figure tell us? It tells me that over a period of time
> (2+ years) 30 million people have registered with hotmail. I seem to recall

Hotmail delete accounts after 4 months of inactivity (ie, the user not
logging in for 4 months), so unless they are bending the figures, they
probably do have 30 million active-ish accounts.

> at the time of microsoft's acquisition the number was around 10million thus
> it would seem since then, 20 million new addresses have been created. Gee I
> didnt realise Microsoft had that much pull with internet users (how does one
> denote tongue in cheek smiley?)

Advertising (TV and otherwise) will do things like that to you...

Scott.

From r.polanskis@nepean.uws.edu.au Wed Dec 2 12:19:25 1998
From: r.polanskis@nepean.uws.edu.au (Rachel Polanskis)
Date: Wed, 2 Dec 1998 22:19:25 +1100 (EST)
Subject: 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL
In-Reply-To: <3664BE25.1CC2@ramin.com.au>
Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.4.00.9812022140460.20881-100000@isis.virago.org.au>


On Wed, 2 Dec 1998, M. da Cruz wrote:

> Tony,
>
> There are at least three vast categories of potential Hotmail users:
>
> i)People without access to a personal computer who rely on Internet
> Cafes and Libraries.
>
> ii)Travellers to avoid lugging equipment around and roaming dial up
>
> iii)Workers with Internet Access who need personal Email.

All of the above are reasons to not reinvent the wheel.
HoTMaiL does nothing that the Internet hasn't already offered for years.

If I am away from my workstation I never think in terms not having access to
it. All I need is a single shell account.

As long as a person has a valid shell account somewhere (somewhere other
than on HoTMaiL), they can read their mailbox and post messages very
efficiently.

Before you cry out "Dinosaur!" and start bemoaning the thought of having
to deal with a command line and text based UI, most of them these days
are more usable than anything the web can bring up. They also have the
benefit of being accessible over virtually any kind of network
connection (patience is required), and from practically any kind of
computer or terminal that supports TCP/IP.

I am not aware of any other method of accessing HoTMaiL except by the use
of a web browser, in the future maybe only a particular web browser?

Doesn't that mean something for those who don't have adequate technology
to be able use the product? (haven't we all asked this question about
something or other before?)

I am also concerned that free email services in general are not what I would
consider the safest way to manage personal information. If you lose it,
you are one voice in 30 million, with no comeback. "All care but no
responsibility taken, please take a number".

If you are in a cafe and don't clear your browser, or it's being logged
for nefarious purposes, you risk having your password and login cached
and other people can read your mail or worse, impersonate you.
I had a friend check their HoTMaiL the other night on my computer
and when they'd finished, I played it all
back for them, and explained why they should not just leave with the browser
running with a loaded cache ;)

>From a systems admin point of view, I see a lot of mail stuck in the
mail queue outbound to hotmail.com (and even hotmail.edu.au!)
that can take several hours to process due to routing or other problems.
It has been observed in the student labs that a lot of HoTMaiL being
sent by students is to other students occupying the same lab,
also using HoTMaiL. It's not hard to calculate the costs of all
those uncachable packets of data going outside the RNO and incurring the
international rate, being that Universities have to pay their way too....

Our School of Computing and Information Technology block all use of
HoTMaiL in their labs, citing the fact that it's a waste of resources and
student time on computers that would otherwise be crunching numbers.
In my department, the policy is to let 'em have it, but if it was up to me
...
I won't rant on anymore about this. Suffice to say that I used to block
HoTMaiL until I was told that I had to "lower the shields" and let it
through, since I had students emailing me with support questions...


rachel

--
Rachel Polanskis Kingswood, Greater Western Sydney, Australia
grove@zeta.org.au http://www.zeta.org.au/~grove/grove.html
r.polanskis@nepean.uws.edu.au http://www.nepean.uws.edu.au/ccd/
"Yow! Am I having fun yet?!" - John Howard^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H Zippy the Pinhead


From tkach@gol.com Wed Dec 2 17:31:29 1998
From: tkach@gol.com (tkach)
Date: Thu, 3 Dec 1998 01:31:29 +0900
Subject: 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL (comment)
Message-ID: <199812021624.BAA13823@pproxy01.gol.ad.jp>


Hello to all,

The comments regarding the use of Hotmail have been quite interesting.
However, I believe that at least at my university (and I suspect in
other universities in Japan) there is a multilingual aspect as well, albeit
on
perhaps a very small scale.

One reason is language capability. In our graduate studies department,
a number of non-Japanese students use Hotmail rather than
Japanese-language email programs because Hotmail is in English.
Most of our computers have Japanese operating systems and the
operation of Eudora, Internet Mail, Exchange, or even UNIX-based
systems, etc. poses a challenge for many students simply be-
cause of language.

A second reason is technical or infrastructure-related. For financial
reasons, our department does not have a full-time technical person
dedicated to managing the network, and the server has a tendency
to go up and down for a day or so every month or six weeks. Some
students have found it more reliable to use Hotmail rather than
university computer accounts.

Related to this is the fact that the email addresses assigned to many
non-Japanese students will change during the course of the year due to
university policy of assigning email addresses by student number.
Many exchange students seem to want *one* email address only rather
than have to change their address in the middle of their exchange year
in Japan.

Therefore, I would add "exchange students" to the three categories
listed in previous messages.....

I would be interested in hearing about the situation in any other
educational institutions regarding this.

Regards,

L.M. Tkach
Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki-ken
JAPAN



From glen.turner@adelaide.edu.au Wed Dec 2 18:19:50 1998
From: glen.turner@adelaide.edu.au (Glen Turner)
Date: Thu, 03 Dec 1998 03:49:50 +1030
Subject: 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL
References: <v0211010db28a39eb623c@[203.37.43.24]> <3664BE25.1CC2@ramin.com.au>
Message-ID: <366576B6.CD1448E7@adelaide.edu.au>

M. da Cruz wrote:

> ii) Travellers to avoid lugging equipment around and roaming dial up

Expect this to change as HTML gateways into corporate e-mail
systems appear. As usual, they're available for UNIX mail servers
today; users of cc:Fail and M$ NoChange will have to wait a
few years.

These gateways are much more useful than Hotmail and co, as it
is your real e-mail folders you are fiddling with. The response
time is also within reasonable bounds.


...and may I suggest

iv) Senders of SPAM

I wonder how many of the accounts have been used to send, but
the (rather irate) replies never read :-)

My procmail filter puts mail from Hotmail accounts into
the Spam folder (along with mail that has an X-Spam header
inserted by sendmail looking up RBL and ORBS). Once in a
while I have a look at the contents before deleting the
entire folder: I've yet to receive valid e-mail from a
Hotmail user that hasn't made themselves known to me
beforehand.

--
Glen Turner Network Specialist
Tel: (08) 8303 3936 Information Technology Services
Fax: (08) 8303 4400 The University of Adelaide 5005
Email: glen.turner@adelaide.edu.au South Australia
--
STOP PRESS: Glen's mobile phone number is now 0416 295 857.

From glen.turner@adelaide.edu.au Wed Dec 2 18:48:24 1998
From: glen.turner@adelaide.edu.au (Glen Turner)
Date: Thu, 03 Dec 1998 04:18:24 +1030
Subject: Linux WP application
Message-ID: <36657D68.3AACF76A@adelaide.edu.au>

Linux has long been criticised over it's lack of desktop
applications. To an extent, this criticism misses the
point: after all, the OS is built by hobbyists and WP
is a workplace activity.

However, I have been truly impressed with StarOffice 5.0.

In the past, I tried earlier versions of StarOffice as
an alternative to Applix. And like most people I found
it even more buggy (as if such a thing were possible).

If you wanted to do serious word processing you asked
why hadn't Adobe ported FrameMaker to Linux yet, and
then bit the bullet and installed the Frame clone with
the attached operating system: MS Word + Windows.

But the new version of StarOffice is a marvellous
reimplementation of Word, Excel and PowerPoint.

It is not an exact clone -- but the file formats seem
transferable, and where the user interface diverges it
appears to be better than the MS design.

Performance is not as good as for the MS products,
but it isn't nearly as bad as for previous versions
of StarOffice.

StarOffice is distributed by StarDivision (www.stardivision.com)
and is free to personal users.


If you want to compare such things, the core memory
requirements are about 26MB. This compares to 13MB
for Communicator, 5MB for Xemacs, and 15MB for X and
its window manager friends. None of this is extraordinary,
the results seem to suggest that when using Linux as
a desktop it needs resources equivalent to Windows
NT 4.0 (although Linux has good behaviour under resource
shortages, unlike WinNT, so less memory will work).


--
Glen Turner Network Specialist
Tel: (08) 8303 3936 Information Technology Services
Fax: (08) 8303 4400 The University of Adelaide 5005
Email: glen.turner@adelaide.edu.au South Australia

From bpa@iss.net.au Wed Dec 2 21:01:29 1998
From: bpa@iss.net.au (Brenda Aynsley)
Date: Thu, 03 Dec 1998 06:31:29 +1030
Subject: 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL
References: <v0211010db28a39eb623c@[203.37.43.24]> <3664BE25.1CC2@ramin.com.au>
<366576B6.CD1448E7@adelaide.edu.au>
Message-ID: <36659C99.FACEAEE4@iss.net.au>

Apropos previous comments re hotmail, I decided I should log into a
hotmail account I created for training purposes in August and the welcome
message sent at that time says:

"Welcome to Hotmail!
The world's leading email provider with over [graphic here =
8 million] accounts

Welcome to the fastest growing community in the history of
the Internet. As you can tell by the graphics and live links in
this message, this is no ordinary email. This is the
beginning of rich Email content that includes graphics and links to
other web pages. "

So how did they get from 8 million in August this year to 30 million? How
come they went backwards from 9-10 million pre microsoft acquisition? Who
says figures dont lie?

v-e-r-y interesting :-)

brenda
--
Brenda Aynsley - http://www.iss.net.au/bpabio.html
Phone:+61 8 8357 8844 Fax:+61 8 8373 3829 Mobile:+61 412 662 988
Internet Support Services Australia Pty Ltd (ACN 069 346 327)
Education, Web site development and Support Services



From tomw@acslink.net.au Wed Dec 2 21:40:10 1998
From: tomw@acslink.net.au (Tom Worthington)
Date: Thu, 03 Dec 1998 07:40:10 +1100
Subject: Privacy Protection Policy for the Next Federal Government
Message-ID: <2.2.32.19981202204010.006b4274@mail.mpx.com.au>

I wrote Fri, 5 Jun 1998 08:33:31 +1000 (EST):

>In the first parliamentary term the new government will introduce privacy
>laws ... not only to protect the rights of citizens from improper use of
>information by business and government, but also to boost our industry.
>Commerce needs rules to prosper and the global information economy needs
>globally consistent rules.
>
>A European Union Data Protection Directive (1) comes into force 24 October
>1998. Australian organizations will not be able to participate in global
>business unless the Australian government adopts comparable laws..."
http://www.anu.edu.au/mail-archives/link/link9806/0087.html

This was a slightly cynical attempt to write a bit of policy which would
suit whoever won the Federal election. There seems to be some similarity to
where the federal government is now said to be heading:

Alston flags U-turn on data privacy law, By JAMES RILEY, The Australian, 1
Dec 98: http://www.theaustralian.com.au/techno/4261315.htm

"THE Federal Government is investigating national privacy and
data-protection legislation, in an apparent about-face on its previous
self-regulation policy...

"Privacy is seen as vital to the future of electronic commerce. The United
States and the European Union have both declared legislation is needed to
protect Internet users.

"The catalyst for the privacy debate was a European Union directive
threatening trade sanctions against countries failing to take adequate steps
to protect personal data...


Tom Worthington http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw PO Box 13
Immediate Past President Belconnen ACT 2617
Australian Computer Society tomw@acslink.net.au

Computer Virus Alert: Beware of Geeks Bearing GIFs ;-)


From tswarner@dynamite.com.au Wed Dec 2 22:17:27 1998
From: tswarner@dynamite.com.au (Terry Swarner)
Date: Thu, 03 Dec 1998 08:17:27 +1100
Subject: 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL
References: <v0211010db28a39eb623c@[203.37.43.24]>
Message-ID: <3665AE67.EC7452F5@dynamite.com.au>

Hi - for you 45%+ Netscape users, Netscape provides a free Email
service with pseudo naming and world-wide access (click the
webmail button on any NS Netcenter page) and 5 MB of mail box
(enough for Bernard and for you, Tony). It is one one the many
little freebies and configurations that can be made to your
personal web browser with the 4.x and higher versions (free also).

Cheers -- Terry




From brd@dynamite.com.au Wed Dec 2 22:53:57 1998
From: brd@dynamite.com.au (Bernard Robertson-Dunn)
Date: Thu, 03 Dec 1998 08:53:57 +1100
Subject: Background Briefing - communities against Economic Rationalism
Message-ID: <3665B6F5.E8CEA832@dynamite.com.au>

For those interested in the Economic Rationalist debate, the
transcript to the program referred to below is available at:
http://www.abc.net.au/rn/talks/bbing/stories/s17458.htm

Drowning By Numbers
Broadcast date: 29/11/98
Imagine if the daily Dow Jones index measured national happiness.
What about a seasonally-adjusted youth suicide indicator? A bullish
share market in the human spirit? Can we measure the economic
rationalism of an afternoon at the community pool with the kids? In
Fitzroy they did. They fought, and they won.

--
The economy is not a machine. The economy is a rain forest. You can
tinker with a machine, retool a machine, slow down or speed up a
machine. But anyone who proposes to intervene in the delicate,
organic, complex, evolving ecosystem known as the economy will have
to prove first that the intervention will be "environmentally
sensitive."
-- Michael Rothschild.

Regards
brd

Bernard Robertson-Dunn
Canberra Australia
brd@dynamite.com.au

From richard@auscoms.com.au Thu Dec 3 00:23:54 1998
From: richard@auscoms.com.au (richard@auscoms.com.au)
Date: Thu, 03 Dec 98 09:23:54 +1000
Subject: Fwd:AU falling in the OECD rankings
Message-ID: <9812039126.AA912637468@mail.auscoms.com.au>


Linkers -- thought I'd forward this out of interest.

>____________________Forward Header_____________________
>Subject: AU falling in the OECD rankings
>Author: "murray j bent" <murrayb@imailbox.com>
>Date: 1/12/98 15:31
>
>The US and Australia join press release on E-commerce endorsed OECD
>practices in the area.
>July 1998 OECD statistics at http://www.ottawaoecdconference.org just
>show how far Australia is
>falling behind:
>- 8th in rank, and now below the OECD average for domain registration
>per 1000 inhabitants
>- 6th in rank in hosts per 1000 inhabitants. Just 2 years before Au was
>#4 , 3 years ago was #2 in the ranking
>http://ausmall.com.au/acnews3.htm#960509)
>
>Once again Australia has blown it! The politicians who crowed while the
>figures were good can now look again while the numbers are in free fall.
>
>mbent

Question: is it as bad as all that? Or am I observing cultural cringe again,
that Australia has such a lack of confidence that we enslave ourselves to
comparison?

Richard Chirgwin






From m.lean@qut.edu.au Wed Dec 2 22:34:39 1998
From: m.lean@qut.edu.au (Michael Lean)
Date: Thu, 03 Dec 1998 08:34:39 +1100
Subject: 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL
Message-ID: <3.0.5.32.19981203083439.007fae80@pop.qut.edu.au>


Ross,
This on Link. Do we observe student use of Hotmail?
Mike

>From a systems admin point of view, I see a lot of mail stuck in the
mail queue outbound to hotmail.com (and even hotmail.edu.au!)
that can take several hours to process due to routing or other problems.
It has been observed in the student labs that a lot of HoTMaiL being
sent by students is to other students occupying the same lab,
also using HoTMaiL. It's not hard to calculate the costs of all
those uncachable packets of data going outside the RNO and incurring the
international rate, being that Universities have to pay their way too....

Our School of Computing and Information Technology block all use of
HoTMaiL in their labs, citing the fact that it's a waste of resources and
student time on computers that would otherwise be crunching numbers.
In my department, the policy is to let 'em have it, but if it was up to me
...
I won't rant on anymore about this. Suffice to say that I used to block
HoTMaiL until I was told that I had to "lower the shields" and let it
through, since I had students emailing me with support questions...


rachel

--
Rachel Polanskis Kingswood, Greater Western Sydney, Australia
grove@zeta.org.au http://www.zeta.org.au/~grove/grove.html
r.polanskis@nepean.uws.edu.au http://www.nepean.uws.edu.au/ccd/
"Yow! Am I having fun yet?!" - John Howard^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H Zippy the Pinhead



From brian.stewart@noie.gov.au Thu Dec 3 00:06:54 1998
From: brian.stewart@noie.gov.au (Brian Stewart)
Date: Thu, 03 Dec 1998 10:06:54 +1100
Subject: 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL
In-Reply-To: <366576B6.CD1448E7@adelaide.edu.au>
References: <v0211010db28a39eb623c@[203.37.43.24]>
<3664BE25.1CC2@ramin.com.au>
Message-ID: <4.1.19981203100218.0094b740@mail.cyberhalides.com>

At 04:19 am 3/12/98 , you wrote:
>Expect this to change as HTML gateways into corporate e-mail
>systems appear. As usual, they're available for UNIX mail servers
>today; users of cc:Fail and M$ NoChange will have to wait a
>few years.

This facility is already available to some local ISP customers. The mail
server being run at my after hours ISP allows me to access my mailbox
through either pop3, imap and/or a web based interface. Sure beats some of
the advertising supported free web based email services. There should be
more of it.

Brian


From r.polanskis@nepean.uws.edu.au Wed Dec 2 23:52:23 1998
From: r.polanskis@nepean.uws.edu.au (Rachel Polanskis)
Date: Thu, 3 Dec 1998 09:52:23 +1100 (EST)
Subject: Linux WP application
In-Reply-To: <36657D68.3AACF76A@adelaide.edu.au>
Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.3.96.981203094609.11021A-100000@photon.nepean.uws.edu.au>

On Thu, 3 Dec 1998, Glen Turner wrote:

> But the new version of StarOffice is a marvellous
> reimplementation of Word, Excel and PowerPoint.
>
> It is not an exact clone -- but the file formats seem
> transferable, and where the user interface diverges it
> appears to be better than the MS design.

Star Office is based on technology from "InsoSoft" which is I believe
an MS partner. Inso create libraries of code to read and write
MS file formats.
>
> Performance is not as good as for the MS products,
> but it isn't nearly as bad as for previous versions
> of StarOffice.

I am having great success on my desktop systems at home and work,
using the Solaris versions. It seems to be at least good enough
that my bosses are considering ditching their NT desktops in favour
of Sun Ultra5's, and in fact our manager is having lots of fun setting
up his own workstation by himself, and generally having more fun than
he did with the commodity box.
>
> StarOffice is distributed by StarDivision (www.stardivision.com)
> and is free to personal users.

We are purchasing a site license at work for the product, and I am
buying a copy for home with a 2 user license. I know the software is
free, but it is worthwhile paying to support such products even if
it is just out of goodwill. It keeps the market open and helps indicate
there is a demand for such products.
>
>
> If you want to compare such things, the core memory
> requirements are about 26MB. This compares to 13MB
> for Communicator, 5MB for Xemacs, and 15MB for X and
> its window manager friends. None of this is extraordinary,
> the results seem to suggest that when using Linux as
> a desktop it needs resources equivalent to Windows
> NT 4.0 (although Linux has good behaviour under resource
> shortages, unlike WinNT, so less memory will work).

It hums very nicely on Solaris, but then again, I have *lots* of RAM,
and very nice, smooth CPU power ;)


rachel

Rachel Polanskis University of Western Sydney, Nepean
Senior UNIX Admin PO Box 10, Kingswood NSW 2747
Systems && Operations Computing && Communications Division Kingswood
r.polanskis@nepean.uws.edu.au Phone: +61 (0247) 360 291


From r.polanskis@nepean.uws.edu.au Wed Dec 2 23:58:48 1998
From: r.polanskis@nepean.uws.edu.au (Rachel Polanskis)
Date: Thu, 3 Dec 1998 09:58:48 +1100 (EST)
Subject: 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL
In-Reply-To: <4.1.19981203100218.0094b740@mail.cyberhalides.com>
Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.3.96.981203095557.11021C-100000@photon.nepean.uws.edu.au>

On Thu, 3 Dec 1998, Brian Stewart wrote:

> This facility is already available to some local ISP customers. The mail
> server being run at my after hours ISP allows me to access my mailbox
> through either pop3, imap and/or a web based interface. Sure beats some of
> the advertising supported free web based email services. There should be
> more of it.

We are also working on a web based mail front end here at UWS Nepean,
but staffing and resources are such that it will be awhile before it becomes
a reality.

I am not convinced that web-based mail programs are a good idea, but
I would prefer that users take to our own system (in the future)
for security, networking and support/admin reasons!


rachel

Rachel Polanskis University of Western Sydney, Nepean
Senior UNIX Admin PO Box 10, Kingswood NSW 2747
Systems && Operations Computing && Communications Division Kingswood
r.polanskis@nepean.uws.edu.au Phone: +61 (0247) 360 291


From SBenson@abare.gov.au Thu Dec 3 00:19:35 1998
From: SBenson@abare.gov.au (SBenson@abare.gov.au)
Date: Thu, 3 Dec 1998 10:19:35 +1100
Subject: Linux WP application
Message-ID: <595FE28AB1EBD111920F0060B06B3DD70E2757@ACTMAIL2>

Hi all,
I also installed this a few days ago on my home machine (Dual boot
win95/Redhat Linux 5.2) but haven't used it much yet. I was very surprised
to discover it opens Office 97 files (Word and Excel) directly from the
mounted Win95 partition almost perfectly. The only problem I've noticed is
some complex charts in Excel display strangely. If you install it under the
KDE Window Manager it is supposed to integrate quite nicely with the KDE
Desktop. KDE gives you a nice clean "windowish" desktop with a number of
useful applications integrated quite nicely to your desktop.

Like others I'm trying to move to a non-Windows platform and this is a great
step in that direction. I just need a good Quicken clone (a port to Linux is
under consideration) that will load my existing Quicken data.

Cheers

Steve

Steve Benson
Systems Librarian
Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry - Australia Library
Canberra AUSTRALIA

Ph 02 62722003 Fax 02 62724709
sbenson@abare.gov.au

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Glen Turner [SMTP:glen.turner@adelaide.edu.au]
> Sent: Thursday, December 03, 1998 4:48 AM
> To: Link list
> Subject: Linux WP application
>
> Linux has long been criticised over it's lack of desktop
> applications. To an extent, this criticism misses the
> point: after all, the OS is built by hobbyists and WP
> is a workplace activity.
>
> However, I have been truly impressed with StarOffice 5.0.
>
> In the past, I tried earlier versions of StarOffice as
> an alternative to Applix. And like most people I found
> it even more buggy (as if such a thing were possible).
>
> If you wanted to do serious word processing you asked
> why hadn't Adobe ported FrameMaker to Linux yet, and
> then bit the bullet and installed the Frame clone with
> the attached operating system: MS Word + Windows.
>
> But the new version of StarOffice is a marvellous
> reimplementation of Word, Excel and PowerPoint.
>
> It is not an exact clone -- but the file formats seem
> transferable, and where the user interface diverges it
> appears to be better than the MS design.
>
> Performance is not as good as for the MS products,
> but it isn't nearly as bad as for previous versions
> of StarOffice.
>
> StarOffice is distributed by StarDivision (www.stardivision.com)
> and is free to personal users.
>
>
> If you want to compare such things, the core memory
> requirements are about 26MB. This compares to 13MB
> for Communicator, 5MB for Xemacs, and 15MB for X and
> its window manager friends. None of this is extraordinary,
> the results seem to suggest that when using Linux as
> a desktop it needs resources equivalent to Windows
> NT 4.0 (although Linux has good behaviour under resource
> shortages, unlike WinNT, so less memory will work).
>
>
> --
> Glen Turner Network Specialist
> Tel: (08) 8303 3936 Information Technology Services
> Fax: (08) 8303 4400 The University of Adelaide 5005
> Email: glen.turner@adelaide.edu.au South Australia

From ron@comu.net.au Thu Dec 3 01:18:38 1998
From: ron@comu.net.au (Ron Ipsen)
Date: Thu, 03 Dec 1998 10:18:38 +1000
Subject: Fwd:AU falling in the OECD rankings
Message-ID: <2.2.32.19981203001838.00880d10@mail01.mel.aone.net.au>

I am not sure that is the conclusion that should be drawn from these figures.

While registrations in the .au may be comparatively falling, that does not
mean that australians are not registering domains or that we are slowing
(comparitively) in growth.

My experience is that much of the domain registration falls into one of two
categories.

1) Stable company puts in for stablecompany.com.au style of registration.
(australian registration)

2) A net innovator wishes to try a concept and puts in for newconcept.com
(foreign registration)

As australians we could artificially boost the numbers of registrations in
the domain name space by going to a NSI style of "first come first served"
domain name system like the US.

I do however believe that the more stable system that is in place here,
requiring comany/business name to be related to the domain applied for and
limits to the number of domains held by each company/business to be more
conducive to long term growth and stability.

Ron.



At 09:23 AM 1998-12-03 +1000, you wrote:
>
>Linkers -- thought I'd forward this out of interest.
>
>>____________________Forward Header_____________________
>>Subject: AU falling in the OECD rankings
>>Author: "murray j bent" <murrayb@imailbox.com>
>>Date: 1/12/98 15:31
>>
>>The US and Australia join press release on E-commerce endorsed OECD
>>practices in the area.
>>July 1998 OECD statistics at http://www.ottawaoecdconference.org just
>>show how far Australia is
>>falling behind:
>>- 8th in rank, and now below the OECD average for domain registration
>>per 1000 inhabitants
>>- 6th in rank in hosts per 1000 inhabitants. Just 2 years before Au was
>>#4 , 3 years ago was #2 in the ranking
>>http://ausmall.com.au/acnews3.htm#960509)
>>
>>Once again Australia has blown it! The politicians who crowed while the
>>figures were good can now look again while the numbers are in free fall.
>>
>>mbent
>
>Question: is it as bad as all that? Or am I observing cultural cringe again,
>that Australia has such a lack of confidence that we enslave ourselves to
>comparison?
>
>Richard Chirgwin
>
>
>
>
>
>
>


From r.polanskis@nepean.uws.edu.au Thu Dec 3 00:21:14 1998
From: r.polanskis@nepean.uws.edu.au (Rachel Polanskis)
Date: Thu, 3 Dec 1998 10:21:14 +1100 (EST)
Subject: Linux WP application
In-Reply-To: <595FE28AB1EBD111920F0060B06B3DD70E2757@ACTMAIL2>
Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.3.96.981203101908.11615A-100000@photon.nepean.uws.edu.au>

On Thu, 3 Dec 1998 SBenson@abare.gov.au wrote:

> Like others I'm trying to move to a non-Windows platform and this is a great
> step in that direction. I just need a good Quicken clone (a port to Linux is
> under consideration) that will load my existing Quicken data.

Have a look at Freshmeat
http://freshmeat.net

There's links to the latest versions of all sorts of Linux/UNIX software.
I believe there is already a Quicken clone called "QDCBB" which
means "Quick and Dirty Checkbook Balancer"....


rachel

Rachel Polanskis University of Western Sydney, Nepean
Senior UNIX Admin PO Box 10, Kingswood NSW 2747
Systems && Operations Computing && Communications Division Kingswood
r.polanskis@nepean.uws.edu.au Phone: +61 (0247) 360 291


From richard@auscoms.com.au Thu Dec 3 01:30:24 1998
From: richard@auscoms.com.au (richard@auscoms.com.au)
Date: Thu, 03 Dec 98 10:30:24 +1000
Subject: Background Briefing - communities against Economic Ration
Message-ID: <9812039126.AA912641456@mail.auscoms.com.au>


BRD quoted:
>
>The economy is not a machine. The economy is a rain forest. You can
>tinker with a machine, retool a machine, slow down or speed up a
>machine. But anyone who proposes to intervene in the delicate,
>organic, complex, evolving ecosystem known as the economy will have
>to prove first that the intervention will be "environmentally
>sensitive."
>-- Michael Rothschild.

Apt: since it's impossible not to participate in an economy (and participation
changes it), sensitivity is required. But the economy's even worse than a
rainforest: it's more like an electron, since the act of observing it changes
it.

Richard Chirgwin



From scott@doc.net.au Thu Dec 3 02:10:17 1998
From: scott@doc.net.au (Scott Howard)
Date: Thu, 3 Dec 1998 12:10:17 +1100
Subject: 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL
In-Reply-To: <366576B6.CD1448E7@adelaide.edu.au>; from Glen Turner on Thu, Dec 03, 1998 at 03:49:50AM +1030
References: <v0211010db28a39eb623c@[203.37.43.24]> <3664BE25.1CC2@ramin.com.au> <366576B6.CD1448E7@adelaide.edu.au>
Message-ID: <19981203121017.A26089@marvin.doc.net.au>

On Thu, Dec 03, 1998 at 03:49:50AM +1030, Glen Turner wrote:
> M. da Cruz wrote:
>
> > ii) Travellers to avoid lugging equipment around and roaming dial up
>
> Expect this to change as HTML gateways into corporate e-mail
> systems appear. As usual, they're available for UNIX mail servers
> today; users of cc:Fail and M$ NoChange will have to wait a
> few years.

Umm.. MS Exchange has had a web-based interface for well over a year...

Scott.

From tonyb@netinfo.com.au Thu Dec 3 02:17:14 1998
From: tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Thu, 3 Dec 1998 12:17:14 +1100
Subject: 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL
Message-ID: <v02110108b28b9087faaf@[203.37.43.24]>

At 8:17 AM 3/12/98, Terry Swarner wrote:
> (click the
>webmail button on any NS Netcenter page) and 5 MB of mail box
>(enough for Bernard and for you, Tony).

Actually no. I have 57megs of current mail in about 400 mail folders and 65
megs in my archive database going back 6 years. These web based services
are hopeless for anybody handling more than a few doxen messages per day -
I get ~150. I use multiple accounts and filtering to pre sort my mail so I
can get to the important stuff first and screen all the lists and mail from
particular people or specific domains into separate folders.

I'm not suggesting that these services are useless just that they are only
suitable for casual users but not anybody making serious use of email.

Tony

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From kgeisel@actonline.com.au Wed Dec 2 12:56:37 1998
From: kgeisel@actonline.com.au (Karin Geiselhart)
Date: Wed, 02 Dec 1998 22:56:37 +1100
Subject: The net never forgets
Message-ID: <3.0.5.32.19981202225637.00794100@pop1.actonline.com.au>

Some snippets from:
>
> http://www.salonmagazine.com/21st/feature/1998/11/25feature.html
>
>SALON MAGAZINE
>
>T h e__N e t_.never f o r g e t s
>
>EVERYTHING YOU'VE EVER POSTED ONLINE
>COULD COME BACK TO HAUNT YOU SOMEDAY.
>
>BY J.D. LASICA

>People assume that their home
>pages disappear once they pull the plug. Not necessarily: While your browser
>may report a "404: File Not Found" when you call up an offline Web page,
>those pages live on in other electronic nooks and crannies. Since 1996, the
>Internet Archive, a kind of digital warehouse, has been trolling the Web and
>hoarding everything it comes across -- text, images, sound clips. Every two
>months, it scoops up the entire Web and stores the results on its virtual
>shelves. ...
>
>Bulletin board messages live on far after the threads peter out. The
>messages we send to the Internet's 33,000 newsgroups often fall off the edge
>of Usenet after a week or so, but the postings live on in databases like
>Deja News and the Internet Archive.
>...
>Federal law makes it a crime for government agencies to compare most digital
>information about U.S. citizens, points out Fred Cate, a law professor at
>Indiana University and author of "Privacy in the Information Age." But
>nothing prevents private companies or individuals from doing so. ...

kg


PhD student
Faculty of Communication
University of Canberra
http://student.canberra.edu.au/~u833885/home.htm

From Matthew.Batten@ozemail.camtech.net.au Thu Dec 3 12:12:42 1998
From: Matthew.Batten@ozemail.camtech.net.au (Matthew Batten)
Date: Thu, 3 Dec 1998 12:12:42 +0100
Subject: 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL
In-Reply-To: <Pine.GSO.4.00.9812022140460.20881-100000@isis.virago.org.au>
References: <3664BE25.1CC2@ramin.com.au>
Message-ID: <v04011705b28c21ad1910@[192.168.1.147]>


>Our School of Computing and Information Technology block all use of
>HoTMaiL in their labs, citing the fact that it's a waste of resources and
>student time on computers that would otherwise be crunching numbers.
>In my department, the policy is to let 'em have it, but if it was up to me
>...

This isn't the only problem that is being faced by Schools etc. that have
students using Hotmail. Many are finding that the amount of traffic that
Hotmail generates on thier INternet links is resulting is resulting in
expensive traffic charges. This is often due to a student at one desk
emailing another a 'card' who then receives this message via HotMail.

Being a dynamically generated site - there is no way that the schools can
efficiently cache this content either, thus leaving little alternative but
to block access to the URL http://www.hotmail.com/ in order to keep their
costs down.

They don't mind people receiving mail from the domain, but don't want them
accessing accounts via the browser. The schools that I have seen block
acces to the Hotmail site have resulted in traffic levels of approx. 50%
what they were when Hotmail was avilable via a browser.

Matt

___________________________________________________________________________
Matthew Batten Phone: +61 8 8303 3317
Manager, Corporate Sales Fax: +61 8 8303 6066
OzEmail Camtech Internet Email: mattb@ozemail.camtech.net.au
WWW: http://www.camtech.net.au Mobile: 0419 900 361

--- Level 8, 10 Pulteney Street Adelaide SA 5000, Australia ---

- OZEMAIL CAMTECH INTERNET - Fast Reliable Service -
___________________________________________________________________________

From Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au Thu Dec 3 03:53:43 1998
From: Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au (Roger Clarke)
Date: Thu, 3 Dec 1998 13:53:43 +1100
Subject: Victorian draft legislation now on-line
Message-ID: <v03130303b28bad355d92@[203.37.38.140]>


Exposure drafts of Victoria's proposed data protection and electronic
commerce legislation are now available on-line (in adobe format) at:
http://mmv.vic.gov.au
look under publications.

Copies of the drafts are also online (under 'what's new') at
http://www.stockdale.vic.gov.au and
http://www.vic.gov.au

Copies of the two exposure drafts will also be available soon by ringing
Multimedia Victoria on (03) 9651 9868.

The closing date for submissions is mid-February next year. Submissions
and comments can be sent to Multimedia Victoria, 55 Collins Street,
Melbourne 3000.

Originally posted to padvocacy by:
Lindy Smith
Tel +61 3 9826 6833 Fax +61 3 9826 6855
Postal: Suite 39/199 Toorak Road, South Yarra, Victoria 3141 Australia
smith@privacymgt.bu.aust.com
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


Roger Clarke http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/
http://www.etc.com.au/Xamax/
Xamax Consultancy Pty Ltd, 78 Sidaway St, Chapman ACT 2611 AUSTRALIA
Tel: +61 2 6288 1472, and 6288 6916 mailto:Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au

Visiting Fellow, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology
The Australian National University Canberra ACT 0200 AUSTRALIA
Information Sciences Building Room 211 Tel: +61 2 6249 3666



From jellicle@inch.com Thu Dec 3 03:20:04 1998
From: jellicle@inch.com (Michael Sims)
Date: Wed, 2 Dec 1998 22:20:04 -0400
Subject: 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL
In-Reply-To: <v04011705b28c21ad1910@[192.168.1.147]>
References: <Pine.GSO.4.00.9812022140460.20881-100000@isis.virago.org.au>
Message-ID: <199812030318.WAA15081@arutam.inch.com>

>
> >Our School of Computing and Information Technology block all use of
> >HoTMaiL in their labs, citing the fact that it's a waste of resources and
> >student time on computers that would otherwise be crunching numbers.
> >In my department, the policy is to let 'em have it, but if it was up to me

Maybe there's something I'm missing. Do these students not have
local email accounts? Why not? The idea of a college student in the
U.S. using a hotmail account in a computer lab is baffling, but then,
I'm a 'Merican.

Microsoft's "30 million" figure is a laugh. I probably account for
10 or 15 of those 30,000,000 accounts, as I have a tendency to
create an account for one-time use (to avoid spam) and then ignore
it - forgetting the password so I must create a new one next time. I
don't think they are routinely recycled, either. Congratulations,
welcome to Microsoft's marketing lies department.

I should also mention that NO ONE SHOULD USE WEB-BASED ACCESS TO
THEIR POP3 ACCOUNTS UNLESS IT'S PROVIDED BY YOUR ISP. How can you
trust the company? You're *giving them your password*, certainly to
your email, likely to a shell account as well. What ability do you
have to trust some random company with a webpage? I could make
up such a page in half an hour; advertise it, slurp up a hundred
passwords and go to town! It's a very, very, very bad idea. If you
want web-based access to your regular email account make your ISP
provide it, don't use a third party.


--
Michael Sims The Censorware Project
http://censorware.org
And today our fragile flesh and steel has laid our hands on a vaster wheel
with all of the stars to know.


From firefly@peg.apc.org Thu Dec 3 19:24:37 1998
From: firefly@peg.apc.org (Bruce Morrison)
Date: Thu, 03 Dec 1998 13:24:37 -0500
Subject: Linux WP application
In-Reply-To: <595FE28AB1EBD111920F0060B06B3DD70E2757@ACTMAIL2>
Message-ID: <3.0.5.32.19981203132437.007eead0@pop.peg.apc.org>

To save on bandwidth StarOffice5.0 is available from the AARNET Mirror. It
is about 65M.

http://mirror.aarnet.edu.au/linux/staroffice/so50_01.tar

Bruce
-
c2o
- Community Communications Online - Bruce Morrison
- PO Box 304 - firefly@c2o.apc.org.au
- Richmond 3121

From tonyb@netinfo.com.au Thu Dec 3 07:04:17 1998
From: tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Thu, 3 Dec 1998 17:04:17 +1100
Subject: $19 Million helps switch on regional Australia
Message-ID: <v02110110b28bd8e1fb4e@[203.37.43.24]>

>Date: Thu, 3 Dec 1998 12:54:15 +1100 (EST)
>From: owner-all@minister.dca.gov.au
>X-Authentication-Warning: edison.dca.gov.au: majordom set sender to
>owner-all using -f
>subject: New Ministerial Media Release
>Sender: owner-all@minister.dca.gov.au
>Precedence: bulk
>Status:
>
>The following Ministerial Media Release is available at:
>
>http://www.dcita.gov.au/cgi-bin/graphics.pl?path=3395
>
>$19 Million helps switch on regional Australia
>
>'The Federal Government is providing $19 million to deliver improved
>internet and telecommunications services to regional communities from the
>tip of Cape York to southernmost Tasmania,' the Minister for Communications,
> Information Technology and the Arts, Senator Richard Alston, announced
>today.
>
>Terry O'Connor, Minister's office

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From monty@knapp.com.au Thu Dec 3 03:57:58 1998
From: monty@knapp.com.au (Paul Montgomery)
Date: Thu, 03 Dec 1998 13:57:58 +1100
Subject: Fwd:AU falling in the OECD rankings
References: <9812039126.AA912637468@mail.auscoms.com.au>
Message-ID: <3665FE33.5D0C6FA9@knapp.com.au>

richard@auscoms.com.au wrote:
[snip]
> >- 8th in rank, and now below the OECD average for domain registration
> >per 1000 inhabitants
> >- 6th in rank in hosts per 1000 inhabitants. Just 2 years before Au was
> >#4 , 3 years ago was #2 in the ranking
> >http://ausmall.com.au/acnews3.htm#960509)

I can see Peter Gerrand calling the troops in around him as they suck their
oranges at half-time in a game in the OECD Big League... "C'mon guys, we've
dropped to eighth on the ladder so we need a win this week!"

> >Once again Australia has blown it! The politicians who crowed while the
> >figures were good can now look again while the numbers are in free fall.
> >
> >mbent
>
> Question: is it as bad as all that? Or am I observing cultural cringe
> again, that Australia has such a lack of confidence that we enslave
> ourselves to comparison?

This can actually be seen as a Good Thing (tm). Many of those domains that are
registered in .com or .co.uk etc would be domain hoarders who would not
actually put up a site, but register it on the hope that someone would buy it
off them at an inflated price (the less clued call these guys "cybersquatters").

For better or worse, Melbourne IT and INA don't pander as much to these ppl.
OTOH, Net Registry has, for better or worse, made it an art form, e.g.
Australia e-Commerce taking 1,300 generic names under the au.com subdomain.
That alone would skew the numbers significantly.

In effect, domain registration is no indication at all of the health of an
industry. The number of domains that actually have sites on the Web, now
that's a better metric. In the latest figures on the Internet Growth Index at
http://www.ausmall.com.au/acnews.htm the estimate is that of the 60,000 regos
in .au, only 23,400 have actual sites that are live. Compare that ratio with
the global average and then you've got something.

--
Paul Montgomery, features editor for Image & Data Manager and assistant
editor for Internet World. Lives like a JavaBean. Fan of Robert Rankin.
Tel: +61 2 9318 2644. Fax: +61 2 9310 4608. mailto:monty@knapp.com.au
http://australia.internet.com “I am a railroad track abandoned.” (JB)

From richard@auscoms.com.au Thu Dec 3 07:47:02 1998
From: richard@auscoms.com.au (richard@auscoms.com.au)
Date: Thu, 03 Dec 98 16:47:02 +1000
Subject: does "text mining" breach copyright?
Message-ID: <9812039126.AA912664056@mail.auscoms.com.au>


Link:

I've been looking over the release info for Odyssey's Isys Spider -- which
incorporates remote sites into a single text index
(http://www.isys.com.au/press/isyspr32.htm)

[snip]
>Spiders can index as many sites as you nominate, going through as >many layers
as you choose and following as many relevant hyperlinks >as you believe
reasonable. The various sites are indexed and the >files added to your local
ISYS index.
..

>When ISYS accesses documents from external domains, the brokering >process
serves up the text complete with hit highlighting and hit to >hit navigation but
the graphics attached to the page goes directly >to your browser.
..
[snip]

My question: at what point is the line drawn between indexing someone else's
content, breaching their copyright?

Richard Chirgwin



From r.polanskis@nepean.uws.edu.au Thu Dec 3 07:55:59 1998
From: r.polanskis@nepean.uws.edu.au (Rachel Polanskis)
Date: Thu, 3 Dec 1998 17:55:59 +1100 (EST)
Subject: 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL
In-Reply-To: <199812030318.WAA15081@arutam.inch.com>
Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.4.00.9812031745530.29151-100000@isis.virago.org.au>

On Wed, 2 Dec 1998, Michael Sims wrote:

> > >Our School of Computing and Information Technology block all use of
> > >HoTMaiL in their labs, citing the fact that it's a waste of resources and
> > >student time on computers that would otherwise be crunching numbers.
> > >In my department, the policy is to let 'em have it, but if it was up to me
>
> Maybe there's something I'm missing. Do these students not have
> local email accounts? Why not? The idea of a college student in the
> U.S. using a hotmail account in a computer lab is baffling, but then,
> I'm a 'Merican.

All UWS students are issued an email account that is accessible from
anywhere in the world. I am told students prefer a HoTMaiL account
because it is more "permanent" since the theory is that when a student
leaves, their account is deleted.

I have given up explaining that HoTMaiL is no guarantee of
long term availability of your mailbox. If you are a hoarder of email
like me, a web based account is definitely not going to be adequate ;)
FTR, I have about 40Mb of email archived...

I've always tried to recommend users to obtain a shell account with an ISP,
rather than relying on portals or specialised mail services, but I think
I'll give up. There's too much marketing behind these less than useful
technological marvels.

> Microsoft's "30 million" figure is a laugh. I probably account for
> 10 or 15 of those 30,000,000 accounts, as I have a tendency to
> create an account for one-time use (to avoid spam) and then ignore
> it - forgetting the password so I must create a new one next time. I
> don't think they are routinely recycled, either. Congratulations,
> welcome to Microsoft's marketing lies department.

<...>
>
> I should also mention that NO ONE SHOULD USE WEB-BASED ACCESS TO
> THEIR POP3 ACCOUNTS UNLESS IT'S PROVIDED BY YOUR ISP. How can you
> trust the company? You're *giving them your password*, certainly to
> your email, likely to a shell account as well. What ability do you
> have to trust some random company with a webpage? I could make
> up such a page in half an hour; advertise it, slurp up a hundred
> passwords and go to town! It's a very, very, very bad idea. If you
> want web-based access to your regular email account make your ISP
> provide it, don't use a third party.

Absolutely. this sort of advice should be spread
around like the GOOD_TIMES virus.


rachel

--
Rachel Polanskis Kingswood, Greater Western Sydney, Australia
grove@zeta.org.au http://www.zeta.org.au/~grove/grove.html
r.polanskis@nepean.uws.edu.au http://www.nepean.uws.edu.au/ccd/
"Yow! Am I having fun yet?!" - John Howard^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H Zippy the Pinhead


From Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au Thu Dec 3 08:13:42 1998
From: Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au (Roger Clarke)
Date: Thu, 3 Dec 1998 18:13:42 +1100
Subject: Supermation Infohighway ...
Message-ID: <v0313030ab28be8fc735a@[203.37.38.140]>


Remember the good old days of the information infrastructure debates, when
we used to talk about metaphors, and I wrote prosaic things like:
http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/II/NetN4.html

Well the following just fell off the back of a virtual truck. Really, it
would have better matched the spirit of the thing if I'd posted it via an
anonymous remailer ...


"Think of the Internet as a highway."

There it is again. Some clueless fool talking about the
"Information Superhighway." They don't know didley about the net.
It's nothing like a superhighway. That's a rotten metaphor.

Suppose the metaphor ran in the other direction. Suppose the
highways were like the net. . .

A highway hundreds of lanes wide. Most with pitfalls for
potholes. Privately operated bridges and overpasses. No highway
patrol. A couple of rent-a-cops on bicycles with broken whistles.
500 member vigilante posses with nuclear weapons. A minimum of
237 on ramps at every intersection. No signs. Wanna get to
Ensenada? Holler out the window at a passing truck to ask
directions. Ad hoc traffic laws. Some lanes would vote to make
use by a single-occupant-vehicle a capital offense on Monday
through Friday between 7:00 and 9:00. Other lanes would just
shoot you without a trial for talking on a car phone.

AOL would be a giant diesel-smoking bus with hundreds of ebola
victims on board throwing dead wombats and rotten cabbage at the
other cars, most of which have been assembled at home from kits.
Some are built around 2.5 horsepower lawnmower engines with a top
speed of nine miles an hour. Others burn nitrogylcerin and idle
at 120.

No license plates. World War II bomber nose art instead.
Terrifying paintings of huge teeth or vampire eagles. Bumper
mounted machine guns. Flip somebody the finger on this highway
and get a white phosphorus grenade up your tailpipe. Flatbed
trucks cruise around with anti-aircraft missile batteries to shoot
down the traffic helicopter. Little kids on tricycles with
squirtguns filled with hydrochloric acid switch lanes without
warning.

NO OFFRAMPS. None.


Of course, this is a descendant of some long-standing engineering /
computer industry / I.T. industry critiques. I never *can* remember the
lines that used to lead up to '... then the first woodpecker would destroy
civilisation'.


Roger Clarke http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/
http://www.etc.com.au/Xamax/
Xamax Consultancy Pty Ltd, 78 Sidaway St, Chapman ACT 2611 AUSTRALIA
Tel: +61 2 6288 1472, and 6288 6916 mailto:Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au

Visiting Fellow, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology
The Australian National University Canberra ACT 0200 AUSTRALIA
Information Sciences Building Room 211 Tel: +61 2 6249 3666



From stephen@melbpc.org.au Thu Dec 3 03:41:01 1998
From: stephen@melbpc.org.au (Stephen)
Date: Thu, 03 Dec 1998 13:41:01 +1100
Subject: 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL
In-Reply-To: <366576B6.CD1448E7@adelaide.edu.au>
References: <v0211010db28a39eb623c@[203.37.43.24]>
<3664BE25.1CC2@ramin.com.au>
Message-ID: <3.0.1.32.19981203134101.00715814@popa.melbpc.org.au>

Glen and all,

At 03:49 AM 3/12/98 +1030, Glen Turner wrote:

>My procmail filter puts mail from Hotmail accounts into
>the Spam folder ..

Here's another approach, from a teacher friend who complained
to abuse@yahoo.com about a rather despicable Yahoo spam today.

-----
Hello Yahoo! Mail User,

Thank you for emailing the Yahoo! Mail Abuse Team.

The Yahoo! Terms of Service (TOS) forbids email abuse. It is very
important to us that any violations of these policies are identified
and addressed. We appreciate your assistance as we enforce these
policies ... (snip)

In addition to enforcing the TOS at Yahoo!, we also employ tough
unsolicited email countermeasures.

1. We limit the number of individual recipients allowed per each
email message.

2. We do not allow numeric characters at the beginning of an email address.
Any Yahoo! ID that begins with a numeric character is a
forgery.

3. We include the Originating IP Address in the header of each email
message that is delivered via our system. If an email message does
not contain an Originating IP Address in its full headers, it did not come
from Yahoo!.

4. We also have implemented procedures to prevent “spammers” from bypassing
these countermeasures.

We do not recommend replying to "Remove" email addresses, because this can
confirm that your email address is active and invite more unwanted
email to your account.

If you are writing to report unwanted, abusive, or fraudulent email, please
include the complete, unedited content of the email message in
question, along with the full, unedited message headers ..

If you are reporting suspected abuse from a non-email source, you
can send your request to the following addresses:

1. Yahoo! Chat – http://chat.yahoo.com/chat/help/abuse-form.html
2. Yahoo! Message Boards - boards-feedback@yahoo-inc.com
3. Yahoo! Games - games-bugs@yahoo-inc.com
4. Yahoo! Pager - pager-bugs@yahoo-inc.com
5. Yahoo! Clubs - http://add.yahoo.com/fast/help/clubs/cgi_feedback

To view our Terms of Service, please visit:

http://edit.my.yahoo.com/config/form?.form=yahoomail_agree

Thank you again for your report. We appreciate your assistance in helping
us to keep Yahoo! Mail free from abuse.

Regards, The Yahoo! Mail Support Team

----------------------------------

Regards all ..
Stephen Loosley

stephen@melbpc.org.au
s.loosley@vermontsc.vic.edu.au
sloosley@vaxc.cc.monash.edu.au
Croydon North Victoria 3136

From tswarner@dynamite.com.au Thu Dec 3 12:49:40 1998
From: tswarner@dynamite.com.au (Terry Swarner)
Date: Thu, 03 Dec 1998 22:49:40 +1100
Subject: 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL
References: <v02110108b28b9087faaf@[203.37.43.24]>
Message-ID: <36667AD3.6D2B5610@dynamite.com.au>

Tony--

I barely suggest that you have 57MB on the server at anyone time. Unless your
ISP is really generous your mail account normally would be bouncing with that
much on the server. Most mailservers to individual accounts are set by
default to around 2MB (give or take). I found the auto routing feature to be
helpful when traveling because all I had to do is get a machine on the net with
NS and check my mail -- then return to deal with the 100 or so Emails a day I
get without losing step.

Agree on serious users -- however -- universal access mail services were
designed to allow access by those without personal equipment and those that
travel and must keep up with business.

Tony Barry wrote:

> At 8:17 AM 3/12/98, Terry Swarner wrote:
> > (click the
> >webmail button on any NS Netcenter page) and 5 MB of mail box
> >(enough for Bernard and for you, Tony).
>
> Actually no. I have 57megs of current mail in about 400 mail folders and 65
> megs in my archive database going back 6 years. These web based services
> are hopeless for anybody handling more than a few doxen messages per day -
> I get ~150. I use multiple accounts and filtering to pre sort my mail so I
> can get to the important stuff first and screen all the lists and mail from
> particular people or specific domains into separate folders.
>
> I'm not suggesting that these services are useless just that they are only
> suitable for casual users but not anybody making serious use of email.




From rw@firstpr.com.au Thu Dec 3 14:34:59 1998
From: rw@firstpr.com.au (Robin Whittle)
Date: Thu, 3 Dec 1998 23:34:59 +1000
Subject: Linux WP application
In-Reply-To: <3.0.5.32.19981203132437.007eead0@pop.peg.apc.org>
References: <595FE28AB1EBD111920F0060B06B3DD70E2757@ACTMAIL2>
Message-ID: <199812031143.WAA04421@gair.firstpr.com.au>

Bruce Morrison pointed to a 65 megabyte distribution file for
StarOffice (http://www.stardivision.com)

> To save on bandwidth StarOffice5.0 is available from the AARNET Mirror. It
> is about 65M.
>
> http://mirror.aarnet.edu.au/linux/staroffice/so50_01.tar

I am going to do it via FTP, because that is more efficient for
handshake data going back to the server, and because I can resume
half-way through the file if the session is broken. (Though I thought
I caught Netscape resuming a big HTTP session recently . . . )

ftp://mirror.aarnet.edu.au/linux/staroffice/

The boxed and documented version is USD$39.95! Thats a lot less
expensive than the MS Office 9x it is intended to replace.

- Robin



===============================================================

Robin Whittle rw@firstpr.com.au http://www.firstpr.com.au
Heidelberg Heights, Melbourne, Australia

First Principles Research and expression: music, Internet
music marketing, telecommunications, human
factors in technology adoption. Consumer
advocacy in telecommunications, especially
privacy. Consulting and technical writing.

Real World Electronics and software for music: eg.
Interfaces the Devil Fish mods for the TB-303.

===============================================================

From bje@cygnus.com Thu Dec 3 21:47:42 1998
From: bje@cygnus.com (Ben Elliston)
Date: Fri, 4 Dec 1998 07:47:42 +1100 (EST)
Subject: 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL
In-Reply-To: <36667AD3.6D2B5610@dynamite.com.au>
Message-ID: <Pine.LNX.3.95.981204074711.27859B-100000@moshpit.cygnus.com>

> I barely suggest that you have 57MB on the server at anyone time. Unless your
> ISP is really generous your mail account normally would be bouncing with that
> much on the server. Most mailservers to individual accounts are set by
> default to around 2MB (give or take). I found the auto routing feature to be
> helpful when traveling because all I had to do is get a machine on the net with
> NS and check my mail -- then return to deal with the 100 or so Emails a day I
> get without losing step.

I think Tony was referring to the amount of mail he has held in local
storage on his own machine, not his ISP's mail spool.

Ben


From bpa@iss.net.au Thu Dec 3 22:27:43 1998
From: bpa@iss.net.au (Brenda Aynsley)
Date: Fri, 04 Dec 1998 07:57:43 +1030
Subject: Linux WP application
References: <595FE28AB1EBD111920F0060B06B3DD70E2757@ACTMAIL2>
<199812031143.WAA04421@gair.firstpr.com.au>
Message-ID: <3667024F.55F1ABA5@iss.net.au>

Robin Whittle wrote:

> half-way through the file if the session is broken. (Though I thought
> I caught Netscape resuming a big HTTP session recently . . . )

you did robin, netscape is supposed to resume an ftp iif it breaks the original
transfer

cheers
brenda

--
Brenda Aynsley - http://www.iss.net.au/bpabio.html
Phone:+61 8 8357 8844 Fax:+61 8 8373 3829 Mobile:+61 412 662 988
Internet Support Services Australia Pty Ltd (ACN 069 346 327)
Education, Web site development and Support Services



From brd@dynamite.com.au Thu Dec 3 23:18:16 1998
From: brd@dynamite.com.au (Bernard Robertson-Dunn)
Date: Fri, 04 Dec 1998 09:18:16 +1100
Subject: Gov IT Outsourcing
Message-ID: <36670E28.95E14051@dynamite.com.au>

It's when you put the pieces together that interesting pictures
form:

What follows are observations, rumours and conclusions, not all
mine.

The government is still fully committed to outsourcing.

The view from within DOFA is that all you have to do is specify the
services you want from IT, request a price and off you go. All
changes can be accommodated via the contract. (My personal view is
that this grossly misunderstands the nature and realities of IT and
IS).

The people in DoFA who are pushing this strategy are getting
frustrated at its slowness. They cannot understand what the delays
are - it can only be those nasty departments who resist change at
any cost.

The government's position is to:
* Reduce cost
* Achieve Industry Development

Departmental secretaries/Agency Heads state, in public:

* We are fully committed to IT outsourcing
* We want to get improved benefits out of IT and IM
* We want value for money
* We are looking for a strategic technology partnership

Departmental secretaries/Agency Heads state, in private, either:

* I hate IT, we don't know how to manage it, it wastes management
time, it costs a fortune, it's just too difficult

or:

* There is no way I want our organisation to have its IT outsourced.
* We will do everything in our power to prevent it.

The process could get a bit difficult if a single Group contains
Departmental secretaries/Agency Heads with both views - ie for and
against.

It would seem that the successful tenderer for Group 5 will not be
announced until next year. That makes one Whole of Government IT
oursourcing completed this year.

What is not generally known is that there is a very significant
point in time next 1 July. the superannuation arrangements that
impact people taking packages change. HR issues in outsourcing
inmplemented before that date are very different (and better from
most people's perspective) than after. That is why the government
set 1 July as the completion date for all IT outsourcing.

Looking at their track record (1 so far) with six months to go, they
may get two more (Group 5 and ATO). It is possible but not likely
that Health will be completed by then.

The Health RFT closes on 15 February, so Christmas may not happen
for everyone this year. Easter disappeared for those bidding for
DEETYA. It closed the Tuesday after the break.

Less than ten weeks to put together a $400 million deal.

I won't tell you what the picture that forms in my mind looks like.
Maybe it's no coincidence that Blue Poles, which normally lives in
the National Gallery, is away at the moment, dazzling the Americans.

I'll stop rambling now and get on with some work.

--
It's a hundred and six miles to Chicago, we've got a full tank
of gas, half a pack of cigarettes, it's dark, and we're wearing
sunglasses. Hit it!
-- Jake and Eliott Blues in "The Blues Brothers"

Regards
brd

Bernard Robertson-Dunn
Canberra Australia
brd@dynamite.com.au

From richard@auscoms.com.au Fri Dec 4 00:32:13 1998
From: richard@auscoms.com.au (richard@auscoms.com.au)
Date: Fri, 04 Dec 98 09:32:13 +1000
Subject: $19 Million helps switch on regional Australia
Message-ID: <9812049127.AA912724378@mail.auscoms.com.au>


A cursory glance over the grants reveals a fair amount of fluffy feel-good
stuff, let's spend fifty grand to study whether we need better
telecommunications 200km from nowhere, just in case nobody knew it already.

But really, $120k to train NT local government employees to use e-mail and the
Web? "You click this, you do that, reboot twice a day because it's Exchange,
thank you and here's my bill." Or is there a special training requirement
involved because of the size of the NT stubby?

And yes, they're starting to deliver the promised PoPs, so if any Linkers have
avoided moving to Hay, Hell or Booligal because they couldn't log into the
Internet, they can now get 2400 bps or so (street parade, throw streamers into
the air etc).

Richard Chirgwin
____________________Reply Separator____________________
Subject: $19 Million helps switch on regional Australia
Author: <tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry)>
Date: 3/12/98 17:04

>Date: Thu, 3 Dec 1998 12:54:15 +1100 (EST)
>From: owner-all@minister.dca.gov.au
>X-Authentication-Warning: edison.dca.gov.au: majordom set sender to
>owner-all using -f
>subject: New Ministerial Media Release
>Sender: owner-all@minister.dca.gov.au
>Precedence: bulk
>Status:
>
>The following Ministerial Media Release is available at:
>
>http://www.dcita.gov.au/cgi-bin/graphics.pl?path=3395
>
>$19 Million helps switch on regional Australia
>
>'The Federal Government is providing $19 million to deliver improved
>internet and telecommunications services to regional communities from the
>tip of Cape York to southernmost Tasmania,' the Minister for Communications,
> Information Technology and the Arts, Senator Richard Alston, announced
>today.
>
>Terry O'Connor, Minister's office

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry







From Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au Thu Dec 3 23:53:31 1998
From: Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au (Roger Clarke)
Date: Fri, 4 Dec 1998 09:53:31 +1100
Subject: Cal Bans Spam
Message-ID: <v03130314b28cc2259556@[203.37.38.140]>


>From PRIVACY JOURNAL, November 1998 (now in its 25th year):

CALIFORNIA REGULATES UNWANTED E-MAIL ADS

New laws in California that may be models for federal legislation
protecting privacy will probably be challenged as restrictions on free
speech.

The state legislature this fall enacted a new law allowing Internet service
providers like America Online to sue anyone who uses their systems to send
unwanted "spam" electronic-mail advertisements. The law makes it a
misdemeanor to use an ISP's mail server to hide the origins of spam e-mail.

But entrepreneurs who send bulk electronic-mail ads say that AB 1629 (Chap.
863) limits their rights of free speech on the Internet.

privacyjournal@cwixmail.com
http://www.townonline.com/privacyjournal
PRIVACY JOURNAL, PO Box 28577, Providence RI 02908


Roger Clarke http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/
http://www.etc.com.au/Xamax/
Xamax Consultancy Pty Ltd, 78 Sidaway St, Chapman ACT 2611 AUSTRALIA
Tel: +61 2 6288 1472, and 6288 6916 mailto:Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au

Visiting Fellow, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology
The Australian National University Canberra ACT 0200 AUSTRALIA
Information Sciences Building Room 211 Tel: +61 2 6249 3666



From ggm@dstc.edu.au Thu Dec 3 23:59:16 1998
From: ggm@dstc.edu.au (George Michaelson)
Date: Fri, 04 Dec 1998 08:59:16 +1000
Subject: Linux WP application
In-Reply-To: Your message of "Thu, 03 Dec 1998 23:34:59 +1000."
<199812031143.WAA04421@gair.firstpr.com.au>
Message-ID: <14442.912725956@dstc.edu.au>


I'm sorry to disappoint you Robin, but I have *measured* the back-channel
dataflow for both FTP and HTTP, and for objects over 256k the back-channel
costs are identical. They are a direct function of the MRU/MTU and are
perturbed by dataloss on the end-to-end path. The behaviour for smaller objects
is disturbed by the URL length, the associated client/server header: fields
and objects like cookies, (for WWW) and by FTP directory filepath and options
negotiations at data establishment/transfer initiation (for FTP) which are
swamped by the volume of data/ack flows which follow.

Further, HTTP:1.1 supports partial transfer resumption. Since its not widely
deployed, you are right to use FTP for that reason.

But not for the first one.

cheers
-George
--
George Michaelson | DSTC Pty Ltd
Email: ggm@dstc.edu.au | University of Qld 4072
Phone: +61 7 3365 4310 | Australia
Fax: +61 7 3365 4311 | http://www.dstc.edu.au



From SBenson@abare.gov.au Fri Dec 4 00:04:15 1998
From: SBenson@abare.gov.au (SBenson@abare.gov.au)
Date: Fri, 4 Dec 1998 10:04:15 +1100
Subject: Linux WP application
Message-ID: <595FE28AB1EBD111920F0060B06B3DD70E275D@ACTMAIL2>

When you do get it from here make sure you go to the StarOffice Company site
first and get a registration key. You'll need this to install the software.

Cheers

Steve


Steve Benson
Systems Librarian
Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry - Australia Library
Canberra AUSTRALIA

Ph 02 62722003 Fax 02 62724709
sbenson@abare.gov.au

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Bruce Morrison [SMTP:firefly@peg.apc.org]
> Sent: Friday, December 04, 1998 5:25 AM
> To: link@www.anu.edu.au
> Subject: RE: Linux WP application
>
> To save on bandwidth StarOffice5.0 is available from the AARNET Mirror.
> It
> is about 65M.
>
> http://mirror.aarnet.edu.au/linux/staroffice/so50_01.tar
>
> Bruce
> -
> c2o
> - Community Communications Online - Bruce Morrison
> - PO Box 304 - firefly@c2o.apc.org.au
> - Richmond 3121

From gtaylor@efa.org.au Fri Dec 4 00:22:19 1998
From: gtaylor@efa.org.au (Greg Taylor)
Date: Fri, 4 Dec 1998 10:22:19 +1100 (EST)
Subject: More crypto controls - US claims victory
Message-ID: <199812032322.KAA24757@boomer.anu.edu.au>

Bad news from the Wassenaar plenary meeting in Vienna. It appears that the
US has bullied the Europeans into adopting a hardline view, extending export
controls to mass market products. So far all the news had come from the
David Aaron camp (US ambassador for crypto controls), and it is not unknown
for him to resort to hype. I have seen nothing official from Europe yet.

Greg

----------------------------------------------------
Greg Taylor
Electronic Frontiers Australia
http://www.efa.org.au


====================================================================

U.S. claims victory on global encryption exports
WASHINGTON, Dec 3 (Reuters) - Clinton administration officials on
Thursday said they had convinced other leading countries to impose strict
new export controls on computer data scrambling products under the guise of
arms control.
At a meeting on Thursday in Vienna, the 33 countries that have signed
the Wassenaar Arrangement limiting arms exports -- including Japan, Germany
and Britain -- agreed to impose controls on the most powerful data
scrambling technologies, including for the first time mass market software,
U.S. special envoy for cryptography David Aaron told Reuters.
The United States, which restricts exports of a wide range of data
scrambling products, has long sought without success to convince other
countries to impose similar restrictions.
Leading U.S. high-technology companies, including Microsoft
Corp.<MSFT.O> and Intel Corp.<INTC.O>, have complained that the lack of
restrictions in other countries hampered their ability to compete abroad.
The industry has sought to have U.S. restrictions relaxed or repealed, but
not asked for tighter controls in other countries.
Aaron said the Wassenaar countries agreed to continue export controls on
powerful scrambling, or encryption, products in general but ended an
exemption for widely available software containing encryption.
The new policy also reduced reporting and paperwork requirements and
specifically excluded from export controls products that used encryption to
protect intellectual property, like movies or recordings sent over the
Internet, from illegal copying, Aaron said.
((Aaron Pressman, Washington newsroom, 202-898-8312))
Thursday, 3 December 1998 12:57:40
RTRS [nN0389576]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF
Commerce News

International Trade Administration

Washington, DC

For Immediate Release
Tuesday, December 3, 1998

Contact: Maria Harris Tildon
(202)482-3809
Sue Hofer
(202)482-2721

P R E S S S T A T E M E N T

U.S. Applauds Agreement on Encryption in International Export Control Regime

Vienna, Austria -- The United States welcomed the decision taken Thursday
in Vienna by the 33 members of the Wassenaar Arrangement to modernize and
improve multilateral encryption export controls. Ambassador David Aaron,
the President's Special Envoy for Cryptology, said that "the international
agreement reached here goes a long way toward leveling the playing field
for exporters and promoting electornic commerce. It provides countries
with a stronger regulatory framework to protect national security and
public safety."

The agreement caps a two year effort by the United States, to update
international encryption export controls and to balance commercial and
privacy interests with national security and public safety concerns.
Thursday's agreement simplifies and streamlines controls on many encryption
items and eliminates multilateral reporting requirements. Specific
improvements to multilateral encryption controls include removing controls
on all encryption products at or below 56 bit and certain consumer
entertainment TV systems, such as DVD products, and on cordless telephone
systems designed for home or office use.

Wassenaar members also agreed to extend controls to mass-market encryption
above 64 bits, thus closing a significant loophole in multilateral
encryption controls. This gives Wassenaar member governments the legal
authority to license many mass market encryption software exports which
were previously not covered by multilateral controls and enables
governments to review the dissemination of the strongest encryption
products that might fall into the hands of rogue end users. The new
controls also extend liberalized mass-market hardware below 64 bits. Until
today, only mass-market software products enjoyed this liberalized
treatment.

"The decisions taken here in Vienna reinforce the Administration's efforts
to promote a balanced encryption policy," Aaron confirmed.



From ggm@dstc.edu.au Fri Dec 4 00:24:23 1998
From: ggm@dstc.edu.au (George Michaelson)
Date: Fri, 4 Dec 1998 09:24:23 +1000 (EST)
Subject: 'Digital jukebox' self-programmed music CD in OZ?
Message-ID: <199812032324.JAA14543@sleet.dstc.edu.au>


Browsing the BBC website I saw an item on the Diamond RIO mp3 player.

That led to this URL:

http://www.cdj.co.uk/index.html

Is there something similar here in Australia?

I don't get out much (any more) so I'd really not know if
this kind of device was in trendoid shops here yet.

-George

From Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au Fri Dec 4 01:03:21 1998
From: Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au (Roger Clarke)
Date: Fri, 4 Dec 1998 11:03:21 +1100
Subject: More crypto controls - US claims victory
Message-ID: <v0313031ab28cd6645a97@[203.37.38.140]>


Greg Taylor wrote:
>Bad news from the Wassenaar plenary meeting in Vienna ...


EPIC Alert Volume 5.18's report suggests things aren't *quite* so bad:

=======================================================================
[2] International Crypto Agreement Modified
=======================================================================

The US Commerce Department reported on December 3 that the Wassenaar
Arrangement, a 33-country group that works on exports of military goods,
has reached an agreement on setting limits on international transfers
of encryption.

The new agreement reportedly allows for exports of crypto products up to 56
bits for all crypto and 64 bits for mass market software or hardware.
These changes reflect both a relaxation and an increase in restrictions.
Currently, cryptography items are strictly controlled. However, mass market
software is exempt. Only a few countries including the US currently
restrict exports of mass market software.

The decision to implement these changes will remain with each country and
this agreement may not result in any changes in current practice. As the
Secretariat notes on their web page: "The decision to transfer or deny
transfer of any item will be the sole responsibility of each Participating
State. All measures undertaken with respect to the arrangement will be in
accordance with national legislation and policies and will be implemented
on the basis of national discretion." The US has been lobbying the other
members to adopt more restrictive laws. However, many nations such as
Finland, Canada and Ireland have announced domestic policies in the past
year which allow for more liberal exports.

[So it's a national agreement which imposes no obligations on anyone, but
enables the U.S. to say that the world agrees with the world's policeman]

Earlier this year members of the Global Internet Liberty Campaign,
an international organizations of civil liberties groups around
the world, wrote to the Wassenaar Secretariat and urged the removal
of controls on cryptography. The GILC Statement said that "failure to
protect the free use and distribution of cryptographic software will
jeopardize the life and freedom of human rights activists, journalists
and political activists all over the world."

The announcement from the US Department of Commerce on the new
Wassenaar controls came in the same week that the White House said that
it would pursue a policy of "self-regulation" for Internet commerce.

More information on Wassenaar is available from:

http://www.wassenaar.org/

GILC Statement:

http://www.gilc.org/crypto/wassenaar/gilc-statement-998.html

...

=======================================================================
[8] Upcoming Conferences and Events
=======================================================================

...
1999 RSA Data Security Conference. January 18-21, 1999. San Jose, CA.
Sponsored by RSA. Contact: http://www.rsa.com/conf99/

FC '99 Third Annual Conference on Financial Cryptography. February
22-25, 1999. Anguilla, B.W.I. Contact: http://fc99.ai/

...
Computers, Freedom and Privacy (CFP) '99. April 6-8, 1999. Washington,
DC. Sponsored by ACM. Contact: info@cfp99.org.

1999 EPIC Cryptography and Privacy Conference. June 7, 1999.
Washington, DC. Sponsored by EPIC. Contact: info@epic.org.

Cryptography & International Protection of Human Rights (CIPHR'99).
9-13 August 1999. Lake Balaton, Hungary. Contact:
http://www.cryptorights.org/

=======================================================================
Subscription Information
=======================================================================

The EPIC Alert is a free biweekly publication of the Electronic
Privacy Information Center. To subscribe or unsubscribe, send email
to epic-news@epic.org with the subject: "subscribe" (no quotes) or
"unsubscribe". A Web-based form is available at:

http://www.epic.org/alert/subscribe.html

Back issues are available at:

http://www.epic.org/alert/

=======================================================================
About EPIC
=======================================================================

The Electronic Privacy Information Center is a public interest research
center in Washington, DC. It was established in 1994 to focus public
attention on emerging privacy issues such as the Clipper Chip, the
Digital Telephony proposal, national ID cards, medical record privacy,
and the collection and sale of personal information. EPIC is sponsored
by the Fund for Constitutional Government, a non-profit organization
established in 1974 to protect civil liberties and constitutional
rights. EPIC publishes the EPIC Alert, pursues Freedom of Information
Act litigation, and conducts policy research. For more information,
e-mail info@epic.org, http://www.epic.org or write EPIC, 666
Pennsylvania Ave., SE, Suite 301, Washington, DC 20003. +1 202 544 9240
(tel), +1 202 547 5482 (fax).

If you'd like to support the work of the Electronic Privacy Information
Center, contributions are welcome and fully tax- deductible. Checks
should be made out to "The Fund for Constitutional Government" and sent
to EPIC, 666 Pennsylvania Ave., SE, Suite 301, Washington DC 20003.

Your contributions will help support Freedom of Information Act and
First Amendment litigation, strong and effective advocacy for the right
of privacy and efforts to oppose government regulation of encryption
and funding of the digital wiretap law.
Thank you for your support.

---------------------- END EPIC Alert 5.18 -----------------------

.


Roger Clarke http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/
http://www.etc.com.au/Xamax/
Xamax Consultancy Pty Ltd, 78 Sidaway St, Chapman ACT 2611 AUSTRALIA
Tel: +61 2 6288 1472, and 6288 6916 mailto:Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au

Visiting Fellow, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology
The Australian National University Canberra ACT 0200 AUSTRALIA
Information Sciences Building Room 211 Tel: +61 2 6249 3666



From adamb@netstorm.net.au Fri Dec 4 01:43:33 1998
From: adamb@netstorm.net.au (Adam Burns)
Date: Fri, 04 Dec 1998 11:43:33 +1100
Subject: 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL
Message-ID: <3.0.32.19981204114331.01000b88@soy.cyber.com.au>

At 05:55 PM 12/3/98 +1100, Rachel Polanskis wrote:
>On Wed, 2 Dec 1998, Michael Sims wrote:

[snip]

>> I should also mention that NO ONE SHOULD USE WEB-BASED ACCESS TO
>> THEIR POP3 ACCOUNTS UNLESS IT'S PROVIDED BY YOUR ISP. How can you
>> trust the company? You're *giving them your password*, certainly to
>> your email, likely to a shell account as well. What ability do you
>> have to trust some random company with a webpage? I could make
>> up such a page in half an hour; advertise it, slurp up a hundred
>> passwords and go to town! It's a very, very, very bad idea. If you
>> want web-based access to your regular email account make your ISP
>> provide it, don't use a third party.
>
>Absolutely. this sort of advice should be spread
>around like the GOOD_TIMES virus.

Absolutely Absolutely. But people are going to continue to use this style
of system, despite usernames and passwords being transmitted around the net
in clear text.

With security related issues, it's almost always better to work with users
than to offer safer alternatives rather than discourage what they'd like to
or already do. It starts to change the culture of how users perceive
'security' issues.

To mitigate the risks of this style of service:

* ISPs should consider implementing services so that different passwords
are used for dial-up and shell access to the password for email collection
(Linux, Solaris and other systems do now support this feature).

* Consult with your userbase to make sure they understand that they do put
the integrity of their email communication at risk by using HoTMaiL-style
services. Some users will not find this too important weighing up the
advantages they see in the use of 'foreign' HTML based POP3 clients.

... but at least your warned them!

Adam.

--
"If I always knew what I meant, I'd be a genius" - Murder My Sweet
--



-NetStorm-----------------------------------------[adamb@netstorm.net.au]
adam burns central++vortex
po box 3168 vortex@netstorm.net.au
SBBC 4101
australia PGP: http://www.netstorm.net.au/pgp/netstorm.net.au/adamb.html
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
storming the reality network into a state of suspended disbelief

From rw@firstpr.com.au Fri Dec 4 02:35:57 1998
From: rw@firstpr.com.au (Robin Whittle)
Date: Fri, 4 Dec 1998 11:35:57 +1000
Subject: Linux WP application
In-Reply-To: <14442.912725956@dstc.edu.au>
References: Your message of "Thu, 03 Dec 1998 23:34:59 +1000." <199812031143.WAA04421@gair.firstpr.com.au>
Message-ID: <199812032344.KAA06299@gair.firstpr.com.au>

Thanks, George, for this report on HTTP being as efficient as FTP for
longer file sizes. I started downloading that 60 megabyte file:

ftp://mirror.aarnet.edu.au/linux/staroffice/so50_01.tar

last night, and this morning, when I looked at the progress window
(Linux Netscape Communicator 4.05), it seemed like it had stalled,
with 48 megabytes done. Then the window closed before my eyes, and I
find no trace of the file whatsoever. Telstra Internet (who I
connect to directly at 33.6 kbps) just made an easy $9.12. Maybe I
should finally install the SQID proxy and point it at Telstra
Internet's upstream SQUID . . .

To find the latest on any Linux (and Unix in general?) software, such
as SQID, search for it at: http://freshmeat.net

- Robin



From rw@firstpr.com.au Fri Dec 4 02:35:57 1998
From: rw@firstpr.com.au (Robin Whittle)
Date: Fri, 4 Dec 1998 11:35:57 +1000
Subject: 'Digital jukebox' self-programmed music CD in OZ?
In-Reply-To: <199812032324.JAA14543@sleet.dstc.edu.au>
Message-ID: <199812032344.KAA06296@gair.firstpr.com.au>

George Michaelson mentioned a small, portable Flash RAM based audio
player, using MP3 (MPEG Audio Layer 3) compression. No moving parts -
just load it up from the paralell port, I think, of your PC (not
Mac?). Made by the same company that brings us Diamond Stealth Super
Viper Accelerated video cards.

> Browsing the BBC website I saw an item on the Diamond RIO mp3
> player. That led to this URL:
>
> http://www.cdj.co.uk/index.html

There is a *lot* of action and controversy regarding music marketing,
MP3 and two other compression algorithms. The best place to start is:

http://www.mp3.com (Obvious isn't it?)

Also, you may be interested in two pages I have just created and am
now updating regarding lossy and lossless audio compression:

http://www.firstpr.com.au/audiocomp/aac-mp3-vq.html
http://www.firstpr.com.au/audiocomp/lossless/

I won't have time to fully update my 3 year old paper on music
marketing, but I hope soon to create an addendum with diagrams, at:

http://www.firstpr.com.au/musicmar/

- Robin


===============================================================

Robin Whittle rw@firstpr.com.au http://www.firstpr.com.au
Heidelberg Heights, Melbourne, Australia

First Principles Research and expression: music, Internet
music marketing, telecommunications, human
factors in technology adoption. Consumer
advocacy in telecommunications, especially
privacy. Consulting and technical writing.

Real World Electronics and software for music: eg.
Interfaces the Devil Fish mods for the TB-303.

===============================================================

From ggm@dstc.edu.au Fri Dec 4 02:10:47 1998
From: ggm@dstc.edu.au (George Michaelson)
Date: Fri, 04 Dec 1998 11:10:47 +1000
Subject: Linux WP application
In-Reply-To: Your message of "Fri, 04 Dec 1998 11:35:57 +1000."
<199812032344.KAA06299@gair.firstpr.com.au>
Message-ID: <14742.912733847@dstc.edu.au>


I think you make true and valid points Robin, but they relate essentially
to failings in the user-agent, not the protocol itself. There *are* failings
in the protocols of both FTP and HTTP. they are not exactly the same problems,
in that FTP is needlessly baroque, and HTTP insufficiently efficient.

But when it comes to data transfer of large objects, TCP and IP and PPP
effects predominate, not applications protocol overhead.

This is to be contrasted with ISO FTAM. Marshall Rose's implementation
lauded itself (sarcastically I add) at being able to achieve 75% of the
speed of standard UNIX ftp. The overhead of ASN.1 and protocol stack
layering effects was the reason it was so much slower.

BTW deploying a squid is a very good idea if you can afford the diskspace
and memory. I recommend people locally to set browser cache sizes to 0
accordingly. Since the squid does partial transfer recovery reasonably well
and does ftp, you get the best of both worlds: a GUI you like, and access
to efficient, recoverable downloads via http: and ftp: URLs

I'm glad the AARNet mirror is proving useful to people. You may like to
know its now done 4.5 Terabytes of downloads since inception, and averages
over 50Gb/day in its recent performance.

cheers
-George
--
George Michaelson | DSTC Pty Ltd
Email: ggm@dstc.edu.au | University of Qld 4072
Phone: +61 7 3365 4310 | Australia
Fax: +61 7 3365 4311 | http://www.dstc.edu.au

From allenm@spectrum.curtin.edu.au Fri Dec 4 02:16:06 1998
From: allenm@spectrum.curtin.edu.au (Matthew Allen)
Date: Fri, 4 Dec 1998 09:16:06 +0800
Subject: Using email as not-email (was 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL)
In-Reply-To: <v02110108b28b9087faaf@[203.37.43.24]>
Message-ID: <74DC22F0D1E@spectrum.curtin.edu.au>

Re Tony's comment about the difficulty of a web-based mail service for handling volume mail...

I concur, receiving large amounts of mail of varying kinds daily (god help me when I go away for
10 days at xmas...)

But, changing threads, I wanted to find out if linkers are also using their 'email' as (essentially)
information management or for other practices that are not strictly 'email': a few ideas...

(1) i'm listening to voice mail - i type names and numbers for call back into a mail msg to myself
(2) references to articles etc (from colleagues, UNCOVER and elsewhere) that appear in my mail
get sorted into folders in the mail app and are stored there rather than being re-entered into some
other application (data base etc)
(3) routinely mail stuff to myself (notes etc)
(4) address book for phone nos etc: use the mail application one

it's nothing very revolutionary, i know, but it is an example of the way in which information
management and communication are inextricably interwoven in practice...other examples?

Matt

Dr Matthew Allen
Senior Lecturer, Humanities
Coordinator, Internet Studies
Curtin University of Technology
61 - 8 9266 3511

From firefly@peg.apc.org Fri Dec 4 17:44:58 1998
From: firefly@peg.apc.org (Bruce Morrison)
Date: Fri, 04 Dec 1998 11:44:58 -0500
Subject: 'Digital jukebox' self-programmed music CD in OZ?
In-Reply-To: <199812032324.JAA14543@sleet.dstc.edu.au>
Message-ID: <3.0.5.32.19981204114458.0342f410@pop.peg.apc.org>

At 09:24 AM 12/4/98 +1000, George Michaelson wrote:
>
>Browsing the BBC website I saw an item on the Diamond RIO mp3 player.
>
>That led to this URL:
>
> http://www.cdj.co.uk/index.html
>
>Is there something similar here in Australia?
>
>I don't get out much (any more) so I'd really not know if
>this kind of device was in trendoid shops here yet.

An Advertisement in yesterdays Age reads...

RIO PMP 3000 $445

Internet Music in the palm of your hand.

This portable, lightweight music player stores up to 60mins of digital
quality music using MP3 compression. Smaller than an audio cassette, with
no moving parts so it never skips. Powered by a single AA battery, it
provides 12 hours of continuous music.


Bruce
-
c2o
- Community Communications Online - Bruce Morrison
- PO Box 304 - firefly@c2o.apc.org.au
- Richmond 3121

From gtaylor@efa.org.au Fri Dec 4 02:54:17 1998
From: gtaylor@efa.org.au (Greg Taylor)
Date: Fri, 4 Dec 1998 12:54:17 +1100 (EST)
Subject: More crypto controls - US claims victory
Message-ID: <199812040154.MAA10172@boomer.anu.edu.au>

Roger Clarke wrote:
>EPIC Alert Volume 5.18's report suggests things aren't *quite* so bad:
>...
>The new agreement reportedly allows for exports of crypto products up to 56
>bits for all crypto and 64 bits for mass market software or hardware.
>These changes reflect both a relaxation and an increase in restrictions.
>Currently, cryptography items are strictly controlled. However, mass market
>software is exempt. Only a few countries including the US currently
>restrict exports of mass market software.

The others are Australia, France, New Zealand, Russia.

>The decision to implement these changes will remain with each country and
>this agreement may not result in any changes in current practice. As the
>Secretariat notes on their web page: "The decision to transfer or deny
>transfer of any item will be the sole responsibility of each Participating
>State. All measures undertaken with respect to the arrangement will be in
>accordance with national legislation and policies and will be implemented
>on the basis of national discretion." The US has been lobbying the other
>members to adopt more restrictive laws. However, many nations such as
>Finland, Canada and Ireland have announced domestic policies in the past
>year which allow for more liberal exports.
>
>[So it's a national agreement which imposes no obligations on anyone, but
>enables the U.S. to say that the world agrees with the world's policeman]

The full original agreement is here:
http://www.wassenaar.org/docs/IE96.html

Australia has always meekly followed the US line on crypto policy. In fact
current Australian policy goes even further than its obligations under
Wassenaar. Mass market and public domain crypto software already requires
an export license here. As to key-length controls, there are no published
guidelines. License applications are handled on a case-by-case basis.

Australia is also affected by the US export laws in that most users can only
obtain crypto-crippled versions of US products, e.g. 40-bit versions of
browser products from MS and Netscape. (I acknowledge that exceptions do
exist, such as the Server Gated Cryptography (SGC) technology used by banks,
and products such as Fortify).

So I expect that countries such as Australia and the UK will continue to do
exactly what the "world's policeman" wants. Meanwhile, countries like
Ireland (which is also a Wassenaar signatory) will use every means at its
disposal to encourage the development of a local IT security industry.

Greg




From rw@firstpr.com.au Fri Dec 4 03:57:31 1998
From: rw@firstpr.com.au (Robin Whittle)
Date: Fri, 4 Dec 1998 12:57:31 +1000
Subject: (Fwd) [RRE]AOL/Netscape Java M$ . . .
Message-ID: <199812040105.MAA06569@gair.firstpr.com.au>

Here's an interesting and rather depressing analysis of the
AOL/Netscape takeover and on the Microsoft Java case.

- Robin

------- Forwarded Message Follows -------
Date sent: Thu, 3 Dec 1998 11:59:43 -0800 (PST)
From: Phil Agre <pagre@alpha.oac.ucla.edu>
To: "Red Rock Eater News Service" <rre@lists.gseis.ucla.edu>
Subject: [RRE]AOL/Netscape merger

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Date: Wed, 2 Dec 1998 22:20:46 -0800 (PST)
From: Audrie Krause <audrie@netaction.org>
Subject: M$ Monitor: Life & Death

The Micro$oft Monitor
$ ----- $ ----- $ ----- $ ----- $ ----- $ ----- $ ----- $ ----- $ ----- $
Published by NetAction Issue No. 37 December 3, 1998
Repost where appropriate. Copyright and subscription info at end of message.
* * * * * * *
In This Issue:
Netscape's Death ... and Java's Life
About the Micro$oft Monitor
$ ----- $ ----- $ ----- $ ----- $ ----- $ ----- $ ----- $ ----- $ ----- $

NETSCAPE'S DEATH ... AND JAVA'S LIFE

-- By Nathan Newman, Project Director
-- Email: nathan@netaction.org

NETSCAPE'S DEATH

It's an odd perverse world were Microsoft touts the death of its browser
rival Netscape as a reason to end the Microsoft antitrust investigation.
It's a bit like a dictatorial regime that shoots its opponents, then bills
the victims' families for the cost of the bullets.

With Microsoft's free giveaway of its Explorer browser (in order to
reinforce its Windows monopoly), Netscape had been forced to give away its
browser as well, thereby punching a gaping hole in its finances. And even
Netscape's sales of server software to business had begun falling under
the Microsoft onslaught. Let me repeat that: in the world of exponential
Internet growth, Netscape's core server sales had fallen 4% this summer
from the previous quarter.

Where Microsoft had revenues of over $4 billion last quarter, Netscape had
revenues of only $162 million - roughly 5% of its rival's revenues. And
where Microsoft made $1.52 billion in profits (the highest profit margin
of any Fortune 500 company), Netscape eked out a microscopic $2.7 million
in profits - probably less than Bill Gates paid for the swimming pool at
his home. The bottom-line is that Netscape has been dying a slow death
for the past year thanks to Microsoft.

So why would AOL exchange roughly $4 billion of its stock in exchange for
this dying dog? A number of analysts have questioned AOL's judgement, but
the best answers are none too savory. If Netscape was not that viable as
an independent company, such analysts note, maybe AOL can take a leaf
from Microsoft and use Netscape's operations as a loss leader to reinforce
its own anticompetitive advantages.

The most obvious attraction for AOL is Netscape's NetCenter web site.
Netscape's Navigator browser helps direct over 22 million people monthly
to the NetCenter web site, which would nicely supplement AOL's already
existing 14.6 million customers directed to its own online content and
services. AOL's customers use a modified browser that includes direct
links to many of AOL's most prominent advertising and commerce partners.

AOL intends to add similar links to Netscape Navigator to reinforce its
revenues from online "content" which is an increasing share of AOL's
revenue. AOL already receives over 16 percent of its revenue from such
online services and advertising, so controlling even a money-losing
browser is likely to give the company an anticompetitive advantage in
selling online content. In this, AOL will begin to emulate the way
Microsoft's browser gives it a similar anticompetitive advantage in
keeping control of its core Windows monopoly.

Ironically, the one thing AOL's acquisition of Netscape will not do is
give AOL's own Internet service customers an alternative to using
Microsoft's browser. As detailed in testimony in the Department of
Justice Microsoft antitrust case, AOL cut a long-term deal to use only
Microsoft's Explorer browser in exchange for AOL being included as an icon
on the Windows desktop. Despite its acquisition of Netscape, AOL has
made clear it needs to be in Windows in order to reinforce AOL's dominance
as an Internet Service Provider, just as Microsoft needs AOL to distribute
Explorer in order to reinforce Microsoft's dominance of proprietary
Internet software standards. So while Microsoft will hold onto its role
as browser for AOL's customers, AOL will poach online commerce from all
its Internet Service Provider (ISP) competitors whose customers use
Navigator - a truly byzantine division of the Internet spoils between
Microsoft and AOL.

This kind of collusion between what will be the two largest ISPs, the two
largest browser distributors, and the two largest online content providers
is the definition of what antitrust law is supposed to ban.

Microsoft has been hyping the "threat" of the AOL/Netscape combination,
but as outlined the merger is mostly a threat to the public interest and
every other ISP other than Microsoft. Microsoft's argument seems to be
that antitrust does not apply as long as the Internet is divided between
two monopolistic companies. The fact that some people are praising the
AOL/Netscape merger as a counterweight to Microsoft shows how much the
Microsoft threat has distorted the original ideal of the Internet as an
even playing field where the best innovation, rather than the biggest
company, would decide who would dominate.

If we want to return to that ideal, federal regulators should block the
AOL/Netscape merger and the DoJ should continue its lawsuit against
Microsoft until the latter agrees to end its monopolistic practices or,
alternatively, is broken up into separate competitive companies. The
answer to Microsoft's monopoly is not more agglomeration of its opponents
but a breaking of its monopoly power.

... AND JAVA'S LIFE

If there is any unknown kicker to the proposed AOL/Netscape merger, it is
the role of Sun Microsystems and the Java language in this whole deal.
While the side deal involving Sun licensing Netscape software for its
enterprise computers creates additional worries of corporate collusion,
the one bright spot is the new emerging strength of the Java language,
both from this deal and from the courtroom loss by Microsoft earlier this
month over the Java issue.

While the Java language is not completely in the public domain, Sun has
been forced to work with a broad range of other corporations and
international regulatory agencies in order to build trust in the
language's standards. The result is a language that is widely used by
thousands of developers and the promise of programs that will run on any
computer, regardless of operating system or hardware. The key to this
promise is maintaining a uniform Java standard of which no company has
proprietary control.

Which is why the preliminary injunction issued on November 17 against
Microsoft is so important. When Sun introduced Java, Microsoft licensed
use of the language for both its software developer tools and for its
Internet browser. However, Microsoft soon began modifying the language in
proprietary ways in order to make programs written for Windows unusable on
other computer systems. This undermined the whole point of Java and Sun
sued Microsoft for violation of its licensing agreement.

Sun maintained that Microsoft was modifying the code for its own
monopolistic purposes, but Microsoft justified its modifications based on
the fact they would improve Java's speed on "Wintel" computers. And the
reality was these modifications did speed up Java, since the cost of Java
running on any computer is that it does run slower on computers whose
hardware has not been designed specifically to accommodate Java.

But the question was why not modify the PC hardware rather than
undermining the Java software?

The answer came on November 9 when Intel Vice-President Steven D. McGeady
testified in the DoJ trial that Microsoft had since 1995 "repeatedly and
on multiple occasions" pushed Intel not to support Java with its hardware.
Microsoft backed up its threats on Java and a number of other issues of
dispute with Intel by threatening not to support future Intel processors
with its software, a "credible and fairly terrifying" threat in McGeady's
testimony.

For those who wonder what is lost from Microsoft's monopoly actions, this
was a clear answer. Due to Microsoft threats, customers lost years of
innovations in computer hardware that were blocked to serve Microsoft's
monopoly interests in undermining Java.

And McGeady's testimony made clear that Microsoft's undermining of Java's
standards was not an incidental result of tailoring it to Intel machines,
but a deliberate strategy in defiance of its licensing agreements with
Sun.

All of this no doubt helped encourage Judge Ronald M. Whyte to issue the
November 17 injunction ordering Microsoft to begin shipping Sun's version
of Java within 90 days. While Microsoft would not have to recall software
already shipped with its modifications, it would have to include Sun's
version of Java in the Windows "virtual machine" for reading Java programs
and its Visual J++ Java development tools that help programmers develop
software.

This ruling was enough to give Java a major boost. On top of that ruling,
one part of the proposed AOL-Netscape-Sun deal appears to be a boost for
Java by AOL in agreeing to produce stand-alone "appliances" to access the
Internet using hardware tailored for the Java language.

This latter fact is another reason many people have looked favorably on
the AOL takeover of Netscape.

However, NetAction agrees with other public advocates like the Consumer
Project on Technology that the AOL-Netscape conglomeration as a twisted
solution to the Microsoft problem. A much better solution is the one
being pursued by the Department of Justice: forcing Microsoft to follow
the law. In a world without monopolists like Microsoft, public-interested
innovations like Java or open source software will be able to succeed
without needing "counter-monopolies" to push them through.

The Internet was built in such an environment and we need to fight for a
technology environment dominated not by two or three monopolists but
instead dominated by the best ideas thousands of minds can conceive,
whether at a university workstation or in a garage startup.

-- Comments or questions about this article should be directed to:
Nathan Newman <mailto:nathan@netaction.org>
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About The Micro$oft Monitor

The Micro$oft Monitor is a free electronic newsletter, published as part of
the Consumer Choice Campaign <http://www.netaction.org/msoft/ccc.html>.
NetAction is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to educating the
public, policy makers, and the media about technology-based social and
political issues, and to teaching activists how to use the Internet for
organizing, outreach, and advocacy.

To subscribe to The Micro$oft Monitor, write to: <majordomo@netaction.org>.
The body of the message should state: <subscribe monitor>. To unsubscribe
at any time, send a message to: <majordomo@netaction.org>. The body of the
message should state: <unsubscribe monitor>

NetAction is seeking sponsors to provide financial support for the continued
publication of the Micro$oft Monitor. Sponsors will be acknowledged in the
newsletter and on NetAction's Web site. NetAction is supported by
individual contributions, membership dues and grants.

For more information about contributing to NetAction, or sponsoring the
Micro$oft Monitor, contact Audrie Krause by phone: (415) 775-8674, by
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message should state: <unsubscribe netaction>.
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Copyright 1998 by NetAction/The Tides Center. All rights reserved.
Material may be reposted or reproduced for non-commercial use provided
NetAction is cited as the source. NetAction is a project of The Tides
Center, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization.










From pargy@hotmail.com Fri Dec 4 03:13:14 1998
From: pargy@hotmail.com (Philip Argy)
Date: Thu, 03 Dec 1998 18:13:14 PST
Subject: does TEXT MINING breach copyright
Message-ID: <19981204021318.23275.qmail@hotmail.com>

If the search engine is merely overlaying what would otherwise be
conventional browser-retrieved content with intelligent highlighting
then I would say it's covered by the same implied licence as the
conventional process.

Philip Argy
National Vice President & NSW Branch Chairman-elect
Australian Computer Society Inc

Head
Intellectual Property, Trade Practices & Technology Group
Mallesons Stephen Jaques

<Philip.Argy@msj.com.au>
http://www.msj.com.au/msj/opeo/profiles/argp.htm
Tel: 612 9296 2054
Fax: 612 9296 3954


>From: richard@auscoms.com.au
>Date: Thu, 03 Dec 98 16:47:02 +1000
>To: <link@www.anu.edu.au>
>Subject: does "text mining" breach copyright?
>
>
>Link:
>
>I've been looking over the release info for Odyssey's Isys Spider --
which
>incorporates remote sites into a single text index
>(http://www.isys.com.au/press/isyspr32.htm)
>
>[snip]
>>Spiders can index as many sites as you nominate, going through as
>many layers
>as you choose and following as many relevant hyperlinks >as you believe
>reasonable. The various sites are indexed and the >files added to your
local
>ISYS index.
>..
>
>>When ISYS accesses documents from external domains, the brokering
>process
>serves up the text complete with hit highlighting and hit to >hit
navigation but
>the graphics attached to the page goes directly >to your browser.
>..
>[snip]
>
>My question: at what point is the line drawn between indexing someone
else's
>content, breaching their copyright?
>
>Richard Chirgwin
>
>



______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

From bpa@iss.net.au Fri Dec 4 03:22:00 1998
From: bpa@iss.net.au (Brenda Aynsley)
Date: Fri, 04 Dec 1998 12:52:00 +1030
Subject: Using email as not-email
References: <74DC22F0D1E@spectrum.curtin.edu.au>
Message-ID: <36674748.F440F6D@iss.net.au>

Matthew Allen wrote:

>
> But, changing threads, I wanted to find out if linkers are also using their 'email' as (essentially)
> information management or for other practices that are not strictly 'email': a few ideas...
>

it has for me too become a pseudo file/reference system. I believe I have most of the mail I have sent
or received since 1993 on my harddisk or floppy disk and my 'archive' comes in very handy from time to
time. The fast searching I am able to do on my mailbox is fantastic and I too use the email in similar
ways to Matthew. The nice thing about it is, I dont have to dive through the many pieces of paper which
litter my workspace to find that elusive bit of information....

another use is to add to my references that "fantastic web page" when I'm at one location to mail myself
with its exact address to be read and bookmarked at another. Very handy for someone like me who works
from several different locations and off local pcs at each.



brenda
--
Brenda Aynsley - http://www.iss.net.au/bpabio.html
Phone:+61 8 8357 8844 Fax:+61 8 8373 3829 Mobile:+61 412 662 988
Internet Support Services Australia Pty Ltd (ACN 069 346 327)
Education, Web site development and Support Services



From r.polanskis@nepean.uws.edu.au Fri Dec 4 03:12:36 1998
From: r.polanskis@nepean.uws.edu.au (Rachel Polanskis)
Date: Fri, 4 Dec 1998 13:12:36 +1100 (EST)
Subject: Using email as not-email
In-Reply-To: <36674748.F440F6D@iss.net.au>
Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.3.96.981204131206.5722E-100000@photon.nepean.uws.edu.au>

On Fri, 4 Dec 1998, Brenda Aynsley wrote:

> Matthew Allen wrote:
>
> >
> > But, changing threads, I wanted to find out if linkers are also using their 'email' as (essentially)
> > information management or for other practices that are not strictly 'email': a few ideas...
> >
>
> it has for me too become a pseudo file/reference system. I believe I have most of the mail I have sent
> or received since 1993 on my harddisk or floppy disk and my 'archive' comes in very handy from time to
> time. The fast searching I am able to do on my mailbox is fantastic and I too use the email in similar
> ways to Matthew. The nice thing about it is, I dont have to dive through the many pieces of paper which
> litter my workspace to find that elusive bit of information....
>
> another use is to add to my references that "fantastic web page" when I'm at one location to mail myself
> with its exact address to be read and bookmarked at another. Very handy for someone like me who works
> from several different locations and off local pcs at each.

<AOL>me too!</AOL>


rachel

Rachel Polanskis University of Western Sydney, Nepean
Senior UNIX Admin PO Box 10, Kingswood NSW 2747
Systems && Operations Computing && Communications Division Kingswood
r.polanskis@nepean.uws.edu.au Phone: +61 (0247) 360 291


From ggm@dstc.edu.au Fri Dec 4 03:36:02 1998
From: ggm@dstc.edu.au (George Michaelson)
Date: Fri, 04 Dec 1998 12:36:02 +1000
Subject: 'Digital jukebox' self-programmed music CD in OZ?
In-Reply-To: Your message of "Fri, 04 Dec 1998 11:44:58 EST."
<3.0.5.32.19981204114458.0342f410@pop.peg.apc.org>
Message-ID: <15145.912738962@dstc.edu.au>


The rio is the engine of the decline of copyright. I love it accordingly.

but the jukebox concept is a way for artists to recover their IPR income
because you *PAY* to make the recording.

so if you fuse the rio with the jukebox, its the same damn thing but cuts
an mp3 image direct into memory and/or a CD.

Thus the question stands: are there jukebox-like vendors operating in OZ
now? Is this niche being attacked yet by entrepreneurs, making music and
other stuff available to *USERS* while meeting a legalistically justified
copyright royalties issue?

I say 'entrepreneurs' because there is no reason for this to be exclusively
HMVshop or Virgin or whatever. This could break open the marketplace.

($400 for a rio is way over the top. This device is still priced for the
early adopters. $150 is more like it. I notice that you can now buy a
portable CD player for under $100 inc tax...)

cheers
-George
--
George Michaelson | DSTC Pty Ltd
Email: ggm@dstc.edu.au | University of Qld 4072
Phone: +61 7 3365 4310 | Australia
Fax: +61 7 3365 4311 | http://www.dstc.edu.au



From allenm@spectrum.curtin.edu.au Fri Dec 4 03:53:08 1998
From: allenm@spectrum.curtin.edu.au (Matthew Allen)
Date: Fri, 4 Dec 1998 10:53:08 +0800
Subject: Using email as not-email
In-Reply-To: <Pine.GSO.3.96.981204131206.5722E-100000@photon.nepean.uws.edu.au>
References: <36674748.F440F6D@iss.net.au>
Message-ID: <74F60803B25@spectrum.curtin.edu.au>

Rachel, you forgot the important <head> tag

<HEAD>

</HEAD>
<AOL>me too!</AOL>

(note the space between<HEAD> and </HEAD> must be left vacant for the <AOL> tag to work

This is the use of email for humour :)

*G* but seriously...email is like...a sort of externalised brain for me...it's like my thoughts on
screen...and it could be WP or HTML editor or anything, but email - the application takes on a
sort of interface quality between myself and my PC; myself and the rest of the world. Strange.

Dr Matthew Allen
Senior Lecturer, Humanities
Coordinator, Internet Studies
Curtin University of Technology
61 - 8 9266 3511

From marghanita@ramin.com.au Fri Dec 4 03:36:22 1998
From: marghanita@ramin.com.au (M. da Cruz)
Date: Fri, 04 Dec 1998 13:36:22 +1100
Subject: 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL
References: <v0211010db28a39eb623c@[203.37.43.24]>
<3664BE25.1CC2@ramin.com.au> <3.0.1.32.19981203134101.00715814@popa.melbpc.org.au>
Message-ID: <36674AA6.64C8@ramin.com.au>

Apparently a well known computer companies marketing department call
themselves SPAM - do you think there is a fundamental problem with
perspectives?

Should advertising on Websites be in the same category as Email SPAM, on
the basis that while it may help fund the site, it is the viewer who
pays for it's download?

Marghanita
--
Marghanita da Cruz
Principal Consultant
Ramin Communications
http://www.ramin.com.au
Tel: (+61) 0414-869202



From marghanita@ramin.com.au Fri Dec 4 03:05:04 1998
From: marghanita@ramin.com.au (M. da Cruz)
Date: Fri, 04 Dec 1998 13:05:04 +1100
Subject: 'Digital jukebox' self-programmed music CD in OZ?
References: <199812032324.JAA14543@sleet.dstc.edu.au>
Message-ID: <36674350.FB3@ramin.com.au>

George Michaelson wrote:
<snip>
> Is there something similar here in Australia?
<snip>
I seem to recall an news item which suggested Grace Brothers in Sydney
may have implemented this in their basement.

Marghanita
----
Marghanita da Cruz
Principal Consultant
Ramin Communications
http://www.ramin.com.au
Tel: (+61) 0414-869202



From glen.turner@adelaide.edu.au Fri Dec 4 04:21:26 1998
From: glen.turner@adelaide.edu.au (Glen Turner)
Date: Fri, 04 Dec 1998 13:51:26 +1030
Subject: 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL
References: <v0211010db28a39eb623c@[203.37.43.24]>
<3664BE25.1CC2@ramin.com.au> <3.0.1.32.19981203134101.00715814@popa.melbpc.org.au> <36674AA6.64C8@ramin.com.au>
Message-ID: <36675536.60856E04@adelaide.edu.au>

M. da Cruz wrote:

> Should advertising on Websites be in the same category as Email SPAM, on
> the basis that while it may help fund the site, it is the viewer who
> pays for it's download?

It is a question of prior permission.

Because I have an email address doesn't mean I want
advertising, especially when I have to pay.

When I contact a web site, then I have implicitly
given my permission to send an ad down the wire.
(Technically, my browser even asks for the ad's
.GIF file: thus you can configure your browser
proxy not to ask for GIFs from, say, doubleclick.com
but to generate a blank GIF file instead).

You question is also a little odd: what does spam
help to fund that is useful to the users of the
Internet?

--
Glen Turner Network Specialist
Tel: (08) 8303 3936 Information Technology Services
Fax: (08) 8303 4400 The University of Adelaide 5005
Email: glen.turner@adelaide.edu.au South Australia
--
STOP PRESS: Glen's mobile phone number is now 0416 295 857.

From edireport@attmail.com Fri Dec 4 13:54:38 1998
From: edireport@attmail.com (Stewart Carter)
Date: Fri, 04 Dec 1998 12:54:38 +0000
Subject: 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL (comment)
In-Reply-To: your message <199812021624.BAA13823@pproxy01.gol.ad.jp> of Thu Dec 3 01:31:29 +0900 1998
Message-ID: <winATT-3_01-edireport-477@attmail.com>


Linkers,

As a some-time (and current) university lecturer I find that free web-based e-
mail services such as Hotmail are useful, despite students having an
entitlement to a 'real' email address and service.

At the RMIT there is no formal instruction on email for students as far as I
am aware, and so many students appear not to take up their email entitlement.

Moreover, there are a number of different email servers in use on the campus,
reflecting the varying degree's of autonomy available to the different
schools/departments.

So to ensure that everyone in my class has an email capability, I show them
Hotmail and ask them to register under a pseudonym. The comparatively
intuitive nature of the web interface enables almost all students, even those
with no prior computer skills, to master Hotmail fairly quickly.

I'm finding however that Hotmail carries an enormous amount of junk and spam-
mail and so will probably use an alternative, Australian provided service,
perhaps OzEmail's Mymail or similar.

Cheers
Stewart Carter
Technosocial/
Electronic Commerce Report/Age IT setion etc.

From richard@auscoms.com.au Fri Dec 4 06:54:44 1998
From: richard@auscoms.com.au (richard@auscoms.com.au)
Date: Fri, 04 Dec 98 15:54:44 +1000
Subject: does TEXT MINING breach copyright
Message-ID: <9812049127.AA912747331@mail.auscoms.com.au>


So ... at the very least, users of text mining index systems should understand
the technology they're using, whether it's merely highlighting content retrieved
by a browser, or it's wholesale copying site content?

Richard Chirgwin

____________________Reply Separator____________________
Subject: Re: does TEXT MINING breach copyright
Author: "Philip Argy" <pargy@hotmail.com>
Date: 3/12/98 18:13

If the search engine is merely overlaying what would otherwise be
conventional browser-retrieved content with intelligent highlighting
then I would say it's covered by the same implied licence as the
conventional process.

Philip Argy
National Vice President & NSW Branch Chairman-elect
Australian Computer Society Inc

Head
Intellectual Property, Trade Practices & Technology Group
Mallesons Stephen Jaques

<Philip.Argy@msj.com.au>
http://www.msj.com.au/msj/opeo/profiles/argp.htm
Tel: 612 9296 2054
Fax: 612 9296 3954


>From: richard@auscoms.com.au
>Date: Thu, 03 Dec 98 16:47:02 +1000
>To: <link@www.anu.edu.au>
>Subject: does "text mining" breach copyright?
>
>
>Link:
>
>I've been looking over the release info for Odyssey's Isys Spider --
which
>incorporates remote sites into a single text index
>(http://www.isys.com.au/press/isyspr32.htm)
>
>[snip]
>>Spiders can index as many sites as you nominate, going through as
>many layers
>as you choose and following as many relevant hyperlinks >as you believe
>reasonable. The various sites are indexed and the >files added to your
local
>ISYS index.
>..
>
>>When ISYS accesses documents from external domains, the brokering
>process
>serves up the text complete with hit highlighting and hit to >hit
navigation but
>the graphics attached to the page goes directly >to your browser.
>..
>[snip]
>
>My question: at what point is the line drawn between indexing someone
else's
>content, breaching their copyright?
>
>Richard Chirgwin
>
>



______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com




From me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au Fri Dec 4 05:25:13 1998
From: me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Fri, 4 Dec 1998 15:25:13 +1100
Subject: AUSTRALIA CHANGING NAME SYSTEM
Message-ID: <v02110100b28d12ccc162@[203.37.43.24]>

>From Net News 04 December 1998

AUSTRALIA CHANGING NAME SYSTEM
The Australian Internet domain name system is presently run by one man -
Melbourne
academic Robert Elz. Not before time, it�s now in the process of
transferring to an
industry self-regulatory regime by March 1999. The Australian Government�s
National
Office for the Information Economy is overseeing the transfer, and has a
discussion
paper, "Self-regulatory Regime for the .au Domain Space" at
http://www.noie.gov.au/dns/index.html#audns where comments are sought.

_______________________________________________________
mailto:tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Ningaui Pty Ltd
mailto:me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au | GPO Box 1680
http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry | Canberra ACT 2601
Phone +61 2 6241 7659 | AUSTRALIA



From richard@auscoms.com.au Fri Dec 4 06:58:16 1998
From: richard@auscoms.com.au (richard@auscoms.com.au)
Date: Fri, 04 Dec 98 15:58:16 +1000
Subject: 'Digital jukebox' self-programmed music CD in OZ?
Message-ID: <9812049127.AA912747543@mail.auscoms.com.au>


But George,

>The rio is the engine of the decline of copyright. I love it accordingly.

I agree that the rio may have that effect. That, in fact, the Internet
undermines copyright. But why is that a good thing? What's the moral imperative
against copyright?

Richard Chirgwin
(Who owns copyright but usually doesn't enforce it.)

____________________Reply Separator____________________
Subject: Re: 'Digital jukebox' self-programmed music CD in OZ?
Author: George Michaelson <ggm@dstc.edu.au>
Date: 4/12/98 12:36


The rio is the engine of the decline of copyright. I love it accordingly.

but the jukebox concept is a way for artists to recover their IPR income
because you *PAY* to make the recording.

so if you fuse the rio with the jukebox, its the same damn thing but cuts
an mp3 image direct into memory and/or a CD.

Thus the question stands: are there jukebox-like vendors operating in OZ
now? Is this niche being attacked yet by entrepreneurs, making music and
other stuff available to *USERS* while meeting a legalistically justified
copyright royalties issue?

I say 'entrepreneurs' because there is no reason for this to be exclusively
HMVshop or Virgin or whatever. This could break open the marketplace.

($400 for a rio is way over the top. This device is still priced for the
early adopters. $150 is more like it. I notice that you can now buy a
portable CD player for under $100 inc tax...)

cheers
-George
--
George Michaelson | DSTC Pty Ltd
Email: ggm@dstc.edu.au | University of Qld 4072
Phone: +61 7 3365 4310 | Australia
Fax: +61 7 3365 4311 | http://www.dstc.edu.au






From stephen@melbpc.org.au Fri Dec 4 07:42:44 1998
From: stephen@melbpc.org.au (Stephen)
Date: Fri, 04 Dec 1998 17:42:44 +1100
Subject: 'Digital jukebox' self-programmed music CD in OZ?
In-Reply-To: <15145.912738962@dstc.edu.au>
References: <Your message of "Fri, 04 Dec 1998 11:44:58 EST." <3.0.5.32.19981204114458.0342f410@pop.peg.apc.org>
Message-ID: <3.0.1.32.19981204174244.00719818@popa.melbpc.org.au>

George and all,

At 12:36 PM 4/12/98 +1000, George wrote:
>Thus the question stands: are there jukebox-like vendors operating
>in OZ now? .. making music and other stuff available to *USERS* while
>meeting a legalistically justified copyright royalties issue?

This recent RMIT initiative would seem along your line of thinking, George.
There doesn't appear an associated URL for this yet though.

--
Date: Thursday, November 05, 1998
Time: 11:30 am to 12:30 pm

Australia's prestigious centre for online interactive multimedia,
RMIT University's Interactive Information Institute (I-Cubed) has joined
with Melbourne's Internet development company, RightAngle
Media, to provide what is believed to be the world's first online
only record company.

PocketSounds is an Internet-based audio streaming and download site
which will help artists earn up to 50 per cent more than what they
would normally receive from a record company.

"The new company will create a distribution method for Australian
artists by providing them with a ready-made presence on the Internet with
no expenditure outlay on their behalf," said Lindon Parker,
Chief Executive Officer of RightAngle Media.

"Garage bands, poets, actors, musicians and sound artists signed to
PocketSounds will have artistic control. They do not have to listen
to record company advice - they can follow their own vision."

PocketSounds will be based at I-Cubed. Besides music, the on-line
facility will feature sound bites of comedy, children's material,
book readings, poetry and story-telling.

WHAT: Launch of PocketSounds
WHEN: 11.30am, Thursday 5 November 1998
WHERE: Interactive Information Institute, RMIT University,
Level 1, 110 Victoria Street, Melbourne
CONTACT:Andrew Yee (03) 9925 3176, 0417 592 398,
Adrian Bruch (03) 9925 3181; Lindon Parker (03) 9634 2992.
--

Regards ..
Stephen Loosley

From tonyb@netinfo.com.au Fri Dec 4 08:19:14 1998
From: tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Fri, 4 Dec 1998 18:19:14 +1100
Subject: Online Australia Day a great success
Message-ID: <v02110109b28d3d13b0bf@[203.37.43.24]>

>Date: Fri, 4 Dec 1998 15:36:35 +1100 (EST)
>From: owner-all@minister.dca.gov.au
>X-Authentication-Warning: edison.dca.gov.au: majordom set sender to
>owner-all using -f
>subject: New Ministerial Media Release
>Sender: owner-all@minister.dca.gov.au
>Precedence: bulk
>Status:
>
>The following Ministerial Media Release is available at:
>
>http://www.dcita.gov.au/cgi-bin/graphics.pl?path=3398
>
>Online Australia Day a great success
>
> 'Online Australia Day last Friday was a fantastic success, with many
>tens of thousands of
> Australians participating both on and off line,' the Minister for
>Communications,
> Information Technology and the Arts, Senator Richard Alston, said
>today.
>
>Terry O'Connor, Minister's office

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From rsedc@urgento.gse.rmit.EDU.AU Fri Dec 4 12:47:21 1998
From: rsedc@urgento.gse.rmit.EDU.AU (David Chia)
Date: Fri, 4 Dec 1998 22:47:21 +1100 (EST)
Subject: does "text mining" breach copyright?
In-Reply-To: <9812039126.AA912664056@mail.auscoms.com.au> from "richard@auscoms.com.au" at Dec 3, 98 04:47:02 pm
Message-ID: <199812041147.WAA01878@urgento.gse.rmit.EDU.AU>


>
> I've been looking over the release info for Odyssey's Isys Spider -- which
> incorporates remote sites into a single text index
> (http://www.isys.com.au/press/isyspr32.htm)
>
> [snip]
>
> My question: at what point is the line drawn between indexing someone else's
> content, breaching their copyright?
>

Normally in web indexing, the document concerned is digested and the
key-words or key-phrases (properly cited and pointed back to the
document sources anyway) are added to the index file(s). In some cases
'brief' abstracts of the beginning of the documents might be stored
(permitted under the 'fair use' clause ?) whereas in the rest of the
cases no 'recognizable' or 'reproduceable' forms of the original
documents are stored.

In the first case it is normally acceptable if the original source is
cited explicitly and visually (not just hot-linked), there is no
confusion and the proper document ownership/authorship is stated. There
were court cases in UK and US where impressions were created on the
ownership/authorship of the headlines hot-linked from elsewhere or
the document owners explicitly does not allow hot-link to them.

In the second case there appeared to be no copyright breaching (IANAL).
(It is just like trying to claim that a dictionary breaches
somebody's copyright on a document because the keywords/phrases in the
document are in the dictionary.) Of course there could be problem if
the indexing is super-intelligent and points directly to the links
cited by the document being indexed (and by-passing it).

> So ... at the very least, users of text mining index systems should understand
> the technology they're using, whether it's merely highlighting content retrieved
> by a browser, or it's wholesale copying site content?

Being on public websites, wholesale access to the documents seems
implicit unless they are managed by access control lists or the
unofficial web-robot code of behaviour (which defines acceptable rate
of access or dis-allow robot access or indexing). By using the web
technology it is implicit that there might be local copy in cache (but
not easily and directly accessible without specifying the URLs) unless
it is disallow technically (in practice it is too late after the
document has been fetched but it might be different legally).

However, right to access does not imply right for local reproducable
storage, right to modification or displaying in forms not acceptable to
the document owner. Indexing does not appear to be wholesale copying to
local reproducable form.

[I'll tend to interpret 'text-mining' to be closer in meaning to
'data-mining' rather than 'text-indexing'. If so text-mining
will extract higher level abstract meaning/conclusion not
expressed explicitly or literally in the documents being indexed
and this will appear to be not infringing copyright. IANAL.]



David Chia, RMIT University

From monty@knapp.com.au Fri Dec 4 08:14:16 1998
From: monty@knapp.com.au (Paul Montgomery)
Date: Fri, 04 Dec 1998 18:14:16 +1100
Subject: Using email as not-email
References: <74DC22F0D1E@spectrum.curtin.edu.au> <36674748.F440F6D@iss.net.au>
Message-ID: <36678BC6.4CF6551B@knapp.com.au>

Brenda Aynsley wrote:
> it has for me too become a pseudo file/reference system. I believe I
> have most of the mail I have sent or received since 1993 on my harddisk
> or floppy disk and my 'archive' comes in very handy from time to
> time. The fast searching I am able to do on my mailbox is fantastic
[snip]

This is a primitive form of an electronic document management system (EDMS),
which is now being hyped by media people such as myself as the basis for
knowledge management (KM). I deal with this stuff all the time for Image &
Data Manager magazine.

Mail clients don't do EDMS functionality very well. Microsoft is now calling
Exchange a KM system, which is a joke, because it doesn't have nearly enough
of the features of a true EDMS - version control, check in/check out, metadata
repositories, life cycle management, and automatic consignment to archival
storage like COLD servers or tape back-up. Exchange is the best attempt so far
from groupware vendors with the possible exception of Lotus Notes, but if you
saw a real KM system in action you'd know what you were missing.

--
Paul Montgomery, features editor for Image & Data Manager and assistant
editor for Internet World. Lives like a JavaBean. Fan of Robert Rankin.
Tel: +61 2 9318 2644. Fax: +61 2 9310 4608. mailto:monty@knapp.com.au
http://australia.internet.com “I am a railroad track abandoned.” (JB)

From monty@knapp.com.au Fri Dec 4 07:37:03 1998
From: monty@knapp.com.au (Paul Montgomery)
Date: Fri, 04 Dec 1998 17:37:03 +1100
Subject: Hotmail and RMIT
References: <winATT-3_01-edireport-477@attmail.com>
Message-ID: <3667830E.9E823AC@knapp.com.au>

Stewart Carter wrote:
[snip]
> At the RMIT there is no formal instruction on email for students as far
> as I am aware, and so many students appear not to take up their email
> entitlement.

As a relatively recent RMIT alumnus, I feel I should set a few things
straight. RMIT has some of the best Internet infrastructure in the country,
and its policies are very good compared with some I've heard about. Richard
Muirden, the sysadmin while I was there, set the thing up to be accessible by
any student using free, public facilities. Any RMIT student, be they
undergraduate, TAFE or post-grad, can get an e-mail account and 5MB of Web
page space by using a barcode scanner on their student card and entering a few
details into a greenscreen terminal. It takes two or three minutes.

Every new student gets a handbook explaining all of this and directing them
where to go. Of course, those who make the most of it are those who take the
initiative to teach themselves, like I did while doing a journalism course
there. I would advise any lurking .edu.au denizen to check out RMIT's gear,
because it's a model that everyone else should follow.

[snip]
> So to ensure that everyone in my class has an email capability, I show
> them Hotmail and ask them to register under a pseudonym. The
> comparatively intuitive nature of the web interface enables almost all
> students, even those with no prior computer skills, to master Hotmail
> fairly quickly.
>
> I'm finding however that Hotmail carries an enormous amount of junk and
> spam- mail and so will probably use an alternative, Australian provided
> service, perhaps OzEmail's Mymail or similar.

I would recommend passing them onto whatever the IT department there is called
now (it's been two years since I was last there).

--
Paul Montgomery, features editor for Image & Data Manager and assistant
editor for Internet World. Lives like a JavaBean. Fan of Robert Rankin.
Tel: +61 2 9318 2644. Fax: +61 2 9310 4608. mailto:monty@knapp.com.au
http://australia.internet.com “I am a railroad track abandoned.” (JB)

From tjordan@vic.bigpond.net.au Sat Dec 5 02:37:47 1998
From: tjordan@vic.bigpond.net.au (Trevor Jordan)
Date: Sat, 5 Dec 1998 12:37:47 +1100 (EDT)
Subject: 'Digital jukebox' self-programmed music CD in OZ?
In-Reply-To: <3.0.1.32.19981204174244.00719818@popa.melbpc.org.au>
References: <15145.912738962@dstc.edu.au> <Your message of "Fri, 04 Dec
1998 11:44:58 EST."
<3.0.5.32.19981204114458.0342f410@pop.peg.apc.org>
Message-ID: <v03130301b28ed79a5bd2@[24.192.14.82]>

The url is: http://www.pocketsounds.com.au/

They should have put it in the press release!

This initiative probably has a positive effect on copyright and
disintermediation (now I have used the word).

Why infringe copyright when you can download material cheaply? Much of the
cheapness would come from the simple distribution channel - musician to
pocketsounds to purchaser. It is also available to anyone without the need
to satisfy the major music production companies - anyone can get their
music published.

Trevor Jordan

At 6:42 AM -0000 4/12/98, Stephen wrote:
>George and all,
>
>At 12:36 PM 4/12/98 +1000, George wrote:
>>Thus the question stands: are there jukebox-like vendors operating
>>in OZ now? .. making music and other stuff available to *USERS* while
>>meeting a legalistically justified copyright royalties issue?
>
>This recent RMIT initiative would seem along your line of thinking, George.
>There doesn't appear an associated URL for this yet though.
>
>--
>Date: Thursday, November 05, 1998
>Time: 11:30 am to 12:30 pm
>
>Australia's prestigious centre for online interactive multimedia,
>RMIT University's Interactive Information Institute (I-Cubed) has joined
>with Melbourne's Internet development company, RightAngle
>Media, to provide what is believed to be the world's first online
>only record company.
>
>PocketSounds is an Internet-based audio streaming and download site
>which will help artists earn up to 50 per cent more than what they
>would normally receive from a record company.
>
>"The new company will create a distribution method for Australian
>artists by providing them with a ready-made presence on the Internet with
>no expenditure outlay on their behalf," said Lindon Parker,
>Chief Executive Officer of RightAngle Media.
>
>"Garage bands, poets, actors, musicians and sound artists signed to
>PocketSounds will have artistic control. They do not have to listen
>to record company advice - they can follow their own vision."
>
>PocketSounds will be based at I-Cubed. Besides music, the on-line
>facility will feature sound bites of comedy, children's material,
>book readings, poetry and story-telling.
>
>WHAT: Launch of PocketSounds
>WHEN: 11.30am, Thursday 5 November 1998
>WHERE: Interactive Information Institute, RMIT University,
>Level 1, 110 Victoria Street, Melbourne
>CONTACT:Andrew Yee (03) 9925 3176, 0417 592 398,
>Adrian Bruch (03) 9925 3181; Lindon Parker (03) 9634 2992.
>--
>
>Regards ..
>Stephen Loosley




From tomw@acslink.net.au Sat Dec 5 09:02:16 1998
From: tomw@acslink.net.au (Tom Worthington)
Date: Sat, 05 Dec 1998 19:02:16 +1100
Subject: ACS to Launch E-Commerce Driving Licence
Message-ID: <2.2.32.19981205080216.0070e3a0@mail.mpx.com.au>

ACS to Launch E-Commerce Driving Licence to Test User Competence
Successful European Scheme to be Adapted for Australia

Friday 4 December 1998 - The Australian Computer Society (ACS) plans to
introduce a national program to train and test Australia's computer
users in a bid to improve and recognise demonstrated levels of
competency.

The E-Commerce Driving Licence (ECDL) scheme is based on a highly
successful international program that is widely available in Europe, and
is targeted for implementation in South Africa and throughout Asia next
year.

Training will be available through accredited industry providers with
subject matter broken into seven modules, as shown below:

* Basic concepts of IT
* Using the computer and managing files
* Word processing
* Spreadsheets
* Databases
* Graphics
* Networking and the Internet

It plans to present details of the program at next week's meeting of
Government and industry representatives to discuss the issues involved
in the IT skills crisis and find a way forward.

Details:

* Full media release: http://www.acs.org.au/news/ecdl.htm
* Electronic Commerce Conference Proceedings:
http://www.acs.org.au/president/1998/past/io98/io98prgs.htm
* ACS Professional Development: http://www.acs.org.au/index-profdevt.htm


Tom Worthington http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw PO Box 13
Immediate Past President Belconnen ACT 2617
Australian Computer Society tomw@acslink.net.au
----------------------------------------------------------------------
E-Commerce: http://www.acs.org.au/president/1998/past/io98/ecomau.htm


From stephen@melbpc.org.au Sat Dec 5 09:17:00 1998
From: stephen@melbpc.org.au (Stephen)
Date: Sat, 05 Dec 1998 19:17:00 +1100
Subject: 'Digital jukebox' self-programmed music CD in OZ?
In-Reply-To: <v03130301b28ed79a5bd2@[24.192.14.82]>
References: <3.0.1.32.19981204174244.00719818@popa.melbpc.org.au>
<15145.912738962@dstc.edu.au>
<Your message of "Fri, 04 Dec 1998 11:44:58 EST." <3.0.5.32.19981204114458.0342f410@pop.peg.apc.org>
Message-ID: <3.0.1.32.19981205191700.00719854@popa.melbpc.org.au>

Trevor and all,

At 12:37 PM 5/12/98 +1100, Trevor wrote:

>The url is: http://www.pocketsounds.com.au/
>They should have put it in the press release!

Yes .. they also have a few other things to organize, eg .. payment,
accepting artistic contributions, and copyright issues ... but, good
luck to them!

Re Payment:

>We are looking at a couple of solutions: One is Millicent (TM) ..
>The other solution is eVend .. We'd like to know which method our
>users prefer, so if you have any comments let us in on them!

Re: Submissions

>Pocket Sounds is now inviting submissions.[Incorrect@5/12/98 but ..]
>Currently the fine details of our contracts are being ironed out by
>our legal advisors .. Once you have submitted your work and we like
>it (and why wouldn't we?), we'll offer you a contract. After signing
>the contracts we'll compress your work so it can be downloaded easily,
>place it on the Web site, decide what to charge (we reserve the right
>to set prices) and start collecting monies from your fans / admirers
>/ family / friends, etc.. We envisage charging between $1.00 and $3.00
>per audio element.

Re: Copyright

>When you join Pocket Sounds you keep ownership of copyright for
>your material .. Pocket Sounds will vigorously pursue pirate vendors
>and unauthorised users of Pocket Sounds products.

>Realistically we cannot pursue individuals who make an occasional
>copy because we'd have a pretty hard time tracking them down.
>Nevertheless, anyone caught distributing illegal copies will be issued
>with a cease-and-desist notice; we will then take matters on a case by
>case basis. Piracy sucks!

>Pocket Sounds are currently considering joining both the software
>industry and music industry associations that pursue software and
>music pirates respectively. If you are a pirate copier (MP3 "ripper"
>or otherwise) we will come after you. We will pursue you, your ISP,
>your e-commerce vendor and anyone else involved in the illegal
>trafficking of our artists' products.

--
Regards ..
Stephen Loosley

From r.polanskis@nepean.uws.edu.au Sun Dec 6 02:21:36 1998
From: r.polanskis@nepean.uws.edu.au (Rachel Polanskis)
Date: Sun, 6 Dec 1998 12:21:36 +1100 (EST)
Subject: Net feels Hotmail glitch (ZDNet article)
Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.4.00.9812061218030.29474-100000@isis.virago.org.au>

Hi Linkers,

This one is relevant, considering the recent discussions about HoTMaiL.
Recall my account of sysadmin issues regarding the service....

http://www.zdnet.com/zdnn/stories/news/0,4586,2171763,00.html


rachel

--
Rachel Polanskis Kingswood, Greater Western Sydney, Australia
grove@zeta.org.au http://www.zeta.org.au/~grove/grove.html
r.polanskis@nepean.uws.edu.au http://www.nepean.uws.edu.au/ccd/
"Yow! Am I having fun yet?!" - John Howard^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H Zippy the Pinhead

---------- Forwarded message ----------

http://www.zdnet.com/zdnn/stories/news/0,4586,2171763,00.html

Net feels Hotmail glitch

When one of the Web's largest e-mail services has problems, everyone has
problems.

Microsoft Corp.'s Hotmail, a Web-based e-mail service with 30 million
members, is experiencing a glitch that is sending ripple effects
throughout the Internet.

At least some of the service's members are discovering that each of their
outgoing e-mails are being sent seven or more times, an effect that could
cause congestion problems for some Internet service providers.

Hotmail has publicly acknowledged that it is experiencing problems, but
declined to give specifics. The multiplying e-mails are especially a
problem for users on automated e-mail lists. Some users reported a single
message was sent several times to the list, then distributed to dozens or
hundreds of users.


From taqpah@webone.com.au Sun Dec 6 04:46:16 1998
From: taqpah@webone.com.au (taqpah)
Date: Sun, 06 Dec 1998 14:46:16 +1100
Subject: 'Digital jukebox' self-programmed music CD in OZ?
References: <3.0.1.32.19981204174244.00719818@popa.melbpc.org.au>
<15145.912738962@dstc.edu.au>
<Your message of "Fri, 04 Dec 1998 11:44:58 EST." <3.0.5.32.19981204114458.0342f410@pop.peg.apc.org> <3.0.1.32.19981205191700.00719854@popa.melbpc.org.au>
Message-ID: <3669FE02.A8E996D9@webone.com.au>

Pocketsounds looks very promising. I guess those involved in it are aware
of mp3.com, if not some interesting comparisons are apparent.

1. Both offer the artist 50% of the retail price. This is great. I would
expect this to become the minimum percentage for content providers who
should not accept less in I-commerce applications.

2. The mp3.com DAM CD biz model relies on the purchase & delivery of a CD
while the free tracks are downloadable & the artists usually upload their
tracks. The Pocketsounds model offers downloadable tracks for free & for
sale, but requires artists to send CDs or DATs. So neither are totally
confined to the digital domain. Interestingly, mp3.com seems to be
experiencing some problems with the implementation of the DAM scheme. As
reliance on physical media is partly due to limited bandwidth I would
expect total migration to the digital domain to be only a matter of time.

3. Mp3.com encourages artists to provide 15 sec samples of tracks
available for download in Real Audio and/or .wav formats so tracks can be
tried before download. While Pocketsounds provides a free sample track for
download there is no sample for the track which is for sale (I'm referring
to the band - Telescope's page). They should consider providing a short
preview sample for tracks that are for sale.

4. One of the best features of the mp3.com site is the detailed
statistical feedback of downloads for artists. This seems to be working
well except for CD sales. I would suggest that Pocketsounds should
consider providing this sort of transparency for artists. The difficulty
of getting accurate statements of sales from record companies is legendary
& is one of many reasons why artists don't trust them.

5. Mp3.com also provides web based discussion groups for artists, this
provides a sense of community & also is a source of creative ideas for
improving the system. Pocketsounds should consider doing this as well.

This is early days for both of these bleeding edge i-commerce applications
& many wrinkles are yet to be ironed out, but it's very encouraging to see
the emergence & development of these native net biz applications.

Good one.

Paul
Trancendental Anarchist
http://www.mp3.com/music/Electronica/3511.html


From taqpah@webone.com.au Sun Dec 6 06:24:25 1998
From: taqpah@webone.com.au (taqpah)
Date: Sun, 06 Dec 1998 16:24:25 +1100
Subject: 'Digital jukebox' self-programmed music CD in OZ?
Message-ID: <366A14FB.3312132C@webone.com.au>

There are rapid developments occuring. Check out Digital Media On Demand
(DMOD).

http://www.dmod.com

If this is all it claims to be then it could revolutionise the digital
product market.

Such applications will still have to compete with free products.

http://www.free-music.com/

This seems to recapitulate developments in the open source/freeware
movements.

http://www.mp3.com/news/142.html

Paul


From kelso@melbpc.org.au Sun Dec 6 08:14:09 1998
From: kelso@melbpc.org.au (Kelso)
Date: Sun, 6 Dec 1998 18:14:09 +1100
Subject: Media Release: Big opportunities for Australian industry in digital broadcasting
Message-ID: <000001be20e8$0531bdc0$149e0ccb@kelso>

On Friday 4 December, Senator Alston's office issued the following Ministerial Media Release:

http://www.dcita.gov.au/cgi-bin/graphics.pl?path=3399

with the headline: Australia's transition to digital broadcasting offers significant manufacturing, software and content opportunities for Australian industry potentially worth billions of dollars! Senator Alston noted the findings of a report by Digital Business Consulting which estimated that 25 per cent of Australia's 6.8 million homes will have digital television receivers by 2005.

Not surprisingly, the report was commissioned by a high-level Working Group of industry and government representatives, established by the Government to help prepare a Digital Broadcasting Industry Action Agenda. Of course, the group included totally non-biased representatives such as the General Manager of the Panasonic television factory located at Penrith and members from the Australian Electrical and Electronic Manufacturers' Association, the Australian Information Industry Association (and the Internet Industry Association).

Unfortunately, neither the Media Release nor its quoted report referred to the recently-issued PricewaterhouseCoopers study (The Australian page 26, 20 November 1998) which revealed that whilst the broadcasters may have to spend about $1 billion to convert to digital, consumers/viewers have no obligation but to spend $19 billion over the next 10 years buying digital TV sets and digital set-top boxes!

In other words, the "significant manufacturing, software and content opportunities for Australian industry potentially worth billions of dollars" are being DIRECTLY and COMPULSORILY funded by consumers. Not bad for business, eh? Pity there was no mention in the Media Release of words such as: 'competition', 'free market forces', 'level playing field' or 'choice'....


Ross Kelso


From tonyb@netinfo.com.au Sun Dec 6 09:19:21 1998
From: tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Sun, 6 Dec 1998 19:19:21 +1100
Subject: ACS to Launch E-Commerce Driving Licence
Message-ID: <v02110106b28fed4fd56c@[203.37.43.24]>

At 7:02 PM 5/12/98, Tom Worthington wrote:
>Training will be available through accredited industry providers with
>subject matter broken into seven modules, as shown below:
>
> * Basic concepts of IT
> * Using the computer and managing files
> * Word processing
> * Spreadsheets
> * Databases
> * Graphics
> * Networking and the Internet

Presumably the HED, TAFE, VET and commercial services who are already
providing such training will be the ones which will be doing it? They are
doing it now. Other than a Seal Of Approval from ACS what's different? I've
speculated that the universities should get out of this other than for
their internal clientele as the market is well supplied and most of this is
at a lower level than tertiary.

Also the content would seem to be general with no specific bearing on E-Commerce

Tony

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From tjordan@vic.bigpond.net.au Sun Dec 6 11:11:51 1998
From: tjordan@vic.bigpond.net.au (Trevor Jordan)
Date: Sun, 6 Dec 1998 21:11:51 +1100 (EDT)
Subject: Media Release: Big opportunities for Australian industry in
digital broadcasting
In-Reply-To: <000001be20e8$0531bdc0$149e0ccb@kelso>
Message-ID: <v03130304b290a2f8dcb2@[24.192.14.82]>

Ross

There does not appear to be anything to force cable TV systems to convert.
Have you ever considered that those customers who do wish to spend money
coverting to digital TV may find cable systems very attractive after the
analogue free-to-air broadcasts cease.

This might change the dynamics of the market considerably. Instead of the
FTA operators demanding royalities for the retransmission of their signals
on cable systems, the cable operators may demand payment for carrying their
programmes.

There are about four million metropolitan households and most would have
free-to-air television, but only 300k to 400k have cable or satellite.
Imagine if the numbers were reversed.

We can forget about country households, they will still be paying for their
new mobile telephones after the forced closure of the analogue mobile
network!

The free-to-air operators will be vulnerable during the closure of analogue
television and they do not have much experience of being in that position.
It remains to be seen whether the cable operators are smart enough to take
advantage of their vulnerability.

Trevor Jordan

At 7:14 AM -0000 6/12/98, Kelso wrote:
>On Friday 4 December, Senator Alston's office issued the following
>Ministerial Media Release:
>
>http://www.dcita.gov.au/cgi-bin/graphics.pl?path=3399
>
>with the headline: Australia's transition to digital broadcasting offers
>significant manufacturing, software and content opportunities for
>Australian industry potentially worth billions of dollars! Senator Alston
>noted the findings of a report by Digital Business Consulting which
>estimated that 25 per cent of Australia's 6.8 million homes will have
>digital television receivers by 2005.
>
>Not surprisingly, the report was commissioned by a high-level Working
>Group of industry and government representatives, established by the
>Government to help prepare a Digital Broadcasting Industry Action Agenda.
>Of course, the group included totally non-biased representatives such as
>the General Manager of the Panasonic television factory located at Penrith
>and members from the Australian Electrical and Electronic Manufacturers'
>Association, the Australian Information Industry Association (and the
>Internet Industry Association).
>
>Unfortunately, neither the Media Release nor its quoted report referred to
>the recently-issued PricewaterhouseCoopers study (The Australian page 26,
>20 November 1998) which revealed that whilst the broadcasters may have to
>spend about $1 billion to convert to digital, consumers/viewers have no
>obligation but to spend $19 billion over the next 10 years buying digital
>TV sets and digital set-top boxes!
>
>In other words, the "significant manufacturing, software and content
>opportunities for Australian industry potentially worth billions of
>dollars" are being DIRECTLY and COMPULSORILY funded by consumers. Not bad
>for business, eh? Pity there was no mention in the Media Release of words
>such as: 'competition', 'free market forces', 'level playing field' or
>'choice'....
>
>
>Ross Kelso




From tonyb@netinfo.com.au Sun Dec 6 12:34:19 1998
From: tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Sun, 6 Dec 1998 22:34:19 +1100
Subject: Media Release: Big opportunities for Australian industry in digital
broadcasting
Message-ID: <v02110107b29019f5531f@[203.37.43.24]>

At 6:14 PM 6/12/98, Kelso wrote:
>about $1 billion to convert to digital, consumers/viewers have no
>obligation but to spend $19 billion over the next 10 years buying digital
>TV sets and digital set-top boxes!

I suspect I won't bother. TV increasingly has less of interest to me. Am I
alone in this?

Tony

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From adamb@netstorm.net.au Sun Dec 6 02:02:58 1998
From: adamb@netstorm.net.au (Adam Burns)
Date: Sun, 06 Dec 1998 12:02:58 +1100
Subject: Media Release: Big opportunities for Australian industry in
digital broadcasting
Message-ID: <3.0.32.19981206120249.006835b0@soy.cyber.com.au>

At 10:34 PM 12/6/98 +1100, Tony Barry wrote:
>I suspect I won't bother. TV increasingly has less of interest to me. Am I
>alone in this?

For all that doubt the necessity or even the requirement of TV


' ... Speaking of TV Reform is, in the words of the author, "as absurd as
speaking of the reform of a technology such as guns"'


Four Arguments for the Elimination of Television, Jerry Mander, Quill,
1978 ISBN 0-688-08274-2. p.p. 196-7

Dr. Ernest Hilgard, who directs Stanford University's research program in
hypnosis and is the author of the most widely used texts in the field,
agree that television could easily put people into a hypnotic state if they
were ready for it.

He said, that in his opinion, the condition of sitting still in a dark
room, passively looking at light over a period of time, would be the prime
component in the induction.

...

Dr. Charles Tart, professor of psychology at the University of California
at Davis, explains that the way you induce *any* altered state of
consciousness is by: disrupting the pattern of ordinary awareness, and then
substituting a new patterning system to reassemble the disassembled pieces.
He said this applied to any state of mind, from drug-induced alteration to
Sufi dancing or repetitive mantras, and, he said, it could also apply to
television.




-NetStorm-----------------------------------------[adamb@netstorm.net.au]
adam burns central++vortex
po box 3168 vortex@netstorm.net.au
SBBC 4101
australia PGP: http://www.netstorm.net.au/pgp/netstorm.net.au/adamb.html
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
storming the reality network into a state of suspended disbelief

From tomw@acslink.net.au Sun Dec 6 22:10:24 1998
From: tomw@acslink.net.au (Tom Worthington)
Date: Mon, 07 Dec 1998 08:10:24 +1100
Subject: ACS to Launch E-Commerce Driving Licence
Message-ID: <2.2.32.19981206211024.00f73bc0@mail.mpx.com.au>

At 19:19 6/12/98 +1100, Tony Barry wrote:

>At 7:02 PM 5/12/98, Tom Worthington wrote:>
>
>>Training will be available through accredited industry providers ...
>
>Presumably the HED, TAFE, VET and commercial services who are already
>providing such training will be the ones which will be doing it?

Yes, the idea is for the training to be available through accredited
industry providers.

>They are doing it now. Other than a Seal Of Approval from ACS what's
>different? ...

An internationally recognized "license". The ACS is the Australian
equivalent to the organizations which set up the European scheme.

>Also the content would seem to be general with no specific bearing
>on E-Commerce ...

The course is based on the existing european drivers license. I suspect this
will need to be upgraded for e-commerce. Australia might develop the
additional content to be added to the international license.

Use of the "drivers license" metaphor is perhaps a bit too cute. I had
difficulty in taking it seriously when the President of the Council of
European Professional Informatics Societies (CEPIS) explained it to a
meeting of national IT presidents I attended in 1996:
help://www.acs.orgy.au/president/1996/epics/uk.him

However, the idea has merit, in that using a computer isn't self evident and
will have more serious consequences with e-commerce.


Tom Worthington http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw PO Box 13
Immediate Past President Belconnen ACT 2617
Australian Computer Society tomw@acslink.net.au
----------------------------------------------------------------------
E-Commerce: http://www.acs.org.au/president/1998/past/io98/ecomau.htm


From marghanita@ramin.com.au Sun Dec 6 23:26:54 1998
From: marghanita@ramin.com.au (M. da Cruz)
Date: Mon, 07 Dec 1998 09:26:54 +1100
Subject: Media Release: Big opportunities for Australian industry in digital broadcasting
References: <000001be20e8$0531bdc0$149e0ccb@kelso>
Message-ID: <366B04AE.4C43@ramin.com.au>

Ross,

Television reception will go (where it isn't already) Digital, not
because of better pictures (the current rather weak argument for HDTV
and the current prescription in the ABA DRAFT COMMERCIAL TELEVISION
DIGITAL CONVERSION SCHEME
at:http://www.aba.gov.au/navigation/newsrel/1998/109nr98.htm ), but
because of the demand and advantages of Wireless services.

This will mean new devices to receive the Signal, if International
demand is met by a factory in Penrith this would be good for Australia.

Marghanita

Kelso wrote:
>
> On Friday 4 December, Senator Alston's office issued the following Ministerial Media Release:
>
> http://www.dcita.gov.au/cgi-bin/graphics.pl?path=3399
>
> with the headline: Australia's transition to digital broadcasting offers significant manufacturing, software and content opportunities for Australian industry potentially worth billions of dollars! Senator Alston noted the findings of a report by Digital Business Consulting which estimated that 25 per cent of Australia's 6.8 million homes will have digital television receivers by 2005.
>
> Not surprisingly, the report was commissioned by a high-level Working Group of industry and government representatives, established by the Government to help prepare a Digital Broadcasting Industry Action Agenda. Of course, the group included totally non-biased representatives such as the General Manager of the Panasonic television factory located at Penrith and members from the Australian Electrical and Electronic Manufacturers' Association, the Australian Information Industry Association (and
>
> Unfortunately, neither the Media Release nor its quoted report referred to the recently-issued PricewaterhouseCoopers study (The Australian page 26, 20 November 1998) which revealed that whilst the broadcasters may have to spend about $1 billion to convert to digital, consumers/viewers have no obligation but to spend $19 billion over the next 10 years buying digital TV sets and digital set-top boxes!
>
> In other words, the "significant manufacturing, software and content opportunities for Australian industry potentially worth billions of dollars" are being DIRECTLY and COMPULSORILY funded by consumers. Not bad for business, eh? Pity there was no mention in the Media Release of words such as: 'competition', 'free market forces', 'level playing field' or 'choice'....
>
> Ross Kelso

--
Marghanita da Cruz
Principal Consultant
Ramin Communications
http://www.ramin.com.au
Tel: (+61) 0414-869202


From brd@dynamite.com.au Sun Dec 6 23:58:15 1998
From: brd@dynamite.com.au (Bernard Robertson-Dunn)
Date: Mon, 07 Dec 1998 09:58:15 +1100
Subject: Background Briefing - Academic Freedom
Message-ID: <366B0C07.5FBE93@dynamite.com.au>

This program was broadcast on Sunday and will be repeated Tuesday,
December 8, at 7.10pm.

Academic Freedom
Producer: Tom Morton

It was 16th-century scholar Francis Bacon who first described
knowledge as power.
In the 20th century politicians use spin doctors and bureaucrats'
red tape to prove the proverb.

Thank goodness then for academic freedom, for scholars who speak up.
But for how long? Now universities are reigning in their academics
with a tight rope - the code of conduct.

There's a squeeze on the public knowledge bank...

<brd>
It's an interesting program that raises many issues that are not
covered by the program itself.

Competition policy, as being implemented by the current crop of
politicians and public sector managers, has the unintended
consequence of distorting the free flow of information that
previously was seen as "publicly available". (Unless you believe
that a major driver behind the outsourcing initiatives is to reduce
accountability by deliberately restricting access to information, in
which case it is an intended consequence)

The internet may provide a mechanism by which information can flow
around restrictions imposed by governments and commercial contracts,
either formally or informally.

The real issue is the value, validity and credibility of such
information.
</brd>

--
No one has been more wrong about computerization than George Orwell
in "1984." So far, nearly everything indicates that computers are
not the beginning of authority but its end.

In the process of connecting everything to everything, computers
elevate the power of the small player. They make room for different,
and they reward small innovations.

Instead of enforcing uniformity, they promote heterogeneity and
autonomy. ... We become more human, not less so, when we use them.
-- Kevin Kelly.

Regards
brd

Bernard Robertson-Dunn
Canberra Australia
brd@dynamite.com.au

From ggebesse@nsw.bigpond.net.au Mon Dec 7 01:07:27 1998
From: ggebesse@nsw.bigpond.net.au (Peter Bowditch)
Date: Mon, 7 Dec 1998 10:07:27 +1000
Subject: Big Trouble in Little China
Message-ID: <199812062307.KAA24041@m5.c2.telstra-mm.net.au>

And we complain about how fast our email is:

Shanghai: A man accused of using the Internet to subvert the Chinese
state faces a possible life sentence after a four-hour hearing in a
Shanghai court.

http://www.smh.com.au/news/9812/07/world/world3.html


.....................
Peter Bowditch
peterb@gebesse.com.au
http://www.gebesse.com.au

From richard@auscoms.com.au Mon Dec 7 01:31:10 1998
From: richard@auscoms.com.au (richard@auscoms.com.au)
Date: Mon, 07 Dec 98 10:31:10 +1000
Subject: Media Release: Big opportunities for Australian indus
Message-ID: <9812079129.AA912987090@mail.auscoms.com.au>


Marghanita,

Picture quality is non-sequitur to Ross' comment, which is that consumers are
being forced to subsidise the broadcast industry, which itself dominates advice
to government. Neither are TV consumers demanding new wireless services.

OK: so digital broadcasting is more bandwidth-efficient than analogue, which
means more can be done with the bandwidth, which means someone has the chance to
make more dollars. But the consumers are being asked to fund an upgrade from
which they'll derive little direct benefit.

Richard Chirgwin

____________________Reply Separator____________________
Subject: Re: Media Release: Big opportunities for Australian industry
Author: <marghanita@ramin.com.au>
Date: 7/12/98 9:26

Ross,

Television reception will go (where it isn't already) Digital, not
because of better pictures (the current rather weak argument for HDTV
and the current prescription in the ABA DRAFT COMMERCIAL TELEVISION
DIGITAL CONVERSION SCHEME
at:http://www.aba.gov.au/navigation/newsrel/1998/109nr98.htm ), but
because of the demand and advantages of Wireless services.

This will mean new devices to receive the Signal, if International
demand is met by a factory in Penrith this would be good for Australia.

Marghanita

Kelso wrote:
>
> On Friday 4 December, Senator Alston's office issued the following Ministerial
Media Release:
>
> http://www.dcita.gov.au/cgi-bin/graphics.pl?path=3399
>
> with the headline: Australia's transition to digital broadcasting offers
significant manufacturing, software and content opportunities for Australian
industry potentially worth billions of dollars! Senator Alston noted the
findings of a report by Digital Business Consulting which estimated that 25 per
cent of Australia's 6.8 million homes will have digital television receivers by
2005.
>
> Not surprisingly, the report was commissioned by a high-level Working Group of
industry and government representatives, established by the Government to help
prepare a Digital Broadcasting Industry Action Agenda. Of course, the group
included totally non-biased representatives such as the General Manager of the
Panasonic television factory located at Penrith and members from the Australian
Electrical and Electronic Manufacturers' Association, the Australian Information
Industry Association (and
>
> Unfortunately, neither the Media Release nor its quoted report referred to the
recently-issued PricewaterhouseCoopers study (The Australian page 26, 20
November 1998) which revealed that whilst the broadcasters may have to spend
about $1 billion to convert to digital, consumers/viewers have no obligation but
to spend $19 billion over the next 10 years buying digital TV sets and digital
set-top boxes!
>
> In other words, the "significant manufacturing, software and content
opportunities for Australian industry potentially worth billions of dollars" are
being DIRECTLY and COMPULSORILY funded by consumers. Not bad for business, eh?
Pity there was no mention in the Media Release of words such as: 'competition',
'free market forces', 'level playing field' or 'choice'....
>
> Ross Kelso

--
Marghanita da Cruz
Principal Consultant
Ramin Communications
http://www.ramin.com.au
Tel: (+61) 0414-869202





From Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au Mon Dec 7 00:35:21 1998
From: Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au (Roger Clarke)
Date: Mon, 7 Dec 1998 10:35:21 +1100
Subject: EC and Electronic Community
Message-ID: <v03130325b290c0c66a15@[203.37.38.148]>


I'd greatly appreciate feedback on a couple of new papers.
Thanks in advance!


Key Issues in Electronic Commerce and Electronic Publishing
http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/EC/Issues98.html

Abstract
An overview of electronic commerce is provided. Electronic publishing is
examined as a particular form of electronic commerce. In comparison with
the explosion of energy that characterised the arrival of electronic
communities, electronic commerce and publishing are merely struggling
towards their expected, very bright future. This paper identifies the most
important of the issues that confront the application of the Internet for
professional and commercial purposes.

Key bits are:

- a revised description of the phases of electronic publishing
http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/EC/Issues98.html#EP

- a compressed version of impediments to business-with-business EC:
http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/EC/Issues98.html#Iss1

- a new statement of issues in electronic publishing:
http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/EC/Issues98.html#Iss3



The Willingness of Net-Consumers to Pay: A Lack-of-Progress Report
http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/EC/WillPay.html

Abstract
Consumer Internet commerce won't work unless participants pay for what they
buy. But there has been a marked reluctance among net-users to actually
part with their money. This document discusses the origins of netizens'
apparent unwillingness to pay; describes some of the attempts that have
been made to winkle them out; argues that marketers have still got it
seriously wrong; and proposes ways in which progress can be made.
The essence of the argument is that marketers must learn that the world has
changed, that significantly different approaches are needed, and that these
must be grounded in a deep appreciation of Internet culture.



Roger Clarke http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/
http://www.etc.com.au/Xamax/
Xamax Consultancy Pty Ltd, 78 Sidaway St, Chapman ACT 2611 AUSTRALIA
Tel: +61 2 6288 1472, and 6288 6916 mailto:Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au

Visiting Fellow, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology
The Australian National University Canberra ACT 0200 AUSTRALIA
Information Sciences Building Room 211 Tel: +61 2 6249 3666



From Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au Mon Dec 7 00:33:41 1998
From: Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au (Roger Clarke)
Date: Mon, 7 Dec 1998 10:33:41 +1100
Subject: Kelly Quote [Was: Background Briefing - Academic Freedom]
In-Reply-To: <366B0C07.5FBE93@dynamite.com.au>
Message-ID: <v03130327b290c20eb74a@[203.37.38.148]>


Bernard Robertson-Dunn <brd@dynamite.com.au>'s seemingly inexhaustible
collection of quotes today included:

>No one has been more wrong about computerization than George Orwell
>in "1984." So far, nearly everything indicates that computers are
>not the beginning of authority but its end.
>
>In the process of connecting everything to everything, computers
>elevate the power of the small player. They make room for different,
>and they reward small innovations.
>
>Instead of enforcing uniformity, they promote heterogeneity and
>autonomy. ... We become more human, not less so, when we use them.
>-- Kevin Kelly.


Lest it be mistakenly thought that Kevin Kelly is especially clever,
especially insightful, or especially early as a spotter of trends and hence
an intellectual leader, check out something I wrote nearly five years ago:
http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/DV/NotesDVEras.html

Given Kelly's rotten track-record as a pundit, my worry now is that, since
KK has now uttered something similar to me, maybe I got it wrong (:-)}



Roger Clarke http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/
http://www.etc.com.au/Xamax/
Xamax Consultancy Pty Ltd, 78 Sidaway St, Chapman ACT 2611 AUSTRALIA
Tel: +61 2 6288 1472, and 6288 6916 mailto:Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au

Visiting Fellow, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology
The Australian National University Canberra ACT 0200 AUSTRALIA
Information Sciences Building Room 211 Tel: +61 2 6249 3666



From ggm@dstc.edu.au Mon Dec 7 00:52:32 1998
From: ggm@dstc.edu.au (George Michaelson)
Date: Mon, 07 Dec 1998 09:52:32 +1000
Subject: 'Digital jukebox' self-programmed music CD in OZ?
In-Reply-To: Your message of "Fri, 04 Dec 1998 15:58:16 +1000."
<9812049127.AA912747543@mail.auscoms.com.au>
Message-ID: <16718.912988352@dstc.edu.au>


>The rio is the engine of the decline of copyright. I love it accordingly.

I agree that the rio may have that effect. That, in fact, the Internet
undermines copyright. But why is that a good thing? What's the moral impera
tive against copyright?

Copyright is a societal decision to abnegate the obvious right and ability to
copy "things" in their widest sense. It was awarded by the state/crown as were
letters patent, to encourage innovation and the reward of the creator. When
reproduction was expensive, or when censorship was a predominant force, then
copyright made sense: it retained centralized control on the reproduction of
things, permitted reward to the entrepreneur, and reduced the financial risk
of the capital invested in the press and the factory.

But the world has changed. Now, instead of reflecting mechanical reproduction
issues, and a high burden on reproduction (and destruction of the original
in many cases) we have almost infinite copying, without loss. Manufacturing
cost bases have shifted. Copyright applies to a far wider circle of things.

Further, we have a stratified real-world framework where in place of patronage
commercial pressures dictate that a small number of artists and creators make
extremely high incomes, and a large number make next to nothing. Instead of
rewarding innovation, Copyright stifles it. Lifecycles in an I.T. world are
measured in months, but Copyright extends for years.

If you ask me, the system is broken. Its un-enforcable, and doesn't actually
serve a useful purpose in many cases. If we want to reward creativity and
creation of new and interesting "things" we can find better ways.

I know many people who make money from their creative effort. I realize that
for some its a mantra that their IPR is "holy" but its not an absolute, its
a societal value-judgement that copyright wins us more than we loose. I'm just
not sure the balance is that clear any more.

What do you think? I am sure Librarians (many of whom lurk here) have mixed
feelings on both sides. Software authors/designers tend to like copyright
when they can enforce income from it, but thats really pretty rare. I'd say
that 'open-source' is definately a counter-argument. So are the RFCs.

cheers
-George
--
George Michaelson | DSTC Pty Ltd
Email: ggm@dstc.edu.au | University of Qld 4072
Phone: +61 7 3365 4310 | Australia
Fax: +61 7 3365 4311 | http://www.dstc.edu.au



From kelso@melbpc.org.au Mon Dec 7 01:19:25 1998
From: kelso@melbpc.org.au (Ross Kelso)
Date: Mon, 7 Dec 1998 11:19:25 +1100 (EST)
Subject: Media Release: Big opportunities for Australian industry in digital broadcasting
Message-ID: <199812070019.LAA08954@emu.melbpc.org.au>

Marghanita,

Sorry - I may be a bit dense here, but I am not appreciating your point.
Free-to-air TV reception is all currently analogue and in the near future is
to go over to digital solely on MANDATE from the Federal Government. It
certainly isn't because of any "demand and advantages of wireless services".
Australia's viewers were never asked! Furthermore, almost all of the digital
reception equipment (not to mention the artistic content) will inevitably be
imported.

Regards

Ross Kelso


>Ross,
>
>Television reception will go (where it isn't already) Digital, not
>because of better pictures (the current rather weak argument for HDTV
>and the current prescription in the ABA DRAFT COMMERCIAL TELEVISION
>DIGITAL CONVERSION SCHEME
>at:http://www.aba.gov.au/navigation/newsrel/1998/109nr98.htm ), but
>because of the demand and advantages of Wireless services.
>
>This will mean new devices to receive the Signal, if International
>demand is met by a factory in Penrith this would be good for Australia.
>
>Marghanita
>
>Kelso wrote:
>>
>> On Friday 4 December, Senator Alston's office issued the following
Ministerial Media Release:
>>
>> http://www.dcita.gov.au/cgi-bin/graphics.pl?path=3399
>>
>> with the headline: Australia's transition to digital broadcasting offers
significant manufacturing, software and content opportunities for Australian
industry potentially worth billions of dollars! Senator Alston noted the
findings of a report by Digital Business Consulting which estimated that 25
per cent of Australia's 6.8 million homes will have digital television
receivers by 2005.
>>
>> Not surprisingly, the report was commissioned by a high-level Working
Group of industry and government representatives, established by the
Government to help prepare a Digital Broadcasting Industry Action Agenda. Of
course, the group included totally non-biased representatives such as the
General Manager of the Panasonic television factory located at Penrith and
members from the Australian Electrical and Electronic Manufacturers'
Association, the Australian Information Industry Association (and
>>
>> Unfortunately, neither the Media Release nor its quoted report referred
to the recently-issued PricewaterhouseCoopers study (The Australian page 26,
20 November 1998) which revealed that whilst the broadcasters may have to
spend about $1 billion to convert to digital, consumers/viewers have no
obligation but to spend $19 billion over the next 10 years buying digital TV
sets and digital set-top boxes!
>>
>> In other words, the "significant manufacturing, software and content
opportunities for Australian industry potentially worth billions of dollars"
are being DIRECTLY and COMPULSORILY funded by consumers. Not bad for
business, eh? Pity there was no mention in the Media Release of words such
as: 'competition', 'free market forces', 'level playing field' or 'choice'....
>>
>> Ross Kelso
>
>--
>Marghanita da Cruz
>Principal Consultant
>Ramin Communications
>http://www.ramin.com.au
>Tel: (+61) 0414-869202
>
>
>


From karina@acwa.asn.au Mon Dec 7 00:40:53 1998
From: karina@acwa.asn.au (Karina Brisby)
Date: Mon, 07 Dec 1998 10:40:53 +1100
Subject: 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL
References: <12556.912578582@dstc.edu.au> <3.0.5.32.19981202184301.00974570@pop.netspace.net.au>
Message-ID: <366B15BD.45ED@acwa.asn.au>

I co own a internet cafe and the majority of users are those with web
based email accounts, with the majority of those being Hotmail.

Surprisingly or maybe not alot of students who would have email address
at uni use web based mail becasue using their own uni account is too
hard once away from the univeresity network.



in the 5 months the cafe as been open there has olny been two requests
for people to access their email via telnet. Though people that know
what they are doing probably don't ask for help.

i think the web based email has made it easier for alot of people to use
the technology without having the access to equipment, skills neccessary
for pine based email. but it still has a bit to go.


It can still be a cranky bastard. Simple things like the service being
fully available all the time can't be assured and there is know way you
can ring them up to hassle them. In peak times the server systems
overloading and not proccessing email effectively.

I personally think sending an email to the help@hotmail.com is not
particularly helpful when you can't get a reply beacuse your email
doesn't work.

Most of the requests for help to cafe staff are for webased email
problems, with half being people not reading instructions or looking at
the page properly with the other half being server side problems.

We can handle the if you want to send it press the send button
questions, but can't do a thing about any sever sided problem which
really can frustrate users. It think they all could do with an overall
making sure that end users get a say in the interface design. For
example how many non computer users know that log out means logout as
used by hotmail to close the email session, would close, leave or exit
bee better?


Karina


Adam Creed wrote:
>
> At 17:26 02/12/98 +1030, you wrote:
> >Can I put in a plug, at this point, for http://www.ozbytes.net.au/ and their
> >aussie offering at http://webmail.ozbytes.net.au/ ?
>
> Another interesting service I spotted a week or so back was
> ThatWeb (from a Singapore company): <http://www.thatweb.com/>
>
> You can access email from your normal service provider's account
> anywhere in the world for free on the Web. Saves the hassle
> sometimes of adjusting roaming settings, paying for roaming or using
> a separate freemail account for travelling.
>
> I think it has some limits such as the protocols it supports and difficulties
> with mail servers behind firewalls, but for your every day account..
>
> Adam Creed



From marghanita@ramin.com.au Mon Dec 7 04:34:48 1998
From: marghanita@ramin.com.au (M. da Cruz)
Date: Mon, 07 Dec 1998 14:34:48 +1100
Subject: Media Release: Big opportunities for Australian indus
References: <9812079129.AA912987090@mail.auscoms.com.au>
Message-ID: <366B4CD8.64C1@ramin.com.au>

Ross/Richard,

There may not be an apparent demand for access to the Spectrum in
Australia, but there certainly is elsewhere and therefore Australian
Viewers/Consumers will be affected by availability of devices and
content. Australia cannot stand alone from an infrastructure or consumer
perspective. While Telstra, Optus and other providers no longer
develop(engineer) their own equipment, the cost of maintaining obsolete
infrastructure will also rise. Till eventually they will give away the
consumer devices.

The point with HDTV, is it is a political game about control of the
spectrum rather than central to the discussion about Digitisation of the
Spectrum. In the multichannel scenario, Pay TV services will be
delivered along with free to air services. There is a community station
in Sydney whose broadcasts seem to overlap the SBS signal which runs
adds saying it has been promised its own channel. How many Internet
users would be interested in receiving a "free to air" Webcasting
Service(with adds).

In the transition, all kinds of devices (settop boxes for Analogue TV
sets, receivers for Personal Computers, and new TV like devices) will
emerge and many will disappear. However hopefully as with the alloy head
motor vehicle engines produced in Australia for the world market,
Australia can manufacture one of the key components of digitisation.

Marghanita
--
Marghanita da Cruz
Principal Consultant
Ramin Communications
http://www.ramin.com.au
Tel: (+61) 0414-869202
--
Marghanita da Cruz
Principal Consultant
Ramin Communications
http://www.ramin.com.au
Tel: (+61) 0414-869202



From fpilcher@nhcip.gov.au Mon Dec 7 07:00:56 1998
From: fpilcher@nhcip.gov.au (Fred Pilcher)
Date: Mon, 07 Dec 1998 17:00:56 +1100
Subject: Background Briefing - Academic Freedom
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.19981207170056.0091dce0@nhcip1>

BRD wrote:
>Academic Freedom
>Producer: Tom Morton

>There's a squeeze on the public knowledge bank...
>
><brd>
>It's an interesting program that raises many issues that are not
>covered by the program itself.

Yes indeedy, and ME TOO about the other stuff. But, sadly, it's going
deeper than that.

Sorry Tony - I know it's off-topic, but...

A colleague of mine sings in a women's choir. Amnesty International has
asked them to sing at celebrations marking 50 years of the signing of the
Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The gig's in the Great Hall of
Parliament House.

They have been told that they must provide the PM's office with the lyrics
of all the songs they're intending to sing. It seems that the PM is holding
a right of veto.

Academic freedom's not all we're losing. I wonder whether this government
would sign the Declaration if it was before them today.

I usually sign "cheers", but this isn't cheery.

Fred

Fred Pilcher
Canberra, Australia

From tonyb@netinfo.com.au Mon Dec 7 08:43:16 1998
From: tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Mon, 7 Dec 1998 18:43:16 +1100
Subject: 'Digital jukebox' self-programmed music CD in OZ?
Message-ID: <v0211010db29135b5ff95@[203.37.43.24]>

At 9:52 AM 7/12/98, George Michaelson wrote:

>
>If you ask me, the system is broken. Its un-enforcable, and doesn't actually
>serve a useful purpose in many cases. If we want to reward creativity and
>creation of new and interesting "things" we can find better ways.

That says it all. I wish I'd said it!

>What do you think? I am sure Librarians (many of whom lurk here) have mixed
>feelings on both sides.

Few librarians would disagree with the proposition that copyright as it
applies to the academic serial literature is an impediment to the academic
communication it is meant to serve. It certainly supplies little reward to
the author, often the reverse.

Tony

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From tonyb@netinfo.com.au Mon Dec 7 08:54:21 1998
From: tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Mon, 7 Dec 1998 18:54:21 +1100
Subject: Background Briefing - Academic Freedom
Message-ID: <v0211010fb29138068ae6@[203.37.43.24]>

At 5:00 PM 7/12/98, Fred Pilcher wrote:

>Sorry Tony - I know it's off-topic, but...

It is but I can't resist ...

>
>A colleague of mine sings in a women's choir. Amnesty International has
>asked them to sing at celebrations marking 50 years of the signing of the
>Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The gig's in the Great Hall of
>Parliament House.
>
>They have been told that they must provide the PM's office with the lyrics
>of all the songs they're intending to sing. It seems that the PM is holding
>a right of veto.

When John Howard and I were students together at Sydney University in the
50s Amnesty was formed. It was a naughty left wing organisation. I joined.
He didn't. He was president of the NSW Young Liberals which seemed
il-liberal. I was a member of the Fabian Society which was hardly the loony
left.

These days Amnesty seems boringly respectable. I don't think "honest" John
has noted there has been this change in Amnesty since the 50s. We are
surprised?

Tony

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From tonyb@netinfo.com.au Mon Dec 7 10:02:25 1998
From: tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Mon, 7 Dec 1998 20:02:25 +1100
Subject: INTERNET'S ROLE IN LAST ELECTION
Message-ID: <v02110112b29149a0adbb@[203.37.43.24]>

>From Edupage, 6 December 1998

INTERNET'S ROLE IN LAST ELECTION
Although the vast majority of Americans indicate that TV and newspapers
remain principal sources of their election information, the number who say
that their main source is the Internet has doubled since 1996, from 3% to
6%, according to a survey by the Pew Research Center for the People and the
Press. (New York Times Cybertimes 4 Dec 98)

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From jwhit@PrimeNet.Com Mon Dec 7 20:32:59 1998
From: jwhit@PrimeNet.Com (Jan Whitaker)
Date: Mon, 7 Dec 1998 12:32:59 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Background Briefing - Academic Freedom
In-Reply-To: <3.0.6.32.19981207170056.0091dce0@nhcip1>
Message-ID: <Pine.BSI.3.96.981207123029.16563B-100000@usr07.primenet.com>

re: They have been told that they must provide the PM's office with the
lyrics of all the songs they're intending to sing. It seems that the PM is
holding a right of veto.

-=-
Maybe it's a benign request and JH just wants to sing along. And Costello
will do the macarena. And then John Herron and Brian Harradine will
perform a corroboree dance they learned last year....

<ducking for cover>

Jan


From richard@auscoms.com.au Mon Dec 7 23:45:25 1998
From: richard@auscoms.com.au (richard@auscoms.com.au)
Date: Tue, 08 Dec 98 08:45:25 +1000
Subject: Background Briefing - Academic Freedom
Message-ID: <9812089130.AA913067134@mail.auscoms.com.au>


Tony wrote:
>I was a member of the Fabian Society ...

So Link is actually your vehicle for changing the system from within?

RC

____________________Reply Separator____________________
Subject: Re: Background Briefing - Academic Freedom
Author: <tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry)>
Date: 7/12/98 18:54

At 5:00 PM 7/12/98, Fred Pilcher wrote:

>Sorry Tony - I know it's off-topic, but...

It is but I can't resist ...

>
>A colleague of mine sings in a women's choir. Amnesty International has
>asked them to sing at celebrations marking 50 years of the signing of the
>Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The gig's in the Great Hall of
>Parliament House.
>
>They have been told that they must provide the PM's office with the lyrics
>of all the songs they're intending to sing. It seems that the PM is holding
>a right of veto.

When John Howard and I were students together at Sydney University in the
50s Amnesty was formed. It was a naughty left wing organisation. I joined.
He didn't. He was president of the NSW Young Liberals which seemed
il-liberal. I was a member of the Fabian Society which was hardly the loony
left.

These days Amnesty seems boringly respectable. I don't think "honest" John
has noted there has been this change in Amnesty since the 50s. We are
surprised?

Tony

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry







From richard@auscoms.com.au Mon Dec 7 23:58:21 1998
From: richard@auscoms.com.au (richard@auscoms.com.au)
Date: Tue, 08 Dec 98 08:58:21 +1000
Subject: Media Release: Big opportunities for Australian indus
Message-ID: <9812089130.AA913067908@mail.auscoms.com.au>


Marghanita,

I can't speak for Ross, but: I don't doubt the demand for spectrum. However, the
forced march on consumers seems too much like disintermediated corporate
welfare. We've been beaten over the head with competition policy for ten years
or more; but digital terrestrial broadcast will have no competition; rather,
consumers have to upgrade at their own cost, like it or not.

>HDTV ... is a political game about control of the spectrum

Indeed. So why should the game be subsidised by consumers?

In the colour conversion it worked differently; PAL was backwards-compatible
with black & white. It competed successfully and is now ubiquitous.

>Australia can't stand alone...

Given that nobody else has made the transition, we are standing alone already.
We're committed to a migration which has not been made by any other country.
(PS, we _benefited_ from our late entry into colour; PAL is vastly superiour to
NTSC. Would it be different in digital?)

>hopefully ... Australia can manufacture one of the key components of
>digitisation.

If that happens, it won't happen because consumers are shelling out to Philips,
Samsung, NEC, Sony etc for TV sets. They'll mostly come from overseas -- AFAIK
Au only has two TV manufacturing/assembly facilities (Mitsubishi and ?Philips?),
and the extent of "local content" is pretty low.

If we contribute, it will be via companies similar to Mitec (Qld-based microwave
systems developer) et al. Consumer dollars will make no difference to that sort
of capability.

Richard Chirgwin

____________________Reply Separator____________________
Subject: Re: Media Release: Big opportunities for Australian indus
Author: <marghanita@ramin.com.au>
Date: 7/12/98 14:34

Ross/Richard,

There may not be an apparent demand for access to the Spectrum in
Australia, but there certainly is elsewhere and therefore Australian
Viewers/Consumers will be affected by availability of devices and
content. Australia cannot stand alone from an infrastructure or consumer
perspective. While Telstra, Optus and other providers no longer
develop(engineer) their own equipment, the cost of maintaining obsolete
infrastructure will also rise. Till eventually they will give away the
consumer devices.

The point with HDTV, is it is a political game about control of the
spectrum rather than central to the discussion about Digitisation of the
Spectrum. In the multichannel scenario, Pay TV services will be
delivered along with free to air services. There is a community station
in Sydney whose broadcasts seem to overlap the SBS signal which runs
adds saying it has been promised its own channel. How many Internet
users would be interested in receiving a "free to air" Webcasting
Service(with adds).

In the transition, all kinds of devices (settop boxes for Analogue TV
sets, receivers for Personal Computers, and new TV like devices) will
emerge and many will disappear. However hopefully as with the alloy head
motor vehicle engines produced in Australia for the world market,
Australia can manufacture one of the key components of digitisation.

Marghanita
--
Marghanita da Cruz
Principal Consultant
Ramin Communications
http://www.ramin.com.au
Tel: (+61) 0414-869202
--
Marghanita da Cruz
Principal Consultant
Ramin Communications
http://www.ramin.com.au
Tel: (+61) 0414-869202






From richard@auscoms.com.au Tue Dec 8 04:39:52 1998
From: richard@auscoms.com.au (richard@auscoms.com.au)
Date: Tue, 08 Dec 98 13:39:52 +1000
Subject: IETF RFCs
Message-ID: <9812089130.AA913084802@mail.auscoms.com.au>


Do any of the more technically minded linkers know whether there's a regular
mailer of new IETF RFCs?

Richard Chirgwin



From kgeisel@actonline.com.au Mon Dec 7 16:08:25 1998
From: kgeisel@actonline.com.au (Karin Geiselhart)
Date: Tue, 08 Dec 1998 02:08:25 +1100
Subject: free Internet news
Message-ID: <3.0.5.32.19981208020825.007b95c0@pop1.actonline.com.au>

The Filter. Your regular dose of public interest Internet news and
commentary from
the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard Law School.

http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/filter/

Published by the Berkman Center for Internet & Society, The Filter
newsletter gives you a unique take on today's most pressing public
interest-oriented Internet issues through the eyes of leading experts,
scholars, and researchers.

Every two weeks in our email newsletter (mirrored on our Web site), we
feature reports from our widely scattered team of correspondents, and
interviews with those involved in the evolution of the Net in politics, law
and policy, culture and media. The newsletter will also feature letters and
essays from readers, creating a truly interactive and publicly accessible
publication.

KG
PhD student
Faculty of Communication
University of Canberra
http://student.canberra.edu.au/~u833885/home.htm

From tonyb@netinfo.com.au Tue Dec 8 04:25:42 1998
From: tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Tue, 8 Dec 1998 14:25:42 +1100
Subject: R&D Expenditure by Microsoft
Message-ID: <v02110116b2924baa4f8e@[203.37.43.24]>

Linkers

While reading the Australian I came across the figure of $A4.75 Billion pa
for Microsoft's R&D expenditure. I looked up Australian Business sector
expenditure
<http://www.statistics.gov.au/websitedbs/D3110124.NSF/0ab4188484b99ec04a2564
8b0014a817/947192160d3ca632ca2565b700794aaf?OpenDocument> and found it was
$A4.24 Billion.

In other words Microsoft spends more on R&D than every Australian Company
combined.

Tony

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au Tue Dec 8 04:27:31 1998
From: Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au (Roger Clarke)
Date: Tue, 8 Dec 1998 14:27:31 +1100
Subject: Build crypto archives worldwide to foil US-built Berlin Walls
Message-ID: <v0313034eb2924c4b9138@[203.37.38.148]>


To: cryptography@c2.net, gnu@toad.com
Subject: Building crypto archives worldwide to foil US-built Berlin Walls
Date: Mon, 07 Dec 1998 15:23:54 -0800
From: John Gilmore <gnu@toad.com>
Sender: owner-cryptography@c2.net

The US Wassenaar initiative is an attempt to deny the public not only
all future strong crypto developments, but all existing ones. As
today's message from Denmark makes clear, the freedom-hating
bureaucrats are threatening to prosecute a citizen merely for
publishing PGP on his web page.

Let's at least ensure that they don't eliminate *today's* strong
crypto, by replicating crypto archives behind each Berlin Wall they
threaten to erect. Today we depend on a small number of archives (in
a small number of countries) containing source and binaries for PGP,
SSH, Kerberos, cryptoMozilla, IPSEC, and many other useful crypto
tools that we use daily.

Let's replicate these archives in many countries. I call for
volunteers in each country, at each university or crypto-aware
organization, to download crypto tools while they can still be
exported from where they are, and then to offer them for export from
your own site and your own country as long as it's legal. (The
Wassenaar agreement is not a law; each country has merely agreed to
try to change its own laws, but that process has not yet started.)

And if at some future moment your own government makes it illegal for
you to publish these tools, after all your appeals are denied, all the
pro-bono court cases rejected, and all the newspaper coverage you can
get has been printed, then restrict your web site so that only your
own citizens can get the tools. That'll still be better than the
citizens of your country having NO access to the tools of privacy!

(I suggest putting these tools on a Web site on a machine that you
own, rather than on a web site where you buy space from someone else.
That way there'll be nobody for the freedom-squashers to threaten
except you.)

I'm sure that John Young's excellent http://jya.com site will be happy
to provide an index of crypto archives around the world, if people
will send him notices at jya@pipeline.com as your sites come up.
(Each archive should locally mirror this list, so that we won't depend
on a single site.)

Rather than having their desired effect of squelching crypto
distribution, perhaps their overbold move can inspire us to increase
strong crypto distribution tenfold, by making it clear to the public
that if you don't keep a copy on your own hard drive, the governments
of the world will be merciless in scheming to deny you access to it.
And if crypto developers have to publish on books, or rely on
smugglers to get crypto from country to country, then at least each
country will have its distribution arrangements already ready for when
the book is scanned or the smuggler arrives.

John Gilmore



Roger Clarke http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/
http://www.etc.com.au/Xamax/
Xamax Consultancy Pty Ltd, 78 Sidaway St, Chapman ACT 2611 AUSTRALIA
Tel: +61 2 6288 1472, and 6288 6916 mailto:Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au

Visiting Fellow, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology
The Australian National University Canberra ACT 0200 AUSTRALIA
Information Sciences Building Room 211 Tel: +61 2 6249 3666



From Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au Tue Dec 8 05:00:06 1998
From: Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au (Roger Clarke)
Date: Tue, 8 Dec 1998 15:00:06 +1100
Subject: History of the Internet in Australia
Message-ID: <v03130340b291fb978cd0@[203.37.38.148]>


I'm not usually nervous about publishing papers, but this one's a bit
different ...

I've looked for, but can't find, a history of the Internet in Australia.

With some assistance from a couple of experts, I've cobbled together a
starting-point, and put it up at:
http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/II/OzIHist.html

I need feedback, and I'll add things and fix things as information is
provided to me. I'll happily consider inserting text, or replacing text,
using other people's drafting (with or without attribution, whichever you
prefer); but I reserve the right to decide how it reads.

Be warned that there are lots of sensitivities involved, and a risk that
this could get contentious. I'd like the paper to document the issues
rather than pretend they didn't happen; but not inflame them.

In general, comments directly to me please rather than to link, except
where they are of general interest to everyone.

Caveat:
I stress that I'm not a communications engineer or a computer scientist,
and I've made no contributions at all to the emergence of the Internet in
Australia - I was one of the vast numbers of beneficiaries of other
people's efforts. What's more, I intentionally kept my then organisation
(Department of Commerce, ANU) away from the Internet until Dec/Jan 1989/90,
when, in response to my question, Geoff Huston affirmed to me that delivery
reliability of email was at least of the same order as that of Australia
Post. So I bring no special authority to the writing of this paper.

Thanks ... Roger


Roger Clarke http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/
http://www.etc.com.au/Xamax/
Xamax Consultancy Pty Ltd, 78 Sidaway St, Chapman ACT 2611 AUSTRALIA
Tel: +61 2 6288 1472, and 6288 6916 mailto:Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au

Visiting Fellow, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology
The Australian National University Canberra ACT 0200 AUSTRALIA
Information Sciences Building Room 211 Tel: +61 2 6249 3666



From tonyb@netinfo.com.au Tue Dec 8 05:05:51 1998
From: tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Tue, 8 Dec 1998 15:05:51 +1100
Subject: Update on Australian Copyright Law Reform
Message-ID: <v02110117b29250847385@[203.37.43.24]>

For information.

Tony

>Date: Tue, 8 Dec 1998 13:38:35 +1100
>Reply-To: copy-lib@nla.gov.au
>Originator: copy-lib@nla.gov.au
>Sender: copy-lib@nla.gov.au
>Precedence: bulk
>From: Annabelle Herd <aherd@nla.gov.au>
>To: tonyb@netinfo.com.au
>Subject: Update on Australian Copyright Law Reform
>Status:
>
>Dear Copy-lib listmembers,
>
>The following is by way of an update on where things are at on the
>Australian copyright law reform scene. As will become evident, 1999 (and in
>particular the first few months of the year), is going to be very busy for
>those involved in copyright law reform work.
>
>1. The Digital Agenda Reforms
>
>- A Cabinet decision was announced in late April 1998 on proposals to amend
>the Australian Copyright Act 1968 in order to bring it into line with the
>two new World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO) treaties adopted in
>December 1996.
>
>- These proposals would also bring the Copyright Act into the 'digital age'
>
>- An 'exposure draft' Copyright Act amendment bill to implement the Digital
>Agenda reforms will be released in early January 1999, with a public
>consultation period of between one and two months to follow. It is expected
>that the bill will be introduced into parliament shortly thereafter, with
>enactment likely by the end of the year.
>
>- Clearly, once the exposure draft is released, following a detailed
>analysis of the implications of the proposed amendments, will have to ensure
>that any amendments adopted are well balanced and reflect the interests of
>libraries and copyright users.
>
>- The press releases announcing the decision, and providing some information
>on the content of the proposals (which have been named the 'Digital Agenda
>reforms' by the Government) are available on the website of the
>Attorney-General's Department, as well as that of the Department of
>Communications, the Information Economy, and the Arts.
>
>- A statement on the proposed reforms from the national, cross-sectoral
>Libraries Copyright Committee adopted in August 1998 can be found on the
>ACLIS website at:
>
>http://www.nla.gov.au/aclis/dareform.html
>
>2. The Copyright Law Review Committee's Report on Simplification of the
>Copyright Act 1968
>
>- Part 1 of the CLRC's report on how to simplify the Copyright Act was
>released in September 1998.
>
>- The report contains over 150 recommendations on how to simplify the parts
>of the Copyright Act that relate to the exceptions to the rights of
>copyright owners. The report makes recommendations on the fair dealing
>provisions, the library copying provisions, the educational copying
>provisions and other exceptions.
>
>- The most significant recommendation from the CLRC is that a new open-ended
>fair dealing provision be adopted. This provision would list the purposes
>for which a fair dealing could be made (research or study, criticism or
>review etc) but would not restrict fair dealing to uses for those purposes.
>In other words, as long as a dealing can be determined to be 'fair' (judged
>by a set of fairness factors being those currently listed in S. 40 (2)) then
>it can be for any purpose.
>
>- The Government has not responded to Part 1 of the CLRC's report. As the
>CLRC can only make recommendations, but not implement them in legislation,
>the Government can choose to implement the report in full, implement only
>some recommendations, or disregard the Report altogether.
>
>- The Australian library community has not adopted a comprehensive position
>on each of the recommendations in Part 1 of the Report (this will take some
>time due to the comprehensive nature of the Report), but the strong
>underlying statements on the public interest objectives of copyright law
>contained throughout Part 1, are obviously strongly supported by Australian
>libraries. Statements to this effect have already been dispatched to the
>relevant Government ministers and other key players. Obviously, libraries
>will have to work to ensure that those recommendations determined to be
>favourable to the public interest, to copyright users, and to libraries, are
>implemented as soon as possible.
>
>- Part 2 of the CLRC's report on how to simplify the Copyright Act has been
>completed and is awaiting a release date from the Attorney-General. It is
>expected that Part 2 will be released in early January (probably at around
>the same time as the exposure draft of the Digital Agenda reforms).
>
>- Part 2 of the simplification report will look at how to simplify the
>exclusive rights of copyright owners, and the nature and range of subject
>matter that is given copyright protection.
>
>- As with Part 1, libraries will have to examine the content of Part 2
>carefully before determining a position, and working to ensure that any
>changes to legislation resulting from the CLRC's recommendations are in the
>best interests of Australian libraries and copyright users in general.
>
>
>3. A new International Treaty Providing sui generis Protection to
>Non-Original Databases
>
>- The issue of whether a new international treaty granting sui generis
>protection to those databases that do not qualify for copyright protection
>due to a lack of originality, is currently being hotly debated at the
>international level.
>
>- A draft treaty was put to the Diplomatic Conference in December 1996, but
>was not discussed to a lack of time and information on the matter.
>
>- Since that time, a database directive has been adopted by the European
>Union, and several EU countries (including the UK) have already enacted
>legislation granting new rights in data contained in non- original
>databases. In the US, several proposals have been put to the legislature,
>and although not yet adopted, it is expected that some kind of database
>protection in the US will come into force in the near future.
>
>- Scientific bodies such as the International Council for Science, as well
>as meteorological organisations (including the World Meteorological
>Organisation), and libraries (including IFLA) have mounted strong campaigns
>highlighting the potentially disastrous effects on science, research,
>education, and access to public domain data that could result from a treaty
>such as this. A statement made by IFLA on the issue of protection of
>databases at a recent WIPO meeting should be available on the IFLA website
>shortly.
>
>- The Australian Government does not yet have a position on the adoption of
>a new international database protection treaty. Obviously those countries
>with strong database industries such as Germany and the UK (and other EU
>countries) are pushing hard for the speedy adoption (ie by the end of 1999)
>of a new international treaty. However, there is resistance, and a call for
>more information, from the countries of several regional groups including
>Asia and Africa, as well as from other countries that are essentially users
>of databases (such as Australia).
>
>- This will be an issue to maintain a watch on over the next few months, and
>it is squarely in the interests of Australian libraries to participate in
>the campaign at the international level to ensure that if a new treaty is
>adopted, appropriate exceptions are included to avoid potentially disastrous
>effects on science, research and education. Australia would of course have
>to implement the standards set in any new database treaty, a process in
>which it would be essential that libraries participate fully.
>
>4. The Australia Digital Alliance
>
>- The meeting papers from the inaugural meeting of the ADA held on 24 July
>1998 are on-line at:
>http://Tony-Barry.emu.id.au/interests/library/ada.html
>
>- The meeting papers contain a draft statement of objectives and a draft
>statement of principles for the ADA.
>
>- In the time since the 24 July inaugural meeting the ADA has received
>strong support from a wide representation of interest groups and
>individuals. In fact, through the press release put out after the meeting,
>and other activities, the ADA has actually already started to make a name on
>the copyright law reform front.
>
>- The ADA is now commencing work on formulating a position on Part 1 of the
>Copyright Law Review Committee's report on simplification of the Copyright
>Act.
>
> - It is certainly not too late to become involved in the ADA, if your
>organisation is interested in being a part of the ADA, please feel free to
>contact me either by email or phone.
>
>Kind regards,
>Annabelle.
>
>Annabelle Herd
>Copyright Research Officer
>Australian Council of Libraries and Information Services
>PO Box E 202 Kingston ACT 2604
>PH: 02 6262 1273 FAX: 02 6273 2545
>

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From ggm@dstc.edu.au Tue Dec 8 14:24:27 1998
From: ggm@dstc.edu.au (George Michaelson)
Date: Tue, 08 Dec 1998 23:24:27 +1000
Subject: IETF RFCs
In-Reply-To: Your message of "Tue, 08 Dec 1998 13:39:52 +1000."
<9812089130.AA913084802@mail.auscoms.com.au>
Message-ID: <1651.913123467@dstc.edu.au>


Yes. the ietf-drafts and ietf lists promulgate new RFC's. You want to
go to the ietf web pages.

-George
--
George Michaelson | DSTC Pty Ltd
Email: ggm@dstc.edu.au | University of Qld 4072
Phone: +61 7 3365 4310 | Australia
Fax: +61 7 3365 4311 | http://www.dstc.edu.au



From glen.turner@adelaide.edu.au Tue Dec 8 05:47:09 1998
From: glen.turner@adelaide.edu.au (Glen Turner)
Date: Tue, 08 Dec 1998 15:17:09 +1030
Subject: R&D Expenditure by Microsoft
References: <v02110116b2924baa4f8e@[203.37.43.24]>
Message-ID: <366CAF4D.692192AF@adelaide.edu.au>

Tony Barry wrote:

> In other words Microsoft spends more on R&D than every Australian Company
> combined.

I should hope so.

It's a software company, right.

So it manufacturing costs are bugger all. That leaves
support and marketing. Oh, and writing more software,
which is billed to the "development" budget.

--
Glen Turner Network Specialist
Tel: (08) 8303 3936 Information Technology Services
Fax: (08) 8303 4400 The University of Adelaide 5005
Email: glen.turner@adelaide.edu.au South Australia
--
STOP PRESS: Glen's mobile phone number is now 0416 295 857.

From glen.turner@adelaide.edu.au Tue Dec 8 05:46:39 1998
From: glen.turner@adelaide.edu.au (Glen Turner)
Date: Tue, 08 Dec 1998 15:16:39 +1030
Subject: IETF RFCs
References: <9812089130.AA913084802@mail.auscoms.com.au>
Message-ID: <366CAF2F.904CFBCC@adelaide.edu.au>

richard@auscoms.com.au wrote:
>
> ... whether there's a regular mailer of new IETF RFCs?

See

http://www.ietf.org/maillist.html

--
Glen Turner Network Specialist
Tel: (08) 8303 3936 Information Technology Services
Fax: (08) 8303 4400 The University of Adelaide 5005
Email: glen.turner@adelaide.edu.au South Australia

From richard@auscoms.com.au Tue Dec 8 07:35:17 1998
From: richard@auscoms.com.au (richard@auscoms.com.au)
Date: Tue, 08 Dec 98 16:35:17 +1000
Subject: RtSNET telecomms
Message-ID: <9812089130.AA913095327@mail.auscoms.com.au>


Linkers -- you may remember the telecomms outfit that sent spam to link a couple
of weeks ago. In the interests of fairness, I should forward the information
below from the TIO's office, which lets us know that while RtSNET is a spammer,
it's not an illegal telecomms operator...

Richard Chirgwin

____________________Forward Header_____________________
Subject: Re: Questionable operator?
Author: Jane Hill <hillj@tio.com.au>
Date: 8/12/98 16:07

Dear Richard ,

Please be advised that RtSNET Telecommunications Group is an agent for
WORLD XCHANGE. As World Xchange is already a registered member with the
TIO, RtSNET is not required to join.

Thankyou for your e-mail.

Regards,
Emily Callander

Jane Hill
Administration Manager
TIO Ltd
315 Exhibition Street
Melbourne Vic 3000
e mail: hillj@tio.com.au
Tel: (03) 8600 8700
Fax: (03) 8600 8797



From Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au Tue Dec 8 05:00:06 1998
From: Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au (Roger Clarke)
Date: Tue, 8 Dec 1998 15:00:06 +1100
Subject: History of the Internet in Australia
Message-ID: <v03130340b291fb978cd0@[203.37.38.148]>


I'm not usually nervous about publishing papers, but this one's a bit
different ...

I've looked for, but can't find, a history of the Internet in Australia.

With some assistance from a couple of experts, I've cobbled together a
starting-point, and put it up at:
http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/II/OzIHist.html

I need feedback, and I'll add things and fix things as information is
provided to me. I'll happily consider inserting text, or replacing text,
using other people's drafting (with or without attribution, whichever you
prefer); but I reserve the right to decide how it reads.

Be warned that there are lots of sensitivities involved, and a risk that
this could get contentious. I'd like the paper to document the issues
rather than pretend they didn't happen; but not inflame them.

In general, comments directly to me please rather than to link, except
where they are of general interest to everyone.

Caveat:
I stress that I'm not a communications engineer or a computer scientist,
and I've made no contributions at all to the emergence of the Internet in
Australia - I was one of the vast numbers of beneficiaries of other
people's efforts. What's more, I intentionally kept my then organisation
(Department of Commerce, ANU) away from the Internet until Dec/Jan 1989/90,
when, in response to my question, Geoff Huston affirmed to me that delivery
reliability of email was at least of the same order as that of Australia
Post. So I bring no special authority to the writing of this paper.

Thanks ... Roger


Roger Clarke http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/
http://www.etc.com.au/Xamax/
Xamax Consultancy Pty Ltd, 78 Sidaway St, Chapman ACT 2611 AUSTRALIA
Tel: +61 2 6288 1472, and 6288 6916 mailto:Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au

Visiting Fellow, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology
The Australian National University Canberra ACT 0200 AUSTRALIA
Information Sciences Building Room 211 Tel: +61 2 6249 3666



From brd@dynamite.com.au Tue Dec 8 06:49:28 1998
From: brd@dynamite.com.au (Bernard Robertson-Dunn)
Date: Tue, 08 Dec 1998 16:49:28 +1100
Subject: Build crypto archives worldwide to foil US-built Berlin Walls
References: <v0313034eb2924c4b9138@[203.37.38.148]>
Message-ID: <366CBDE8.4D404AE0@dynamite.com.au>

Roger Clarke quoted:

> Let's replicate these archives in many countries. I call for
> volunteers in each country, at each university or crypto-aware
> organization, to download crypto tools ......

To repeat a tag I used earlier this week in posting to Link, in a
different context:

--
No one has been more wrong about computerization than George Orwell
in "1984." So far, nearly everything indicates that computers are
not the beginning of authority but its end.

In the process of connecting everything to everything, computers
elevate the power of the small player. They make room for different,
and they reward small innovations.

Instead of enforcing uniformity, they promote heterogeneity and
autonomy. ... We become more human, not less so, when we use them.
-- Kevin Kelly.

We become more powerful in our ability to resist the authority of the
law. This can be a good thing or a bad thing. Whichever it is, is a
reflection of our own goodness or badness.

--
Regards
brd

Bernard Robertson-Dunn
Canberra Australia
brd@dynamite.com.au

From tonyb@netinfo.com.au Tue Dec 8 05:05:51 1998
From: tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Tue, 8 Dec 1998 15:05:51 +1100
Subject: Update on Australian Copyright Law Reform
Message-ID: <v02110117b29250847385@[203.37.43.24]>

For information.

Tony

>Date: Tue, 8 Dec 1998 13:38:35 +1100
>Reply-To: copy-lib@nla.gov.au
>Originator: copy-lib@nla.gov.au
>Sender: copy-lib@nla.gov.au
>Precedence: bulk
>From: Annabelle Herd <aherd@nla.gov.au>
>To: tonyb@netinfo.com.au
>Subject: Update on Australian Copyright Law Reform
>Status:
>
>Dear Copy-lib listmembers,
>
>The following is by way of an update on where things are at on the
>Australian copyright law reform scene. As will become evident, 1999 (and in
>particular the first few months of the year), is going to be very busy for
>those involved in copyright law reform work.
>
>1. The Digital Agenda Reforms
>
>- A Cabinet decision was announced in late April 1998 on proposals to amend
>the Australian Copyright Act 1968 in order to bring it into line with the
>two new World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO) treaties adopted in
>December 1996.
>
>- These proposals would also bring the Copyright Act into the 'digital age'
>
>- An 'exposure draft' Copyright Act amendment bill to implement the Digital
>Agenda reforms will be released in early January 1999, with a public
>consultation period of between one and two months to follow. It is expected
>that the bill will be introduced into parliament shortly thereafter, with
>enactment likely by the end of the year.
>
>- Clearly, once the exposure draft is released, following a detailed
>analysis of the implications of the proposed amendments, will have to ensure
>that any amendments adopted are well balanced and reflect the interests of
>libraries and copyright users.
>
>- The press releases announcing the decision, and providing some information
>on the content of the proposals (which have been named the 'Digital Agenda
>reforms' by the Government) are available on the website of the
>Attorney-General's Department, as well as that of the Department of
>Communications, the Information Economy, and the Arts.
>
>- A statement on the proposed reforms from the national, cross-sectoral
>Libraries Copyright Committee adopted in August 1998 can be found on the
>ACLIS website at:
>
>http://www.nla.gov.au/aclis/dareform.html
>
>2. The Copyright Law Review Committee's Report on Simplification of the
>Copyright Act 1968
>
>- Part 1 of the CLRC's report on how to simplify the Copyright Act was
>released in September 1998.
>
>- The report contains over 150 recommendations on how to simplify the parts
>of the Copyright Act that relate to the exceptions to the rights of
>copyright owners. The report makes recommendations on the fair dealing
>provisions, the library copying provisions, the educational copying
>provisions and other exceptions.
>
>- The most significant recommendation from the CLRC is that a new open-ended
>fair dealing provision be adopted. This provision would list the purposes
>for which a fair dealing could be made (research or study, criticism or
>review etc) but would not restrict fair dealing to uses for those purposes.
>In other words, as long as a dealing can be determined to be 'fair' (judged
>by a set of fairness factors being those currently listed in S. 40 (2)) then
>it can be for any purpose.
>
>- The Government has not responded to Part 1 of the CLRC's report. As the
>CLRC can only make recommendations, but not implement them in legislation,
>the Government can choose to implement the report in full, implement only
>some recommendations, or disregard the Report altogether.
>
>- The Australian library community has not adopted a comprehensive position
>on each of the recommendations in Part 1 of the Report (this will take some
>time due to the comprehensive nature of the Report), but the strong
>underlying statements on the public interest objectives of copyright law
>contained throughout Part 1, are obviously strongly supported by Australian
>libraries. Statements to this effect have already been dispatched to the
>relevant Government ministers and other key players. Obviously, libraries
>will have to work to ensure that those recommendations determined to be
>favourable to the public interest, to copyright users, and to libraries, are
>implemented as soon as possible.
>
>- Part 2 of the CLRC's report on how to simplify the Copyright Act has been
>completed and is awaiting a release date from the Attorney-General. It is
>expected that Part 2 will be released in early January (probably at around
>the same time as the exposure draft of the Digital Agenda reforms).
>
>- Part 2 of the simplification report will look at how to simplify the
>exclusive rights of copyright owners, and the nature and range of subject
>matter that is given copyright protection.
>
>- As with Part 1, libraries will have to examine the content of Part 2
>carefully before determining a position, and working to ensure that any
>changes to legislation resulting from the CLRC's recommendations are in the
>best interests of Australian libraries and copyright users in general.
>
>
>3. A new International Treaty Providing sui generis Protection to
>Non-Original Databases
>
>- The issue of whether a new international treaty granting sui generis
>protection to those databases that do not qualify for copyright protection
>due to a lack of originality, is currently being hotly debated at the
>international level.
>
>- A draft treaty was put to the Diplomatic Conference in December 1996, but
>was not discussed to a lack of time and information on the matter.
>
>- Since that time, a database directive has been adopted by the European
>Union, and several EU countries (including the UK) have already enacted
>legislation granting new rights in data contained in non- original
>databases. In the US, several proposals have been put to the legislature,
>and although not yet adopted, it is expected that some kind of database
>protection in the US will come into force in the near future.
>
>- Scientific bodies such as the International Council for Science, as well
>as meteorological organisations (including the World Meteorological
>Organisation), and libraries (including IFLA) have mounted strong campaigns
>highlighting the potentially disastrous effects on science, research,
>education, and access to public domain data that could result from a treaty
>such as this. A statement made by IFLA on the issue of protection of
>databases at a recent WIPO meeting should be available on the IFLA website
>shortly.
>
>- The Australian Government does not yet have a position on the adoption of
>a new international database protection treaty. Obviously those countries
>with strong database industries such as Germany and the UK (and other EU
>countries) are pushing hard for the speedy adoption (ie by the end of 1999)
>of a new international treaty. However, there is resistance, and a call for
>more information, from the countries of several regional groups including
>Asia and Africa, as well as from other countries that are essentially users
>of databases (such as Australia).
>
>- This will be an issue to maintain a watch on over the next few months, and
>it is squarely in the interests of Australian libraries to participate in
>the campaign at the international level to ensure that if a new treaty is
>adopted, appropriate exceptions are included to avoid potentially disastrous
>effects on science, research and education. Australia would of course have
>to implement the standards set in any new database treaty, a process in
>which it would be essential that libraries participate fully.
>
>4. The Australia Digital Alliance
>
>- The meeting papers from the inaugural meeting of the ADA held on 24 July
>1998 are on-line at:
>http://Tony-Barry.emu.id.au/interests/library/ada.html
>
>- The meeting papers contain a draft statement of objectives and a draft
>statement of principles for the ADA.
>
>- In the time since the 24 July inaugural meeting the ADA has received
>strong support from a wide representation of interest groups and
>individuals. In fact, through the press release put out after the meeting,
>and other activities, the ADA has actually already started to make a name on
>the copyright law reform front.
>
>- The ADA is now commencing work on formulating a position on Part 1 of the
>Copyright Law Review Committee's report on simplification of the Copyright
>Act.
>
> - It is certainly not too late to become involved in the ADA, if your
>organisation is interested in being a part of the ADA, please feel free to
>contact me either by email or phone.
>
>Kind regards,
>Annabelle.
>
>Annabelle Herd
>Copyright Research Officer
>Australian Council of Libraries and Information Services
>PO Box E 202 Kingston ACT 2604
>PH: 02 6262 1273 FAX: 02 6273 2545
>

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au Tue Dec 8 08:40:53 1998
From: me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Tue, 8 Dec 1998 18:40:53 +1100
Subject: NET A NECESSITY
Message-ID: <v0211011ab29283c57ea6@[203.37.43.24]>

>From Net News 07 December 1998

NET A NECESSITY
Nearly half of Internet users say the Net is a necessity, and three-quarters
say it's made their life better, according to a study by market researcher
Roper Starch for AOL. And 71% say they use the Internet for information about
products. 51% prefer email for business communications rather than the
phone (35%)
or snailmail (5%) - and 26% check their email while on vacation. Women now
account for 47% of the online audience, compared with 38% three years ago.
See http://www.roper.inter.net/

_______________________________________________________
mailto:tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Ningaui Pty Ltd
mailto:me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au | GPO Box 1680
http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry | Canberra ACT 2601
Phone +61 2 6241 7659 | AUSTRALIA



From me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au Tue Dec 8 08:40:58 1998
From: me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Tue, 8 Dec 1998 18:40:58 +1100
Subject: NEW IP
Message-ID: <v0211011bb29283d782ca@[203.37.43.24]>

>From Net News 07 December 1998

NEW IP
After four years of work, the Internet Engineering Task Force has released a
new version of Internet Protocol, IP version 6 (IPv6). Improvements include the
ability to use longer IP addresses, and a more robust architecture. Details at
ftp://ftp.isi.edu/in-notes/rfc2460.txt

_______________________________________________________
mailto:tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Ningaui Pty Ltd
mailto:me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au | GPO Box 1680
http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry | Canberra ACT 2601
Phone +61 2 6241 7659 | AUSTRALIA



From me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au Tue Dec 8 08:41:17 1998
From: me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Tue, 8 Dec 1998 18:41:17 +1100
Subject: LA Times column, 12/7/98
Message-ID: <v0211011db292883f8bc8@[203.37.43.24]>

Another interesting piece from Gary Chapman on internet culture.

Tony

>Mime-Version: 1.0
>Date: Mon, 7 Dec 1998 10:44:47 -0600
>To: chapman@mcfeeley.cc.utexas.edu
>From: Gary Chapman <gary.chapman@mail.utexas.edu>
>Subject: LA Times column, 12/7/98
>Reply-To: gary.chapman@mail.utexas.edu
>Sender: owner-chapman@mcfeeley.cc.utexas.edu
>
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" ; format="flowed"
>
>Friends,
>
>Below is my Los Angeles Times column for today, December 7, 1998. As
>always, please feel free to pass this on, but please retain the
>copyright notice.
>
>-- Gary
>
>Gary Chapman
>Director
>The 21st Century Project
>LBJ School of Public Affairs
>Drawer Y, University Station
>University of Texas
>Austin, TX 78713
>(512) 263-1218
>(512) 471-1835 (fax)
>gary.chapman@mail.utexas.edu
>http://www.utexas.edu/lbj/21cp
>
> ------------------------------------------
>
>If you have received this from me, Gary Chapman
>(gary.chapman@mail.utexas.edu), you are subscribed to the listserv
>that sends out copies of my column in The Los Angeles Times and other
>published articles.
>
>If you wish to UNSUBSCRIBE from this listserv, send mail to
>listproc@mcfeeley.cc.utexas.edu, leave the subject line blank, and
>put "Unsubscribe Chapman" in the first line of the message.
>
>If you received this message from a source other than me and would
>like to subscribe to the listserv, the instructions for subscribing
>are at the end of the message.
>
> ------------------------------------------
>
>Monday, December 7, 1998
>
>DIGITAL NATION
>
>Duel Heats Up Over Culture of the Internet
>
>By Gary Chapman
>
>Copyright 1998, The Los Angeles Times, All Rights Reserved
>
>The proposed merger of America Online Inc. and Netscape
>Communications Corp. seems to have pleased Wall Street, and boosted
>almost all Internet stocks, but it created a sour and anxious feeling
>among longtime Internet activists and programmers.
>
>They see this new goliath as yet another encroachment by "the suits,"
>the corporate culture that has recently discovered the Internet, and
>as perhaps the cyberspace equivalent of suburban sprawl, the "malling
>of America." AOL's flirtation with the metaphors of commercial TV,
>with its "channels" and ubiquitous advertising, raises the specter of
>the Internet turning into a commercial wasteland like TV, subverting
>the promise of cyberspace as a different kind of medium.
>
>New-media pundit Jon Katz wrote that the AOL-Netscape merger is a
>"catastrophe" for Net culture.
>
>The hacker and activist community on the Internet is deeply
>suspicious of any company that seems to harbor ambitions of being
>emperor of cyberspace, whether it's AOL-Netscape or Microsoft. These
>programmers, activists and idealists think the Internet is working
>just fine already, the way they created it.
>
>What seems to be shaping up is a fascinating duel between two models
>of Net culture, both of them gaining strength in the last year: the
>commercial culture of big corporations and the "gift economy"
>developing among thousands of computer programmers who are
>contributing to "open source" software such as the operating system
>Linux. These two models will coexist for a while, but how they
>interact with each other is likely to be the most interesting story
>in the technology field for some years to come.
>
>Linux has been the rage in all the technology press lately, in part
>because of its radically different development from the corporate
>model represented by Microsoft and its Windows operating system. A
>familiar story by now, Linux was first developed by Linus Torvalds in
>1991, when the Finnish computer science student wanted a version of
>the Unix operating system to run on his 386 PC.
>
>Torvalds used software tools produced by the Free Software
>Foundation, an organization founded by Richard Stallman in Cambridge,
>Mass. Stallman's personal philosophy -- which earned him a MacArthur
>Foundation "genius grant" -- is that software should be free and
>widely shared in a community committed to improving its capabilities,
>not unlike the way we regard scientific knowledge. This does not mean
>that software should cost nothing. It means that software source
>code, the text of a program that is interpreted by computers as
>instructions, should be freely available for modification and
>improvement by others, for the benefit of all.
>
>Torvalds put Linux into this model of software development and relied
>on the distributed intelligence of thousands of volunteers around the
>world to improve the operating system. He also made it free in the
>conventional sense of that word: It's available for download, without
>cost, through many sites on the Internet.
>
>The result is that Linux is now widely used -- estimates of its user
>population vary from 6 million up to 20 million people, depending on
>whom you ask -- and widely admired for its stability, scalability
>(its ability to handle large tasks) and speed. It's highly
>customizable because its source code is accessible to programmers,
>unlike that of Windows. Linux doesn't crash, or only rarely, also
>unlike Windows. And Linux is so fast and efficient that it can
>resurrect otherwise obsolete -- and therefore cheap -- computers and
>turn them into effective Internet servers or desktop machines. And
>because it's free, it greatly reduces the expense of implementing
>cutting-edge computing.
>
>The Mexican government, for example, last month announced that it
>will install Linux in 140,000 computer labs in Mexican elementary and
>secondary schools. Government officials estimated that Windows
>licenses for all these labs would cost them close to $125 million.
>Linux is not only free, it doesn't require replacing older computers,
>and it's possibly the operating system of the future -- Mexico could
>lead the world in producing Linux system administrators. This may be
>the smartest thing the Mexican government has ever done.
>
>Aside from its technical benefits, however, the most interesting
>thing about Linux and other open source software -- which includes
>the scripting language Perl and many applications -- may be the
>corresponding phenomenon of the open source model of development as a
>true social movement. And the resurrection of the idea of a "gift
>economy," a term with a long history in anthropology, to apply to a
>high-tech subculture is intriguing and portentous.
>
>The phrase was coined by French anthropologist Marcel Mauss in his
>1924 book "The Gift" (translated into English in 1935), a study of
>the potlatch ceremonies of Northwest American Indians. It has been,
>since then, a paradigm of anthropological study but almost
>exclusively of "primitive" societies such as South Sea islanders,
>North American Indians and African tribes. It refers to the practice
>among these groups of circulating gifts -- such as blankets, shells
>or herd animals -- as a mode of prestige and exchange.
>
>Anthropologist Bronislaw Malinowski, in his 1922 book, "Argonauts of
>the Western Pacific," wrote about the gift circulation of shell
>armbands among the Kula on islands near New Guinea. He wrote that one
>of these armbands enabled a Kula man "to draw a great deal of renown,
>to exhibit the article, to tell how he obtained it, and to plan to
>whom he is going to give it. And all this forms one of the favorite
>subjects of tribal conversation and gossip."
>
>This description is pretty much identical to what happens among the
>thousands of programmer volunteers working on open source software
>code, who clearly view themselves as part of a community. Their
>conversation and gossip can be found on Usenet sites, where people
>get free technical support advice, and on Web sites like Slashdot
>(http://www.slashdot.org), which ills itself as "News for Nerds.
>Stuff That Matters." The volume of traffic on Slashdot is astounding,
>with hundreds of new messages every day. And the overall gestalt of
>Slashdot and other open source sites is evangelical, pushing the
>concept of open source software as the superior method of software
>development.
>
>Eric Raymond, who wrote the influential open source manifesto "The
>Cathedral and the Bazaar,"
>(http://www.tuxedo.org/~esr/writings/cathedral-bazaar/) and who is
>the president of a new organization called the Open Source Initiative
>(http://www.opensource.org/), says, "In a real gift culture, the
>wealth is inside the person's head, not in economic value.
>
>"One of the things that ticks me off," says Raymond, "is when the
>corporate types approach the Internet as a tabula rasa, as unexplored
>wilderness that can be transformed by corporate beneficence. They
>don't understand that the Internet already has its own folklore, its
>own heroes, its own values. If you come to the Internet like some
>British imperialist thinking that your mission is to civilize the
>natives, they're not likely to take it very well." Indeed, antipathy
>to Microsoft and the other "suits" of the "new economy" is part of
>the glue that holds the open source community together.
>
>"This is my politics, as well as my technology," Raymond adds. "When
>someone says 'social movement,' I typically reach for my gun -- it
>usually means coercion. But the open source movement is about
>voluntarism, cooperation, gift-giving, building community. It's about
>working for the benefit of everyone without anyone holding a gun to
>your head."
>
>It will be strange and fascinating if the real long-term threat to
>Microsoft is less another corporate competitor or the Justice
>Department and more a high-tech version of an ancient human ritual of
>exchange, the gift economy. Bill Gates must be watching this in utter
>stupefaction.
>
>Gary Chapman is director of The 21st Century Project at the
>University of Texas at Austin. His e-mail address Is
>gary.chapman@mail.utexas.edu.
>
> ------------------------------------------
>
>To subscribe to a listserv that forwards copies of Gary Chapman's
>published articles, including his column "Digital Nation" in The Los
>Angeles Times, send mail to:
>
> listproc@mcfeeley.cc.utexas.edu
>
>Leave the subject line blank. In the first line of the message, put:
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>
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>anyone who might be interested in such material.
>
>Questions should be directed to Gary Chapman at gary.chapman@mail.utexas.edu.
>Friends,
>
>Below is my Los Angeles Times column for today, December 7, 1998. As
>always, please feel free to pass this on, but please retain the copyright
>notice.
>
>-- Gary
>
>Gary Chapman
>Director
>The 21st Century Project
>LBJ School of Public Affairs
>Drawer Y, University Station
>University of Texas
>Austin, TX 78713
>(512) 263-1218
>(512) 471-1835 (fax)
>gary.chapman@mail.utexas.edu
>http://www.utexas.edu/lbj/21cp
>
> ------------------------------------------
>
>If you have received this from me, Gary Chapman
>(gary.chapman@mail.utexas.edu), you are subscribed to the listserv that
>sends out copies of my column in The Los Angeles Times and other published
>articles.
>
>If you wish to UNSUBSCRIBE from this listserv, send mail to
>listproc@mcfeeley.cc.utexas.edu, leave the subject line blank, and put
>"Unsubscribe Chapman" in the first line of the message.
>
>If you received this message from a source other than me and would like to
>subscribe to the listserv, the instructions for subscribing are at the end
>of the message.
>
> ------------------------------------------
>
>Monday, December 7, 1998
>
>DIGITAL NATION
>
>Duel Heats Up Over Culture of the Internet
>
>By Gary Chapman
>
>Copyright 1998, The Los Angeles Times, All Rights Reserved
>
>The proposed merger of America Online Inc. and Netscape Communications
>Corp. seems to have pleased Wall Street, and boosted almost all Internet
>stocks, but it created a sour and anxious feeling among longtime Internet
>activists and programmers.
>
>They see this new goliath as yet another encroachment by "the suits," the
>corporate culture that has recently discovered the Internet, and as
>perhaps the cyberspace equivalent of suburban sprawl, the "malling of
>America." AOL's flirtation with the metaphors of commercial TV, with its
>"channels" and ubiquitous advertising, raises the specter of the Internet
>turning into a commercial wasteland like TV, subverting the promise of
>cyberspace as a different kind of medium.
>
>New-media pundit Jon Katz wrote that the AOL-Netscape merger is a
>"catastrophe" for Net culture.
>
>The hacker and activist community on the Internet is deeply suspicious of
>any company that seems to harbor ambitions of being emperor of cyberspace,
>whether it's AOL-Netscape or Microsoft. These programmers, activists and
>idealists think the Internet is working just fine already, the way they
>created it.
>
>What seems to be shaping up is a fascinating duel between two models of
>Net culture, both of them gaining strength in the last year: the
>commercial culture of big corporations and the "gift economy" developing
>among thousands of computer programmers who are contributing to "open
>source" software such as the operating system Linux. These two models will
>coexist for a while, but how they interact with each other is likely to be
>the most interesting story in the technology field for some years to come.
>
>Linux has been the rage in all the technology press lately, in part
>because of its radically different development from the corporate model
>represented by Microsoft and its Windows operating system. A familiar
>story by now, Linux was first developed by Linus Torvalds in 1991, when
>the Finnish computer science student wanted a version of the Unix
>operating system to run on his 386 PC.
>
>Torvalds used software tools produced by the Free Software Foundation, an
>organization founded by Richard Stallman in Cambridge, Mass. Stallman's
>personal philosophy -- which earned him a MacArthur Foundation "genius
>grant" -- is that software should be free and widely shared in a community
>committed to improving its capabilities, not unlike the way we regard
>scientific knowledge. This does not mean that software should cost
>nothing. It means that software source code, the text of a program that is
>interpreted by computers as instructions, should be freely available for
>modification and improvement by others, for the benefit of all.
>
>Torvalds put Linux into this model of software development and relied on
>the distributed intelligence of thousands of volunteers around the world
>to improve the operating system. He also made it free in the conventional
>sense of that word: It's available for download, without cost, through
>many sites on the Internet.
>
>The result is that Linux is now widely used -- estimates of its user
>population vary from 6 million up to 20 million people, depending on whom
>you ask -- and widely admired for its stability, scalability (its ability
>to handle large tasks) and speed. It's highly customizable because its
>source code is accessible to programmers, unlike that of Windows. Linux
>doesn't crash, or only rarely, also unlike Windows. And Linux is so fast
>and efficient that it can resurrect otherwise obsolete -- and therefore
>cheap -- computers and turn them into effective Internet servers or
>desktop machines. And because it's free, it greatly reduces the expense of
>implementing cutting-edge computing.
>
>The Mexican government, for example, last month announced that it will
>install Linux in 140,000 computer labs in Mexican elementary and secondary
>schools. Government officials estimated that Windows licenses for all
>these labs would cost them close to $125 million. Linux is not only free,
>it doesn't require replacing older computers, and it's possibly the
>operating system of the future -- Mexico could lead the world in producing
>Linux system administrators. This may be the smartest thing the Mexican
>government has ever done.
>
>Aside from its technical benefits, however, the most interesting thing
>about Linux and other open source software -- which includes the scripting
>language Perl and many applications -- may be the corresponding phenomenon
>of the open source model of development as a true social movement. And the
>resurrection of the idea of a "gift economy," a term with a long history
>in anthropology, to apply to a high-tech subculture is intriguing and
>portentous.
>
>The phrase was coined by French anthropologist Marcel Mauss in his 1924
>book "The Gift" (translated into English in 1935), a study of the potlatch
>ceremonies of Northwest American Indians. It has been, since then, a
>paradigm of anthropological study but almost exclusively of "primitive"
>societies such as South Sea islanders, North American Indians and African
>tribes. It refers to the practice among these groups of circulating gifts
>-- such as blankets, shells or herd animals -- as a mode of prestige and
>exchange.
>
>Anthropologist Bronislaw Malinowski, in his 1922 book, "Argonauts of the
>Western Pacific," wrote about the gift circulation of shell armbands among
>the Kula on islands near New Guinea. He wrote that one of these armbands
>enabled a Kula man "to draw a great deal of renown, to exhibit the
>article, to tell how he obtained it, and to plan to whom he is going to
>give it. And all this forms one of the favorite subjects of tribal
>conversation and gossip."
>
>This description is pretty much identical to what happens among the
>thousands of programmer volunteers working on open source software code,
>who clearly view themselves as part of a community. Their conversation and
>gossip can be found on Usenet sites, where people get free technical
>support advice, and on Web sites like Slashdot (http://www.slashdot.org),
>which ills itself as "News for Nerds. Stuff That Matters." The volume of
>traffic on Slashdot is astounding, with hundreds of new messages every
>day. And the overall gestalt of Slashdot and other open source sites is
>evangelical, pushing the concept of open source software as the superior
>method of software development.
>
>Eric Raymond, who wrote the influential open source manifesto "The
>Cathedral and the Bazaar,"
>(http://www.tuxedo.org/~esr/writings/cathedral-bazaar/) and who is the
>president of a new organization called the Open Source Initiative
>(http://www.opensource.org/), says, "In a real gift culture, the wealth is
>inside the person's head, not in economic value.
>
>"One of the things that ticks me off," says Raymond, "is when the
>corporate types approach the Internet as a tabula rasa, as unexplored
>wilderness that can be transformed by corporate beneficence. They don't
>understand that the Internet already has its own folklore, its own heroes,
>its own values. If you come to the Internet like some British imperialist
>thinking that your mission is to civilize the natives, they're not likely
>to take it very well." Indeed, antipathy to Microsoft and the other
>"suits" of the "new economy" is part of the glue that holds the open
>source community together.
>
>"This is my politics, as well as my technology," Raymond adds. "When
>someone says 'social movement,' I typically reach for my gun -- it usually
>means coercion. But the open source movement is about voluntarism,
>cooperation, gift-giving, building community. It's about working for the
>benefit of everyone without anyone holding a gun to your head."
>
>It will be strange and fascinating if the real long-term threat to
>Microsoft is less another corporate competitor or the Justice Department
>and more a high-tech version of an ancient human ritual of exchange, the
>gift economy. Bill Gates must be watching this in utter stupefaction.
>
>Gary Chapman is director of The 21st Century Project at the University of
>Texas at Austin. His e-mail address Is gary.chapman@mail.utexas.edu.
>
> ------------------------------------------
>
>To subscribe to a listserv that forwards copies of Gary Chapman's
>published articles, including his column "Digital Nation" in The Los
>Angeles Times, send mail to:
>
> listproc@mcfeeley.cc.utexas.edu
>
>Leave the subject line blank. In the first line of the message, put:
>
> Subscribe Chapman [First name] [Last name]
>
>Leave out the brackets, just put your name after Chapman.
>
>Send this message.
>
>You'll get a confirmation message back confirming your subscription. This
>message will contain some boilerplate text, generated by the listserv
>software, about passwords, which you should IGNORE. Passwords will not be
>used or required for this listserv.
>
>Mail volume on this listserv is low; expect to get something two or three
>times a month. The list will be used only for forwarding published
>versions of Gary Chapman's articles, or else pointers to URLs for online
>versions of his articles -- nothing else will be sent to the list.
>
>To unsubscribe from the listserv, follow the same instructions above,
>except substitute the word "Unsubscribe" for "Subscribe."
>
>Please feel free to pass along copies of the forwarded articles, but
>please retain the relevant copyright information. Also feel free to pass
>along these instructions for subscribing to the listserv, to anyone who
>might be interested in such material.
>
>Questions should be directed to Gary Chapman at gary.chapman@mail.utexas.edu.
>

_______________________________________________________
mailto:tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Ningaui Pty Ltd
mailto:me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au | GPO Box 1680
http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry | Canberra ACT 2601
Phone +61 2 6241 7659 | AUSTRALIA



From tomw@acslink.net.au Tue Dec 8 22:04:44 1998
From: tomw@acslink.net.au (Tom Worthington)
Date: Wed, 09 Dec 1998 08:04:44 +1100
Subject: ACS to Launch E-Commerce Driving Licence
Message-ID: <2.2.32.19981208210444.00705f30@mail.mpx.com.au>

I wrote Sat, 05 Dec 1998 19:02:16 +1100:

> ACS to Launch E-Commerce Driving Licence to Test User Competence
> Successful European Scheme to be Adapted for Australia ...
>* Full media release: http://www.acs.org.au/news/ecdl.htm

Thanks to Linkers for your constructive (and forceful) comments on the
announcement. In response to those comments I will be suggesting some
changes to improve the proposal and reduce confusion over terminology.

Also The Australian has a report which may be of interest: "Licensing
double-up" by JENNIFER FORESHEW, 8 December 1998:
http://www.newsit.com.au/techno/4299013.htm

"TWO IT groups have released almost identical plans – just days apart and
without the other's knowledge – for a new industry qualification."

"The Australian Computer Society unveiled plans for the E-Commerce Driving
Licence (ECDL) almost simultaneously with Franklin Collins and Labtram,
which has flagged an Australian Computer Driving Licence (ACDL)..."


Tom Worthington http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw PO Box 13
Immediate Past President Belconnen ACT 2617
Australian Computer Society tomw@acslink.net.au
----------------------------------------------------------------------
E-Commerce: http://www.acs.org.au/president/1998/past/io98/ecomau.htm


From Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au Tue Dec 8 22:13:36 1998
From: Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au (Roger Clarke)
Date: Wed, 9 Dec 1998 08:13:36 +1100
Subject: Telstra Complaint: 'Unblock Your Line Today'
Message-ID: <v0313035cb29346977d79@[203.37.38.148]>


This is only *adjacent* to link concerns, so please send any comments to me
directly rather than to the list. Thanks!


>Date: Wed, 9 Dec 1998 08:11:47 +1100
>To: tio@tio.com.au (Complaints Manager)
>From: Roger Clarke <Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au>
>Subject: Complaint: 'Unblock Your Line Today'
>
>The Telecommunications Ombudsman
>PO Box 276
>Collins Street West
>Melbourne Victoria 8007
>
>Dear Sir / Madam
>
>Re: Complaint re Unsolicited Telstra Mailing: 'Unblock Your Line Today'
>
>I write to complain in the strongest possible terms concerning an
>advertising campaign being conducted by Telstra.
>
>We received today a plastic-wrapped multi-fold card addressed to the
>telephone subscriber in the household.
>
>The front bears the name and address of the subscriber and Telstra's logo
>and address. The back is designed to expose the words "Just a reminder
>that your home telephone line is currently BLOCKED".
>
>The inside of the card includes a request to:
>ˆ YES. Please unblock my home phone line without delay.
>
>My complaints are as follows:
>
>1. This mailing was unsolicited, and there is nothing in the usage profile
> of the service that suggests that we might want it (in particular, the
> per-call unblocking facility is used little or not at all);
>
>2. This mailing is designed in such a manner that many recipients would be
> likely to mistakenly assume that their *line* or their *service* is
> blocked, rather than that the unwanted *calling-number display* service
> is blocked. This is at the very least seriously misleading
> communications;
>
>3. The design is such that it is almost impossible to believe other than
> that this ambiguity was intentional. Telstra is seeking to reduce the
> number and percentage of subscribers who block their number from being
> displayed to the recipient of their phone-calls, and is doing so in a
> manner that is not merely unfair and unreasonable, but is downright
> deceitful;
>
>4. The information that is provided on the facing page about Calling
> Number Display is misleading, and misleading in a manner calculated to
> deceive subscribers. The words used are "Let family and friends return
> your calls when they can't get to the phone"; and "the people you know
> and trust, like your family and friends, are unable to use a new
> service ...". This is deceptive conduct, because it wilfully omits the
> fact that the primary users of calling-number identification are not
> people, but businesses. Contrived language is used in the subsequent
> text, which advises how to use the (inconvenient) per-call rather than
> per-line blocking option.
>
> To remove its deceit, Telstra would have to either change the
> expression to something generic (e.g. "your callers"), or must contrive
> some other manner in which they can communicate fairly the actual
> import of the act of unblocking their line;
>
>5. The card fails to communicate to the reader that an additional option
> is available: per-call unblocking of a blocked line. This provides
> further evidence of Telstra's continued completely unbalanced handling
> of this matter, which is designed to maximise convenience to its
> corporate customers and hence its revenue and share-value, irrespective
> of the degree of inconvenience to its consumer customers.
>
>I have submitted this Complaint by email rather than using your web-page
>at http://www.tio.com.au/content_complaint.html , because the use of that
>page precludes the complainant from keeping a copy of their complaint.
>
>Yours sincerely
>
>
>
>
>
>R.A. Clarke & L.E. Spinaze
>Subscription (02) 6288 6916



Roger Clarke http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/
http://www.etc.com.au/Xamax/
Xamax Consultancy Pty Ltd, 78 Sidaway St, Chapman ACT 2611 AUSTRALIA
Tel: +61 2 6288 1472, and 6288 6916 mailto:Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au

Visiting Fellow, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology
The Australian National University Canberra ACT 0200 AUSTRALIA
Information Sciences Building Room 211 Tel: +61 2 6249 3666



From Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au Tue Dec 8 23:10:25 1998
From: Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au (Roger Clarke)
Date: Wed, 9 Dec 1998 09:10:25 +1100
Subject: Build crypto archives worldwide to foil US-built Berlin Walls
Message-ID: <v03130361b29353cf9ae8@[203.37.38.148]>

Date: Tue, 08 Dec 1998 09:09:04 -0500
To: cypherpunks@EINSTEIN.ssz.com
From: John Young <jya@pipeline.com>
Subject: Re: Building crypto archives worldwide to foil US-built Berlin
Walls (fwd)

In response to John Gilmore's call for a foil to US-Wassenaar
restrictions acoming, we've put up a preliminary list of international
cryptography sources for mirroring:

http://jya.com/crypto-free.htm

This is a quick starter-kit and is far from comprehensive.
Contributions welcome.

Ken Williams offers an impressive (177MB) crypto/stego archive:

http://www.genocide2600.com/~tattooman/cryptography/


Roger Clarke http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/
http://www.etc.com.au/Xamax/
Xamax Consultancy Pty Ltd, 78 Sidaway St, Chapman ACT 2611 AUSTRALIA
Tel: +61 2 6288 1472, and 6288 6916 mailto:Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au

Visiting Fellow, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology
The Australian National University Canberra ACT 0200 AUSTRALIA
Information Sciences Building Room 211 Tel: +61 2 6249 3666



From arankine@lucent.com Tue Dec 8 23:12:07 1998
From: arankine@lucent.com (Rankine, Alastair)
Date: Wed, 9 Dec 1998 09:12:07 +1100
Subject: R&D Expenditure by Microsoft
Message-ID: <D133051DBC4AD111B90800A0C96949837ABCBC@natasha.auslabs.lucent.com>

> While reading the Australian I came across the figure of
> $A4.75 Billion pa
> for Microsoft's R&D expenditure. I looked up Australian
> Business sector
> expenditure
> <http://www.statistics.gov.au/websitedbs/D3110124.NSF/0ab41884
> 84b99ec04a2564
> 8b0014a817/947192160d3ca632ca2565b700794aaf?OpenDocument> and found it was
> $A4.24 Billion.

Hmm, that's interesting.

Microsoft's 1998 Annual Report at
<http://www.microsoft.com/msft/ar98/income.htm> lists R&D expenditure at
US$2.502 billion.

Which is closer to AU$4 billion is it not?

--
Alastair Rankine Senior Software Engineer
mailto:arankine@lucent.com Lucent Technologies
phone: +61-2-98868926 Bell Labs Australia

From r.polanskis@nepean.uws.edu.au Wed Dec 9 00:10:48 1998
From: r.polanskis@nepean.uws.edu.au (Rachel Polanskis)
Date: Wed, 9 Dec 1998 10:10:48 +1100 (EST)
Subject: [AUUG-ANNOUNCE]: The death of John Lions -- AUUG founder and life member (fwd)
Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.3.96.981209100831.24514C-100000@photon.nepean.uws.edu.au>

Hi linkers,
I was forwarded this today.

What can I say?


rachel

---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Wed, 9 Dec 1998 09:40:13 +1100 (EST)
From: Lucy Chubb <lucyc@softway.com.au>
Reply-To: auug@auug.org.au
To: auug-announce@auug.org.au
Subject: [AUUG-ANNOUNCE]: The death of John Lions -- AUUG founder and life
member

=====
Sent by Lucy Chubb <lucyc@softway.com.au> to <auug-announce@auug.org.au>.
To unsubscribe from this list, send a message to <majordomo@auug.org.au>
with the line "unsubscribe auug-announce" in the message body.
It is a sad day for AUUG, as I have to announce the death of John Lions,
AUUG founder and life member. John died on Saturday morning December 5th
after a long illness.

Ken Thompson and Dennis Ritchie published a paper "The Unix Time-Sharing
System" in May 1974 in the Communications of the ACM. After fellow lecturer
Ken Robinson wrote away to get the new operating system, John Lions, a
lecturer at the University of New South Wales, decided to base his
Operating Systems course around reading the source code and wrote a
commentary to accompany it. Legal distribution of the commentary was
restricted to UNIX licence holders, however that didn't prevent it from
being widely photocopied and becoming a legend in the UNIX world.
Finally, in 1996, the Lions source code and commentary were able to be
published and sold freely as one book. The book has been translated into
several languages including Japanese.

Directly or indirectly John's early work with the UNIX operating system,
his contribution in founding AUUG, and his enthusiasm in introducing it
to students through his book and through his operating systems course has
had a great influence on the direction of UNIX in Australia and possibly
the world.

Lucy Chubb
AUUG President


From tonyb@netinfo.com.au Wed Dec 9 01:06:55 1998
From: tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Wed, 9 Dec 1998 11:06:55 +1100
Subject: R&D Expenditure by Microsoft
Message-ID: <v02110124b29364042f85@[203.37.43.24]>

At 9:12 AM 9/12/98, Rankine, Alastair wrote:
>Which is closer to AU$4 billion is it not?

Heis quoting $US3b to the Antitrust case. The rationale being that even
though they may be big they are not stifling innovation as they do a lot of
R&D

Tony


. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From tonyb@netinfo.com.au Wed Dec 9 01:44:58 1998
From: tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Wed, 9 Dec 1998 11:44:58 +1100
Subject: [AUUG-ANNOUNCE]: The death of John Lions -- AUUG founder and life member (fwd)
Message-ID: <v02110128b29373faef81@[203.37.43.24]>

At 10:10 AM 9/12/98, Rachel Polanskis wrote:
>I was forwarded this today.
>
>What can I say?

John Lions and I were both residents at Wesley College, Sydney University
1958-1961. Known to all as "Harry John" for reasons I never knew, he was by
far the best mathematician in College and I was a bit in awe of his skills.
We were both studying Maths and Phsics so we spent most of our time either
in Wesley or in the School of Physics next door which also housed the Maths
Department and the Basser Computing Department.

He was also a great practical joker and thence often the butt of the jokes
of others and so held in affection by all. His physical sporting prowess
were often described affectionately as "spastic", but he was the best shot
in the Wesley shooting team if I remember correctly. He played a prominent
part in the social life of the College and held a number of positions on
the Committee of the College Student Club.

He was effervenscent, with a rapid fire wit so I was greatly saddened when
I last saw him at the 1995 AUUG conference. His illness had taken away the
sparkle and dulled a mind that gave so much.

Tony

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From tonyb@netinfo.com.au Wed Dec 9 01:49:51 1998
From: tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Wed, 9 Dec 1998 11:49:51 +1100
Subject: SUN MICROSYSTEMS MOVES TOWARD "OPEN SOURCE" MODEL
Message-ID: <v02110129b29379863d3f@[203.37.43.24]>

>From Edupage, 8 December 1998

SUN MICROSYSTEMS MOVES TOWARD "OPEN SOURCE" MODEL
Sun Microsystems is poised to ship its new Java Development Kit 1.2 -- the
company's first major upgrade since February 1997. The release fulfills
Sun's promise to give Java developers and licensees more input to the Java
software development process, and the company plans to streamline that
process. This latest release will make it easier for software developers to
write Java applications for large computer servers -- one of the most
popular uses of the software is to integrate Web site applications with
database software. "This is just booming," says Jon Kannegaard, VP of Sun's
Java platform division. "We underestimated the demand." (Investor's
Business Daily 8 Dec 98)

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From tonyb@netinfo.com.au Wed Dec 9 01:49:56 1998
From: tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Wed, 9 Dec 1998 11:49:56 +1100
Subject: IT MANAGERS STRIKE BACK
Message-ID: <v0211012ab293799b4244@[203.37.43.24]>

>From Edupage, 8 December 1998

IT MANAGERS STRIKE BACK
An increasing number of large companies are mad as you-know-what and aren't
taking it any more -- they're arming their systems with software capable of
launching counterattacks on crackers that invade their computer networks. A
study titled "Corporate America's Competitive Edge" indicates that 30% of
the 320 Fortune 500 companies interviewed say they now have such software
installed. The tactic, known as "strikeback," runs the gamut from passive
collection of information on hackers to deter further intrusion, to a "Ping
of Death" that shuts the intruding system down. Security experts warn that
strikeback systems, taken too far, could pose serious legal and technical
problems. For example, the strikeback user must be sure the attack is
targeted at the correct system, or face the litigious consequences. In a
recent case involving the Defense Department, "the DOD was lucky it knew who
was attacking and could get the right people," says the director of
penetration services at Secure Computing. "In many cases, you can't be
completely sure of who's attacking." Some reports have indicated that 80%
of intrusions occur inside an organization, and 65% to 70% of those are
mistakes. (InternetWeek 7 Dec 98)

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From tswarner@dynamite.com.au Wed Dec 9 11:39:43 1998
From: tswarner@dynamite.com.au (Terry Swarner)
Date: Wed, 09 Dec 1998 21:39:43 +1100
Subject: Background Briefing - Academic Freedom
References: <v0211010fb29138068ae6@[203.37.43.24]>
Message-ID: <366E536F.E4BD0960@dynamite.com.au>


---------------------- multipart/alternative attachment
<worry> <smile> Heard on the radio the other day that John Howard
was not really worried about the millienum bug because anything
that takes the country back to 1900 can't be all bad. </smile>

Cheers -- Terry

---------------------- multipart/alternative attachment
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: http://mailman.anu.edu.au/pipermail/link/attachments/ea78a3d3/attachment.htm

---------------------- multipart/alternative attachment--


From tomw@acslink.net.au Wed Dec 9 22:16:22 1998
From: tomw@acslink.net.au (Tom Worthington)
Date: Thu, 10 Dec 1998 08:16:22 +1100
Subject: IRC: Networked the Nation?, Canberra, 5:30pm Friday, 11 Dec
Message-ID: <2.2.32.19981209211622.006a2060@mail.mpx.com.au>

Internet Reality Check
5:30pm Friday, 11 December 1998
Bar, National Press Club, Canberra
Topic: Networked the Nation?
http://www.peg.apc.org/~tomw/irc/irc26.html

Special Guests: ROGER CLARKE, Xamax Consultancy Pty Ltd & Visiting
Fellow, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, ANU
TOM WORTHINGTON, Former Advisor Internet Policy, Department of Defence
& Immediate Past President, Australian Computer Society

How far along the path to the "networked nation" is Australia? How did we
get where we are? What next?

In 1994 Roger Clarke and Tom Worthington prepared "Vision for a Networked
Nation - The Public Interest in Network Services" for the Australian
Computer Society. This was to establish policy on public interest in
'national information infrastructure' in Australia.

Roger Clarke is currently preparing a History of the Internet in Australia.
Tom Worthington has this week stood down as the Internet Policy Advisor at
the Department of Defence, to undertake a six month assignment with the
Defence CIP Y2K Project Management Office.

Join Roger and Tom in looking back over recent Internet developments at the
last IRC of the year.

IRCs are free (but you have to buy your own drinks and one for
the special guest) and open to anyone interested: just turn up.
Internet Reality Check (not to be confused with Internet Relay
Chat) is designed so that members of the 'net community can meet
and exchange the small amount of very important information which
is not suitable for digital transmission. ;-)

See also:

* Event details: http://www.peg.apc.org/~tomw/irc/irc26.html
* History of the Internet in Australia:
http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/II/OzIHist.html
* Vision for a Networked Nation - The Public Interest in Network
Services: http://www.acs.org.au/president/1997/acsnet/acsnet.htm


Tom Worthington http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw PO Box 13
Immediate Past President Belconnen ACT 2617
Australian Computer Society tomw@acslink.net.au
----------------------------------------------------------------------
IRC, Friday, 11 Dec: http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw/irc/irc26.html


From tonyb@netinfo.com.au Thu Dec 10 00:07:23 1998
From: tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Thu, 10 Dec 1998 10:07:23 +1100
Subject: National bandwidth inquiry
Message-ID: <v02110100b293af6177b5@[203.37.43.24]>

>Date: Wed, 9 Dec 1998 15:02:55 +1100 (EST)
>From: owner-all@minister.dca.gov.au
>subject: New Ministerial media release
>Sender: owner-all@minister.dca.gov.au
>
>The following Ministerial media release is available at:
>
>http://www.dcita.gov.au/cgi-bin/trap.pl?path=3408
>
>National bandwidth inquiry
>The Minister for Communications, Information Technology and the Arts,
>Senator Richard Alston, today announced that he will ask the newly formed
>Australian Information Economy Advisory Council (AIEAC) to examine the
>issue of bandwidth availability and pricing within, and to and from,
>Australia.
>
>Terry O'Connor, Minister's office

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au Thu Dec 10 00:40:56 1998
From: Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au (Roger Clarke)
Date: Thu, 10 Dec 1998 10:40:56 +1100
Subject: National bandwidth inquiry
In-Reply-To: <v02110100b293af6177b5@[203.37.43.24]>
Message-ID: <v031303a5b294b715469a@[203.37.38.148]>


tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry) wrote:
>>The following Ministerial media release is available at:
>>http://www.dcita.gov.au/cgi-bin/trap.pl?path=3408
>>National bandwidth inquiry
>>The Minister for Communications, Information Technology and the Arts,
>>Senator Richard Alston, today announced that he will ask the newly formed
>>Australian Information Economy Advisory Council (AIEAC) to examine the
>>issue of bandwidth availability and pricing within, and to and from,
>>Australia.


The absurdity of the ACA's report on 64Kbps and the USO is underlined by a
couple of sentences in the Minister's Statement:

"the majority of customers in urban areas can achieve 'reasonable' data
rates over the customer access network-somewhere between 14.4 and 28.8 kbps
... rural customers ... often cannot achieve over 2.4 kbps"

[majority = >50%; 14.4-28.8 is already several years behind the rapidly
developing demand, and falling significantly further behind by the *week*;
and contemporary modems can't get *down* to 2.4Kbps!!]


"the costs of upgrading Telstra's network to provide a 64 kilobit per
second (kbps) digital data service would significantly exceed the benefits.
Also, the costs of upgrading the network to 28.8 or 14.4 kbps would exceed
the benefits, although to a lesser degree"

[these turkeys - economists presumably? - have yet to appreciate that
connection is the entry-ticket to the information society and economy, i.e.
it's a threshhold question, not a mere sliding scale. They also don't seem
to understand that costs in such a context are arbitrary allocations, are
relative, and are rapidly changing (and, in the case of cost-data supplied
by Telstra, anything but trustworthy)]


"[at 2.4Kbps, rural customers] must stay connected to the Internet for
longer periods of time to access the same information as their city
counterparts"

[which shows that the twerps who wrote the ACA report simply didn't
understand that a great deal of information is totally impractical to
access at that speed, because of the hours involved, and the high
likelihood of line-dropout in the interim. Hansards and Bills are made
available in PDF, you silly people!!]


It's a great relief to see that Alston's phrasing is less than fully
supportive of the ACA's silly report; in fact, it reads to me more like a
gentlemanly repudiation. If only the Government wasn't heavily committed
to selling more of Telstra, there's a good chance that ACA would have felt
a heavy boot up their tail-end.



Roger Clarke http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/
http://www.etc.com.au/Xamax/
Xamax Consultancy Pty Ltd, 78 Sidaway St, Chapman ACT 2611 AUSTRALIA
Tel: +61 2 6288 1472, and 6288 6916 mailto:Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au

Visiting Fellow, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology
The Australian National University Canberra ACT 0200 AUSTRALIA
Information Sciences Building Room 211 Tel: +61 2 6249 3666



From me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au Thu Dec 10 01:37:38 1998
From: me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Thu, 10 Dec 1998 11:37:38 +1100
Subject: SUN OPENS JAVA
Message-ID: <v02110108b294be000df0@[203.37.43.24]>

>From Net News 09 December 1998

SUN OPENS JAVA
Sun, in one of 11 separate announcements at http://www.sun.com said today it
will share Java's source code over the Internet, and stop collecting licence
fees from developers. Instead, developers need only buy a license when
they are ready to sell their Java applications. Sun also unveiled its newest,
faster version of the language, Java 2. The Java 2 platform is available for
immediate download at http://java.sun.com/products/jdk

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au Thu Dec 10 01:37:47 1998
From: me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Thu, 10 Dec 1998 11:37:47 +1100
Subject: WINS FOR LINUX
Message-ID: <v02110109b294be1412ac@[203.37.43.24]>

>From Net News 09 December 1998

WINS FOR LINUX
Two wins for Linux today from IBM. Big Blue says DB2 Universal
Developer�s Edition Version 5.2, and Net.Data Version 2, both for Linux
beta, are available for immediate download. DB2 is a robust and popular
relational database used widely by business. It�s at
http://www.software.ibm.com/data/db2/linux/news.html - and at the same
time, IBM Research has released its leading Java compiler, Jilkes, as
Open Source. This is the first Open Source license that IBM has crafted,
this being their original code. You can download the source now at
http://www.research.ibm.com/jikes/

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From brd@dynamite.com.au Thu Dec 10 01:37:25 1998
From: brd@dynamite.com.au (Bernard Robertson-Dunn)
Date: Thu, 10 Dec 1998 11:37:25 +1100
Subject: I want my HDTV - or not.
Message-ID: <366F17C5.FD302C10@dynamite.com.au>

Do you believe researchers when they make forecasts?

http://www.wired.com/news/news/email/explode-infobeat/
business/story/16708.html

HDTV -- not:

The future is not bright for digital high-definition television,
according to a new report from Forrester Research. The reason, in a
nutshell: price.

"Consumers will be dazzled by HDTV's picture and sound, but the sets
will remain economically out of reach for 90 percent of customers" for
the next 10 years, said Forrester analyst Josh Bernoff.

Standard definition digital television, on the other hand, will thrive.
While the picture quality cannot match that of HDTV, it is far superior
to today's analog standard, and not much more expensive. Forrester
expects the price of standard digital sets to fall below $1,000 by 2002,
while HDTV sets will hover around $2,000.

"While digital television offers a variety of ways for TV manufacturers,
broadcasters, and cable operators to make money, high-definition
television does not," the report concludes.

--
The difference between an American and a European is that a European
thinks that 100 miles is a long distance while an American thinks that
100 years is a long time.
-- anonymous

Regards
brd

Bernard Robertson-Dunn
Canberra Australia
brd@dynamite.com.au

From gmuldoon@scu.edu.au Thu Dec 10 03:02:42 1998
From: gmuldoon@scu.edu.au (Geoff Muldoon)
Date: Thu, 10 Dec 1998 13:02:42 +1100
Subject: National bandwidth inquiry
In-Reply-To: <v031303a5b294b715469a@[203.37.38.148]>
References: <v02110100b293af6177b5@[203.37.43.24]>
Message-ID: <3.0.1.32.19981210130242.00b8b5e0@mailhost.scu.edu.au>

Hi Roger et al,

I'm responding because of my personal experience with poor rural
connections. While I luxuriate at work with a direct ethernet connection,
my phone line at my rural home will only support 4.8 kbps. And I'm in a
digital mobile phone reception shadow, so no option there even.

At 10:40 10/12/1998 +1100, you (Roger Clarke) wrote:
>The absurdity of the ACA's report on 64Kbps and the USO is underlined by a
>couple of sentences in the Minister's Statement:
>
>"the majority of customers in urban areas can achieve 'reasonable' data
>rates over the customer access network-somewhere between 14.4 and 28.8 kbps
>... rural customers ... often cannot achieve over 2.4 kbps"
>
>[majority = >50%; 14.4-28.8 is already several years behind the rapidly
>developing demand, and falling significantly further behind by the *week*;
>and contemporary modems can't get *down* to 2.4Kbps!!]

While 28.8 may be slow for you, I think that you will find that the vast
majority of current users in regional (as opposed to remote or metro) still
connect at about that. I don't deny that this is a poor state of affairs,
but it is current reality.

And my Hayes Optima 33.6 can readily be wound back to 4.8 (and could be set
at 2.4 if needed).

>"the costs of upgrading Telstra's network to provide a 64 kilobit per
>second (kbps) digital data service would significantly exceed the benefits.
>Also, the costs of upgrading the network to 28.8 or 14.4 kbps would exceed
>the benefits, although to a lesser degree"
>
>[these turkeys - economists presumably? - have yet to appreciate that
>connection is the entry-ticket to the information society and economy, i.e.
>it's a threshhold question, not a mere sliding scale. They also don't seem
>to understand that costs in such a context are arbitrary allocations, are
>relative, and are rapidly changing (and, in the case of cost-data supplied
>by Telstra, anything but trustworthy)]

While I am loathe ever to defend Telstra, some of these costs would indeed
be quite high. My problem isn't at the exchange level (it can handle 56k),
it's the 6.5 kilometres of line (which has probably had a backhoe or
tractor chop through it a dozen times resulting in numerous patches and
joins) between the house and the exchange. The cost to recondition that
line for a single user would easily exceed any societal benefit.

>"[at 2.4Kbps, rural customers] must stay connected to the Internet for
>longer periods of time to access the same information as their city
>counterparts"
>
>[which shows that the twerps who wrote the ACA report simply didn't
>understand that a great deal of information is totally impractical to
>access at that speed, because of the hours involved, and the high
>likelihood of line-dropout in the interim. Hansards and Bills are made
>available in PDF, you silly people!!]

While I find connecting at home at such low speeds to be a chore in
comparison to work, I still can get valuable information from the 'net at
home over these low speeds. I regularly get 3 hours with no line drop-out.
PDF is a major pain, though, on file size as well as my dislike for
proprietory systems.

Cheers,

Geoff


Geoff Muldoon
Client Services Administrator
Information Technology Directorate
Southern Cross University
Lismore NSW Australia

Email: gmuldoon@scu.edu.au
Telephone: +61 2 6620 3097
Facsimile: +61 2 6620 3033

From tjordan@vic.bigpond.net.au Thu Dec 10 03:14:27 1998
From: tjordan@vic.bigpond.net.au (Trevor Jordan)
Date: Thu, 10 Dec 1998 13:14:27 +1100 (EDT)
Subject: I want my HDTV - or not.
In-Reply-To: <366F17C5.FD302C10@dynamite.com.au>
Message-ID: <v03130308b29575ddbc8a@[24.192.14.82]>

In a word, NO.

Around 1983, Electronics Today magazine stated that the price of CD players
was never likely to drop below $1000 because of the inherent complexity of
the technology, etc. This was in an era where CD players were about $1600
and they were suggesting that there was no point in waiting for price
drops. Within three years, prices were below $500, and now they are down
to $100.

What Electronics Today did not predict was that they would close within 10
years.

The comment about standard definition digital sets being far superior to
today's analog standard, may be a comparison with the North American NTSC
standard. Just about everything is superior to that. The advantages over
PAL in this country may not be as great.

Digital television will either result in market for HDTV or for multiview
(the only successful predictions cover all possible outcomes). Either
would be a benefit, but we just do not know whether it justifies the cost.
As Ross Kelso pointed out a few days ago, we cannot trust the industry to
tell us: they are spending mostly our money.

Trevor Jordan

At 12:37 AM -0000 10/12/98, Bernard Robertson-Dunn wrote:
>Do you believe researchers when they make forecasts?
>
>http://www.wired.com/news/news/email/explode-infobeat/
>business/story/16708.html
>
>HDTV -- not:
>
>The future is not bright for digital high-definition television,
>according to a new report from Forrester Research. The reason, in a
>nutshell: price.
>
>"Consumers will be dazzled by HDTV's picture and sound, but the sets
>will remain economically out of reach for 90 percent of customers" for
>the next 10 years, said Forrester analyst Josh Bernoff.
>
>Standard definition digital television, on the other hand, will thrive.
>While the picture quality cannot match that of HDTV, it is far superior
>to today's analog standard, and not much more expensive. Forrester
>expects the price of standard digital sets to fall below $1,000 by 2002,
>while HDTV sets will hover around $2,000.
>
>"While digital television offers a variety of ways for TV manufacturers,
>broadcasters, and cable operators to make money, high-definition
>television does not," the report concludes.
>
>--
>The difference between an American and a European is that a European
>thinks that 100 miles is a long distance while an American thinks that
>100 years is a long time.
>-- anonymous
>
>Regards
>brd
>
>Bernard Robertson-Dunn
>Canberra Australia
>brd@dynamite.com.au




From richard@auscoms.com.au Thu Dec 10 05:13:41 1998
From: richard@auscoms.com.au (richard@auscoms.com.au)
Date: Thu, 10 Dec 98 14:13:41 +1000
Subject: National bandwidth inquiry
Message-ID: <9812109132.AA913259644@mail.auscoms.com.au>


Well -- at last the government is backing away from the ACA report, which they
so heartily endorsed when it was released, during the election campaign.

However, it still points up the gap between building PoPs and providing access.
I keep hearing supposedly intelligent people endorsing the funding of PoPs which
will provide third-rate access speeds. And from the earlier Networking the
Nation release
(http://www.dcita.gov.au/cgi-bin/trap.pl?path=3408)
we saw a significant chunk of the money which Alston said would "switch on
regional Australia" going to some fairly fluffy projects -- teaching the punters
how to use PCs to connect to an Internet that doesn't reach their region, for
example.

Also,
>'It will focus on the "backbone" telecommunications data networks >and links
within Australia, and between Australia and other >countries.'

That doesn't sound like a 64k bps customer access network for rural Australia to
me...frankly, it sounds like Telstra lobbyists are campaigning hard for taxpayer
funding for some more submarine fibre. Or perhaps getting some cash to run up
some brand-new wavelength division muxes.

And before anybody extols the virtues of satellite access re (for example) the
Farmwide trial: there ain't no IP/satellite standards yet. Using satellite
services means buying vendor implementations which may or may not be compatible
with a standard, if and when it arrives.

Richard Chirgwin
____________________Reply Separator____________________
Subject: Re: National bandwidth inquiry
Author: Roger Clarke <Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au>
Date: 10/12/98 10:40


tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry) wrote:
>>The following Ministerial media release is available at:
>>http://www.dcita.gov.au/cgi-bin/trap.pl?path=3408
>>National bandwidth inquiry
>>The Minister for Communications, Information Technology and the Arts,
>>Senator Richard Alston, today announced that he will ask the newly formed
>>Australian Information Economy Advisory Council (AIEAC) to examine the
>>issue of bandwidth availability and pricing within, and to and from,
>>Australia.


The absurdity of the ACA's report on 64Kbps and the USO is underlined by a
couple of sentences in the Minister's Statement:

"the majority of customers in urban areas can achieve 'reasonable' data
rates over the customer access network-somewhere between 14.4 and 28.8 kbps
... rural customers ... often cannot achieve over 2.4 kbps"

[majority = >50%; 14.4-28.8 is already several years behind the rapidly
developing demand, and falling significantly further behind by the *week*;
and contemporary modems can't get *down* to 2.4Kbps!!]


"the costs of upgrading Telstra's network to provide a 64 kilobit per
second (kbps) digital data service would significantly exceed the benefits.
Also, the costs of upgrading the network to 28.8 or 14.4 kbps would exceed
the benefits, although to a lesser degree"

[these turkeys - economists presumably? - have yet to appreciate that
connection is the entry-ticket to the information society and economy, i.e.
it's a threshhold question, not a mere sliding scale. They also don't seem
to understand that costs in such a context are arbitrary allocations, are
relative, and are rapidly changing (and, in the case of cost-data supplied
by Telstra, anything but trustworthy)]


"[at 2.4Kbps, rural customers] must stay connected to the Internet for
longer periods of time to access the same information as their city
counterparts"

[which shows that the twerps who wrote the ACA report simply didn't
understand that a great deal of information is totally impractical to
access at that speed, because of the hours involved, and the high
likelihood of line-dropout in the interim. Hansards and Bills are made
available in PDF, you silly people!!]


It's a great relief to see that Alston's phrasing is less than fully
supportive of the ACA's silly report; in fact, it reads to me more like a
gentlemanly repudiation. If only the Government wasn't heavily committed
to selling more of Telstra, there's a good chance that ACA would have felt
a heavy boot up their tail-end.



Roger Clarke http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/
http://www.etc.com.au/Xamax/
Xamax Consultancy Pty Ltd, 78 Sidaway St, Chapman ACT 2611 AUSTRALIA
Tel: +61 2 6288 1472, and 6288 6916 mailto:Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au

Visiting Fellow, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology
The Australian National University Canberra ACT 0200 AUSTRALIA
Information Sciences Building Room 211 Tel: +61 2 6249 3666






From Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au Thu Dec 10 04:35:56 1998
From: Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au (Roger Clarke)
Date: Thu, 10 Dec 1998 14:35:56 +1100
Subject: National bandwidth inquiry
In-Reply-To: <9812109132.AA913259644@mail.auscoms.com.au>
Message-ID: <v0313030cb294f1052289@[203.37.10.225]>


richard@auscoms.com.au said:
...
>we saw a significant chunk of the money which Alston said would "switch on
>regional Australia" going to some fairly fluffy projects -- teaching the
>punters
>how to use PCs to connect to an Internet that doesn't reach their region, for
>example.

I'm pretty comfortable that RTIF money is applied to multiple aspects of
the problem.

If just *one* of the complex of impediments got lots of both money and
ingenuity flung at it, and got fixed, the something else would be likely to
cause the venture as a whole to fail or stutter along.

Hence, as long as the individual projects are well-conceived, and the
bucket of money isn't divided into lots that are too small to do anything
useful with, I agree with their streaming strategy.


>And before anybody extols the virtues of satellite access re (for example) the
>Farmwide trial: there ain't no IP/satellite standards yet. Using satellite
>services means buying vendor implementations which may or may not be
>compatible
>with a standard, if and when it arrives.

Ah, the penny drops - I'd never thought to ask *that* question!


Roger Clarke http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/
http://www.etc.com.au/Xamax/
Xamax Consultancy Pty Ltd, 78 Sidaway St, Chapman ACT 2611 AUSTRALIA
Tel: +61 2 6288 1472, and 6288 6916 mailto:Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au

Visiting Fellow, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology
The Australian National University Canberra ACT 0200 AUSTRALIA
Information Sciences Building Room 211 Tel: +61 2 6249 3666



From kgeisel@actonline.com.au Wed Dec 9 17:43:04 1998
From: kgeisel@actonline.com.au (Karin Geiselhart)
Date: Thu, 10 Dec 1998 03:43:04 +1100
Subject: High-tech industry fights cancer studies (fwd)
Message-ID: <3.0.5.32.19981210034304.007bf9d0@pop1.actonline.com.au>

Forwarding this because of interest for the IT industry, but also the 'fair
use' clause at the end seems to offer a solution to the issue of sharing
copyright info in a forum such as Link:

>An article, "Cancer Cases Cast Pall Over High-Tech Jobs" by Ricardo
>Alonso-Zaldivar appeared in Saturday's, Dec. 5, 1998 LA Times. An excerpted
>version of the article appeared in Sunday's San Jose Mercury News.(see below)
>The LA Times article has a little more detail, and includes a little more
>information about Linda Foutche and Lee Leth.
>...
> The LA Times article tells of Foutche becoming sterile in her 30's, having
>breathing problems and Labor Dept. data showing that people who make
>computer chips and disk drives have higher rates of "respiratory conditions
>caused by toxic agents." Because of her breathing problems, in 1990 she
>retired on disability.
>http://www.mercurycenter.com/premium/local/docs/cancer06p.htm
>Published Sunday, December 6, 1998, in the San Jose Mercury News
>High-tech industry fights study on cancers
>BY RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR
>Los Angeles Times
>...
> How Leth, Foutche and others contracted cancer hangs like a cloud over
>the chemical-intensive industries of Silicon Valley. And, because of high
>tech's reach, the prospect that workers risk cancer has global health
>implications.
>...
> A cluster of cancers has been reported among semiconductor workers in
>Scotland. Concerns also have been raised in Asia, where manufacturing
>technology is often older, government regulation looser. Most occupational
>cancers result from long-term, low-level exposure and can take decades to
>appear.
>________________________________________________________________________--
>
>
>FAIR USE NOTICE. This document contains copyrighted material whose use has
>not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Silicon Valley
>Toxics Coalition is making these articles available in our efforts to
>advance understanding of ecologically sustainable development,
>environmental, community and worker health, economic democracy, corporate
>accountability, and social justice issues. We believe that this constitutes
>a `fair use' of the copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of
>the US Copyright Law. If you wish to use this copyrighted material for
>purposes of your own that go beyond `fair use', you must obtain permission
>from the copyright owner.
>
kg


PhD student
Faculty of Communication
University of Canberra
http://student.canberra.edu.au/~u833885/home.htm

From ramin@consult.com.au Thu Dec 10 06:22:51 1998
From: ramin@consult.com.au (ramin)
Date: Thu, 10 Dec 1998 16:22:51 +1100
Subject: National bandwidth inquiry
References: <9812109132.AA913259644@mail.auscoms.com.au>
Message-ID: <366F5AAB.8B42419D@consult.com.au>


It continues to amaze me that we are all so gung ho about helping the
rural and remote folk. Sure, the National Farmers Federation believe
that 60-70% of Australia's wealth originates in the bush and sure, the
National party holds the balance of power, and sure, everyone loves to
have a bash at any rational thinking (economic or not).

Whilst opening myself to all sorts of abuse and criticism, i really want
to know who is balancing which equations: crime, pollution and traffic
in the cities vs clean air of the country; forced servitude in the bush;
a serious lack of subsidies already in place (joke); mega export
support and government research programs; etc etc.

Why is it that those 1-2% of the population have so much more sway?
After all, they are not forced to live there against their will, and
if commercial technologies (like proprietary satellite stuff) exist
that can help them, then why, for goodness sake, with the existence of
one of the strongest co-op bodies around (NFF and variants) do they
still look for handouts rather than pay the money (market rates less
co-op volume discount)? It must be the same mentality that says "dont
sell the wool stockpile because [market] prices are too low".

we seem to live in a state of suspended realities where policymakers
refuse to accept the laws of supply and demand, and where lazy thinking
(currently called "arguments against the dries" in treasury) has become
a substitute for basic cost/benefit analysis.

It is really not funny at all. The redistribution of wealth through
well-intentioned but completely perverse policies makes my stomach
turn. No wonder the Kerry Packers of this world choose not to "donate"
any extra to the government in the form of tax.

If this stuff was put to referendum, does anyone have any doubt that
the democratic processes in this country would firmly vote NO against
more handouts to the bush?

--
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Ramin Marzbani
www.consult ACN 070 079 122

If you live in Australia, have your say
http://survey.hotlink.com.au/cgi-bin/goto_survey_new?refid=rm

From gtaylor@efa.org.au Thu Dec 10 06:25:03 1998
From: gtaylor@efa.org.au (Greg Taylor)
Date: Thu, 10 Dec 1998 16:25:03 +1100 (EST)
Subject: (fwd) GILC statement on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights
Message-ID: <199812100525.QAA05135@boomer.anu.edu.au>

GILC Statement on the 50th Anniversary of the Universal Declaration of
Human Rights

Fifty years ago, the nations of the world affirmed their commitment to
protect and promote human rights in the Universal Declaration of Human
Rights. Understanding that "recognition of the inherent dignity and
of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family
is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world," the
nations of the world committed themselves to protect the rights of
privacy, equality, human dignity and freedom of speech. As we
approach the fiftieth anniversary of the Universal Declaration of
Human Rights, it is essential that the international community
reassert its commitment to respect and promote human rights regardless
of physical borders.

The rights cemented in the UDHR are as essential, and as threatened,
today as they were fifty years ago. The undersigned organizations,
members of the Global Internet Liberty Campaign, would like to remind
the citizen nations of the world of the guarantees of freedom of
expression and privacy enshrined in the UDHR.

Article 19 of the UDHR provides that "Everyone has the right to
freedom of opinion and expression...through any media and regardless
of frontiers." However, governments continue to restrict expression on
the Internet. In China, software dealer Lin Hai is awaiting
sentencing for releasing 30,000 email addresses to a dissident group
in the United States. Civil rights groups in the United States are
fighting a court battle against a law dubbed Communications Decency
Act II, which would restrict access by adults to online content.

Although Article 12 of the UDHR states that "No one shall be subjected
to arbitrary interference with his privacy..." governments around the
world seek to monitor and intercept communications on the Internet and
elsewhere. Recently, under pressure from the United States, 33
countries in Europe, North America, Asia, and South America agreed to
limit the exportation of mass-market software that would protect the
privacy of Internet users. This software, which scrambles data so
that it can only be read by its intended recipient, is widely used by
human rights groups, including GILC members, to ensure the safety and
integrity of sensitive information. In Singapore, all Internet
service providers (ISPs) are controlled directly or indirectly by the
government and in Russia, a proposal is being debated to connect all
ISPs via a black box to the Federal Security Service to monitor all
Internet communications.

The Internet holds the promise of being the greatest tool for
communication and freedom of expression. The undersigned members of
GILC encourage the governments of the world to recognize and promote
this potential in accordance with the principles of the UDHR. The
undersigned members of GILC also encourage the governments of the
world to avoid restrictions on any software that protects the privacy
of an individual's communications.

American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU)
http://www.aclu.org/

Bulgarian Institute for Legal Development
http://www.bild.acad.bg/

Center for Democracy and Technology
http://www.cdt.org/

Derechos Human Rights
http://www.derechos.org/

Digital Freedom Network (DFN)
http://www.dfn.org/

Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF)
http://www.eff.org/

Electronic Frontiers Australia
http://www.efa.org.au/

FrEE (Electronic Frontiers Spain)
http://www.arnal.es/free/

Electronic Frontiers Texas
http://www.eftexas.org/

Electronic Privacy Information Center
http://www.epic.org/

Equipo Nizkor
http://www.derechos.org/nizkor/

F�rderverein Informationstechnik und Gesellschaft (FITUG)
http://www.fitug.de/

Human Rights Watch
http://www.hrw.org/

Imaginons un R�seau Internet Solidaire (IRIS)
http://www.iris.sgdg.org/

Index on Censorship
http://www.indexoncensorship.org/index.html

Liberty (National Council of Civil Liberties)

NetAction
http://www.netaction.org/

Privacy International
http://www.privacy.org/pi/

quintessenz e-zine
http://www.quintessenz.at/entrance/index.html




From allenm@spectrum.curtin.edu.au Thu Dec 10 06:30:00 1998
From: allenm@spectrum.curtin.edu.au (Matthew Allen)
Date: Thu, 10 Dec 1998 13:30:00 +0800
Subject: I want my HDTV - or not.
In-Reply-To: <v03130308b29575ddbc8a@[24.192.14.82]>
References: <366F17C5.FD302C10@dynamite.com.au>
Message-ID: <7E2020B1078@spectrum.curtin.edu.au>

I concur with Trevor and other's scepticism about predictions either way on HDTV. However, I
suspect that the trick will be to find something which makes the HDTV a replacement for more
than one home appliance...

a bundle of DVD and HDTV might work; especially with some sort of 'in built' stereo system: we
are already seeing not insignificant sales of home theatre systems - HDTV+ could be sold as
'poor man's' (ROTFLMAO) home theatre.

HDTV and games - free sony playstation with every HDTV? (with the money on the PS of course
being made on the software);

you could, of course, integrate cheap netcomputing power into an HDTV and maybe some form
of CD-ROM player. (Remember all those great MM CD-ROMS that we never use cos they look
horrible on small monitors and, worse, can't be watched in comfort?); free web access or access
to some 'store' of specially-good on HDTV material?

Matt


Dr Matthew Allen
Senior Lecturer, Humanities
Coordinator, Internet Studies
Curtin University of Technology
61 - 8 9266 3511

From Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au Thu Dec 10 07:10:25 1998
From: Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au (Roger Clarke)
Date: Thu, 10 Dec 1998 17:10:25 +1100
Subject: National bandwidth inquiry
In-Reply-To: <366F5AAB.8B42419D@consult.com.au>
References: <9812109132.AA913259644@mail.auscoms.com.au>
Message-ID: <v03130311b29513cd551a@[203.37.10.225]>


[Ramin ranted justabout as loudly as Roger]

Granted that the study of balance is worth a look.

But Ramin, you're overlooking a couple of things:

- this is a federation, and the commitment to nationhood implied a degree
of equality and cross-subsidisation. It's only the loonie end of the
economic rationalist perspective that argues that cross-subsidisation
is evil; most people argue about how much, to whom, when and why;

- infrastructure is fundamental to the capacity of a region to
participate in the economy. It was railroads, roads, water, power,
airports. It is now (that plus) comms of a meaningful bandwidth;

- giving regions bandwidth may well be an inappropriate form and scale of
cross-subsidy. But fixing the Telecomms Act to get rid of the
ludicrous amount of power that Telstra has been left with, and so that
regional coops are facilitated to establish regional telcos, rather
than impeded - would *that* be a fair contribution do you reckon?


>If this stuff was put to referendum, does anyone have any doubt that
>the democratic processes in this country would firmly vote NO against
>more handouts to the bush?

Let's see now: N-S-W 4.5m, Mel-Geelong 3m, Bris-Adel-Perth 3x1.2m, so
about 11/18m. Assume similar proportions of voters in the population of
both urban and rural; so yep: my a priori expectation would be a 60-40
vote. Does that prove something?


Roger Clarke http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/
http://www.etc.com.au/Xamax/
Xamax Consultancy Pty Ltd, 78 Sidaway St, Chapman ACT 2611 AUSTRALIA
Tel: +61 2 6288 1472, and 6288 6916 mailto:Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au

Visiting Fellow, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology
The Australian National University Canberra ACT 0200 AUSTRALIA
Information Sciences Building Room 211 Tel: +61 2 6249 3666



From DTebbutt@acp.com.au Thu Dec 10 07:16:26 1998
From: DTebbutt@acp.com.au (Dan Tebbutt)
Date: Thu, 10 Dec 1998 16:16:26 +1000
Subject: National bandwidth inquiry
Message-ID: <199812100616.RAA09690@boomer.anu.edu.au>

As someone who grew up in the country (now urban fringe), I would have to
say, respectfully, that Ramin's rhetoric is a pile of simplistic horseshit.
While some individual points are valid, I don't think we advance the debate
by making it an us vs them issue. All of Australia needs to come into the
new economy. If you just focus on the Internet and ignore things like the
lack of basic services available to people in the country/outer suburbs/most
of Tassie, SA, WA & NT, then of course it might sound silly. But for god's
sake put this thing in context.

We are all Australians and we should all have as close to equivalent
services as is *reasonably* possible. Now I don't for a minute pretend that
this should be free 64Kbps to everyone, but we need better than we have at
present. Things are improving rapidly, but we still need to goad govt,
Telstra, big business every step of the way because we do not, by and large,
have a competitive infrastructure market.

Arguments like "noone forces them to live there" are the sort of
contemptible rubbish I would expect from a Hansonite attacking Asians. Rural
Australians are just as important to the country as suave inner city
trendies. This country is more than just the Sydney CBD, but too often
that's forgotten these days.

DanT@Melbourne

From chrisc@socialchange.net.au Thu Dec 10 19:09:38 1998
From: chrisc@socialchange.net.au (Chris Connolly)
Date: Thu, 10 Dec 1998 18:09:38 -0000
Subject: National bandwidth inquiry
Message-ID: <01be2468$404c6620$0100a8c0@admin>


Raminr wrote:


>>If this stuff was put to referendum, does anyone have any doubt that
>>the democratic processes in this country would firmly vote NO against
>>more handouts to the bush?


Roger replied:

>Let's see now: N-S-W 4.5m, Mel-Geelong 3m, Bris-Adel-Perth 3x1.2m, so
>about 11/18m. Assume similar proportions of voters in the population of
>both urban and rural; so yep: my a priori expectation would be a 60-40
>vote. Does that prove something?


The old legal instinct in me just can't help pointing out that a referendum
would be decided on a majority of voters AND a majority of states... I think
the bush would win, and good on 'em.

Nothing wrong with the odd cross-subsidy. I think Ramin may overestimate the
'buying power' of the NFF. Hasn't helped them fight the decline of services
and subsequent low morale in regional Australia to date... A helping hand re
new technology might be just the thing to reverse the trend.

Chris Connolly
chrisc@socialchange.net.au


From ramin@consult.com.au Thu Dec 10 08:27:51 1998
From: ramin@consult.com.au (ramin)
Date: Thu, 10 Dec 1998 18:27:51 +1100
Subject: National bandwidth inquiry
References: <199812100616.RAA12698@dunno.consultco.com>
Message-ID: <366F77F7.1B29129C@consult.com.au>


Geez Dan
Equating Economic rationalism to Hansonitism is a bit rough i would say.
What you missed in the argument were two simple concepts: freedom of
choice (to live and work where one wants/prefers to for a variety of
reasons); and market forces (which provide commercial products to those
willing to pay the market price - eg valuing the goods at some level
possibly higher than their cost of production). Economic Cost/Benefit
analysis is a reasonably simple concept that takes into account the time
value of money, ability and willingness to pay and other simple but
useful concepts.

Saying "we are all Australians" is hansonite rhetoric. Plus, the
statement
is likely to be false as we are not all Australians (as demonstrated by
Bill O'Chee's challenge :-).

It IS AN US vs THEM ISSUE when tax moneys get diverted, especially when
they are not necessarily put to the optimal use. I am sure that in a
few
months we will have government research saying that one dose of Internet
and E-C is better than two doses of <INSERT ANYTHING>, but you must
realise that we have so many distortions in the system already that
we are only messing with the problem more.

ALL OF AUSTRALIA DOES NOT NEED TO COME INTO THE NEW ECONOMY. Why not?
Simple! It may be an inefficient allocation of resources. Just because
you have religion and everything is so simple and clear to you does not
mean it is so. If it was, why did we not say the same about PCs, or
fax machines, etc (whereas they just happened despite excessive
government
wholesale sales taxes and other impediments). Should you then argue
for NO GST on IT, Telecommunications and the Internet, and E-C...? Go
ahead.

Why do people in rural areas have lower incomes? lower education levels?
etc... They have made choices. Theoretically, all we need are
competitive
markets (and the satellite example provides a perfect case for
technology
competition) for things to sort themselves out.

NOW, having sounded patronisingly simple in my own defence, i invite
further
attacks to be sent to me personally and not the list as discussing
Economics 101 (with the technology twist) is quite boring. Maybe I
have no religion but I have seen too much waste to sit by and hope
against
hope that we won't waste more in this effort. Hallelujiah :0

Ramin


Dan Tebbutt wrote:
>
> As someone who grew up in the country (now urban fringe), I would have to
> say, respectfully, that Ramin's rhetoric is a pile of simplistic horseshit.
> While some individual points are valid, I don't think we advance the debate
> by making it an us vs them issue. All of Australia needs to come into the
> new economy. If you just focus on the Internet and ignore things like the
> lack of basic services available to people in the country/outer suburbs/most
> of Tassie, SA, WA & NT, then of course it might sound silly. But for god's
> sake put this thing in context.
>
> We are all Australians and we should all have as close to equivalent
> services as is *reasonably* possible. Now I don't for a minute pretend that
> this should be free 64Kbps to everyone, but we need better than we have at
> present. Things are improving rapidly, but we still need to goad govt,
> Telstra, big business every step of the way because we do not, by and large,
> have a competitive infrastructure market.
>
> Arguments like "noone forces them to live there" are the sort of
> contemptible rubbish I would expect from a Hansonite attacking Asians. Rural
> Australians are just as important to the country as suave inner city
> trendies. This country is more than just the Sydney CBD, but too often
> that's forgotten these days.
>
> DanT@Melbourne

--
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Ramin Marzbani
www.consult ACN 070 079 122

If you live in Australia, have your say
http://survey.hotlink.com.au/cgi-bin/goto_survey_new?refid=rm

From ramin@consult.com.au Thu Dec 10 08:46:34 1998
From: ramin@consult.com.au (ramin)
Date: Thu, 10 Dec 1998 18:46:34 +1100
Subject: National bandwidth inquiry
References: <9812109132.AA913259644@mail.auscoms.com.au> <v03130311b29513cd551a@[203.37.10.225]>
Message-ID: <366F7C5A.D2DDC06E@consult.com.au>



Roger Clarke wrote:
>
> [Ramin ranted justabout as loudly as Roger]
>
> Granted that the study of balance is worth a look.
>
> But Ramin, you're overlooking a couple of things:
>
> - this is a federation, and the commitment to nationhood implied a degree
> of equality and cross-subsidisation. It's only the loonie end of the
> economic rationalist perspective that argues that cross-subsidisation
> is evil; most people argue about how much, to whom, when and why;

What you say is partially true and partially the reality of politics,
granted.
Only problem is that no one is really able to untangle all of these
cross-subsidies, many of which linger for all the wrong reasons way past
their USE BY date. The lack of transparency is also a problem (e.g. the
process of how much, to whom, when and why usually gets it wrong and
wastes
a lkot of resources in the process). We are not closing any of the
feedback
loops.

> - infrastructure is fundamental to the capacity of a region to
> participate in the economy. It was railroads, roads, water, power,
> airports. It is now (that plus) comms of a meaningful bandwidth;

Yes, and infrastructure, including maximisation of consumer surplus
should
be managed by those who would benefit the most. The problem is that
with a
whole lot of these new technologies (like satellite) we have moved away
from the cost curves of water and gas pipelines.

> - giving regions bandwidth may well be an inappropriate form and scale of
> cross-subsidy. But fixing the Telecomms Act to get rid of the
> ludicrous amount of power that Telstra has been left with, and so that
> regional coops are facilitated to establish regional telcos, rather
> than impeded - would *that* be a fair contribution do you reckon?

no idea. we have seen regional attempts to build telcos fail because of
poor management and lots of other problems. it is not simple, although
most regulation tends to mess thinds up further.

> >If this stuff was put to referendum, does anyone have any doubt that
> >the democratic processes in this country would firmly vote NO against
> >more handouts to the bush?
>
> Let's see now: N-S-W 4.5m, Mel-Geelong 3m, Bris-Adel-Perth 3x1.2m, so
> about 11/18m. Assume similar proportions of voters in the population of
> both urban and rural; so yep: my a priori expectation would be a 60-40
> vote. Does that prove something?

well, lets see, if you actually put some $ figures against it, and ran
the same Question and also checked if people were able to pay the extra
$$ and you only got 80-20; then you would know it was a political issue
and not an economic one.


> Roger Clarke http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/
> http://www.etc.com.au/Xamax/
> Xamax Consultancy Pty Ltd, 78 Sidaway St, Chapman ACT 2611 AUSTRALIA
> Tel: +61 2 6288 1472, and 6288 6916 mailto:Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au
>
> Visiting Fellow, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology
> The Australian National University Canberra ACT 0200 AUSTRALIA
> Information Sciences Building Room 211 Tel: +61 2 6249 3666

--
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Ramin Marzbani
www.consult ACN 070 079 122

If you live in Australia, have your say
http://survey.hotlink.com.au/cgi-bin/goto_survey_new?refid=rm

From tonyb@netinfo.com.au Thu Dec 10 10:36:38 1998
From: tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Thu, 10 Dec 1998 20:36:38 +1100
Subject: National bandwidth inquiry
Message-ID: <v02110119b29541e40c83@[203.37.43.24]>

At 6:10 PM 10/12/98, Chris Connolly wrote:
>Nothing wrong with the odd cross-subsidy. I think Ramin may overestimate the
>'buying power' of the NFF. Hasn't helped them fight the decline of services
>and subsequent low morale in regional Australia to date... A helping hand re
>new technology might be just the thing to reverse the trend.

Let us remember some simple morality. This is not winner takes all. It is
the _duty_ of the strong to help the weak. That's why we have progressive
tax scales. That's why we have cross subsidies. And that's why the regions
need reasonable (that's where politics comes in) communications
infrastructure.

Economic rationalism is fine when it talks about efficiency but too often
it seems amoral at best and immoral at worst. It might be economically
rational to begger thy neighbour but that does not preserve happy
societies. We create and tolerate governments so that they can support our
society. That is the primary goal. Efficiency is important only if it
supports that goal.

Tony

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From kheitman@it.net.au Thu Dec 10 13:03:27 1998
From: kheitman@it.net.au (Kimberley Heitman)
Date: Thu, 10 Dec 1998 20:03:27 +0800 (WST)
Subject: Australia-USA Statement on E-Commerce
Message-ID: <199812101203.UAA30243@belgarion.it.net.au>

It seems that Australia and the USA have come to an agreement over
e-commerce issues, if the Prime Minister's press release of 1 December can
be taken at face value.

http://www.pm.gov.au/media/pressrel/cooponecommerce.htm

Some highlights:

"A. The internet is a medium for promoting, in a positive way, diffusion
of knowledge, cultural diversity and social interaction, as well as a
means of facilitating commerce. Governments should not prevent their
citizens from accessing information simply because it is published online
in another country."

Is this Australia abandoning go-it-alone content regulation, or stating a
de facto adoption of the First Amendment and lowest-common-denominator
international censorship? Or is it all just meaningless waffle ?

"B. Privacy: Ensuring the effective protection of privacy with regard to
the processing of personal data on global information networks is
necessary as is the need to continue the free flow of information. With
regard to frameworks for personal data protection, governments and
businesses should consider consumers’ concern about their personal
information. Governments should support industry in implementing effective
privacy protection.Personal information should be collected and handled in
a fair and reasonable manner consistent with generally accepted privacy
principles. The OECD Privacy Guidelines provide an appropriate basis
for policy development."

Such twisty-turny language :-) Does the third sentence mean privacy
legislation or not? Are the OECD guidelines to be adopted, modified or
rejected ?

It is indeed a measure of the cluefulness of the governments concerned
that the statement conforms with Usenet principles - it says "yes", "no"
and "maybe" about any policy position.

Kimberley Heitman

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Kimberley James Heitman
http://www.multiline.com.au/~kheit/
Internet kheitman@it.net.au Telephone +618 9458 2790
----------------------------------------------------------------------



From tonyb@netinfo.com.au Thu Dec 10 13:51:07 1998
From: tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Thu, 10 Dec 1998 23:51:07 +1100
Subject: Australia-USA Statement on E-Commerce
Message-ID: <v0211011eb29573c4c48c@[203.37.43.24]>

At 8:03 PM 10/12/98, Kimberley Heitman wrote:
>It is indeed a measure of the cluefulness of the governments concerned
>that the statement conforms with Usenet principles - it says "yes", "no"
>and "maybe" about any policy position.

But you just quote the bits you need ;^)

Tony

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From kheitman@it.net.au Thu Dec 10 19:11:30 1998
From: kheitman@it.net.au (Kimberley Heitman)
Date: Fri, 11 Dec 1998 02:11:30 +0800 (WST)
Subject: Computer professionals strike on Monday December 14! (fwd)
Message-ID: <199812101811.CAA07771@belgarion.it.net.au>

FYI, details of Bob Glickstein's campaign for a global strike by computer
and IT professionals next Monday.

Kimberley Heitman,
Chair, EFA

----- Forwarded message from Andrew Pam -----

This is a global call for computer professionals to strike on Monday,
14 December, 1998 to protest the signing of the Wassenaar Arrangement,
an international treaty that imposes new restrictions on cryptographic
software technology. Australia is a signatory! This treaty will
affect your right to privacy and your ability to do business online.

Please read the web page at http://www.glasswings.com.au/wassenaar.html
(an Australian mirror of http://www.zanshin.com/~bobg/ ) and at the very
least contact your political representatives on Monday.

Please forward this message to all your contacts in the computer industry
until Monday December 14, 1998. Do not forward after this date.

Cheers,
Andrew
--
mailto:xanni@xanadu.net Andrew Pam
http://www.xanadu.com.au/ Technical VP, Xanadu
http://www.glasswings.com.au/ Technical Editor, Glass Wings
http://www.sericyb.com.au/sc/ Manager, Serious Cybernetics
P.O. Box 26, East Melbourne VIC 8002 Australia Phone +61 3 96511511

----- End of forwarded message from Andrew Pam -----

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Kimberley James Heitman
http://www.multiline.com.au/~kheit/
Internet kheitman@it.net.au Telephone +618 9458 2790
----------------------------------------------------------------------



From tomw@acslink.net.au Thu Dec 10 22:11:01 1998
From: tomw@acslink.net.au (Tom Worthington)
Date: Fri, 11 Dec 1998 08:11:01 +1100
Subject: History of the Internet in Australia
Message-ID: <2.2.32.19981210211101.006cdaec@mail.mpx.com.au>

At 15:00 8/12/98 +1100, Roger Clarke wrote:

>...I need feedback, and I'll add things and fix things as information...

Well worth a look is "Exploring the Internet - A Technical Travelogue", by
Carl Malamud, 1992, Prentice-Hall, Inc. ISBN 0-13-296898-3, Electronic
edition published by Thin Battle Lines, Inc.: http://invisible.net/eti/

Unfortunately the book doesn't have a table of contents (either in the print
on-line edition), making it difficult to navigate. Here are the Australian
chapters:

Melbourne: http://invisible.net/eti/RoundTwo08.html
Sydney: http://invisible.net/eti/RoundTwo09.html
Canberra: http://invisible.net/eti/RoundTwo10.html
Adelaide: http://invisible.net/eti/RoundTwo11.html

You will notice some Linkers mentioned.

This book was one of the sources of inspiration for my series of high
technology tourist reports, over the last four years:
http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw/tourist.htm


Tom Worthington http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw PO Box 13
Immediate Past President Belconnen ACT 2617
Australian Computer Society tomw@acslink.net.au
----------------------------------------------------------------------
IRC, Friday, 11 Dec: http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw/irc/irc26.html


From billd@effect.net.au Fri Dec 11 00:02:11 1998
From: billd@effect.net.au (Bill D'Arcy)
Date: Fri, 11 Dec 1998 09:02:11 +1000
Subject: National bandwidth inquiry
In-Reply-To: <01be2468$404c6620$0100a8c0@admin>
Message-ID: <l03130300b295fc07512b@[203.30.99.162]>

>Raminr wrote:
>
>
>>>If this stuff was put to referendum, does anyone have any doubt that
>>>the democratic processes in this country would firmly vote NO against
>>>more handouts to the bush?
>
>
>Roger replied:
>
>>Let's see now: N-S-W 4.5m, Mel-Geelong 3m, Bris-Adel-Perth 3x1.2m, so
>>about 11/18m. Assume similar proportions of voters in the population of
>>both urban and rural; so yep: my a priori expectation would be a 60-40
>>vote. Does that prove something?
>
Chris commented:

>The old legal instinct in me just can't help pointing out that a referendum
>would be decided on a majority of voters AND a majority of states... I think
>the bush would win, and good on 'em.

The bush, IMHO, would win by a country mile. And, like Chris, good on 'em.
Having spent the greater part of this year in the bush (Eurobodalla on the
NSW south coast), net commerce, in my opinion, offers the most positive
hope of long-term, sustainable economic activity and with it jobs. And
that's in an area only a couple of hours from Canberra, an area on the
coast, and an area that attracts a lot of tourists. Yet youth unemployment
is running at 37 per cent, adult unemployment at 15 per cent, with
aborigines the hardest hit: 2.7 per cent of the Eurobodalla population, 38
per cent of the local arrest rate, no jobs (not one aborigine is employed
in Batemans Bay's CBD).
We can provide the bandwidth necessary for net commerce to operate
effectively (and this includes the cities) and educate and train people on
commercial opportunities, or we can continue to pick up the social tab.
By the way, the Eurobodalla council is sticking a 155mb/s pipe through the
Shire courtesy of Networking the Nation.

----------------------------------------------------
Bill D'Arcy
Hughes ACT + South Durras NSW
mailto:billd@effect.net.au
"Simplicity is the key to truth."
Bloke in the pub



From richard@auscoms.com.au Fri Dec 11 01:49:18 1998
From: richard@auscoms.com.au (richard@auscoms.com.au)
Date: Fri, 11 Dec 98 10:49:18 +1000
Subject: Networking the Nation Grants (Was Re: National bandwidth inq
Message-ID: <9812119133.AA913333790@mail.auscoms.com.au>


Reckon I'll stay out of the flame game. I agree that cross-subsidy is not only
fair but necessary, but it has to be well spent. That's the focus of the
following comments:

>richard@auscoms.com.au said:
>....
>>we saw a significant chunk of the money which Alston said would "switch >>on
regional Australia" going to some fairly fluffy projects -- teaching >>the
punters how to use PCs to connect to an Internet that doesn't reach >>their
region, for example.

Roger Clarke said:
>I'm pretty comfortable that RTIF money is applied to multiple aspects of
>the problem.
>
>If just *one* of the complex of impediments got lots of both money and
>ingenuity flung at it, and got fixed, the something else would be likely >to
cause the venture as a whole to fail or stutter along.

Looking over how the money was spent in more detail, I'm still concerned. The
second-largest allocation, for example, 2.9 million, is being spent on the
Outback Digital Network's office and administrative structures. BTW, in the
ministerial press release, that allocation is described as the "first stage of
the network", not "setting up the office that will design the first stage of the
network".

It gets nearly triple the largest allocation for "Internet access at local call
rates" which was how the money was presented during the election.

(PS, I think the ODN is a Good Thing. I think it should get money for offices
etc. I think _this_ money should not have come from _this_ particular fund.)

I'm also unsure about the allocations to "attracting IT servies to the region"
which turns up a couple of times...the history of such initiatives in the
long-term isn't brilliant. Some places getting ten grand for "real" access could
feel dudded if they notice that Uniting Our Rural Community got 25 times that
for promotional work.

It looks like the people most experienced in presenting grant applications got
the best deals ... it was ever thus, I suppose. :-(

Roger said:
>Hence, as long as the individual projects are well-conceived, and the
>bucket of money isn't divided into lots that are too small to do anything
>useful with, I agree with their streaming strategy.

Most of the technical buckets are small, most of the bureaucractic buckets are
large.

Richard Chirgwin



From richard@auscoms.com.au Fri Dec 11 01:58:33 1998
From: richard@auscoms.com.au (richard@auscoms.com.au)
Date: Fri, 11 Dec 98 10:58:33 +1000
Subject: I want my HDTV - or not.
Message-ID: <9812119133.AA913334345@mail.auscoms.com.au>


Allen wrote:

>the trick will be to find something which makes the HDTV a
>replacement for more than one home appliance...

Why? Most houses I go into have multiples of the TV. Multiples of PCs are common
so that John and Jane don't fight over who's turn. "Let's buy one big one in the
living room" would appear to run counter to consumer history.

What's more feasible to my mind is a "one big" processor with lots of much
cheaper appliances. Bundling is exciting to engineers and futurists, but IMNSHO
debundling, not bundling, would fit the known pattern of consumption.

Richard Chirgwin

____________________Reply Separator____________________
Subject: Re: I want my HDTV - or not.
Author: <allenm@spectrum.curtin.edu.au>
Date: 10/12/98 13:30

I concur with Trevor and other's scepticism about predictions either way on
HDTV. However, I
suspect that the trick will be to find something which makes the HDTV a
replacement for more
than one home appliance...

a bundle of DVD and HDTV might work; especially with some sort of 'in built'
stereo system: we
are already seeing not insignificant sales of home theatre systems - HDTV+ could
be sold as
'poor man's' (ROTFLMAO) home theatre.

HDTV and games - free sony playstation with every HDTV? (with the money on the
PS of course
being made on the software);

you could, of course, integrate cheap netcomputing power into an HDTV and maybe
some form
of CD-ROM player. (Remember all those great MM CD-ROMS that we never use cos
they look
horrible on small monitors and, worse, can't be watched in comfort?); free web
access or access
to some 'store' of specially-good on HDTV material?

Matt


Dr Matthew Allen
Senior Lecturer, Humanities
Coordinator, Internet Studies
Curtin University of Technology
61 - 8 9266 3511




From fist@ozemail.com.au Fri Dec 11 00:54:25 1998
From: fist@ozemail.com.au (Stewart Fist)
Date: Fri, 11 Dec 1998 10:54:25 +1100
Subject: I want my HDTV - or not.
Message-ID: <199812110000.LAA00822@fep8.mail.ozemail.net>

Trevor Jordan makes a very good point about Electronic Today's predictions
about the price of CD players. Electronic complexity doesn't appear to
relate to price in mass production -- provided the number of units (chips)
remains the same. In most cases they consolidate circuits or greater and
greater complexity, and reduce the number of components over time. Moore's
Law allows each chip to be far more complex for the same (or less) price.

However Trevor then says:
>The comment about standard definition digital sets being far superior to
>today's analog standard, may be a comparison with the North American NTSC
>standard. Just about everything is superior to that.

I need to respond to that ... even though I've long been guilty of
disparaging NTSC in print myself, and enjoy taking a dig at the Yanks.

I've just spent a few weeks in the USA, and looked at a lot of TV - some
over-air, some satellite, and mostly cable. I have to say that NTSC now, is
at least as subjectively pleasing to watch as Australian PAL - and the
slightly reduced line structure isn't noticeable at all except on the very
large projection systems.

Partly this is because, in the States, I was seeing a clean NTSC
studio-to-viewer feed without a PAL translation stage most of the time.
However, even when the image comes from film or from local playback, the
quality was universally excellent. Colours were very stable, and sound was
good (although each channel seems to be set to its own volume level).

NTSC used to be awful, but with digital signal processing in analog sets the
quality is now very good.

I think this points out the fact that in normal viewing circumstances in a
home or motel room (where I tend to sit closer), it is virtually impossible
to distinguish 525 lines of resolution from 625 lines.

Line structure is secondary in our judgement of quality past a certain point
set by human perceptual resolution. And since our eyes don't have the
ability to resolve much more than about 625 lines at reasonable distances
from even a large set, then 1000+ lines is just ridiculous waste of
bandwidth unless you are willing to sit keyboard distance from the screen,
or build those special Home Cinema rooms with a projection system throwing
images on a wall.

Costs are likely to remain high for many years yet. I went into dozens of
major stores in San Francisco and LA, and not one of them could even show me
a HDTV set. They all tried to sell me a widescreen Sony standard definition
(NTSC) set instead, and all said that you then only needed to then add a
black box to get high definition!!

American bullshit is even more prevelant than Australian bullshit.

Currently the price of a HDTV CRT set in the States is said to be $US8 to
$10,000 - with Sony producing (individually by hand, one would assume) a
very few large CRT models (someone told me there were only 100 in the whole
USA). The other companies with sets on sale are apparently all using
back-projection systems onto home units that look like a double-door
wardrobe, with dimensions about 2 metres high x 2 metres wide, by half a
metre deep. And if the standard definition projection systems I saw are any
guide to HDTV projection quality, then give it away quickly. They are
horrible - colours are bad, no real brilliance or sharpness. I want to see
sharp images not well-defined screen lines -- so I suppose HDTV or line
doubling with EDTV could make them a bit better.

I'm not at all sure that standard definition digital TV is going to produce
better pictures in the home than the present analog, its just that the
artifacts will be different. The loss of ghost images from reflections is
good (but this can be done with digital circuitry in analog sets), but other
very strange artifacts are created by MPEG compression -- especially in
sports.

The real benefit of digitisation is the increased number of standard
definition channels and better coverage of territory, it seems to me. Also,
there's the ability to watch movies in the 16:9 widescreen format (EDTV).
Sound is also very much better with AC-3 and MPEG with Surround Sound.

Cathode ray tubes are still the best display technology for television in
ambient light conditions, and the cost of these in large dimensions is
limited by mechanical factors, and not influenced much by Moore's Law. So
don't expect these set costs to dive down to $1000. I doubt that I will see
a true HDTV CRT set under $A5000 in my lifetime (a lot of lower-quality sets
are being sold as HDTV). However digital standard aspect ratio sets could
become very cheap with mass production.



------------------------------------------------------------------
Stewart Fist - Independent writer and columnist
70 Middle Harbour Road, LINDFIELD, NSW, 2070, Australia
Ph: +612 9416 7458 Fax: +612 9416 4582
------------------------------------------------------------------
The Australian <http://www.newsit.com.au/index_opinion.htm>
The ABC <http://www.abc.net.au/http/sfist/>
Electric-words <http://www.electric-words.com>
------------------------------------------------------------------


From brd@dynamite.com.au Fri Dec 11 01:27:08 1998
From: brd@dynamite.com.au (Bernard Robertson-Dunn)
Date: Fri, 11 Dec 1998 11:27:08 +1100
Subject: National bandwidth inquiry
References: <l03130300b295fc07512b@[203.30.99.162]>
Message-ID: <367066DC.5526601E@dynamite.com.au>

IMHO the word "simple" has been used rather too much in this debate.

There is a saying, worthy of a tag:
For any complex problem there is always at least one solution that is
both simple and wrong.

Also IMHO, the failure of Economic Rationalism lies in its scope. You
cannot optimise a system by optimising its components. By carving up
society into the economy and the rest and then carving up the economy
into smaller parts and improving the competitiveness or efficiency of
each sub-sub-part, society is more likely to suffer than benefit.

Dividing the country up into bush/non-bush (or in fact in any other way)
is to fall into the same trap that the EconRats have.

Similarly having an inquiry into bandwith, as an isolated topic, will
also lead to sub-optimal strategies.

Just my opinion.

--
I think that the most important thing to teach children in an
environmentally conscious age is alternative views of nature. They must
be shown how our interpretation of natural systems is often completely
dependent not on what is there but on what kind of box we draw around
the data. And if they are going to be smarter than their parents, then
schoolchildren must think subversively about accepted wisdoms concerning
natural systems.
-- Stephen Strauss

Regards
brd

Bernard Robertson-Dunn
Canberra Australia
brd@dynamite.com.au

From marghanita@ramin.com.au Fri Dec 11 02:40:43 1998
From: marghanita@ramin.com.au (M. da Cruz)
Date: Fri, 11 Dec 1998 12:40:43 +1100
Subject: National bandwidth inquiry
References: <l03130300b295fc07512b@[203.30.99.162]>
Message-ID: <3670781B.136B@ramin.com.au>

Bill D'Arcy wrote:
<snip>
> We can provide the bandwidth necessary for net commerce to operate
> effectively (and this includes the cities) and educate and train people on
> commercial opportunities, or we can continue to pick up the social tab.
> By the way, the Eurobodalla council is sticking a 155mb/s pipe through the
> Shire courtesy of Networking the Nation.
<snip>
Well said! Sufficient bandwidth and education are the key points here
and not just in the bush.

An interesting parallel could be drawn with medical services, currently
being used to sell high bandwidth. In Sweden, some years ago they had a
careful look at their health budget and concluded that their money would
be better spent on preventive health measures rather than medical
services.

Marghanita
--
Marghanita da Cruz
Principal Consultant
Ramin Communications
http://www.ramin.com.au
Tel: (+61) 0414-869202



From tjordan@vic.bigpond.net.au Fri Dec 11 02:52:12 1998
From: tjordan@vic.bigpond.net.au (Trevor Jordan)
Date: Fri, 11 Dec 1998 12:52:12 +1100 (EDT)
Subject: I want my HDTV - or not.
In-Reply-To: <199812110000.LAA00822@fep8.mail.ozemail.net>
Message-ID: <v03130301b296b763a869@[24.192.14.82]>

At 11:54 PM -0000 10/12/98, Stewart Fist wrote:

>However Trevor then says:
>>The comment about standard definition digital sets being far superior to
>>today's analog standard, may be a comparison with the North American NTSC
>>standard. Just about everything is superior to that.
>
>I need to respond to that ... even though I've long been guilty of
>disparaging NTSC in print myself, and enjoy taking a dig at the Yanks.
>
>I've just spent a few weeks in the USA, and looked at a lot of TV - some
>over-air, some satellite, and mostly cable. I have to say that NTSC now, is
>at least as subjectively pleasing to watch as Australian PAL - and the
>slightly reduced line structure isn't noticeable at all except on the very
>large projection systems.
>
>Partly this is because, in the States, I was seeing a clean NTSC
>studio-to-viewer feed without a PAL translation stage most of the time.
>However, even when the image comes from film or from local playback, the
>quality was universally excellent. Colours were very stable, and sound was
>good (although each channel seems to be set to its own volume level).
>
>NTSC used to be awful, but with digital signal processing in analog sets the
>quality is now very good.

Although I have never studied US television in any detail, my impression
has been that the technical performance is of similar quality to the
content. The other factor that you have not mentioned is the signal
quality. With good quality signals, the colour on NTSC is as good as PAL.
I suspect that you may have been viewing good quality cable systems rather
than broadcast signals. If you want to see NTSC at its best, try a video
disk; at its worst, a VCR or marginal reception broadcast.

Cable systems also produce improvements in PAL performance, particularly
the elimination of ghosts, but the improvements are probably not as great
as with NTSC.

>I think this points out the fact that in normal viewing circumstances in a
>home or motel room (where I tend to sit closer), it is virtually impossible
>to distinguish 525 lines of resolution from 625 lines.
>
>Line structure is secondary in our judgement of quality past a certain point
>set by human perceptual resolution. And since our eyes don't have the
>ability to resolve much more than about 625 lines at reasonable distances
>from even a large set, then 1000+ lines is just ridiculous waste of
>bandwidth unless you are willing to sit keyboard distance from the screen,
>or build those special Home Cinema rooms with a projection system throwing
>images on a wall.

I though that this was the whole point of HDTV; sit closer and achieve
greater immersion in the material.

>The real benefit of digitisation is the increased number of standard
>definition channels and better coverage of territory, it seems to me. Also,
>there's the ability to watch movies in the 16:9 widescreen format (EDTV).
>Sound is also very much better with AC-3 and MPEG with Surround Sound.

Widescreen is already available with analogue: see SBS. A benefit of
digital television MIGHT be the increased number of standard channels, but
it might also be HDTV. The fundamental benefit of digital television is
the flexibility of a digital signal.

An application which is rarely mentioned is its use as an information
delivery system. A high bandwidth successor to Teletex, based on HTML,
would provide an alternative to the internet for mass market web browsing.
With a back channel through the telephone network, it could provide an
asymmetric high speed internet delivery system. Without a back channel,
the media moguls could select and control the mass market internet content.

>Cathode ray tubes are still the best display technology for television in
>ambient light conditions, and the cost of these in large dimensions is
>limited by mechanical factors, and not influenced much by Moore's Law. So
>don't expect these set costs to dive down to $1000. I doubt that I will see
>a true HDTV CRT set under $A5000 in my lifetime (a lot of lower-quality sets
>are being sold as HDTV). However digital standard aspect ratio sets could
>become very cheap with mass production.

Quite possibly. Digital television is about data processing and when the
production volumes rise, the cost may be no greater than analogue. The
displays will change more slowly, but they will not improve without the
impetus of a better quality signal.

However, I would not be as pessimistic about price. The top end (not the
exotic end) of the television receiver market is about $A1500 to 2000. The
price range does not change much over time, even with inflation, but the
performance creeps up relentlessly. I would expect to see 70 to 80 cm CRT
based HDTV receivers in that price range by the end of the transition
period (2008).

Do not underestimate the potential of newer display technologies such as
LCD and plasma. Twenty years ago LCDs were used for displays in pocket
calculators with seven segment numerical displays. Now they are used in
computer displays of similar quality to CRT displays. Think what may be
achieved over the next decade.

It is surprising that music systems went modular three decades ago, desktop
computers have been largely modular since their origin, but television is
still largely about integrated receivers. Digital television, or perhaps
HDTV, may change that.

Trevor Jordan



From monty@knapp.com.au Fri Dec 11 00:14:20 1998
From: monty@knapp.com.au (Paul Montgomery)
Date: Fri, 11 Dec 1998 10:14:20 +1100
Subject: National bandwidth inquiry
References: <9812109132.AA913259644@mail.auscoms.com.au> <366F5AAB.8B42419D@consult.com.au>
Message-ID: <367055CA.BA5F085D@knapp.com.au>

I'll make this short, keeping in mind ramin's boredom threshhold. BTW, I grew
up in Seymour in central Victoria, and my Dad worked for 20 years for the
Department of Agriculture.

One, if capital punishment was put to referendum it would pass with flying
colours, so I don't think that's a sound indication. All it would take to
defeat such a vote on stiffing the bush would be a telethon hosted by Ray
Martin, anyway.

Two, it's not only farmers who are propping up the eastern seaboard power
elites (of which the Link membership is a small part). It's also the miners in
remote WA and Qld. Both industries are vitally important to the future of the
country, and in the absence of any serious signs of a viable IT industry
developing to take up the export cudgel, it makes good economic rationalist
sense to drag the agribusiness and resources sectors into the information age,
to help with their international competitiveness. Part of that is
familiarising the inhabitants of Ruritania with the technology, so educating
them that the Net doesn't have to be as slow as a wet week is a Good Thing(tm).

--
Paul Montgomery, features editor for Image & Data Manager and assistant
editor for Internet World. Lives like a JavaBean. Fan of Robert Rankin.
Tel: +61 2 9318 2644. Fax: +61 2 9310 4608. mailto:monty@knapp.com.au
http://australia.internet.com “I am a railroad track abandoned.” (JB)

From me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au Fri Dec 11 05:52:00 1998
From: me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Fri, 11 Dec 1998 15:52:00 +1100
Subject: U.N. seeks global action on Y2K bug
Message-ID: <v02110130b2964ef74706@[203.37.43.24]>

A wee bit late methinks...

>From Edupage, 10 December 1998

U.N. seeks global action on Y2K bug
http://detnews.com/1998/technology/9812/10/12100169.htm
Recognizing that the looming Year 2000 computer glitch could spark a global
ripple effect -- with the least prepared nations pulling down others -- the
United Nations is opening an unprecedented international conference to
confront the so-called Y2K problem. Representatives from at least 80
nations, and possibly as many as 120, begin arriving Thursday at the U.N.
Headquarters in New York. Formal working sessions and a meeting with U.N.
Secretary-General Kofi Annan are set for Friday

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From miko@miko.com Wed Dec 9 06:56:41 1998
From: miko@miko.com (Miko Matsumura)
Date: Tue, 8 Dec 1998 21:56:41 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [miko] Farewell
Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.3.95.981208215230.8033D-100000@outside.organic.com>

Hello my community,

Hello my friends both nearby and overseas; Coworkers both old and new. I also greet my colleagues and leaders in this fast, vibrant industry. Through working and playing with all of you I have felt the admiration, inspiration and motivation needed to kee
p me going.

For three and a half years I've had the privilege to serve as the Java Evangelist for Sun Microsystems. This role has taught me what it means to run fast and "run everywhere". The early Java team showed me what kind of incredible creative energy, talent,
intelligence, persistence, humor, and insight it takes to bring a great new technology into the world. I'm grateful for that time. This is why I include a measure of sadness as well as excitement and hope among the feelings as I close this chapter of my c
areer.

I am leaving Sun but of course I am not leaving Java. I am launching a Silicon Valley Java startup tentatively called BizTone-a subsidiary of Madura.net (http://www.madura.net). They are innovators in their use of the latest Java technologies including Ji
ni and JFC/Swing. And of course they have the killer app. Using Java to deliver the power of Fortune 500 Enterprise Resource Management to "the rest of us" (small and mid-sized businesses) over network or even phone lines.

I feel confident leaving the official duties of Java Evangelism especially at a time when America OnLine has announced its commitment to Java client browsers and hardware. Coupled with the announcement of the release of the Java 2 class libraries and the
preliminary injunction against Microsoft, I can retire knowing that tens of millions of compatible clients are assured. Having evangelized some 100,000 people I can rest with the knowledge that I contributed in some way to the Java revolution. I am not cl
aiming that the Java story is complete, merely that these trends represent
the end of an important stage in Java's evolution. Finally, the
announcement of community source models for JDK suggest a natural
evolution of Java towards a open but compatible conclusion.

The richest, most meaningful events in one's life are those which are reflected in our relationships with others. I've had the good fortune to share some of myself with each of you and in turn appreciate what you have offered me. Without the mirror of my
communities, I would be much the poorer in the knowledge I have of myself. The context of a community is further deepened by a sense of history and continuity. I hope that you will stay in contact with me through this and other life transitions. (Further
information is provided below.)

Sincerely,
Miko Matsumura
Former Java Evangelist
President, US operations
VP of strategy
Madura.net


How often do you want to hear from Miko?
Once every six months: If you received a primary copy of this message, it means that you have been subscribed to the Javangelist. This mailing list will be updated approximately once in six months. If you do not wish to receive these updates, please send
a message to majordomo@miko.com with the body text unsubscribe javangelist. (I have only added people to the list whose email addresses I have in my personal inbox. If you don't know me, I don't know how your email came to be in my box!)

Once every few weeks: If you are more actively interested to hear what is going on with Miko, feel free to subscribe to Miko's friends' list. Just send a message to majordomo@miko.com with the body text subscribe friends.

At will: If you ever want to check in on me, feel free to email me at miko@miko.com or check my web page at www.miko.com





From reagle@RPCP.MIT.EDU Fri Dec 11 16:08:26 1998
From: reagle@RPCP.MIT.EDU (Joseph M. Reagle Jr.)
Date: Fri, 11 Dec 1998 10:08:26 -0500
Subject: I want my HDTV - or not.
In-Reply-To: <199812110000.LAA00822@fep8.mail.ozemail.net>
Message-ID: <3.0.5.32.19981211100826.009a4100@rpcp.mit.edu>

At 10:54 AM 12/11/98 +1100, Stewart Fist wrote:
>NTSC used to be awful, but with digital signal processing in analog sets
the
>quality is now very good.
>
>I think this points out the fact that in normal viewing circumstances in a
>home or motel room (where I tend to sit closer), it is virtually impossible
>to distinguish 525 lines of resolution from 625 lines.

As a yank, I think I can tell, but I guess it depedends at what quality of
set. I know if I'm in a US hotel versus a EU one (of similar quality with
similar quality TVs), I'm much more pleased with the quality of the PAL set.

At home, I have a 40" widescreen TV that has 3D-comb filters for NTSC
signals, and its an amazing thing. But I wouldn't call it startling quality
regardless. The NTSC broadcast of a composite signal never will be. I figure
I could tell the difference with 625, particular if the source is letter-box
and I end up blowing it up (and cropping the bars) further.

Anamorphic DVD with RGB is a truly wonderful thing to behold, and I figure
PAL wouldn't make much of a difference there....
_______________________
Regards, http://web.mit.edu/reagle/www/home.html
Joseph Reagle E0 D5 B2 05 B6 12 DA 65 BE 4D E3 C1 6A 66 25 4E
independent research account

From miko@miko.com Wed Dec 9 16:32:09 1998
From: miko@miko.com (Miko Matsumura)
Date: Wed, 9 Dec 1998 07:32:09 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [miko] Farewell
Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.3.95.981209073050.13701C-100000@outside.organic.com>

Hello my community,

Hello my friends both nearby and overseas; Coworkers both old and new. I also greet my colleagues and leaders in this fast, vibrant industry. Through working and playing with all of you I have felt the admiration, inspiration and motivation needed to kee
p me going.

For three and a half years I've had the privilege to serve as the Java Evangelist for Sun Microsystems. This role has taught me what it means to run fast and "run everywhere". The early Java team showed me what kind of incredible creative energy, talent,
intelligence, persistence, humor, and insight it takes to bring a great new technology into the world. I'm grateful for that time. This is why I include a measure of sadness as well as excitement and hope among the feelings as I close this chapter of my c
areer.

I am leaving Sun but of course I am not leaving Java. I am launching a Silicon Valley Java startup tentatively called BizTone-a subsidiary of Madura.net (http://www.madura.net). They are innovators in their use of the latest Java technologies including Ji
ni and JFC/Swing. And of course they have the killer app. Using Java to deliver the power of Fortune 500 Enterprise Resource Management to "the rest of us" (small and mid-sized businesses) over network or even phone lines.

I feel confident leaving the official duties of Java Evangelism especially at a time when America OnLine has announced its commitment to Java client browsers and hardware. Coupled with the announcement of the release of the Java 2 class libraries and the
preliminary injunction against Microsoft, I can retire knowing that tens of millions of compatible clients are assured. Having evangelized some 100,000 people I can rest with the knowledge that I contributed in some way to the Java revolution. I am not cl
aiming that the Java story is complete, merely that these trends represent
the end of an important stage in Java's evolution. Finally, the
announcement of community source models for JDK suggest a natural
evolution of Java towards a open but compatible conclusion.

The richest, most meaningful events in one's life are those which are reflected in our relationships with others. I've had the good fortune to share some of myself with each of you and in turn appreciate what you have offered me. Without the mirror of my
communities, I would be much the poorer in the knowledge I have of myself. The context of a community is further deepened by a sense of history and continuity. I hope that you will stay in contact with me through this and other life transitions. (Further
information is provided below.)

Sincerely,
Miko Matsumura
Former Java Evangelist
President, US operations
VP of strategy
Madura.net


How often do you want to hear from Miko?
Once every six months: If you received a primary copy of this message, it means that you have been subscribed to the Javangelist. This mailing list will be updated approximately once in six months. If you do not wish to receive these updates, please send
a message to majordomo@miko.com with the body text unsubscribe javangelist. (I have only added people to the list whose email addresses I have in my personal inbox. If you don't know me, I don't know how your email came to be in my box!)

Once every few weeks: If you are more actively interested to hear what is going on with Miko, feel free to subscribe to Miko's friends' list. Just send a message to majordomo@miko.com with the body text subscribe friends.

At will: If you ever want to check in on me, feel free to email me at miko@miko.com or check my web page at www.miko.com





From miko@miko.com Wed Dec 9 16:32:09 1998
From: miko@miko.com (Miko Matsumura)
Date: Wed, 9 Dec 1998 07:32:09 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [miko] Farewell
Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.3.95.981209073050.13701C-100000@outside.organic.com>

Hello my community,

Hello my friends both nearby and overseas; Coworkers both old and new. I also greet my colleagues and leaders in this fast, vibrant industry. Through working and playing with all of you I have felt the admiration, inspiration and motivation needed to kee
p me going.

For three and a half years I've had the privilege to serve as the Java Evangelist for Sun Microsystems. This role has taught me what it means to run fast and "run everywhere". The early Java team showed me what kind of incredible creative energy, talent,
intelligence, persistence, humor, and insight it takes to bring a great new technology into the world. I'm grateful for that time. This is why I include a measure of sadness as well as excitement and hope among the feelings as I close this chapter of my c
areer.

I am leaving Sun but of course I am not leaving Java. I am launching a Silicon Valley Java startup tentatively called BizTone-a subsidiary of Madura.net (http://www.madura.net). They are innovators in their use of the latest Java technologies including Ji
ni and JFC/Swing. And of course they have the killer app. Using Java to deliver the power of Fortune 500 Enterprise Resource Management to "the rest of us" (small and mid-sized businesses) over network or even phone lines.

I feel confident leaving the official duties of Java Evangelism especially at a time when America OnLine has announced its commitment to Java client browsers and hardware. Coupled with the announcement of the release of the Java 2 class libraries and the
preliminary injunction against Microsoft, I can retire knowing that tens of millions of compatible clients are assured. Having evangelized some 100,000 people I can rest with the knowledge that I contributed in some way to the Java revolution. I am not cl
aiming that the Java story is complete, merely that these trends represent
the end of an important stage in Java's evolution. Finally, the
announcement of community source models for JDK suggest a natural
evolution of Java towards a open but compatible conclusion.

The richest, most meaningful events in one's life are those which are reflected in our relationships with others. I've had the good fortune to share some of myself with each of you and in turn appreciate what you have offered me. Without the mirror of my
communities, I would be much the poorer in the knowledge I have of myself. The context of a community is further deepened by a sense of history and continuity. I hope that you will stay in contact with me through this and other life transitions. (Further
information is provided below.)

Sincerely,
Miko Matsumura
Former Java Evangelist
President, US operations
VP of strategy
Madura.net


How often do you want to hear from Miko?
Once every six months: If you received a primary copy of this message, it means that you have been subscribed to the Javangelist. This mailing list will be updated approximately once in six months. If you do not wish to receive these updates, please send
a message to majordomo@miko.com with the body text unsubscribe javangelist. (I have only added people to the list whose email addresses I have in my personal inbox. If you don't know me, I don't know how your email came to be in my box!)

Once every few weeks: If you are more actively interested to hear what is going on with Miko, feel free to subscribe to Miko's friends' list. Just send a message to majordomo@miko.com with the body text subscribe friends.

At will: If you ever want to check in on me, feel free to email me at miko@miko.com or check my web page at www.miko.com





From jwhit@PrimeNet.Com Fri Dec 11 22:30:22 1998
From: jwhit@PrimeNet.Com (Janet Whitaker)
Date: Sat, 12 Dec 1998 08:30:22 +1100 (EST)
Subject: National bandwidth inquiry
Message-ID: <199812112130.IAA12286@mars.planet.net.au>

At 11:27 AM 12/11/98 +1100, Bernard Robertson-Dunn wrote:

>
>There is a saying, worthy of a tag:
>For any complex problem there is always at least one solution that is
>both simple and wrong.
>
>Also IMHO, the failure of Economic Rationalism lies in its scope. You
>cannot optimise a system by optimising its components. By carving up
>society into the economy and the rest and then carving up the economy
>into smaller parts and improving the competitiveness or efficiency of
>each sub-sub-part, society is more likely to suffer than benefit.

If anyone is interested in these sorts of concepts about thinking and
strategy, a book I highly recommend is "The Fifth Discipline" by Dr. Peter
Senge. Excellent discussion about interactions, the 'learning organisation'
[which is really what the book is about, Senge I believe originated the
process or at least developed it for use in management theory/practice] and
why simple approaches and non-integrative solutions often fail. Systems
analysis at its best!

Jan

JLWhitaker Associates
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
jwhit@primenet.com -- http://www.primenet.com/~jwhit/whitentr.htm



From jwhit@PrimeNet.Com Fri Dec 11 22:30:19 1998
From: jwhit@PrimeNet.Com (Janet Whitaker)
Date: Sat, 12 Dec 1998 08:30:19 +1100 (EST)
Subject: I want my HDTV - or not.
Message-ID: <199812112130.IAA12283@mars.planet.net.au>

At 10:54 AM 12/11/98 +1100, Stewart Fist wrote:
[snip a whole lot]
>
>The real benefit of digitisation is the increased number of standard
>definition channels and better coverage of territory, it seems to me. Also,
>there's the ability to watch movies in the 16:9 widescreen format (EDTV).
>Sound is also very much better with AC-3 and MPEG with Surround Sound.

ummm...the first point is always an interesting one, about increased numbers
of channels; I'm not sure how better coverage is accomplished with this new
technology. The first assumes there is more programming available for the
extra channels. Oh? More imports maybe? Not that that's all bad, but we
seem to have enough problems programming only 4-5 free to air channels now.
And some of the quality of some of those programs is marginal.

Yes, the cable/pay tv system has shown a slightly different model, but it's
based on a payment regime, not free to air digital [subsidised by ads of
course], and a HUGE distribution market, particularly of cartoons, sports
events, movies. Or does anyone think we'll start to blend in the British
model of a tv tax to go along with the GST to cover some program development
costs? [does that still exists?] Or does it mean the ABC will be encouraged
to include sponsorship and then more expanded ads as has happened with US
public broadcasting?

Or perhaps will this extended number of channels put pay tv out of business
because the programs will be identical on both? Is FOXTEL doomed by this
development because of program access competition effects?

In the 'internet world' the content comes from the users. In the 'tv
broadcast world' the content comes from actors, writers, producers,
specialists, technicians, etc. Two very different models.

I'm still skeptical of the economic feasibility of this move. But, oh, I'm
forgetting the 40million population projections that some in government
have. Maybe that's the missing variable in my thinking? <only half joking>

Jan

JLWhitaker Associates
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
jwhit@primenet.com -- http://www.primenet.com/~jwhit/whitentr.htm



From effectivebusiness@pplications.com.au Sat Dec 12 03:17:47 1998
From: effectivebusiness@pplications.com.au (Mark Hughes)
Date: Sat, 12 Dec 1998 13:17:47 +1100
Subject: Using email as not-email (was 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL)
In-Reply-To: <74DC22F0D1E@spectrum.curtin.edu.au>
Message-ID: <001001be2575$9c030ec0$4a1c6ccb@markhugh>

> But, changing threads, I wanted to find out if linkers are
> also using their 'email' as (essentially)
> information management or for other practices that are not
> strictly 'email': a few ideas...

I'm using Outlook's Netfolders capability to replicate my Calendar
from my laptop to my home PC so the rest of the family can keep up
with my whereabouts. I'm also replicating my mum's Outlook calendar
from her laptop onto mine for the same reason. The netfolders
replication uses email to send the data around - when I make a change
to my calendar it automatically creates and sends an outgoing email to
those designated as recipients of the replication. At the receiver's
end it comes in as an email and automatically updates the calendar
copy. The process has the usual ability to give the other people
varying levels of control (view, create, edit, etc) of the shared
calendar. 'Networked' calendars using SMTP as a 'store and forward
batch network'.

Could be a useful process for say, a small company with a rep always
on the road.

Although it appears to use standard SMTP as the transport, and Outlook
handles the messages as email, I dunno if I should call it email
though. I tend to define email as 'person-to-person' communication.
But this is actually application-to-application communication, so I
think its actually 'EDI' using SMTP as transport and with a
proprietary file format.

Regards, Mark

PS - the only weird thing is the size of the emails that are created
(which don't appear to be viewable in Outlook btw - I can see they're
there ready to send, but can't open them up). A change to the
calendar ought to a pretty small amount of text data; event, start
time/date, end time/date, etc; but the emails seem overly large when
being transmitted. Aha, its a Microsoft product - 'nuff said :)

Mark Hughes
Director
Effective Business Applications
effectivebusiness@pplications.com.au
61 4 1374 3959


From ramin@consult.com.au Sat Dec 12 04:22:50 1998
From: ramin@consult.com.au (ramin)
Date: Sat, 12 Dec 1998 14:22:50 +1100
Subject: EMAIL BLOCKING?
References: <001001be2575$9c030ec0$4a1c6ccb@markhugh>
Message-ID: <3671E18A.61132374@consult.com.au>


It would be truly amazing if there was any truth to this.


Friday December 11 6:36 PM ET

Blue Mountain sues Microsoft, WebTV

By Maria Seminerio, ZDNet

Web site Blue Mountain Arts Inc. has filed suit against Microsoft Corp.,
alleging the company launched a "systematic" attempt to "disrupt and
ultimately destroy" Blue Mountain's online greeting card business
to eliminate competition for its own new electronic card site.

The advertisement-supported site, which lets users design and send free
e-mail greeting cards, began getting reports of difficulties late last
month.
This was "at or about the same time Microsoft
(Nasdaq:MSFT) created its competing Web site for electronic greeting
cards,"
according to the suit filed Dec. 8 in Santa Clara, Calif., Superior
Court.

The lawsuit alleges that a version of Microsoft's Internet Explorer
browser
contains a "filter" that "relegates Blue Mountain's greeting cards to a
junk
mail folder for immediate discard, rather than receipt by the
intended recipient."

Users of Microsoft's WebTV system have reported the same problem,
according
to the suit, which also names WebTV Networks Inc. as a defendant.

"The effect of this is that Microsoft, through its dominant Internet
browser,
is able to block Blue Mountain from delivering its electronic greetings
cards
to the intended recipients during the critical holiday
season," the lawsuit states.

Evidence against MS?
While Blue Mountain's main business is poetry publishing, the company
does earn
ad revenue from its free greeting card service. In the suit, Blue
Mountain
alleges that by blocking its cards, Microsoft could
grab additional ad revenue.

Blue Mountain claims to have evidence that "thousands" of its greeting
cards
were blocked from being received by WebTV subscribers. Company officials
also
allege in the lawsuit that Microsoft refused their
request to correct the problem in Internet Explorer and in the WebTV
software.

The lead attorney on the case is longtime Microsoft foe Gary Reback of
the
Palo Alto, Calif., law firm Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosatio. Officials
at
Microsoft were not immediately available for comment
on the lawsuit.

--
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Ramin Marzbani
www.consult ACN 070 079 122

If you live in Australia, have your say
http://survey.hotlink.com.au/cgi-bin/goto_survey_new?refid=rm

From r.polanskis@nepean.uws.edu.au Sat Dec 12 05:53:46 1998
From: r.polanskis@nepean.uws.edu.au (Rachel Polanskis)
Date: Sat, 12 Dec 1998 15:53:46 +1100 (EST)
Subject: Using email as not-email (was 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL)
In-Reply-To: <001001be2575$9c030ec0$4a1c6ccb@markhugh>
Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.4.00.9812121551390.559-100000@isis.virago.org.au>


On Sat, 12 Dec 1998, Mark Hughes wrote:

> PS - the only weird thing is the size of the emails that are created
> (which don't appear to be viewable in Outlook btw - I can see they're
> there ready to send, but can't open them up). A change to the
> calendar ought to a pretty small amount of text data; event, start
> time/date, end time/date, etc; but the emails seem overly large when
> being transmitted. Aha, its a Microsoft product - 'nuff said :)

And a another thing to Lookout for with Outlook, as recently mentioned
on "comp.risks" is the wonderful feature that is has of rescheduling your
appointments forward or back so many hours if you change time zones....

Ahhhh.... thanks for StarOffice!


rachel

--
Rachel Polanskis Kingswood, Greater Western Sydney, Australia
grove@zeta.org.au http://www.zeta.org.au/~grove/grove.html
r.polanskis@nepean.uws.edu.au http://www.nepean.uws.edu.au/ccd/
"Yow! Am I having fun yet?!" - John Howard^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H Zippy the Pinhead


From fist@ozemail.com.au Sat Dec 12 06:26:09 1998
From: fist@ozemail.com.au (Stewart Fist)
Date: Sat, 12 Dec 1998 16:26:09 +1100
Subject: I want my HDTV -- or not.
Message-ID: <199812120525.QAA09200@fep9.mail.ozemail.net>

Janet wrote re ditigal TV:

> I'm not sure how better coverage is accomplished with this new
>technology.

We've chosen to use a DTV system which allows Single Frequency Networks, and
this means that small low-power transponders can be used to fill shadow
areas. Also, digital signals can be discriminated at location half-way
between two stations using the same frequency (co-located). Both effects
mean that coverage areas at a good quality will be better -- with a
cliff-edge drop-off outside these areas.

On the second point of more channels. I've now had a Paulian conversion on
this. In Los Angeles we had 90 channels on the cable system and at least
five of them were always watchable. You get a lot more junk, but also more
watchable programs with interest for niche-viewers.

Most of the cable channels in the USA are still advertising supported. Most
production has been paid for in home territories, and so Australia will get
a lot of good foreign material (also from Asia and Europe) at a very low
cost. The real question is what this will do to our domestic production
industry.

A lot of the most interesting material I saw in the USA, was also the
cheapest to produce. I also liked having a nostalgia B&W film channel, and
the costs of most of these programs would be next to zero in Australia, I
would think.

Generally niche channels will be advertising-supported in the future, I
would guess, because the advertisers have access to a highly targeted
audience. Pay TV will probably be general interest, with popular
entertainment like major sports and block-buster films.

I don't object to this arrangement.
------------------------------------------------------------------
Stewart Fist - Independent writer and columnist
70 Middle Harbour Road, LINDFIELD, NSW, 2070, Australia
Ph: +612 9416 7458 Fax: +612 9416 4582
------------------------------------------------------------------
The Australian <http://www.newsit.com.au/index_opinion.htm>
The ABC <http://www.abc.net.au/http/sfist/>
Electric-words <http://www.electric-words.com>
------------------------------------------------------------------

From rickml@dot.net.au Sun Dec 13 00:44:43 1998
From: rickml@dot.net.au (Richard Welykochy)
Date: Sun, 13 Dec 1998 10:44:43 +1100
Subject: EMAIL BLOCKING?
References: <001001be2575$9c030ec0$4a1c6ccb@markhugh> <3671E18A.61132374@consult.com.au>
Message-ID: <3672FFEB.5DD3BE8D@dot.net.au>

ramin wrote:

> It would be truly amazing if there was any truth to this.


> Blue Mountain sues Microsoft, WebTV
>
> Web site Blue Mountain Arts Inc. has filed suit against Microsoft Corp.,
> alleging the company launched a "systematic" attempt to "disrupt and
> ultimately destroy" Blue Mountain's online greeting card business
> to eliminate competition for its own new electronic card site.

[big snip]

In cases like this, the source of the problem is either
conspiracy or incompetence. It would almost be laughable if
the problem in the case of Blue Mtn Arts proved to be a bug
in MS IE 4.0, which is certainly not beyond the realm of
possibility. Since MS is finely tunely its defenses mechanisms
in court these days, expect "incompetence" as a defense ;)

R Welykochy

From Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au Sun Dec 13 01:41:10 1998
From: Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au (Roger Clarke)
Date: Sun, 13 Dec 1998 11:41:10 +1100
Subject: EC Conf. Bled'99: New Information
Message-ID: <v03130330b298bd5411af@[203.37.10.225]>


1. White Paper on Key EC Issues

A GDSS-supported workshop was held at the Bled EC Conference in June 1998.
The results have been published in a White paper on

'Key Research Issues in International Electronic Commerce'

edited by Prof. Doug Vogel, and available from the Conference web page at:
http://ecom.fov.uni-mb.si/


2. Additional Publishing Outlet

Each year since 1995, the authors of a selection of the best research
papers at the Bled conference have been invited to revise them for
publication in a special issue of

IJEC - International Journal of Electronic Commerce
http://www.cba.bgsu.edu/ijec/

The Conference is pleased to announce that, commencing in 1999, an
additional such relationship has been forged with the journal

Electronic Markets
http://www.electronicmarkets.org/

Outlets are therefore assured for the best papers, not only of a
specifically research nature, but also for those that are oriented towards
the interface between academics and practitioners.


3. Reminder of Submission Date

Papers are due only 7 weeks from now, on 2 February 1999
Instructions are at:
http://www-wi.uni-muenster.de/wi/bled99/


Roger Clarke http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/
http://www.etc.com.au/Xamax/
Xamax Consultancy Pty Ltd, 78 Sidaway St, Chapman ACT 2611 AUSTRALIA
Tel: +61 2 6288 1472, and 6288 6916 mailto:Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au

Visiting Fellow, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology
The Australian National University Canberra ACT 0200 AUSTRALIA
Information Sciences Building Room 211 Tel: +61 2 6249 3666



From stephen@melbpc.org.au Sun Dec 13 02:34:01 1998
From: stephen@melbpc.org.au (Stephen)
Date: Sun, 13 Dec 1998 12:34:01 +1100
Subject: FYI: One Step Ahead 12-Dec-98
Message-ID: <3.0.1.32.19981213123401.0072415c@popa.melbpc.org.au>

Hello,

In case you've not come across this before, perhaps link members might
be interested in the following, in-full here, but for some advertising.

--
Date: Sat, 12 Dec 1998 20:15:52 +0800
From: Gihan Perera <gihan@firststep.com.au>
Organization: First Step Communications
Subject: One Step Ahead 12-Dec-98
Reply-To: gihan@firststep.com.au

One Step Ahead
from First Step Communications
============================================

You are receiving this newsletter because you have subscribed to our
mailing list (or somebody has subscribed you on your behalf). To read
old newsletters, and for information on how to subscribe and
unsubscribe, go to: http://www.firststep.com.au/newsletter/

=== Society ===========================================================

--- Internet plays crucial role in human rights struggle ---

As the world celebrates the 50th anniversary of the Universal
Declaration of Human Rights, activists acknowledge the role of the
Internet in transforming the struggle for human rights.

Source:
http://www.news.com/News/Item/0%2C4%2C29774%2C00.html?dd.ne.tx.fs9.1210

--- Internet users turn to Web sites for latest news ---

Although television remains the primary source for breaking news,
almost half of (American) on-line users turn to the Internet and
other on-line services for the latest news stories and headlines.

Source:
http://www.wired.com/news/news/email/explode-infobeat/culture/story/16715.html

--- Rural Australia takes to the Net ---

High access costs and poor service quality haven't stopped country
Australians from taking advantage of the Internet as a tool for
shopping and financial transactions.

Source: http://newswire.com.au/9811/rural.htm

=== Education and Children ============================================

--- Techies get lion's share of the IT training pie ---

Corporate America spends more money training its technology experts
in keeping up their skills than it does in training other employees
in using the technology.

Source: http://www.globetechnology.com/gam/TechCareer/19981126/TWUSER.html

=== Culture of the Net ================================================

--- Women are on-line shopping equals ---

A recent survey shows that women are no longer lagging behind men in
using the Internet for on-line shopping.

Source: http://www.ecommercetimes.com/news/articles/981207-3.shtml

--- Australian ISPs urged to join ombudsman scheme ---

The Australian telecommunications ombudsman is encouraging Internet
Service Providers to join the voluntary Telecommunications Industry
Ombudsman scheme, which offers ISPs the backing of an official body
and offers consumers extra protection.

Source: http://www.andovernews.com/cgi-bin/news_story.pl?102602/topstories

--- Telstra claims top ISP spot in Australia ---

Telstra claims that its Big Pond service now has 280,000 subscribers
in Australia, making it the largest ISP in the country. OzEmail, its
closest competitor, is disputing the claim, calling for an independent
audit of Telstra's figures.

Source: http://www.theaustralian.com.au/techno/4265892.htm

--- Rapid increase in Internet usage in Australian homes ---

Over 1.2 million Australian homes had access to the Internet in August
1998, almost 50% higher than six months previously, according to the
Australian Bureau of Statistics.

Source:
http://www.abs.gov.au/websitedbs/d3110125.nsf/4a255eef008309e44a255eef00061e
57/d69a87dffa39a58aca2566c600800f16?OpenDocument

=== Technology ========================================================

--- Telstra to create e-mail directory information service ---

Telstra is planning to create a telephone service listing Australian
e-mail addresses. Users will be able to call Telstra to find out an
e-mail address the same way they currently use the telephone directory
enquiry service.

Source: http://www.theaustralian.com.au/techno/4319444.htm

--- Software developer sues over ownership of "e-book" ---

An Australian software developer that has a trademark on the term
"e-book" is suing an American company for the use of the term in its
new software product.

Source: http://www.theaustralian.com.au/techno/4295787.htm

=== Security and Privacy ==============================================

--- Spam vandal brings OzEmail e-mail to its knees ---

An unknown hacker brought Australia's largest ISP's e-mail system to
its knees by flooding it with over 7000 messages, delaying other e-mail
by two hours and in some cases sending duplicate messages to OzEmail
customers.

Source: http://www.theaustralian.com.au/techno/4258626.htm

--- Internal security problems worse than external hackers ---

A London security conference has warned businesses that they face more
risk from their own employees than from hackers breaking in over the
Internet.

Source: http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/sci/tech/newsid_203000/203547.stm

=== Business ==========================================================

--- IBM offers e-commerce service to ISPs ---

IBM is offering a new electronic commerce product which allows ISPs to
build electronic shopping services for their customers.

Source: http://www.theaustralian.com.au/techno/4332339.htm

--- Australia joins U.S. on e-commerce policy ---

The Australian and United States governments issued a joint statement
on electronic commerce, covering issues such as taxation, privacy,
infrastructure development and consumer confidence.

Source: http://www.andovernews.com/cgi-bin/news_story.pl?100197/topstories

-- ADVERTISEMENT ------------------------------------------------------
<snip>
-- ADVERTISEMENT ------------------------------------------------------
<snip>
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
LEARN TO USE THE INTERNET MORE EFFECTIVELY

Are you making the most of the Internet? If you'd like to use it more
effectively, subscribe to the FREE weekly newsletter, Solid Ground:

http://www.firststep.com.au/solid_ground
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=======================================================================
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special emphasis on the Internet in Australia. This is a free service
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You can join the mailing list or remove yourself from our Web site:

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Happy trails ..
Stephen Loosley
stephen@melbpc.org.au
s.loosley@vermontsc.vic.edu.au
sloosley@vaxc.cc.monash.edu.au
Croydon North Victoria 3136

From ggebesse@nsw.bigpond.net.au Sun Dec 13 08:24:36 1998
From: ggebesse@nsw.bigpond.net.au (Peter Bowditch)
Date: Sun, 13 Dec 1998 17:24:36 +1000
Subject: EMAIL BLOCKING?
In-Reply-To: <3672FFEB.5DD3BE8D@dot.net.au>
Message-ID: <199812130624.RAA12295@m5.c2.telstra-mm.net.au>

> In cases like this, the source of the problem is either
> conspiracy or incompetence. It would almost be laughable if
> the problem in the case of Blue Mtn Arts proved to be a bug
> in MS IE 4.0, which is certainly not beyond the realm of
> possibility. Since MS is finely tunely its defenses mechanisms
> in court these days, expect "incompetence" as a defense ;)

I doubt that MS has even heard of this outfit. This is a classic case of
some liar chasing someone with deep pockets. I'll bet the shyster hums
"My Sweet Lord" in the shower.

The Java at the Blue Mountains site crashed IE4 here to the point where a
reboot was necessary. Now, while I can imagine a circumstance where
Microsoft might block access to a site (although I don't believe for a
moment that they do), I can't really envisualise Bill saying to Steve "Let's
write some code to crash Windows when someone tries to send a
Christmas card".

When I found a card which did not crash my machine, I was able to send
it to myself and read it in IE4 with no trouble at all. The most likely answer
is that the Blue Mountain server has started to get a bit more activity now
that Christmas is coming and it is just falling over by itself because the
turkeys there can't write software.


.....................
Peter Bowditch
peterb@gebesse.com.au
http://www.gebesse.com.au

From jellicle@inch.com Sun Dec 13 07:49:18 1998
From: jellicle@inch.com (Michael Sims)
Date: Sun, 13 Dec 1998 02:49:18 -0400
Subject: EMAIL BLOCKING?
In-Reply-To: <199812130624.RAA12295@m5.c2.telstra-mm.net.au>
References: <3672FFEB.5DD3BE8D@dot.net.au>
Message-ID: <199812130747.CAA08026@arutam.inch.com>

Peter Bowditch wrote:

> > In cases like this, the source of the problem is either
> > conspiracy or incompetence. It would almost be laughable if
> > the problem in the case of Blue Mtn Arts proved to be a bug
> > in MS IE 4.0, which is certainly not beyond the realm of
> > possibility. Since MS is finely tunely its defenses mechanisms
> > in court these days, expect "incompetence" as a defense ;)
>
> I doubt that MS has even heard of this outfit. This is a classic
> case of some liar chasing someone with deep pockets. I'll bet the
> shyster hums "My Sweet Lord" in the shower.

I've looked into the situation a little bit more and it really is a
"bug" on Microsoft's part. Well, maybe a design feature.

Basically Microsoft is attempting to create email spam filters that
filter out, semi-automatically, the various make-money-fast and other
types of email spam. There were articles in the U.S. press a while
back about M$ collecting many, many spams, analyzing them, and
attempting to write rules which would send most of them to a Spam
mail folder and most of your good mail to your regular folder.

It probably affects only the latest versions of Internet Explorer.

Obviously, this heuristic mail-handling approach cannot come
near 100% accuracy. It seems very likely that the email messages
these people are sending out appear, to whatever M$ software, to be
email spam, and are thus being redirected automatically for users
which have default settings to Spam folders - which the recipient may
or may not ever read.

"The lawsuit alleges that a version of Microsoft's Internet Explorer
browser contains a "filter" that "relegates Blue Mountain's greeting
cards to a junk mail folder for immediate discard, rather than receipt
by the intended recipient.""


Basically M$ is trying to make it "easier" for internet-newbies to
avoid junk email. The problems come when newbies do not have the
knowledge necessary to understand what is going on or to recognize
that good email is being set for discarding - they may never receive
their email cards at all because of the default selection of their
email software to trash it.

This problem of filtering is quite similar to the problems with
various other internet censorship products - they always, always
sweep overbroadly.

Now, it appears that the Blue Mountain people also have concerns that
this may have been done intentionally (hey boys, add one more
rule into the spam filter...). I couldn't venture an opinion on
that. I'd say it's certainly possible that it was unintentional
though, and Occam's Razor suggests that M$ probably didn't do it
intentionally. On the other hand, if you give M$ the benefit of the
doubt here, you make it possible for them (or whoever) to actually
slip something in at a later date.

Step back and look at it: by default, the product comes with certain
secret rules turned on which take some of your email away and make
it hard to access. Many default settings are never ever changed by
the vast majority of computer users, making defaults quite powerful
- even if one can turn it off, many users simply won't. And nobody
knows the secret email-handling rules except Micro$oft. M$ has
demonstrated tendencies to do things which hurt their competitors.
Think to the logical outcome and it starts getting rather worrisome.



--
Michael Sims The Censorware Project
http://censorware.org
| <- You must be smarter than this stick to ride the Internet.


From ggebesse@nsw.bigpond.net.au Sun Dec 13 11:58:59 1998
From: ggebesse@nsw.bigpond.net.au (Peter Bowditch)
Date: Sun, 13 Dec 1998 20:58:59 +1000
Subject: EMAIL BLOCKING?
In-Reply-To: <199812130747.CAA08026@arutam.inch.com>
References: <199812130624.RAA12295@m5.c2.telstra-mm.net.au>
Message-ID: <199812130959.UAA27641@m5.c2.telstra-mm.net.au>

Michael Sims said:

> I've looked into the situation a little bit more and it really is a
> "bug" on Microsoft's part. Well, maybe a design feature.
>
> Basically Microsoft is attempting to create email spam filters that
> filter out, semi-automatically, the various make-money-fast and other

Information about the card is delivered by email. The mail message
contains a link to a URL for the card itself. Here's mine (copied
from Pegasus Mail):

http://www.bluemountain.com/cards/box3794w/wka3ttudeicwzx.htm

So E4 is NOT involved until the link is clicked and, if IE4 is set as
the default browser, it opens the web page. If Netscape is the
browser, Netscape will open.

The problem then must be built into an email client, not a browser.
Outlook (of all kinds) allows the user to set up filters and one
special kind of filter (Restricted Sites) is a list of unwelcome
senders for mail. These filters are empty when the product is
installed, and the user can add whatever she likes.

So, in summary, we have a company complaining that a browser is
stopping their mail from being delivered, and they nominate a
browser which has no inbuilt mail receiving client. If they don't know
the difference between a mail client and a browser, it is little
wonder that their Java code sucks like a Dustbuster. Like I said,
some liars chasing deep pockets.


.....................
Peter Bowditch
peterb@gebesse.com.au
http://www.gebesse.com.au

From danny@cs.su.oz.au Sun Dec 13 12:48:35 1998
From: danny@cs.su.oz.au (Danny Yee)
Date: Sun, 13 Dec 1998 21:48:35 +1000
Subject: EFA: New Encryption Controls Condemned
Message-ID: <199812131050.VAA21120@boomer.anu.edu.au>

http://www.efa.org.au/Publish/PR981214.html

Media Release 14th December 1998

New Encryption Controls Condemned

Electronic Frontiers Australia (EFA) today condemned the recently
announced revision of an international protocol which placed new
restrictions on the availability of privacy-enhancing tools for
electronic communication.

On the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Universal Declaration
of Human Rights, 33 nations, including Australia, bowed to US demands
to restrict the export of cryptography software, tools which are
often used by human rights organisations such as Amnesty to inform
the world of atrocities committed by repressive governments.

The Wassenaar Arrangement, which was originally established in 1996
to control the export of strategic military weapons, has now
extended its scope to include mass market encryption tools, in a
move that has been greeted with widespread disapproval.

EFA spokesperson Greg Taylor said, "Cryptography controls have been
universally condemned by privacy advocates, industry groups, and
professional bodies for many years. At a time when there was an
expectation that common sense might finally prevail, the world's
cold warriors have met in closed session in Vienna to rebuff their
many critics and to extend existing controls to commonly available
commercial products."

The new arrangement places restrictions on the export of mass
market security software using keys greater than 64 bits, at a time
when most security experts believe that a minimum of 128 bits is
essential for secure communications.

"Cryptography is not a weapon", Mr. Taylor said. "It is a defensive
tool that is a necessary element in resisting information warfare
attacks. By agreeing to US demands, Australia's Wassenaar
delegation has tacitly accepted that restrictions should be placed
on Australian citizens, who will continue to be deprived of access to
many high-strength security products, particularly from the USA. The
controls defy rational analysis", he said, "because high quality
strong crypto products are freely available in the public domain.
The real reasons behind such controls can only be speculated upon."

Predictably the Internet community has responded to this latest
threat of enhanced global surveillance by demonstrating that
mathematics cannot be banned. Websites are now springing up around
the world making available high-strength security products for
downloading.

"EFA will now be stepping up its public awareness campaign on
cryptography restrictions," said EFA Chair Kim Heitman.
"Politicians generally are only too happy to leave this controversial
issue to Defence Department bureaucrats. At a time when governments
are preaching the benefits of electronic commerce, it is incredible
that security tools should be restricted. Parliament needs to be
made aware of the importance of cryptography, and the negative
impact of current policy."

[ENDS]

--------------------------------------------------------------
Electronic Frontiers Australia Inc -- http://www.efa.org.au/
representing Internet users concerned with on-line freedoms
--------------------------------------------------------------
Media Contacts

Greg Taylor Kim Heitman
Phone: 07 3370 6362 Phone: 08 9458 2790
gtaylor@efa.org.au kheitman@it.com.au
--------------------------------------------------------------

BACKGROUND

What is the Wassenaar Arrangement?

This is a 1995 international regime to control trade
in conventional arms and dual-use goods and technology. It
replaced the previous COCOM regime. 33 countries are signatories,
including most European countries, Canada, Japan, New Zealand,
the USA and Australia. Details: http://www.wassenaar.org

The new Wassneaar Control Lists
http://www.wassenaar.org/List/Table%20of%20Contents%20-%2098web.html
HTML version:
http://www.fitug.de/news/wa/index.html


REFERENCES and RESOURCES

Global Internet Liberty Campaign, member resolution on Wassenaar
control regime.
http://www.gilc.org/crypto/wassenaar/gilc-statement-998.html

International Cryptography Campaign
http://www.efa.org.au/wassenaar/

Draft Declaration of Human Rights in Cyberspace
http://www.be-in.com/9/ten/rightsdec.html

Being economical for the truth. From internal briefings to remote links,
Amnesty International needs secure systems.
Network Week 9/12/98
http://www.networkweek.com/news/13_912.html

Is Strong Crypto a Human Right?
Wired News
http://www.wired.com/news/news/politics/story/16768.html

Building crypto archives worldwide to foil US-built Berlin Walls
http://jya.com/crypto-call.htm

US 'Echelon' Spy Network Monitoring Email, Fax, Cell Phones Worldwide
http://politicaltexan.com/wwwboard/messages/58.html

Cryptography and Liberty. An International Survey of Encryption Policy.
Global Internet Liberty Campaign, 1998.
http://www.gilc.org/crypto/crypto-survey.html

Review of policy relating to encryption technologies (Walsh Review).
Australian Commonwealth Attorney-General's Department 1996.
http://www.efa.org.au/Issues/Crypto/Walsh/

Cryptography's Role in Securing the Information Society. National Research
Council, USA, 1996.
http://www.replay.com/mirror/nrc/

From jwhit@PrimeNet.Com Sun Dec 13 20:41:31 1998
From: jwhit@PrimeNet.Com (Janet Whitaker)
Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 06:41:31 +1100 (EST)
Subject: San Francisco power outage story
Message-ID: <199812131941.GAA19442@mars.planet.net.au>


>San Francisco blackout snarls Web
>
>By Tim Clark and Paul Festa
>Staff Writers, CNET News.com
>
>December 8, 1998, 5:45 p.m. PT
>
>update SAN FRANCISCO--One of the worst blackouts
>in the region's history paralyzed much of the San
>Francisco Bay Area today, knocking out power to
>nearly 1 million people and disrupting online
>operations in the process.
>
>The power outage affected areas from this city to the
>northern edge of Silicon Valley, snarling airport activity and
>creating monster traffic jams both on surface streets and in
>cyberspace. The outage also ceased trading at the Pacific
>Stock Exchange, which closed for the day, sending equity
>and options orders to its Los Angeles arm.
>
>Pacific Gas & Electric estimated that the blackout affected
>370,000-plus bill-paying customers, a figure that translated
>exponentially into numbers approaching 1 million, according
>to estimates by public officials. The utility said it had
>restored power to all but 20,000 customers by
>midafternoon, several hours after the outage began at 8:17
>a.m.
>
>"I've lived in the Bay Area for three decades, and I've never
>seen anything like this," PG&E spokesman Chris Johnson
>said of the blackout, which began at a substation south of
>San Francisco and triggered outages at other facilities in an
>electrical domino effect.
>
>The public utility, which supplies power to cities and
>counties throughout Northern California, blamed the problem
>on a "simple human error" stemming from construction work
>in the city of San Mateo. PG&E chief executive Gordon
>Smith said the construction error involved a single piece of
>copper pipe and said the utility had no back-up systems in
>place. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>
>Although the outage was limited to the San Francisco
>region, its effects knew no geographic boundaries in
>cyberspace. The blackout affected vast numbers of people
>and companies that use the Internet everywhere, many of
>which rely on communications with the Bay Area and
>operations based here, regardless of where they themselves
>are physically located.
>
>PG&E said it would review compensation claims for
>business lost to the power failure. "Claims will be handled
>on a case-by-case basis," said a statement posted its Web
>site at the end of the day.
>
>A number of Web and e-commerce companies went dark or
>were forced to use back-up power systems when the
>blackout struck. Electricity at the offices of CNET: The
>Computer Network was out this morning, temporarily
>disabling the company's servers, including those used by
>News.com and Snap.
>
>Some companies had backed up their servers outside the
>Bay Area, allowing them to weather the outage better than
>others. Such was the case for online brokerage E*Trade
>and the Web operations of San Francisco-based Charles
>Schwab.
>
>Internet companies like Excite, Yahoo, Netscape
>Communications, @Home, and San Francisco online
>agency Preview Travel were not affected.
>
>CompareNet, which has offices based in San Francisco's
>China Basin area, was able to continue its online operations
>because its site is hosted at Web hosting firm Frontier
>Globalcenter in Sunnyvale. Nevertheless, the outage
>downed internal servers at CompareNet, preventing it from
>updating its site, making changes to its database of
>consumer price-comparison information, or launching a
>scheduled banner ad campaign.
>
>"The site was on autopilot," company president Trevor
>Traina said. "It's amazing to me that the world's most
>productive and technologically advanced region was brought
>to its knees because one guy somewhere made a
>mistake."
>
>Most Internet service providers reported few
>disruptions in service. "We had to go on back-up
>power using a diesel generator, but we didn't blink at
>the outage," said Mike Lydon, director of network
>operations for Best Internet, a major Web hosting
>operation whose San Francisco office was hit by the
>blackout.
>
>IGC Netcom switched customers dialing into its one
>San Francisco point of presence (POP) to other
>connections. Pacific Bell Internet resorted to back-up
>power, but Concentric Network reported no problems
>with its lines.
>
>"Good afternoon. We have power back from PG&E,
>servers are slowly coming back online," said a
>message posted this afternoon on the Web site of
>Whole Earth Networks, an ISP in San Francisco.
>
>"Modems are on and answering, although you may
>not be able to login yet. Mail and news should be up
>and running. We will keep updating as information
>becomes availible. Sorry for the inconvenience. Have
>a good day," the message concluded.
>
>A toll-free tape-recorded message at the ISP offered
>a similar explanation.
>
>The outage did not extend far south enough to affect
>most Silicon Valley businesses. "They had a blink of
>the eye when the hit came, but they didn't lose
>power," PG&E spokesman Scott Blakey said.
>
>Stanford University, which hosts a major Internet hub
>that has had problems with power surges in the past,
>experienced no interruptions. In fact, its own
>power-generating facility supplied power to PG&E
>during the outage.
>
>Major banks go offline
>Still, companies that rely on other services based in
>San Francisco, such as banking, were affected by
>the outage. Bank of America and Wells Fargo
>reported disruptions at their branches and with their
>automated teller machine networks. Wells said that
>the lack of power forced 113 branches to close but
>that credit card operations continued, though phone
>authorizations were required in areas where the
>power was out.
>
>Companies were also hampered because many
>employees couldn't get to work. Traffic lights in much
>of San Francisco were out, slowing movement on
>city streets to a crawl. Traffic into the city from
>Oakland and the South Bay also was jammed as
>vehicles exiting the freeways ran into snarls.
>
>The blackout halted public transit systems in the
>area, including the underground BART commuter rail
>that links San Francisco to Oakland and other parts
>of the Bay Area. Within San Francisco, electric
>trolleys and cable cars were out of service in many
>areas, as were the underground Metro trains.
>
>The outage, which prompted San Francisco Mayor
>Willie Brown to declare a citywide state of
>emergency, took at least two local television stations
>and several radio broadcasts off the air.
>
>The outage served as a reminder of the kinds of
>disruption the power-reliant information industry
>could face in the year 2000. Some predict that the
>so-called Y2K bug, the result of common computer
>date fields that do not distinguish between the years
>1900 and 2000, will cause greater power failures and
>other infrastructure problems.
>
>Outages pose a special risk to computers and other
>sensitive electrical appliances because of surges
>that occur when power is restored. Homes or
>businesses located in close proximity to
>transformers--hardware on the power line that
>connects a building--are at particular risk.
>
>As a result, power companies recommend the use of
>surge protectors. They also recommend that, during
>a power outage, sensitive appliances be unplugged
>and main breakers be switched off.
>
>Reuters contributed to this report.
>
>But not this bit, "In God We Trust", all others pay cash !
>

>

JLWhitaker Associates
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
jwhit@primenet.com -- http://www.primenet.com/~jwhit/whitentr.htm



From tomw@acslink.net.au Sun Dec 13 22:06:24 1998
From: tomw@acslink.net.au (Tom Worthington)
Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 08:06:24 +1100
Subject: National bandwidth inquiry
Message-ID: <2.2.32.19981213210624.007056a4@mail.mpx.com.au>

At 14:13 10/12/98 +1000, richard@auscoms.com.au wrote:

>...I keep hearing supposedly intelligent people endorsing the funding
>of PoPs which will provide third-rate access speeds...

A thought from Friday's IRC <http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw/irc/irc.html>:
Has any funding or thought gone into community run wireless data networks?
This would be the data equivalent of UHF CB Radio repeaters.

Most of the wireless technology being developed appears to be for city use
and assumes a corporate infrastructure (and profits) to support it.

Instead, if we had a technology which would work with one isolated base
station plugged into the Internet, it could service the surrounding
community and be supported by that community. UHF CB radio repeaters cost a
few thousand dollars and service about a 50 km radius.

Access might be free for local data and charged for remote data. As well as
being cost-effective, this might promote a sense of community (as CB radio
does).

This might literally use UHF CB radio technology and amateur developed
packet radio repeaters, But something a little more sophisticated may be
possible.

It may be better if some public money was put into developing this
technology for community use, rather than short term subsidies for
unsustainable technology. There would also be export potential for the
technology in third world countries.


ps: Apologies if this has already been discussed, but the title "National
bandwidth inquiry" put me off reading any of the thread up until now.


Tom Worthington http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw PO Box 13
Immediate Past President Belconnen ACT 2617
Australian Computer Society tomw@acslink.net.au
----------------------------------------------------------------------
IRC 1999 Topics Needed: http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw/irc/irc.html


From tomw@acslink.net.au Sun Dec 13 22:06:27 1998
From: tomw@acslink.net.au (Tom Worthington)
Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 08:06:27 +1100
Subject: Computer professionals strike on Monday December 14! (fwd)
Message-ID: <2.2.32.19981213210627.006adf7c@mail.mpx.com.au>

At 02:11 11/12/98 +0800, Kimberley Heitman wrote:

>FYI, details of Bob Glickstein's campaign for a global strike by computer
>and IT professionals next Monday... protest the signing of the Wassenaar
>Arrangement... restrictions on cryptographic software ... Australia is a
>signatory! ... http://www.zanshin.com/~bobg/

IT professionals might achieve better results by putting their efforts into
positive action. The Internet can be used to communicate the message in
interesting, informative and even humorous ways.

As an example during an EFA organized protest against some Internet
censorship legislation, I wrote a review of the play "Galileo", which drew
parallels between censorship by the office of the inquisition with Internet
censorship now.

In the current case I can't help being reminded by Wassenaar Arrangement of
the "Warsaw Concerto", a pastiche of classical music from the WWII film
"Dangerous Moonlight". Perhaps someone could produce a parody of the
Wassenaar Arrangement done as a spy drama, with people smuggling copies of
PGP tattooed on their toes. :-)

See also: "ACS Welcomes IFIP Position on Cryptography", media release,
Friday 23 May 1997: http://www.acs.org.au/news/caelli.htm
"The Australian Computer Society (ACS) has backed calls from international
IT security experts to end restrictions on the availability of cryptography
technology..."


Tom Worthington http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw PO Box 13
Immediate Past President Belconnen ACT 2617
Australian Computer Society tomw@acslink.net.au
----------------------------------------------------------------------
IRC 1999 Topics Needed: http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw/irc/irc.html


From rickml@dot.net.au Sun Dec 13 23:18:06 1998
From: rickml@dot.net.au (Richard Welykochy)
Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 09:18:06 +1100
Subject: San Francisco power outage story
References: <199812131941.GAA19442@mars.planet.net.au>
Message-ID: <36743D1E.E4CF758@dot.net.au>

Janet Whitaker submitted:
>
> >San Francisco blackout snarls Web

<<SNIP>>

> >Pacific Gas & Electric estimated that the blackout affected
> >370,000-plus bill-paying customers, a figure that translated
> >exponentially into numbers approaching 1 million, according
> >to estimates by public officials.

Public officials don't seem to know the meaning of the word
"exponential". This is less than a three-fold increase in effect,
hardly exponential ;)

<<SNIP MILD HYSTERIA>>

There is a lesson to be learnt here about backup systems and
UPS (see the current discussion in Aussie ISP for a coincidental
parallel discussion on this).

But: Hmmmf! A four hour outage like this will not be remembered
four months from now, and will hardly dent mankind's propsperity
and history now, will it? The news spinners loved to beat this one
up, since it affect the hub of silicon-based life on the planet.

Gimme a break! I doubt the one year+ AUckland outage received
this much attention!

R Welykochy

From tjordan@vic.bigpond.net.au Sun Dec 13 23:20:41 1998
From: tjordan@vic.bigpond.net.au (Trevor Jordan)
Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 09:20:41 +1100 (EDT)
Subject: National bandwidth inquiry
In-Reply-To: <2.2.32.19981213210624.007056a4@mail.mpx.com.au>
Message-ID: <v03130302b29a87d25639@[24.192.14.82]>

At 9:06 PM -0000 13/12/98, Tom Worthington wrote:
>At 14:13 10/12/98 +1000, richard@auscoms.com.au wrote:
>
>>...I keep hearing supposedly intelligent people endorsing the funding
>>of PoPs which will provide third-rate access speeds...
>
>A thought from Friday's IRC <http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw/irc/irc.html>:
>Has any funding or thought gone into community run wireless data networks?
>This would be the data equivalent of UHF CB Radio repeaters.

Tom

See the 'The Bass Coast Network' in the Telecommunications Journal of
Australia No.3 of 1998. Radio-based rural internet access at 2.2 Mbit/s.
RTIF funded.

Trevor Jordan



From richard@auscoms.com.au Mon Dec 14 00:57:03 1998
From: richard@auscoms.com.au (richard@auscoms.com.au)
Date: Mon, 14 Dec 98 09:57:03 +1000
Subject: Wireless PoPs (was Re: National bandwidth inquiry)
Message-ID: <9812149135.AA913589830@mail.auscoms.com.au>


Tom Worthington wrote:

>A thought from Friday's IRC ><http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw/irc/irc.html>:
>Has any funding or thought gone into community run wireless data networks?
>This would be the data equivalent of UHF CB Radio repeaters.
>
>Most of the wireless technology being developed appears to be for city use
>and assumes a corporate infrastructure (and profits) to support it.
>
>Instead, if we had a technology which would work with one isolated base
>station plugged into the Internet, it could service the surrounding
>community and be supported by that community. UHF CB radio repeaters cost >a
few thousand dollars and service about a 50 km radius.

I'll do some reading and get more definitive answers, but I think there are
several points of incompatibility between TCP/IP and CB radio. The CB channels
are too narrow for wideband data rates, I believe.

Also, CB is a shared access medium, ie anybody can talk on any channel at any
given time. So as well as transmitting across multiple CB "channels" to get
decent data rates, the system would have to resolve collisions. At the same
time, it would have to be able to reserve the "channel" for data access, since
anybody with a CB radio attempting voice communications across that channel
would blast the data (note, this kind of collision resolution also suggests
replacing existing voice-only CB sets).

Privacy is another issue. The open channel means any receiver can pick up any
traffic -- which means my e-mail is sent to everybody, so I have to be confident
that it's not 'snoopable' by others.

Lastly, my criticism of other wireless IP solutions -- whether wireless local
loop or satellite IP -- still applies: I'm wary of advocating something that
breaks the standard.

Sorry to be the gloomy one...

Richard Chirgwin

>Access might be free for local data and charged for remote data. As well >as
being cost-effective, this might promote a sense of community (as CB >radio
does).
>
>This might literally use UHF CB radio technology and amateur developed
>packet radio repeaters, But something a little more sophisticated may be
>possible.
>
>It may be better if some public money was put into developing this
>technology for community use, rather than short term subsidies for
>unsustainable technology. There would also be export potential for the
>technology in third world countries.
>
>
>ps: Apologies if this has already been discussed, but the title "National
>bandwidth inquiry" put me off reading any of the thread up until now.
>
>
>Tom Worthington http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw PO Box >13
>Immediate Past President Belconnen ACT 2617
>Australian Computer Society tomw@acslink.net.au
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>IRC 1999 Topics Needed: http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw/irc/irc.html





From tonyb@netinfo.com.au Mon Dec 14 00:02:49 1998
From: tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 10:02:49 +1100
Subject: EMAIL BLOCKING?
Message-ID: <v02110101b2993f95b127@[203.37.43.24]>

At 2:49 AM 13/12/98, Michael Sims wrote:
>Obviously, this heuristic mail-handling approach cannot come
>near 100% accuracy.

This is precisely the same problem that web filters have.

Those trying to write such things should look at the work the automatic
indexing people did on recall-precision evaluation studies thirty years ago
to know they are going to reject a significant proportion of things they
should not and let though a significant of thing they should reject. The
better you get at one the worse at the other. A quick read of the last few
chapters of Lancaster, F. Wilfrid. Information Retrieval Systems:
Characteristics, Testing, and Evaluation, New York, Wiley, 1968 would have
made it clear to them.

I wonder why people don't read the previous literature before they reinvent
the square wheel.

Tony

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From brd@dynamite.com.au Mon Dec 14 00:41:44 1998
From: brd@dynamite.com.au (Bernard Robertson-Dunn)
Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 10:41:44 +1100
Subject: email limbo land
Message-ID: <367450B8.6D7D5F91@dynamite.com.au>

Today I received two copies of an email that seems to have been sent
over six weeks ago.

I had already received a copy on Nov 6. All three messages had the same
message ID.

Could someone who knows about these things suggest how this might
happen? Is it just an email service gone haywire?

What are the consequences for e-commerce if a message can be received
multiple times?

The headers the the last email I received are:

Return-Path: <ppoole@fcref.org>

Received: from wilma.netinfo.com.au (wilma.netinfo.com.au
[203.8.127.33]) by mail.dynamite.com.au (8.8.5/8.8.5) with ESMTP id
IAA13499 for<brd@dynamite.com.au>; Sun, 13 Dec 1998 08:52:00 +1100

Received: from mail.fcref.org ([209.31.249.3]) by wilma.netinfo.com.au
(8.8.7/8.8.7) with ESMTP id UAA07858 for <brd@netinfo.com.au>;
Sun, 13 Dec 1998 20:01:09 +1100

Received: by MAIL with Internet Mail Service (5.0.1458.49) id
<4SRX0V4N>; Thu, 5 Nov 1998 17:58:23 -0500

Message-ID: <8066C3162669D111A8EB006097C2FC023BC505@MAIL>
From: Patrick Poole <ppoole@fcref.org>
Subject: CfCL Weekly Update 11.06.98
Date: Thu, 5 Nov 1998 17:58:09 -0500
X-Priority: 3
MIME-Version: 1.0
X-Mailer: Internet Mail Service (5.0.1458.49)
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
X-UIDL: 422ac9b4e75d21773dbf214d62284ef0
X-Mozilla-Status: 8001

Coalition for Constitutional Liberties
Weekly Update for 11/06/98
Volume I, Number 37

<the rest snipped>

--
Regards
brd

Bernard Robertson-Dunn
Canberra Australia
brd@dynamite.com.au

From tonyb@netinfo.com.au Mon Dec 14 00:49:23 1998
From: tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 10:49:23 +1100
Subject: San Francisco power outage story
Message-ID: <v02110100b299fe642638@[203.37.43.24]>

At 9:18 AM 14/12/98, Richard Welykochy wrote:
>Public officials don't seem to know the meaning of the word
>"exponential". This is less than a three-fold increase in effect,
>hardly exponential ;)

<pedant mode>

"Exponential" does not relate the the amount of increase at all but to the
relation between the rate of increase and the size, Mathematically, that
the first derivative of the value can be expressed as a linear function of
the value.

For example -

dy/dx = Ax

where 'A' is a constant.

It is not that exponential growth need be high just that the growth rate
feeds itself and continues to increase with results some find surprising.
eg the old one about getting more rice that has even been grown if you put
one grain on the first square of a chess board, two on the next and so on
until all 64 squares are full. There will be 2^63 grains on the last square
which is approximately 8,000,000,000,000,000,000 grains

A more physical example is you can't fold a piece of paper in half, no
matter how large more, than 8 times.

Then there is the environmentalist's lily pad and the pond story. There is
a lily in a pond. Each day the the number of leaves will double. In thirty
days it will fill the pond and ruin it. When will the pond he half full?
Answer - the 29th day.

</pedant mode>

Apologies to those of you with some mathematical backgound for whom all
this is obvious.

Tony

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From kgeisel@actonline.com.au Sun Dec 13 13:28:49 1998
From: kgeisel@actonline.com.au (Karin Geiselhart)
Date: Sun, 13 Dec 1998 23:28:49 +1100
Subject: Police techno-surveillance (fwd)
Message-ID: <3.0.5.32.19981213232849.007a9460@pop1.actonline.com.au>

Such a dilemma - for fear of breaching copyright in these forwarded
articles, I've cut out all the articles. (and particles) Anyone who wants
full monty knows who ask.

> United States, Canada, New Zealand, and Norway,
> agreement allows authorities conduct telecom
> surveillance across international borders, according
> Europol document leaked members
> European Parliament.
>
>...[snip]...
>
>Europe readies police techno-surveillance law
>
> By Niall McKay
>
>SAN FRANCISCO (Wired) - European Union is quietly getting ready
>approve legislation that will allow police eavesdrop both Internet
>conversations Iridium satellite telephone calls without obtaining court
>authorization.
>
>The legislation is part much wider memorandum understanding between
> EU, United States, Canada, New Zealand, and Norway, nonmember
>European nation. agreement allows authorities conduct telecom
>surveillance across international borders, according Europol document
>leaked members European Parliament.
>
>''Security measures are often necessary in the cases of terrorism or
>organized crime,'' said Glyn Ford, a member of the European Parliament for
>the British Labour Party and a director of the EU's Civil Liberties and
>Internal Affairs Committee. ''But what we need is some sort of democratic
>control. It seems to me that many security services are a law unto
>themselves.''
>....
>That will presumably be a topic of discussion when the European Council of
>Ministers meets behind closed doors
...>
>The FBI would neither confirm nor deny any relationship between the United
>States and the other nations involved in the memorandum of understanding.
>However, Rotenberg said such provisions are already in place under the 1994
>Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act.
>
>(Reuters/Wired)
>
>Subject: REVEALED: SECRET PLAN TO TAP ALL MOBILE PHONES
>
>The Observer (London) Sunday December 6, 1998
>
>REVEALED: SECRET PLAN TO TAP ALL MOBILE PHONES
>
> By Duncan Campbell
>
>Plans for an international network of centres able to tap mobile
>phones anywhere in Europe have been prepared by European law
>enforcement agencies.
>
>Confidential European Union documents leaked in Germany and obtained
>by The Observer outline plans for instant-access centres across
>Europe, equipped to tap every type of communications system, including
>mobile phones, the Internet, fax machines, pagers and interactive
>cable television services.
>
...lots more

KG
PhD student
Faculty of Communication
University of Canberra
http://student.canberra.edu.au/~u833885/home.htm

From rha@interdomain.net.au Mon Dec 14 02:27:49 1998
From: rha@interdomain.net.au (Richard Archer)
Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 11:27:49 +1000
Subject: San Francisco power outage story
In-Reply-To: <199812131941.GAA19442@mars.planet.net.au>
Message-ID: <l03130338b29a196136f9@[203.17.167.127]>

At 5:41 +1000 14/12/1998, Janet Whitaker wrote:

>>San Francisco blackout snarls Web


Here's a compilation of two reports posted to the NANOG mail list:



Official Start time: 8:17AM Pacific Standard Time
Official End time: 3:52PM Pacific Standard Time

Root cause, failure by a work crew to *UN*ground two safety ground
straps after completing work on the 115Kvolt line at the San Mateo
Coyote Point substation. When they turned on the power, it caused a
low frequency condition and tripped protective breakers on the
substation. It also caused a cascade effect, tripping the Hunters
Point and Potrero power plants. This isolated San Mateo County and
northward to parts of San Francisco City from the electrical grid
primary power sources. Aside from the human error, the system
worked "as designed to protect the rest of the grid."

Approximately 375,000 customers were without power, including San
Francisco Airport (SFO), the Pacific Stock Exchange, traffic lights,
and cable cars. Since the electrical grid was isolated, PG&E had to
"blackstart" the system on a circuit by circuit basis.

The SFO airport power was restored at 9:10AM. The San Francisco Office
of Emergency Services was activated at 9:22AM according to EDIS.

At 1:00PM about 200,000 customers were still without power. PG&E
estimated that full restoration would be completed by 2:15PM, but
some customers were still without power through the afternoon.

1 fatality, a women struck at an intersection with non-functioning
traffic signals.

San Francisco has two subway systems. BART was able to move their
trains to the next station, reportedly in some cases after a 1-2 hour
delay. MUNI evacuated people on foot through the tunnels.

San Francisco International Airport had emergency power for runway
lights and navagation, and did land planes during the outage. The
jetways, baggage conveyers, security checkpoints, ticketing systems, etc
did not have power. Because the airport can't handle large numbers of
passengers without power other flights were delayed, cancelled or
diverted to other airports.


Effect on Major/Minor Internet providers.

A number of people wrote in saying that provider XYZ had problems. There
may not have been any 'major' problems with 'major' providers, there were
some minor/major problems with major/minor providers.

How individual customers were affected varied, mostly depending on the
customers' own backup planning. Generally the Customer Premise Equipment
lost power (or backup power) before the ISP's equipment went down.

Telephone calling volume was up 43% in the Bay area. This may have
lead to a higher number of ISP/busy/no connection problems with dialup
access.

The most common reported problem was with webserver farms only having
limited backup battery. I also received a report of a provider's
customer service PBX system battery failing, so their phones gave ring-no
answer. Providers generally gave priority to routers and access servers
over web and mail servers. You could often use the Internet, but your
mail or web page may have been unavailable. E-Mail is automatically
queued for 2-4 days, so very few e-mail messages should have been lost,
only delayed a few hours.

When evaluating how your provider did, ask where their POP is and if it
lost utlity power. I've noticed some provider sales people already
enaging in some competitor bashing, saying they stayed up while
provider X didn't. However in some cases, it was because they were
located in a different area and never lost utility power.

Effects on other industries.

Banks may have a lot of backup systems to protect them, but their customer
access systems appear less reliable. 600 ATM machines, and 200 bank
branches in the area were shutdown due to the power outage. One person
noted that Nordstroms, long noted for their customer service, remained
open throughout the power outage. At other stores, clerks couldn't make
sales without computer price lookup and approval, especially for 'sale'
items. VISA/Mastercard say their credit card approval systems remained
operational, but some store's inhouse PBX and Verifone terminals didn't
have battery backup. Some grocery stores shutdown, others implemented
an "honor" system where people used pencil and paper to write the prices
off the shelf tags, since the UPC laser scanners require power.


In other news:

On December 7, 1998 PG&E donated $87,000 to San Fransico's
Emergency Services Communications Center to install extra back up
electrical facilities for the center. The new facility will work
with PG&E during major service interruptions to establish restoration
priorities.




From me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au Mon Dec 14 03:23:01 1998
From: me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 13:23:01 +1100
Subject: Education on the line
Message-ID: <v02110102b29a0ce28deb@[203.37.43.24]>

Linkers

>From The Australian News Network 14/12/1998

Education on the line
The Australian
STATE government spending programs in the past two years have caused
computers to flood into schools at rates unrivalled around the world.
http://www.theaustralian.com.au/index.asp?URL=/national/4105161.htm

The gist of the story is that we are pouring computers into schools with
potentially huge support costs which could be spent on teachers instead
without clear educational benefits and that it is duplicating what is in
the home (now 43% have computers).

When I was at school I remember they supplied books of mathematical tables
but I had to supply the slide rule. Times change..

Tony

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From rha@interdomain.net.au Mon Dec 14 04:18:52 1998
From: rha@interdomain.net.au (Richard Archer)
Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 13:18:52 +1000
Subject: Fwd: [Oz-ISP] Telstra stacking market research?
Message-ID: <l0313033ab29a338d5f33@[203.17.167.127]>

Here's an interesting report on Telstra's surveying techniques.
This is reposted with permission from the Aussie-ISP list.
This is the second time such practises by Telstra have been reported.



--- begin forwarded text

From: mikel@cynet.net.au
Date: Mon, 14 Dec 98 10:47:39 +1000
To: aussie-isp@aussie.net
Subject: [Oz-ISP] Telstra stacking market research?

I had a funny call today, transcript went something like:

Her: "Hello, are you the person responsible for making billing enquiries
to Telstra about your bills?"

Me: "Yes, that is correct"

Her: "Oh good, well, I have a few questions, it will take about ten
minutes you can put me on hold at any time, do you have time for this
right now?"

Me: "Sure"

Her: "Great! Firstly can I ask if your company is involved in any
telecommunications or market research type operations?"

Me: "Well, yes, we run an ISP"

Her: "Oh thank you, that's all the questions I have for you, goodbye"

Me: "Yer, thought you might, seeya."


I hope that Telstra don't intend to publish this information if the
majority of the market who HAVE problems with Telstra are not included.
For referance, market research companies usually have a LOT of telephone
services and make lots of outgoing calls *8-]

Regards,

Mikel

--
-----------------------------------------------------------
Mikel Lindsaar | "The dream is the foundation,
mikel@cynet.net.au | of our society!"
-----------------------------------------------------------
Cynet! The Business ISP! http://www.cynet.net.au/
-----------------------------------------------------------

--- end forwarded text





From fist@ozemail.com.au Mon Dec 14 05:24:35 1998
From: fist@ozemail.com.au (Stewart Fist)
Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 15:24:35 +1100
Subject: Wireless PoPs (was Re: National bandwidth inquiry)
Message-ID: <199812140425.PAA22490@fep8.mail.ozemail.net>

Richard wrote:
>I'll do some reading and get more definitive answers, but I think there are
>several points of incompatibility between TCP/IP and CB radio. The CB channels
>are too narrow for wideband data rates, I believe.

CB radio has a prohibition on use for data, so its also illegal. I've been
fighting a battle on behalf of famers, with spectrum management and the
government, for a few years trying to get permission to use standard CB
radios to quiz monitoring equipment on electric fences and water tanks.

So far the spectrum management people have managed to block all efforts to
do this legally.



>Also, CB is a shared access medium, ie anybody can talk on any channel at any
>given time. So as well as transmitting across multiple CB "channels" to get
>decent data rates, the system would have to resolve collisions. At the same
>time, it would have to be able to reserve the "channel" for data access, since
>anybody with a CB radio attempting voice communications across that channel
>would blast the data (note, this kind of collision resolution also suggests
>replacing existing voice-only CB sets).


The problem is not with shared-access, provided you have a code-based
system. Then its not a problem of collisions so much as one of rising error
rates when the systems overload. SuperNIC or SuperNET CDMA developments in
the USA are being designed to use the ISM unlicensed spectrum at 5GHz for
delivery of data over distances of about 5 to 10 miles with no need for any
arbitration system (or carrier assignment of channels). Buy a device at the
local Dick Smith store, make an arrangement with your ISP to tke the PPP via
CDMA radio contact -- and you have an always-on tariff-free data channel.

I underestand that the ITU has refused to become involved in standardisation
of these devices since the aim is to cut the carrier out ...
disintermediation, I think is the term? The FCC says it is willing to look
at proposals. Apple dropped out (I can't find anyone in Apple still talking
about it).

------------------------------------------------------------------
Stewart Fist - Independent writer and columnist
70 Middle Harbour Road, LINDFIELD, NSW, 2070, Australia
Ph: +612 9416 7458 Fax: +612 9416 4582
------------------------------------------------------------------
The Australian <http://www.newsit.com.au/index_opinion.htm>
The ABC <http://www.abc.net.au/http/sfist/>
Electric-words <http://www.electric-words.com>
------------------------------------------------------------------

----------

>I'll do some reading and get more definitive answers, but I think there are
>several points of incompatibility between TCP/IP and CB radio. The CB channels
>are too narrow for wideband data rates, I believe.
>
>Also, CB is a shared access medium, ie anybody can talk on any channel at any
>given time. So as well as transmitting across multiple CB "channels" to get
>decent data rates, the system would have to resolve collisions. At the same
>time, it would have to be able to reserve the "channel" for data access, since
>anybody with a CB radio attempting voice communications across that channel
>would blast the data (note, this kind of collision resolution also suggests
>replacing existing voice-only CB sets).


From David.Nicholls@isr.gov.au Mon Dec 14 06:09:34 1998
From: David.Nicholls@isr.gov.au (Nicholls, David)
Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 16:09:34 +1100
Subject: Wireless PoPs (was Re: National bandwidth inquiry)
Message-ID: <D71F8E39400BD211ADD300805FBB6DD1ED78DB@email_po1.dist.gov.au>

Interesting, Stewart. I was involved with a group (Bushtronics) back in the
mid 1980s that designed and built a system that monitored remote tanks,
troughs, electric fence voltages etc. We were allowed to use a band around
430 mHz (or thereabouts), without the need for a licence. Low power of
course. We managed comms up to 20kms line of site. We processed the incoming
signals and then fed them to a suitably modified Microbee computer(!).
Worked very well, except that the dust was murder on the 'Bee keyboard!

DN

-----Original Message-----
From: Stewart Fist [mailto:fist@ozemail.com.au]
Sent: Monday, 14 December 1998 3:25 PM
To: richard@auscoms.com.au
Cc: link@www.anu.edu.au
Subject: Re: Wireless PoPs (was Re: National bandwidth inquiry)


Richard wrote:
>I'll do some reading and get more definitive answers, but I think there are
>several points of incompatibility between TCP/IP and CB radio. The CB
channels
>are too narrow for wideband data rates, I believe.

CB radio has a prohibition on use for data, so its also illegal. I've been
fighting a battle on behalf of famers, with spectrum management and the
government, for a few years trying to get permission to use standard CB
radios to quiz monitoring equipment on electric fences and water tanks.

So far the spectrum management people have managed to block all efforts to
do this legally.





From brd@dynamite.com.au Mon Dec 14 07:44:38 1998
From: brd@dynamite.com.au (Bernard Robertson-Dunn)
Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 17:44:38 +1100
Subject: MCI WorldCom offers to buy OzEmail
Message-ID: <3674B3D6.69219ADB@dynamite.com.au>

Doesn't this sort of thing incease our foreign debt as well as reduce
the size and capacity of our indigenous IT industry?

IMHO, it's another example of local optimisation that does not benefit
the system as a whole.

>From the Computerworld site:

NEWS FLASH: MCI WorldCom offers to buy OzEmail

Industry

A unit of MCI WorldCom will make a cash offer for leading Australian
Internet service provider OzEmail, the US company has announced.
The Jackson, Mississippi-based telecomms giant announced that its
wholly-owned subsidiary UUNET Holdings Australia Pty Ltd will offer to
buy
all the issued ordinary shares of OzEmail Ltd. for a price of $US2.20
per share.

Click on the link below for the full story
http://www2.idg.com.au/CWT1997.nsf/CWTCurrent/NT000069F6

--
Acting is merely the art of stopping a large number of people from
coughing
-- Sir Ralph Richardson

Regards
brd

Bernard Robertson-Dunn
Canberra Australia
brd@dynamite.com.au

From jwhit@PrimeNet.Com Mon Dec 14 12:30:20 1998
From: jwhit@PrimeNet.Com (Janet Whitaker)
Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 22:30:20 +1100 (EST)
Subject: Education on the line
Message-ID: <199812141130.WAA01792@mars.planet.net.au>

re Tony's post about computers in schools ...

Yeah, and there is a big problem with school fees supposedly voluntary being
put through collection agencies in Victoria, despite the minister saying
he'll 'do something' to schools that use strong arm tactics. <shaking head>
sort of makes one wonder about priorities, doesn't it? Kids can't go to the
zoo unless their single parent pays up their fees, but the gubmint can come
up with zillions to put a few computers in schools. And don't even talk
about music and art.....

Jan


JLWhitaker Associates
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
jwhit@primenet.com -- http://www.primenet.com/~jwhit/whitentr.htm



From reagan@desire.emails.net Mon Dec 14 13:42:34 1998
From: reagan@desire.emails.net (Reagan Blundell)
Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 22:42:34 +1000
Subject: Fwd: [Oz-ISP] Telstra stacking market research?
In-Reply-To: Your message of "Mon, 14 Dec 1998 13:18:52 +1000."
<l0313033ab29a338d5f33@[203.17.167.127]>
Message-ID: <199812141242.WAA13351@desire.emails.net>

>
> I hope that Telstra don't intend to publish this information if the
> majority of the market who HAVE problems with Telstra are not included.
> For referance, market research companies usually have a LOT of telephone
> services and make lots of outgoing calls *8-]
>

In my student days, I worked for a market research firm (just doing
the grunt work phoning people up) but it was fairly standard practice
to exclude people who worked in the industry we were conducting the
the survey about, as well as those who worked in market research.

I wouldn't necessarily put this down to any conniving on Telstra's
behalf - much more likely to be the market research firm naively trying
to obtain what they consider to be an un-biased sample of respondants.





From tomw@acslink.net.au Mon Dec 14 22:09:57 1998
From: tomw@acslink.net.au (Tom Worthington)
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 1998 08:09:57 +1100
Subject: San Francisco power outage story
Message-ID: <2.2.32.19981214210957.00697ef0@mail.mpx.com.au>

At 06:41 14/12/98 +1100, Janet Whitaker wrote:

>>San Francisco blackout snarls Web
>>
>>By Tim Clark and Paul Festa Staff Writers, CNET News.com
>>
>>December 8, 1998, 5:45 p.m. PT ...

Might be interesting to compare with the Auckland problems:

>Date: Thu, 23 Jul 1998 03:59:57 +1100
>To: risks@CSL.sri.com
>From: Tom Worthington <tomw@acslink.net.au>
>Subject: Auckland power supply failure report released
>
>"After a series of four power cable failures, on 20 February 1998 Mercury
Energy Limited, the major distributor and retailer of electrical power to
the city of Auckland, announced that it could no longer supply power to the
central business district. Emergency services were notified and mobilised ..."
>
>From the report of the Ministerial Inquiry into the Auckland power supply
failure, issued today. Now available:
>
>* Executive summary:
http://www.executive.govt.nz/minister/bradford/power/summary.htm
>* Media Release from the Minister of Energy:
http://www.executive.govt.nz/minister/bradford/power/release.htm
>* Inquiry Home Page: http://www.moc.govt.nz/inquiry/
>
>ps: The lights are on, here in Auckland, now. See: http://www.webcam.co.nz/


Tom Worthington http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw PO Box 13
Immediate Past President Belconnen ACT 2617
Australian Computer Society tomw@acslink.net.au
----------------------------------------------------------------------
IRC 1999 Topics Needed: http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw/irc/irc.html


From tomw@acslink.net.au Mon Dec 14 22:10:00 1998
From: tomw@acslink.net.au (Tom Worthington)
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 1998 08:10:00 +1100
Subject: Wireless PoPs (was Re: National bandwidth inquiry)
Message-ID: <2.2.32.19981214211000.006a3080@mail.mpx.com.au>

At 15:24 14/12/98 +1100, Stewart Fist wrote:

>...CB radio has a prohibition on use for data, so its also illegal...

This is by regulation, so a relatively easy sort of law to change (done by
bureaucrats rather than Parliament).

Just tell the deputy PM it will help Mick sell more whips. ;-)

A more reasoned version would be:

"Can the Acting Prime Minister explain why this Government is stopping
farmers from using their UHF CB radios for accessing the Internet? Why is
the honorable member helping city slickers suck the life-blood out of
country areas, with high charges for data services? Why are the livelihoods
and lives of lives of hard working rural people being placed at risk by this
government, denying country people to efficient data services? Farmers could
use efficient data services for more productive, efficient farming
practices. Rural communities depend on the CB radio networks that their own
community paid for and installed, in time of flood and bush fire. Why is
this government denying use of those radios to transmit vital information in
times of emergency?"

Reply:

"It was the opposition, when in government, which introduced those
regulations. I am informed by the experts at the relevant authority that at
the time CB radio was developed there were concerns that data transmission
would interfere with voice operation. Also the Labour government, with an
interest in protecting their mates in the unions, didn't want free data
services which would undermine rip-offs and featherbedding at Telstra. I am
delighted to announce that this government will introduce new regulations
for the first sitting of Parliament in 1999 which will allow free use of
data on UHF CB, while meeting stringent technical standards to prevent
interference. $1.2M in funds will be allocated under the ???? scheme for the
piloting of this service and future development, creating not only a new
service for country Australia, but export opportunities. The project will be
called the Wireless Homestead Internet Packet Service (Whips). I hope Mick
will be using it for his exports."


Tom Worthington http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw PO Box 13
Immediate Past President Belconnen ACT 2617
Australian Computer Society tomw@acslink.net.au
----------------------------------------------------------------------
IRC 1999 Topics Needed: http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw/irc/irc.html


From tomw@acslink.net.au Mon Dec 14 22:09:58 1998
From: tomw@acslink.net.au (Tom Worthington)
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 1998 08:09:58 +1100
Subject: Wireless PoPs (was Re: National bandwidth inquiry)
Message-ID: <2.2.32.19981214210958.0069b1fc@mail.mpx.com.au>

At 09:57 14/12/98 +1000, richard@auscoms.com.au wrote:

>Tom Worthington wrote:
>
>>Has any funding or thought gone into community run wireless data networks?
>>This would be the data equivalent of UHF CB Radio repeaters...
>
>...The CB channels are too narrow for wideband data rates, I believe...

A CB channel may be suitable for e-mail at 9600bps. While this may not sound
like much, it is better than nothing at all. I have done a lot of productive
work at 9600bps with GSM.

>Also, CB is a shared access medium, ie anybody can talk on any channel
>at any given time. So as well as transmitting across multiple CB "channels"
> to get decent data rates, the system would have to resolve collisions...

I had a vague idea that packet radio modems developed by radio amateurs used
a predecessor of the multiple access protocol used for Ethernet. A quick web
search found a wealth of excellent information on work done by amateurs with
packet radio and in Australia for emergency communications:

* Introduction to Packet Radio: http://www.tapr.org/tapr/html/pktfaq.html

* Wollongong Packet Radio Gateway, Joint Research Project:
http://hamgate.gw.uow.edu.au/root.htm

* AMPRNet TCP/IP Address Management in Australia:
http://hamgate.gw.uow.edu.au/ip/ip.htm

>... At the same time, it would have to be able to reserve the "channel"
>for data access ...

In country areas it should be possible to reserve a channel for data.

>Privacy is another issue. The open channel means any receiver can pick
>up any traffic -- which means my e-mail is sent to everybody...

Use encryption.

>Lastly, my criticism of other wireless IP solutions -- whether wireless
> local loop or satellite IP -- still applies: I'm wary of advocating
> something that breaks the standard...

Simple: make a standard.


Tom Worthington http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw PO Box 13
Immediate Past President Belconnen ACT 2617
Australian Computer Society tomw@acslink.net.au
----------------------------------------------------------------------
IRC 1999 Topics Needed: http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw/irc/irc.html


From richard@auscoms.com.au Mon Dec 14 23:45:46 1998
From: richard@auscoms.com.au (richard@auscoms.com.au)
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 98 08:45:46 +1000
Subject: Fwd: [Oz-ISP] Telstra stacking market research?
Message-ID: <9812159136.AA913671956@mail.auscoms.com.au>


Reagan -- I'll confirm your experience of researchers. My own is that my wife
has worked as a journalist and PR in the food industry for 13 years, which
(wonderfully!) excludes us from _most_ market research -- anything involving
retail, anyway.

Like you said, standard research practice.

Richard Chirgwin

____________________Reply Separator____________________
Subject: Re: Fwd: [Oz-ISP] Telstra stacking market research?
Author: Reagan Blundell <reagan@desire.emails.net>
Date: 14/12/98 22:42

>
> I hope that Telstra don't intend to publish this information if the
> majority of the market who HAVE problems with Telstra are not included.
> For referance, market research companies usually have a LOT of telephone
> services and make lots of outgoing calls *8-]
>

In my student days, I worked for a market research firm (just doing
the grunt work phoning people up) but it was fairly standard practice
to exclude people who worked in the industry we were conducting the
the survey about, as well as those who worked in market research.

I wouldn't necessarily put this down to any conniving on Telstra's
behalf - much more likely to be the market research firm naively trying
to obtain what they consider to be an un-biased sample of respondants.








From ivan.trundle@alia.org.au Mon Dec 14 22:46:13 1998
From: ivan.trundle@alia.org.au (Ivan Trundle)
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 1998 08:46:13 +1100
Subject: QUERY: Access problems to US databases
Message-ID: <s6762263.067@alia.org.au>

Dear Link subscribers
(a forwarded query from Ghoy@uctlib.uct.ac.za)

In South Africa we have the same problems with internet access that I
guess you do in Oz. Our morning access is barely acceptable (when
there are few students on campus), but our afternoon access is
terrible. We are 7 hours ahead of the US. I am interested as to how
you might have dealt with the problem with particular reference to
electronic databases. Many of these databases are online in the US so
effectively are of little use. There are 2 obvious options:
1. Improve bandwidth i.e. maybe purchase a dedicated library
overseas link - but this is very expensive.
2. Obtain the information and mount it locally for instititutions in SA -
also expensive!

I am keen to find out what your libraries in OZ have done. We as yet
have not done much work on this but it is now moving to the top of
our agendas. Mounting a server for both OZ and SA sounds great, but
our access to Oz is via the US, which really slows down the speed of
connection.

I will be grateful and appreciate any replies (directly to
Ghoy@uctlib.uct.ac.za, since Geoff is not on the Link list - yet).

Regards, Geoff Hoy
Deputy Director, UCT Library
Library Information Technology Manager
UCT Library, University of Cape Town
Rondebosch 7700 South Africa

Ghoy@uctlib.uct.ac.za


From brd@dynamite.com.au Mon Dec 14 22:57:03 1998
From: brd@dynamite.com.au (Bernard Robertson-Dunn)
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 1998 08:57:03 +1100
Subject: IBM Opens Up Email Code
Message-ID: <367589AF.2310DA6B@dynamite.com.au>

<brd>
We live in changing times:
</brd>

IBM Opens Up Email Code
Wired News Report

7:45 a.m. 14.Dec.98.PST

Chalk up another victory for the open-source movement: IBM, hoping to
boost confidence in the Internet as a safe place to do business, on
Monday unveiled the code to its email program Secure Mailer.

IBM claims that Secure Mailer offers improved "security, reliability,
and performance" over existing email delivery services such as Sendmail,
the software that is now believed to process some three-quarters of
Internet correspondence.

IBM has traditionally kept close guard over its proprietary software
creations and is seen as a jealous defender of its patents. But like a
growing number of companies, it now sees possible benefits to opening up
its technology.

Sendmail Inc. already freely publishes its own programming code,
allowing programmers to tinker with the email software's basic functions
and develop improvements.

Charles King, an analyst with industry researcher Meta Group, said that
far from giving up on its commercial goals, IBM stands to benefit
indirectly from solving security issues due to its large and rapidly
growing investment in e-commerce.

"IBM sees this as an indirect revenue generator," King said.

IBM said it is publishing the email software code not only to replace
what it considers antiquated and faulty Sendmail software, but also as a
test run for developing open-source software in general.

"By offering Secure Mailer free without licensing restrictions, IBM is
helping build a stronger base for secure e-business," Jeff Jaffe,
general manager for IBM's IT Security, said in a statement.

Open-source software has become popular with a growing number of
programmers, who see it as an alternative to Microsoft's perceived
stranglehold on new innovations through its dominant Windows operating
system.

<snip>

--
If you have eight hours to cut down a tree, it is best to spend six
hours sharpening your axe and then two hours cutting down the tree.
-- anonymous, on the benefits of having good tools

Regards
brd

Bernard Robertson-Dunn
Canberra Australia
brd@dynamite.com.au

From Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au Tue Dec 15 00:01:47 1998
From: Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au (Roger Clarke)
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 1998 10:01:47 +1100
Subject: ADMA code for Internet Marketing
Message-ID: <v0313030bb29b4856135f@[203.37.10.239]>


The Australian Direct Marketing Association (ADMA) is attempting to gain
the imprimatur of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC)
for a highly inadequate code for Internet marketing.

Approval of the code would be very damaging to public confidence, and hence
to the prospects for mass consumer marketing on the net.

The deadline for submissions to be in ACCC's hands is this coming Friday,
18 December.

The Australian Computer Society's position was clearly expressed in its
column in The Australian of today, 15 December, p.55. See:
http://www.acs.org.au/news/oz151298.htm

(The primary author was me, but it was heavily worked over by members of
the ACS's Economic, Legal & Social Implications Committee, and approved by
ACS Council).


Roger Clarke http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/
http://www.etc.com.au/Xamax/
Xamax Consultancy Pty Ltd, 78 Sidaway St, Chapman ACT 2611 AUSTRALIA
Tel: +61 2 6288 1472, and 6288 6916 mailto:Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au

Visiting Fellow, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology
The Australian National University Canberra ACT 0200 AUSTRALIA
Information Sciences Building Room 211 Tel: +61 2 6249 3666



From col.lapworth@asic.gov.au Tue Dec 15 00:10:03 1998
From: col.lapworth@asic.gov.au (Col Lapworth)
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 1998 09:10:03 +1000
Subject: "...public key encryption will become obsolete."
Message-ID: <CA2566DA.007E82DD.00@spiderman.asic.gov.au>


Linkers,

Below is an article from "UPSIDE today" which may interest some of you.

Cheers,
Col

<snip>
UPSIDE today: Computing's Holy Grail:
<http://www.upside.com/texis/mvm/story?id=366dbf150>

Computing's Holy Grail
Lab Watch
December 09, 1998
by Robert Buderi
(From the January 1999 issue)

It was headline news. Back in April 1994, led by computer scientist
Arjen Lenstra, 600 technojockeys in 24 countries teamed to take on a
17-year-old challenge: factoring the 129-digit key to an "unbreakable"
public key encryption program. By figuring out which two prime
numbers would produce the unique 129-digit key when multiplied
together, the team was able to decode the message.

Today, many encryption systems are based on integers of 300-plus digits, so
security
systems would hardly seem in jeopardy.

Enter AT&T Labs Senior Researcher Peter Shor, who has provided the
theoretical
framework for shattering that complacency. In fact, his breakthrough
algorithm
indicates that a single computer can rapidly factor integers well upward of
300 digits. If
hardware gurus can put meat on those theoretical bones--and they're working
on
it--public key encryption will become obsolete.

But that's not all. Shor's stunning work is conjuring up a new era of
computing, where
superbrains solve the universe's basic riddles and quickly sift through
mountains of
data: encyclopedias, the Internet, even the Starr report. For this
accomplishment,
unveiled four-plus years ago but now in full bloom, Shor in August won the
prestigious
Nevanlinna Prize, which the International Congress of Mathematicians gives
every four
years to the computer-science theorist age 40 or under deemed most
promising.

It's all about quantum computing (QC), a Holy Grail area where the physics
changes
from the familiar solid-state to things unresolved even by Albert Einstein.
The very act
of describing QC causes random inaccuracies. But in a quark shell,
qubits--binary
things such as nuclear spins, or atoms jumping between two energy
states--will replace
the electrons that now represent the ones and zeros of our digital society.
That means
we're talking small, and we're talking fast.

The fast part is what could stymie electronic security. That's because
Shor's algorithm
showed that quantum computers can dispense with the linear calculations
used by most
computers in favor of massively parallel calculations. Shor isn't thinking
about parallel
computers such as IBM Corp.'s Deep Blue. He's pondering quantum
parallelism,
where computers instantly tackle all possible solutions to a problem
because, as Shor
says, "All these computations are taking place in different worlds."

Shor's algorithm rests on the fact that while the energy levels (quantum
states) of atoms
or nuclei can replace the zeros and ones of conventional computers, these
entities don't
always occupy one specific energy level. Instead, they can span many
states--or
worlds--simultaneously. Moreover, these states can be rigged to interfere
with one
another in ways that cancel wrong answers and amplify correct solutions.
For
code-breaking, the payoff is that factoring becomes orders of magnitude
easier. For
example, a conventional computer would take an impossible 1024 operations
to
decipher a 300-digit integer, but a QC could do it in a manageable 1011
operations.

Since the factoring algorithm debuted, Shor, VP of AT&T Labs information
sciences
research Robert Calderbank and Oxford University Fellow Andrew Steane have
devised ways to solve crucial reliability problems for quantum computers.
In recent
months, for example, a group at Los Alamos National Laboratory demonstrated
the
ability to manipulate three qubits, and a group at the National Institute
of Standards
and Technology in Gaithersburg, Md., fashioned a crude QC system with two
qubits--enough to support the general theory. Ultimately, it will take a
few thousand
qubits to break the public-key backbone, and that may be decades away.
Until then,
Shor envisions smaller systems probing quantum physics problems, such as
unraveling
the behavior of quarks--poorly understood elementary particles inside the
proton and
neutron--that bring today's supercomputers to their knees.

He's now trying to dream up more realistic, shorter-term applications. "I'm
not getting
very far," he confesses. Feel free to pass on ideas. Shor promises they'll
get the
dimension they deserve.


Robert Buderi is former technology editor of Business Week and author of
The
Invention That Changed the World (Simon & Schuster, 1996).
</snip>

______________________________
Col Lapworth
Australian Securities & Investments Commission
http://www.asic.gov.au
______________________________

The views expressed in this email may not reflect those of my employer.



From richard@auscoms.com.au Tue Dec 15 02:26:24 1998
From: richard@auscoms.com.au (richard@auscoms.com.au)
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 98 11:26:24 +1000
Subject: Education on the line
Message-ID: <9812159136.AA913681594@mail.auscoms.com.au>


Natch, Jan.
1) Music, arts, excursions aren't 21st century technology that the kids will
have to have if they're to survive in the new competitive (oh hell, I can't keep
constructing a sentence like that...)
2) Music, arts, excursions don't have a sexy and wealthy industry lobby bending
the ear of ministers who are anyway ill-equipped to apply critical assessment to
what they're told.

Needless to say that on the ground, at least in an NSW public school of my
intimate knowledge, the computers-in-schools thing doesn't deliver much. The
computer in my son's classroom is now in a skip because nobody could get another
copy of the 5 1/4 inch boot floppy. No, I'm not kidding.

Richard Chirgwin
____________________Reply Separator____________________
Subject: Re: Education on the line
Author: <jwhit@PrimeNet.Com (Janet Whitaker)>
Date: 14/12/98 22:30

re Tony's post about computers in schools ...

Yeah, and there is a big problem with school fees supposedly voluntary being
put through collection agencies in Victoria, despite the minister saying
he'll 'do something' to schools that use strong arm tactics. <shaking head>
sort of makes one wonder about priorities, doesn't it? Kids can't go to the
zoo unless their single parent pays up their fees, but the gubmint can come
up with zillions to put a few computers in schools. And don't even talk
about music and art.....

Jan


JLWhitaker Associates
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
jwhit@primenet.com -- http://www.primenet.com/~jwhit/whitentr.htm






From monty@knapp.com.au Mon Dec 14 23:39:16 1998
From: monty@knapp.com.au (Paul Montgomery)
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 1998 09:39:16 +1100
Subject: MCI WorldCom offers to buy OzEmail
References: <3674B3D6.69219ADB@dynamite.com.au>
Message-ID: <36759393.B1800FD0@knapp.com.au>

Bernard Robertson-Dunn wrote:
>
> Doesn't this sort of thing incease our foreign debt as well as reduce
> the size and capacity of our indigenous IT industry?

Oh, I don't know, maybe Sean Howard will plough his newly minted US$ millions
back into some little start-up here and create another success story. I'm sure
Malcolm Turnbull won't, but you win some, you lose some.

> IMHO, it's another example of local optimisation that does not benefit
> the system as a whole.

It was bound to happen, given the paucity of a venture capital culture here.
Would you rather that Cable & Wireless or maybe (cough) AOL bought it instead,
as the rumours had it? At least Telstra didn't take it over, as I'm sure it
would have if it had been in majority private ownership by now.

--
Paul Montgomery, features editor for Image & Data Manager and assistant
editor for Internet World. Lives like a JavaBean. Fan of Robert Rankin.
Tel: +61 2 9318 2644. Fax: +61 2 9310 4608. mailto:monty@knapp.com.au
http://australia.internet.com “I am a railroad track abandoned.” (JB)

From carl@xena.ipaustralia.gov.au Tue Dec 15 03:41:51 1998
From: carl@xena.ipaustralia.gov.au (Carl Makin)
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 1998 13:41:51 +1100
Subject: Wireless PoPs (was Re: National bandwidth inquiry)
References: <2.2.32.19981214210958.0069b1fc@mail.mpx.com.au>
Message-ID: <3675CC6F.960A5FCB@xena.ipaustralia.gov.au>

Tom Worthington wrote:

> At 09:57 14/12/98 +1000, richard@auscoms.com.au wrote:
> >Tom Worthington wrote:

> >>Has any funding or thought gone into community run wireless data networks?
> >>This would be the data equivalent of UHF CB Radio repeaters...

> >...The CB channels are too narrow for wideband data rates, I believe...

> A CB channel may be suitable for e-mail at 9600bps. While this may not sound

There are commercially available modems that will run 9600 baud half
duplex over a CB channel reasonably well. These modems however, require
you to bypass the audio pre/de-emphasis circuitry so your radio will
require some modification. Depending on how "integrated" the CB is that
may not be possible on some models. Also, at 4800 baud and above, half
duplex (ie receiving and transmitting on the same frequency),
transmitter keyup times and receiver settling times become a large part
of the total transmission time for a frame and end up limiting your
usable data bandwidth.

> I had a vague idea that packet radio modems developed by radio amateurs used
> a predecessor of the multiple access protocol used for Ethernet. A quick web

Amateur Packet Radio uses a channel multiple access method called
"Aloha". Basically when a frame is sent a timer is started. If the
timer expires before an acknowledgment is received then it is assumed
the frame didn't make it and it is retried. Ethernet is a lot better
than that in that it can (mostly) sense a collision as it takes place
and abort the frame. Packet radio can't. This has the effect that as
channel occupancy increases data throughput drops dramatically.

If you'd like to see Amateur Packet Radio in operation Tom, give me a
call.

Carl.

From fist@ozemail.com.au Tue Dec 15 01:59:47 1998
From: fist@ozemail.com.au (Stewart Fist)
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 1998 11:59:47 +1100
Subject: Wireless PoPs (was Re: National bandwidth inquiry)
Message-ID: <199812150312.OAA11204@fep7.mail.ozemail.net>

I think Tom hit the nail right on the head. If I didn't know better, I'd be
led to believe that Tom has had a lot of practice writing questions (and
possibly answers) for politicans. ???


On the farmer's use of CB for data problem: We've been lobbying through the
Labor, Liberals and National/Country party for a few years but we've had no
joy. Apparently Labor's need to protect the jobs of unionists was matched
by the Liberal/National coalition's wish to maintain the high sale price of
Telstra shares.


God protect us from politicians!


------------------------------------------------------------------
Stewart Fist - Independent writer and columnist
70 Middle Harbour Road, LINDFIELD, NSW, 2070, Australia
Ph: +612 9416 7458 Fax: +612 9416 4582
------------------------------------------------------------------
The Australian <http://www.newsit.com.au/index_opinion.htm>
The ABC <http://www.abc.net.au/http/sfist/>
Electric-words <http://www.electric-words.com>
------------------------------------------------------------------

----------
>From: Tom Worthington <tomw@acslink.net.au>
>To: link@www.anu.edu.au
>Subject: Re: Wireless PoPs (was Re: National bandwidth inquiry)
>Date: Tue, Dec 15, 1998, 8:10 AM
>

>At 15:24 14/12/98 +1100, Stewart Fist wrote:
>
>>...CB radio has a prohibition on use for data, so its also illegal...
>
>This is by regulation, so a relatively easy sort of law to change (done by
>bureaucrats rather than Parliament).
>
>Just tell the deputy PM it will help Mick sell more whips. ;-)
>
>A more reasoned version would be:
>
>"Can the Acting Prime Minister explain why this Government is stopping
>farmers from using their UHF CB radios for accessing the Internet? Why is
>the honorable member helping city slickers suck the life-blood out of
>country areas, with high charges for data services? Why are the livelihoods
>and lives of lives of hard working rural people being placed at risk by this
>government, denying country people to efficient data services? Farmers could
>use efficient data services for more productive, efficient farming
>practices. Rural communities depend on the CB radio networks that their own
>community paid for and installed, in time of flood and bush fire. Why is
>this government denying use of those radios to transmit vital information in
>times of emergency?"
>
>Reply:
>
>"It was the opposition, when in government, which introduced those
>regulations. I am informed by the experts at the relevant authority that at
>the time CB radio was developed there were concerns that data transmission
>would interfere with voice operation. Also the Labour government, with an
>interest in protecting their mates in the unions, didn't want free data
>services which would undermine rip-offs and featherbedding at Telstra. I am
>delighted to announce that this government will introduce new regulations
>for the first sitting of Parliament in 1999 which will allow free use of
>data on UHF CB, while meeting stringent technical standards to prevent
>interference. $1.2M in funds will be allocated under the ???? scheme for the
>piloting of this service and future development, creating not only a new
>service for country Australia, but export opportunities. The project will be
>called the Wireless Homestead Internet Packet Service (Whips). I hope Mick
>will be using it for his exports."
>
>
>Tom Worthington http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw PO Box 13
>Immediate Past President Belconnen ACT 2617
>Australian Computer Society tomw@acslink.net.au
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>IRC 1999 Topics Needed: http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw/irc/irc.html
>
>

From richard@auscoms.com.au Tue Dec 15 05:53:07 1998
From: richard@auscoms.com.au (richard@auscoms.com.au)
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 98 14:53:07 +1000
Subject: Wireless PoPs (was Re: National bandwidth inquiry)
Message-ID: <9812159136.AA913697301@mail.auscoms.com.au>


Tom:

Reserving CB radio channels for data by community consent may be impossible. You
could never guarantee that:
1) Some smelly yob up from the city with a Land Cruiser, a spotlight and a
couple of shotties won't transmit on whatever channel the set happens to be
tuned to, thus ditching the data; and
2) You won't get interference from adjoining areas.

Let's assume that number (1) gets dealt with with the farmers' own shotties and
the remaining smelly yobs learn manners (no bad thing).

To deal with (2), I've been drawing circles with a bottle cap: region 1 agrees
that channel 1 is its data channel: they also have to get surrounding regions 2
to 9 (say) to agree they channels 2 to 9 are _their_ data channels. Spread it
out, and pretty quickly you need 50 or so channels dedicated for data in regions
fairly closely separated, to ensure that they don't cross interfere. And you
need to teach the punters not to use those channels for voice. And are there 50
channels anyway?

And it's not so easy to "make a standard", as you suggest. The world's been
waiting with breath bated to varying degrees for IPv6 for a lonnnnng time.

Richard Chirgwin
________________Reply Separator____________________
Subject: Re: Wireless PoPs (was Re: National bandwidth inquiry)
Author: Tom Worthington <tomw@acslink.net.au>
Date: 15/12/98 8:09

At 09:57 14/12/98 +1000, richard@auscoms.com.au wrote:

>Tom Worthington wrote:
>
>>Has any funding or thought gone into community run wireless data networks?
>>This would be the data equivalent of UHF CB Radio repeaters...
>
>...The CB channels are too narrow for wideband data rates, I believe...

A CB channel may be suitable for e-mail at 9600bps. While this may not sound
like much, it is better than nothing at all. I have done a lot of productive
work at 9600bps with GSM.

>Also, CB is a shared access medium, ie anybody can talk on any channel
>at any given time. So as well as transmitting across multiple CB "channels"
> to get decent data rates, the system would have to resolve collisions...

I had a vague idea that packet radio modems developed by radio amateurs used
a predecessor of the multiple access protocol used for Ethernet. A quick web
search found a wealth of excellent information on work done by amateurs with
packet radio and in Australia for emergency communications:

* Introduction to Packet Radio: http://www.tapr.org/tapr/html/pktfaq.html

* Wollongong Packet Radio Gateway, Joint Research Project:
http://hamgate.gw.uow.edu.au/root.htm

* AMPRNet TCP/IP Address Management in Australia:
http://hamgate.gw.uow.edu.au/ip/ip.htm

>... At the same time, it would have to be able to reserve the "channel"
>for data access ...

In country areas it should be possible to reserve a channel for data.

>Privacy is another issue. The open channel means any receiver can pick
>up any traffic -- which means my e-mail is sent to everybody...

Use encryption.

>Lastly, my criticism of other wireless IP solutions -- whether wireless
> local loop or satellite IP -- still applies: I'm wary of advocating
> something that breaks the standard...

Simple: make a standard.


Tom Worthington http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw PO Box 13
Immediate Past President Belconnen ACT 2617
Australian Computer Society tomw@acslink.net.au
----------------------------------------------------------------------
IRC 1999 Topics Needed: http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw/irc/irc.html





From allenm@spectrum.curtin.edu.au Tue Dec 15 06:43:49 1998
From: allenm@spectrum.curtin.edu.au (Matthew Allen)
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 1998 13:43:49 +0800
Subject: I want my HDTV - or not.
In-Reply-To: <9812119133.AA913334345@mail.auscoms.com.au>
Message-ID: <85A3B9A3F84@spectrum.curtin.edu.au>

IN response to Richard...
> What's more feasible to my mind is a "one big" processor with lots of much
> cheaper appliances. Bundling is exciting to engineers and futurists, but IMNSHO
> debundling, not bundling, would fit the known pattern of consumption.

Bundling is about finding a way of separating consumers from the $$$: my argument is not that
people _want_ everything bundled together but that the way to get them to buy a new technology
when it is still pricey is to add something to it which is much less pricey (and therefore has a very
low margin), absorb the 'loss' on the cheap element and still make the sale. So bundling is a
possible marketing strategy, not a 'what people want' description.

As for multiple TVs etc; that happened because they were cheap: maybe we'll have unbundled
HDTV when it's cheaper?

Dr Matthew Allen
Senior Lecturer, Humanities
Coordinator, Internet Studies
Curtin University of Technology
61 - 8 9266 3511

From allenm@spectrum.curtin.edu.au Tue Dec 15 06:51:20 1998
From: allenm@spectrum.curtin.edu.au (Matthew Allen)
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 1998 13:51:20 +0800
Subject: Australia-USA Statement on E-Commerce
In-Reply-To: <199812101203.UAA30243@belgarion.it.net.au>
Message-ID: <85A5B3E7368@spectrum.curtin.edu.au>

Kimberly cited...

> "A. The internet is a medium for promoting, in a positive way, diffusion
> of knowledge, cultural diversity and social interaction, as well as a
> means of facilitating commerce. Governments should not prevent their
> citizens from accessing information simply because it is published online
> in another country."

the key word is "simply". In other words, one should not hate another nation's electronic
publications because they come from that nation; one should hate them because the government
of your country _tells_ you (via legislation etc) to hate them ;).

eg: porn is bad because we tell you it is, not because it is published in (say) .nl

> "B. Privacy: Ensuring the effective protection of privacy with regard to
> the processing of personal data on global information networks is
> necessary as is the need to continue the free flow of information. With
> regard to frameworks for personal data protection, governments and
> businesses should consider consumers’ concern about their personal
> information. Governments should support industry in implementing effective
> privacy protection.Personal information should be collected and handled in
> a fair and reasonable manner consistent with generally accepted privacy
> principles. The OECD Privacy Guidelines provide an appropriate basis
> for policy development."

key phrase "generally accepted privacy principles" - the key principle being (i believe) 'don't get
caught' and, if caught, blame someone else, set up a committee and continue as before.

Sorry, too much cynicism?
Dr Matthew Allen
Senior Lecturer, Humanities
Coordinator, Internet Studies
Curtin University of Technology
61 - 8 9266 3511

From rw@firstpr.com.au Tue Dec 15 08:49:07 1998
From: rw@firstpr.com.au (Robin Whittle)
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 1998 17:49:07 +1000
Subject: ADMA code for Internet Marketing
In-Reply-To: <v0313030bb29b4856135f@[203.37.10.239]>
Message-ID: <199812150552.QAA05084@gair.firstpr.com.au>

My web site has the ADMA draft code of conduct, amendments to it, the
ACCC's (asleep at the wheel) initial positive assesment of it and a
number of submissions and other resources.

http://www.firstpr.com.au/issues/tm/

I believe that ADMA's attempt to get the government to approve this
deliberately limited code is a desperate and amateurish manouvre
which should be resoundly rejected by the ACCC.

Have your part in this code's demise! The more perspecive and
feedback the ACCC get (by Thursday or Friday) the better. The
contact details are at my web site.

- Robin




===============================================================

Robin Whittle rw@firstpr.com.au http://www.firstpr.com.au
Heidelberg Heights, Melbourne, Australia

First Principles Research and expression: music, Internet
music marketing, telecommunications, human
factors in technology adoption. Consumer
advocacy in telecommunications, especially
privacy. Consulting and technical writing.

Real World Electronics and software for music: eg.
Interfaces the Devil Fish mods for the TB-303.

===============================================================

From marghanita@ramin.com.au Tue Dec 15 07:38:39 1998
From: marghanita@ramin.com.au (M. da Cruz)
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 1998 17:38:39 +1100
Subject: MCI WorldCom offers to buy OzEmail
References: <3674B3D6.69219ADB@dynamite.com.au> <36759393.B1800FD0@knapp.com.au>
Message-ID: <367603EF.4CE6@ramin.com.au>

Paul Montgomery wrote:
<snip>
> It was bound to happen, given the paucity of a venture capital culture here.
> Would you rather that Cable & Wireless or maybe (cough) AOL bought it instead,
<snip>

Let's not get sentimental about this:
a) OzEmail was beyond the Venture capital stage
b) Optus bought Microplex earlier this year
c) OzEmail went to the highest bidder!

By the way, I was curious about the space "The Australian" gave to the
announcement and...

for the Australian Internet Folklore record, was Connect.com.au or
OzEmail the first commercial ISP in Australia?

Marghanita
--
Marghanita da Cruz
Principal Consultant
Ramin Communications
http://www.ramin.com.au
Tel: (+61) 0414-869202


From tonyb@netinfo.com.au Tue Dec 15 08:51:05 1998
From: tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 1998 18:51:05 +1100
Subject: Six month extension to Telstra price caps
Message-ID: <v0211010db29b4962ebf3@[203.37.43.24]>

>Date: Tue, 15 Dec 1998 08:47:13 +1100 (EST)
>From: owner-all@minister.dca.gov.au
>X-Authentication-Warning: edison.dca.gov.au: majordom set sender to
>owner-all using -f
>Subject: New Ministerial Media Release
>Sender: owner-all@minister.dca.gov.au
>Precedence: bulk
>Status:
>
>The following ministerial media release can be found at
>http://www.dcita.gov.au/cgi-bin/graphics.pl?path=3412
>
>Six month extension to Telstra price caps
>
> The Minister for Communications, Senator Richard Alston, today
>announced a
> six-month extension of the existing telecommunications price cap
>regime.
>
>Terry O'Connor
>02 6277 7480
>

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From sldavey@fl.asn.au Tue Dec 15 09:05:04 1998
From: sldavey@fl.asn.au (Sandra Davey)
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 1998 19:05:04 +1100
Subject: Where is OzLists
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.19981215190504.007a25f0@203.61.218.131>

G'day everyone,

I am trying to find ozlists, the super list maintained by Linda Herron at
Griffith Uni. The normal URL of http://www.gu.edu.au/gint/ozlists tells me
it's not there and it will be available next semester. Can anyone shed any
light?

Cheers
Sandra


____________________________________________________________________________
___
Sandra Davey
SMS Consulting
Email: sldavey@sms.com.au
Ph: +61 2 9267 6344


From rsedc@urgento.gse.rmit.EDU.AU Tue Dec 15 10:08:03 1998
From: rsedc@urgento.gse.rmit.EDU.AU (David Chia)
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 1998 20:08:03 +1100 (EST)
Subject: Wireless PoPs (was Re: National bandwidth inquiry)
In-Reply-To: <2.2.32.19981214210958.0069b1fc@mail.mpx.com.au> from "Tom Worthington" at Dec 15, 98 08:09:58 am
Message-ID: <199812150908.UAA22029@urgento.gse.rmit.EDU.AU>

>
> >Privacy is another issue. The open channel means any receiver can pick
> >up any traffic -- which means my e-mail is sent to everybody...
>
> Use encryption.
>

I was told that special license is needed for encrypted broadcast,
especially when the source or receiving sites are not known.


David Chia, RMIT University

From rsedc@urgento.gse.rmit.EDU.AU Tue Dec 15 10:36:47 1998
From: rsedc@urgento.gse.rmit.EDU.AU (David Chia)
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 1998 20:36:47 +1100 (EST)
Subject: Wireless PoPs (was Re: National bandwidth inquiry)
In-Reply-To: <9812159136.AA913697301@mail.auscoms.com.au> from "richard@auscoms.com.au" at Dec 15, 98 02:53:07 pm
Message-ID: <199812150936.UAA22075@urgento.gse.rmit.EDU.AU>

>
> Reserving CB radio channels for data by community consent may be impossible. You
> could never guarantee that:
> 1) Some smelly yob up from the city with a Land Cruiser, a spotlight and a
> couple of shotties won't transmit on whatever channel the set happens to be
> tuned to, thus ditching the data; and
> 2) You won't get interference from adjoining areas.
>

Thats is where spread spectrum technology is good for. The data is
broadcast for fraction of a second on a channel before hopping
automatically to another pre-agreed channel, etc. The packet can
squeezed in between other packet or voice transmissions. Packet
collisions can be detected and retransmitted on another channel.
Different hopping patterns allows the channels to be shared. A few
noisy channels have little effect on overall data transmission. The
random but pre-agreed hopping patterns also allows some level of
privacy against the 'casual' amateur snoop. I was told no special
permit is needed if operating in the 900 MHz range. Packet radio at
such frequency offers 230 kbps (on amateur equipment) and up.
(CB radio is on 27 MHz).


David Chia, RMIT University

From tonyb@netinfo.com.au Tue Dec 15 11:00:50 1998
From: tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 1998 21:00:50 +1100
Subject: Where is OzLists
Message-ID: <v02110105b29be21dde07@[203.37.43.24]>

At 7:05 PM 15/12/98, Sandra Davey wrote:
>I am trying to find ozlists, the super list maintained by Linda Herron at
>Griffith Uni. The normal URL of http://www.gu.edu.au/gint/ozlists tells me
>it's not there and it will be available next semester. Can anyone shed any
>light?

Linda left Griffith some good time ago. Griffith seems to have scambled a
number of pages which are information related eg
<http://www.gu.edu.au/alib/iii/iii-home.htm> which was home to the Library
Infrastructure grants. Perhaps anybody from Griffith on the list can tell
us what is happening to their site?

I had the impression that ozlists had not been updated since Linda left. It
would be a forbidding task to maintain such a database centrally now.

Tony

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au Tue Dec 15 12:36:02 1998
From: me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 1998 22:36:02 +1100
Subject: ORACLE, SUN DEAL
Message-ID: <v0211010bb29bf8280c19@[203.37.43.24]>

>From Net News 15 December 1998

ORACLE, SUN DEAL
Oracle and Sun today announced an agreement to license each other's
software, combining components of
the Oracle8i Internet database into the Sun Solaris operating environment,
and for Oracle to use the Solaris core
to deliver the industry's first database server appliances. This should
encourage
development of computers that don't need an operating system, such as
those sold by Microsoft. See http://www.sun.com

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au Tue Dec 15 12:35:45 1998
From: me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 1998 22:35:45 +1100
Subject: 80% OF WEB ADS UNSOLD
Message-ID: <v02110107b29bf5a3749f@[203.37.43.24]>

>From Net News 14 December 1998

80% OF WEB ADS UNSOLD
Forbes magazine reports that the Internet has failed dismally as an advertising
medium, with 80% of all Web ad inventory going unsold - and what's left is
being
dumped at firesale prices. It also says speculators have lost $2 billion
shorting
Amazon.com and Yahoo stocks, and that the lengthy delays in Windows NT 5.0 (now
Windows 2000) has got the industry worried that it might lead to a sales
slow-down.
See http://www.forbes.com/Forbes/98/1228/

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au Tue Dec 15 12:36:06 1998
From: me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 1998 22:36:06 +1100
Subject: INTERNAUT STRIKE
Message-ID: <v0211010cb29bf839100d@[203.37.43.24]>

>From Net News 15 December 1998

INTERNAUT STRIKE
French Netizens calling themselves the Association of Unhappy Internauts
claimed success for a weekend Internet strike over high phone bills.
They said between 50 to 90% of Web surfers boycotted France
Telecom over its high Web fees ($1.60 to $3 an hour). The Internauts want
an American-style flat rate model of $36 a month unlimited access, which
France Telecom has rejected outright.

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au Tue Dec 15 12:36:11 1998
From: me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 1998 22:36:11 +1100
Subject: ADOPT AN MP
Message-ID: <v0211010db29bf84a140f@[203.37.43.24]>

>From Net News 15 December 1998

ADOPT AN MP
British activists worried about proposed legislation to control how data is
encrypted on the Net have adopted a novel protest - adopt an MP and
educate him or her about the dangers. Typically British - see
http://www.stand.org.uk/

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From gwhite@educationau.edu.au Tue Dec 15 14:52:04 1998
From: gwhite@educationau.edu.au (Gerry White)
Date: Wed, 16 Dec 1998 00:22:04 +1030
Subject: Education on the line
Message-ID: <015101be2832$19fadf60$09bb0ccb@ibm-thinkpad-1>

Whoa there! Lets not get too carried away by one piece of research on the
use of computers in schools which puts a critical view on the use of
computers in education.

There is heaps of evidence on the benefits of students using computers in
education across the board e.g. reading, writing, spelling, social cohesion
etc. which are well documented.

The knockers will always gain an attention spot in the media. Remember the
fuss about the introduction of school libraries in the sixties! And science
labs in the seventies! And it never hurts to have a critical review of
educational programs to try to understand what is being said by the critical
reviewers. If we try to understand what critiques are saying then often a
positive effect can be realised as a result of critical reflection and
perhaps new insights.

I recall that I encouraged my kids to have books at home and they also had
books at school. Of course. Advocating that if we have computers at home,
then we don't need computers at school is perhaps a bit naive about what
education is about. And I'm not selling my books either!

Computers are excellent learning and communication tools which are emerging
as part of an infrastructure to underpin our knowledge based society. Surely
these are fundamentsal aspects upon which education is built. And using
computers in education is only partly about familiarity of them in the
workplace, although I hear industries crying out for an improved computer
skills base in the workforce. Building a skilled workforce does not happen
in three weeks but takes many years and needs to start at an early age to be
effective.

What about books. Books have been used in education for many purposes
including as a memory aid and transmission of information. Computers fulfill
these functions too and can also allow for manipulation of information to be
applied as value-added-infomation or useful knowledge. And they can store
greater volumes of readily accessible information than books.

Students have enormous trouble buying expensive books to be used for
reference as do libraries because of escalating print costs. However,
keeping up with changes in the world can be cheaper and easier using
computers than through outlays on out-of-date expensive print materials.

The real debate is how best to use computers in education and how to provide
for professional development of teachers/lecturers to make best use of
computers in education.

Regards
Gerry White

-----Original Message-----
From: Janet Whitaker <jwhit@PrimeNet.Com>
To: Tony Barry <me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au>; link@www.anu.edu.au
<link@www.anu.edu.au>
Date: Monday, 14 December 1998 23:08
Subject: Re: Education on the line


>re Tony's post about computers in schools ...
>
>Yeah, and there is a big problem with school fees supposedly voluntary
being
>put through collection agencies in Victoria, despite the minister saying
>he'll 'do something' to schools that use strong arm tactics. <shaking
head>
>sort of makes one wonder about priorities, doesn't it? Kids can't go to
the
>zoo unless their single parent pays up their fees, but the gubmint can come
>up with zillions to put a few computers in schools. And don't even talk
>about music and art.....
>
>Jan
>
>
>JLWhitaker Associates
>Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
>jwhit@primenet.com -- http://www.primenet.com/~jwhit/whitentr.htm
>
>


From bje@cygnus.com Tue Dec 15 23:11:18 1998
From: bje@cygnus.com (Ben Elliston)
Date: Wed, 16 Dec 1998 09:11:18 +1100 (EST)
Subject: Wireless PoPs (was Re: National bandwidth inquiry)
In-Reply-To: <2.2.32.19981214210958.0069b1fc@mail.mpx.com.au>
Message-ID: <Pine.LNX.3.95.981216091045.266A-100000@moshpit.cygnus.com>

> I had a vague idea that packet radio modems developed by radio amateurs used
> a predecessor of the multiple access protocol used for Ethernet. A quick web
> search found a wealth of excellent information on work done by amateurs with
> packet radio and in Australia for emergency communications:

This is true. The simplest version of such a protocol is known as `ALOHA'
and was developed at the University of Hawaii.

Ben


From gtaylor@efa.org.au Wed Dec 16 00:22:39 1998
From: gtaylor@efa.org.au (Greg Taylor)
Date: Wed, 16 Dec 1998 10:22:39 +1100 (EST)
Subject: Computers, Freedom + Privacy '99 call for proposals
Message-ID: <199812152322.KAA29393@boomer.anu.edu.au>

[Circulate until January 15, 1999]

Computers, Freedom + Privacy 1999
THE GLOBAL INTERNET

Omni Shoreham Hotel
Washington, DC
April 6-8, 1999


CALL FOR PROPOSALS


The Program Committee of the conference on Computers, Freedom, and
Privacy (CFP99) is seeking proposals for the ninth annual CFP,
which will be held in Washington DC between April 6th and April 8th
1999 at the Omni Sheraton Hotel.

CFP is the leading Internet policy conference. For almost a decade,
CFP has shaped the public debate on the future of privacy and
freedom in the online world. The CFP audience is diverse with
representatives from government, business, education, non-profits
and the media. The themes are broad and forward-looking. CFP
explores what will be, not what has been. It is the place where the
future is mapped.

The theme of the 1999 CFP conference is "The Global Internet."
Proposals are welcomed on all aspects of privacy and freedom. The
1999 Program Committee is particularly interested in receiving
proposals that deal with:

ACCESS TO THE INTERNET, particularly those relating to
globalization and governance. Of particular interest are
issues of privacy, censorship, free speech and access.

INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, especially the emerging issues of global
privacy protection, encryption policy, international
principles of human rights, regulation, legislation, and
copyright.

ELECTRONIC COMMERCE, including the impact of payment systems,
regulations, and technical standards on personal freedom and
privacy.

CULTURE AND LANGUAGE ON THE INTERNET, such as the significance
of diversity, multilingualism, and cultural representation

We strongly encourage proposals that involve leading experts,
innovators, policymakers, and thinkers.

The CFP99 Program Committee will finalize the selection of
proposals by February 1, 1999, and all proposals must be received
by January 15, 1999 Please follow the submission guidelines below.


CFP99 PROPOSAL SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

Proposals should be sent by email to proposals@cfp99.org before
January 15, 1999.

Proposals should include the following information:

1. Presentation Title

2. Presentation Type (Panel discussion, Luncheon meeting,
Tutorial, "BOF" Session)

3. Proposed Length of Presentation (typical CFP sessions are 1
hour)

4. Name(s) of Speaker(s), plus brief background description
for each speaker.

5. A one to two paragraph description of the Topic and Format,
suitable for conference brochure and press release.

6. Complete contact information (email, phone, and mailing
address). For presentations with more than one speaker, please
provide contact information for all of the proposed speakers.

For more information on the Computers, Freedom, and Privacy
Conferences, please visit the conference Web page
http://www.cfp99.org. If your have further questions about CFP,
please feel free to contact a member of the Program Committee.


PROGRAM COMMITTEE

Marc Rotenberg, EPIC and ACM, Washington, DC, CFP99 Chair; Carlos
Afonso, Alliance for Progressive Computing, Rio de Janeiro, BRAZIL;
Phil Agre, University of California, San Diego, California; Yaman
Akdeniz, Centre for Criminal Justice Studies, Leeds University,
London, UNITED KINGDOM; Roger Clarke, Australian National
University, Canberra, AUSTRALIA; Tracey Cohen, Centre For Applied
Legal Studies, SOUTH AFRICA; Lorrie Faith Cranor, AT&T
Labs-Research, Florham Park, New Jersey; Simon Davies, London
School of Economics, London, UNITED KINGDOM; David Flaherty, Office
of the Privacy and Information Commissioner, British Columbia,
CANADA; Oscar Gandy, Annenburg School of Communication,
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Deborah Hurley, Harvard Information
Infrastructure Project, Kennedy School of Government, Cambridge,
Massachusetts; Joichi Ito, Digital Garage, Tokyo, JAPAN; Stephen
Lau, Privacy Commission, HONG KONG; Paul McMasters, Freedom Forum,
Rosslyn, Virginia; Peter Neumann, SRI, Menlo Park. California; Eli
Noam, Columbia University, New York, New York; Jonathan Peizer,
Open Society Institute, New York, New York; Bruce Schneier,
Counterpane Systems, Minneapolis, Minnesota; Keith Sears, Creative
Artists, Los Angeles, California; Barbara Simon, ACM, Palo Alto,
California; Ross Stapleton-Gray, Electronic Embassy Program,
Arlington, Virginia; Barry Steinhardt, American Civil Liberties
Union, New York; Nadine Strossen, American Civil Liberties Union,
New York, New York; Frank Tuerkheimer, University of Wisconsin,
Madison, Wisconsin


FUNDRAISING COMMITTEE

Rob Kushen, Open Society Institute, New York, New York


PREVIOUS CFP CHAIRS

Jim Warren, Woodside, California (CFP91); Lance Hoffman, George
Washington University, Washington, DC (CFP92); Bruce Koball,
Berkeley, California (CFP93); George Trubow, John Marshall School
of Law, Chicago, Illinois (CFP94); Carey Heckman, Stanford Law
School, Stanford, California (CFP95); Hal Abelson, MIT, Cambridge,
Massachusetts (CFP96); Kent Walker, Netscape Communication,
Mountain View, California (CFP97); Mark Lemley, University of Texas
School of Law, Austin, Texas (CFP98)

MORE INFORMATION

proposals@cfp99.org
info@cfp99.org

http://www.cfp99.org/





From richard@auscoms.com.au Wed Dec 16 00:10:17 1998
From: richard@auscoms.com.au (richard@auscoms.com.au)
Date: Wed, 16 Dec 98 09:10:17 +1000
Subject: MCI WorldCom offers to buy OzEmail
Message-ID: <9812169137.AA913759839@mail.auscoms.com.au>


Marghanita -- I think it was connect.com.au; as I recall, OzEmail's earliest
incarnation wasn't as an ISP, but as a bulletin-board-style private e-mail
service (ie not connected to the Internet).

About sentimentality -- at least MCI might address some of the more painful
aspects of the OzEmail network ...

Richard Chirgwin

____________________Reply Separator____________________
Subject: Re: MCI WorldCom offers to buy OzEmail
Author: <marghanita@ramin.com.au>
Date: 15/12/98 17:38

Paul Montgomery wrote:
<snip>
> It was bound to happen, given the paucity of a venture capital culture here.
> Would you rather that Cable & Wireless or maybe (cough) AOL bought it instead,
<snip>

Let's not get sentimental about this:
a) OzEmail was beyond the Venture capital stage
b) Optus bought Microplex earlier this year
c) OzEmail went to the highest bidder!

By the way, I was curious about the space "The Australian" gave to the
announcement and...

for the Australian Internet Folklore record, was Connect.com.au or
OzEmail the first commercial ISP in Australia?

Marghanita
--
Marghanita da Cruz
Principal Consultant
Ramin Communications
http://www.ramin.com.au
Tel: (+61) 0414-869202





From sandied@vicnet.net.au Wed Dec 16 01:00:08 1998
From: sandied@vicnet.net.au (Sandie Downey)
Date: Wed, 16 Dec 1998 11:00:08 +1100
Subject: Education on the line
In-Reply-To: <015101be2832$19fadf60$09bb0ccb@ibm-thinkpad-1>
Message-ID: <3.0.3.32.19981216110008.007401c0@mail.vicnet.net.au>

At 12:22 AM 12/16/98 +1030, Gerry White wrote:
>Whoa there! Lets not get too carried away by one piece of research on the
>use of computers in schools which puts a critical view on the use of
>computers in education.


Have a look at what they are doing in Canada
www.schoolnet.ca

Vicnet is also doing a lot or work with putting computers into schools especially in remote and isolated towns in Victoria.

Sandie


Sandie Downey
Skills.net Roadshow Co-ordinator
http://cf.vicnet.net.au/skillsnet/
Phone 0411 738 407 or 018 842 619



From DTebbutt@acp.com.au Wed Dec 16 02:51:33 1998
From: DTebbutt@acp.com.au (Dan Tebbutt)
Date: Wed, 16 Dec 1998 11:51:33 +1000
Subject: MCI WorldCom offers to buy OzEmail
Message-ID: <199812160057.LAA10578@boomer.anu.edu.au>

>About sentimentality -- at least MCI might address some of the more painful
>aspects of the OzEmail network ...


Why does everyone in Australia insist on calling it "MCI"? it's WorldCom.
WorldCom bought MCI (after outbidding BT) and then sold MCI's Internet
business (then the world's largest) to Cable & Wireless. so in some sense
CWO would (have) been a good fit for OzEmail... but UUNet (the WorldCom
subsidiary that will control OzEmail) is probably better.

dant

From philip.mccrea@cmis.csiro.au Wed Dec 16 01:58:51 1998
From: philip.mccrea@cmis.csiro.au (Philip McCrea)
Date: Wed, 16 Dec 1998 10:58:51 +1000
Subject: Gatekeeper progress
Message-ID: <3.0.32.19981216105847.00958100@pophost.nsw.cmis.csiro.au>

Can any informed linker provide me with the current status of project
Gatekeeper?
At the same time, perhaps someone could give me the new email addresses of
the former ogit staff.

Thanks in anticipation.
Phil McCrea


From bpa@iss.net.au Wed Dec 16 02:02:11 1998
From: bpa@iss.net.au (Brenda Aynsley)
Date: Wed, 16 Dec 1998 11:32:11 +1030
Subject: ADOPT AN MP
References: <v0211010db29bf84a140f@[203.37.43.24]>
Message-ID: <36770692.254C0B5E@iss.net.au>

Tony Barry wrote:

> >From Net News 15 December 1998
>
> ADOPT AN MP
> British activists worried about proposed legislation to control how data is
> encrypted on the Net have adopted a novel protest - adopt an MP and
> educate him or her about the dangers. Typically British - see
> http://www.stand.org.uk/
>

I went there, I viewed the source and read the following:

<!-- Begin Tracker Script-->
<script>
<!--an=navigator.appName;sr='http://x3.extreme-dm.com/';srw="na";srb="na";d=document;r=41;function
pr(n) {
d.write("<img
src=\""+sr+"n\/?tag=stand&p=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.stand.org.uk%2F&j=y&srw="+srw+"&srb="+srb+"

&l="+escape(d.referrer)+"&rs="+r+"\" height=1 width=1>");}//-->
</script>
<script language="javascript1.2">
<!--s=screen;srw=s.width;an!="Netscape"?srb=s.colorDepth:srb=s.pixelDepth//-->
</script>
<IMG
src="http://x3.extreme-dm.com/n/?tag=stand&p=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.stand.org.uk%2F&j=y&srw=800&srb=16

&l=mailbox%3A/e%7C/Users/bpa/mail/lists.sbd/link%3Fid%3Dv0211010db29bf84a140f%2540%255B203.37.43.24%255D%26number%3D5494432

&rs=41" height=1 width=1>
<CENTER>


It seems that both my mailbox location (directory) on my pc (it's not quite
right tho' if I read it correctly it assumes the directory is on the C drive)
and tony's IP address are now captured by this process and recorded at
stand.org.uk. I'm not sure I like this and cant work out what the advantage is
for stand.org or why they would do this? Anyone suggest what the pros and cons
are?

brenda
--
Brenda Aynsley - http://www.iss.net.au/bpabio.html
Phone:+61 8 8357 8844 Fax:+61 8 8373 3829 Mobile:+61 412 662 988
Internet Support Services Australia Pty Ltd (ACN 069 346 327)
Education, Web site development and Support Services



From philip.mccrea@cmis.csiro.au Wed Dec 16 02:13:25 1998
From: philip.mccrea@cmis.csiro.au (Philip McCrea)
Date: Wed, 16 Dec 1998 11:13:25 +1000
Subject: MCI WorldCom offers to buy OzEmail
Message-ID: <3.0.32.19981216111323.00928990@pophost.nsw.cmis.csiro.au>

I think Richard is correct. As a matter of interest, connect.com emerged
from the Unix world where TCP/IP was the default comms protocol, while
Ozemail's heritage, as Richard indicated, was PC oriented. Being a Unix
user at the time (and AUUG president), I recall being more than a little
put out that these 'foreigners' were tramping on our turf! Suffice to say,
I've relaxed my attitude considerably...

For historical interest only,
Phil

At 09:10 AM 16-12-98 +1000, richard@auscoms.com.au wrote:
>
>Marghanita -- I think it was connect.com.au; as I recall, OzEmail's earliest
>incarnation wasn't as an ISP, but as a bulletin-board-style private e-mail
>service (ie not connected to the Internet).
...
Marghanita had asked:
>for the Australian Internet Folklore record, was Connect.com.au or
>OzEmail the first commercial ISP in Australia?

____________________________________________________________
philip.mccrea@cmis.csiro.au tel (02) 9325 3205
CSIRO fax (02) 9325 3200
Bldg E6B Macquarie University mob (0411) 102 548
North Ryde NSW 2113

From richard@auscoms.com.au Wed Dec 16 00:05:57 1998
From: richard@auscoms.com.au (richard@auscoms.com.au)
Date: Wed, 16 Dec 98 09:05:57 +1000
Subject: Wireless PoPs (was Re: National bandwidth inquiry)
Message-ID: <9812169137.AA913759579@mail.auscoms.com.au>


Thanks David. You're right, that's what spread spectrum is for -- but I think
this underlines the point I made which started this thread, that things ain't as
simple as they look at first glance. The debate started with a simple "why not
use data on CB radio?" which became "data plus encryption plus an a community
arrangement about channel allocation" which now becomes "data plus encryption
plus a different radio system" etc (because I don't know any $40 CB transceivers
that support spread spectrum).

Please, everybody, I'm not knocking the idea of remote area connectivity. I just
don't want to see a mistaken belief that it's simple; it's counter productive.
What if a Canberra reader of this list were to decide that the Nats would be
overjoyed if we handled a few simmple administrative details and made CB radio
the vehicle of remote area Internet connectivity? An unholy mess, wasted money,
and real service delivery would be delayed...

Richard Chirgwin

____________________Reply Separator____________________
Subject: Re: Wireless PoPs (was Re: National bandwidth inquiry)
Author: David Chia <rsedc@urgento.gse.rmit.EDU.AU>
Date: 15/12/98 20:36

>
> Reserving CB radio channels for data by community consent may be impossible.
You
> could never guarantee that:
> 1) Some smelly yob up from the city with a Land Cruiser, a spotlight and a
> couple of shotties won't transmit on whatever channel the set happens to be
> tuned to, thus ditching the data; and
> 2) You won't get interference from adjoining areas.
>

Thats is where spread spectrum technology is good for. The data is
broadcast for fraction of a second on a channel before hopping
automatically to another pre-agreed channel, etc. The packet can
squeezed in between other packet or voice transmissions. Packet
collisions can be detected and retransmitted on another channel.
Different hopping patterns allows the channels to be shared. A few
noisy channels have little effect on overall data transmission. The
random but pre-agreed hopping patterns also allows some level of
privacy against the 'casual' amateur snoop. I was told no special
permit is needed if operating in the 900 MHz range. Packet radio at
such frequency offers 230 kbps (on amateur equipment) and up.
(CB radio is on 27 MHz).


David Chia, RMIT University




From tomw@acslink.net.au Wed Dec 16 02:39:40 1998
From: tomw@acslink.net.au (Tom Worthington)
Date: Wed, 16 Dec 1998 12:39:40 +1100
Subject: Privacy legislation - Government announcement
Message-ID: <2.2.32.19981216013940.006f9e88@mail.mpx.com.au>

Just received this curiously worded announcement from the Attorney-General's
Office. Not sure if it matches what the ACS asked for:
http://www.acs.org.au/president/1998/past/privpos.htm

>From: "Grono, Nick" <Nick.Grono@ag.gov.au>
>Subject: Privacy protection for the private sector
>Date: Wed, 16 Dec 1998 11:02:53 +1100
>Return-Receipt-To: "Grono, Nick" <Nick.Grono@ag.gov.au>
>MIME-Version: 1.0
>X-Mailer: Internet Mail Service (5.5.2232.9)
>Content-Type: text/plain
>Status:
>
>> I am happy to be able to inform you that the Government today agreed to
>> the development of a light-touch legislative scheme to support
>> self-regulatory privacy protection in the private sector.
>>
>> The Government believes that those businesses that are self-regulating
>> should be supported by an environment of consistency and certainty in
>> relation to privacy standards across the private sector.
>>
>> Following its consideration of the views that have been put forward by you
>> and other business representatives in recent times, the Government decided
>> that the best way of achieving that consistency and certainty is to
>> establish a light-touch legislative regime based on the Privacy
>> Commissioner's National Principles for the Fair Handling of Personal
>> Information.
>>
>> The scheme will provide a back up to self-regulatory codes and apply a
>> legislative framework where codes are not adopted. There will be
>> appropriate exemptions, such as for employee records, which will mean that
>> businesses which hold no personal data other than employee data will not
>> be affected by the legislation. Personal information collected and used
>> by the media for journalistic purposes will also be exempt from the
>> scheme.
>>
>> The Privacy Commissioner will assist business to implement the scheme.
>> This will build on the excellent relations which the Commissioner and her
>> Office have developed with business groups in developing the National
>> Principles.
>>
>The scheme will be designed to avoid imposing undue burdens or constraints
>on business. It will be developed by the Attorney-General's Department in
>close consultation with business groups, the Privacy Commissioner, the
>National Office for the Information Economy, relevant federal agencies and
>privacy and consumer advocates.
>
>> The Attorney-General looks forward to your continued participation in the
>> development of workable and effective privacy protection in Australia.
>>
>>
>> Regards,
>>
>> Nicholas Grono
>> Adviser
>> Office of the Attorney-General
>> nick.grono@ag.gov.au


Tom Worthington http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw PO Box 13
Immediate Past President Belconnen ACT 2617
Australian Computer Society tomw@acslink.net.au
----------------------------------------------------------------------
IRC 1999 Topics Needed: http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw/irc/irc.html


From karina@acwa.asn.au Wed Dec 16 03:22:13 1998
From: karina@acwa.asn.au (Karina Brisby)
Date: Wed, 16 Dec 1998 13:22:13 +1100
Subject: Call for papers/Advance Notice Community Networking Conference 1999
Message-ID: <367718F6.154D@acwa.asn.au>

Hi everyone,

I am on the organising committee for this conference and thought that it
may be of interest to more than one linker.

Karina Brisby


Call for papers / Advance Notice
Community Networking Conference 1999
29 September - 1 October 1999
Ballarat Australia

The organising committe for the 1999 Conference "Engaging Regionalism"
conference is pleased to announce the conference and call for papers
http://www.civ.org.au/cn99/

This conference is the fourth in a series organised by Community
Information Victoria Inc. (CIVic.) in association with ACNA, Vicnet and
other not-for-profit organisations. The 1999 Conference "Engaging
Regionalism" will be held at Ballarat University, set in bushland in the
historic Victorian goldfields. The conference will provide an
opportunity for people interested in low-cost electronic networking in
Australia, New Zealand, and other countries to focus on the importance
of location and region in online networking.

To maximise attendance for community organisations the organising
committee is planning on making this a low cost event.

For further information visit the website http://www.civ.org.au/cn99/
(and bookmark it!)

Please forward this message to appropriate colleagues and listservs

Ken Young for the Organising Committee
--
************************************
Ken Young
Manager
Community Information Victoria Inc.
4/136 Exhibition Street
Melbourne Vic. 3000
Tel: +61 3 9650 5322
Fax: +61 3 9650 5817
Email: ken@civ.org.au
Homepage: www.civ.org.au
************************************

From Matthew.Batten@ozemail.camtech.net.au Wed Dec 16 13:00:20 1998
From: Matthew.Batten@ozemail.camtech.net.au (Matthew Batten)
Date: Wed, 16 Dec 1998 13:00:20 +0100
Subject: MCI WorldCom offers to buy OzEmail
In-Reply-To: <199812160057.LAA10578@boomer.anu.edu.au>
Message-ID: <v0401171eb29d512648cb@[192.168.1.43]>

At 11:51 AM +1000 16/12/98, Dan Tebbutt wrote:
>>About sentimentality -- at least MCI might address some of the more painful
>>aspects of the OzEmail network ...
>
>
>Why does everyone in Australia insist on calling it "MCI"? it's WorldCom.
>WorldCom bought MCI (after outbidding BT) and then sold MCI's Internet
>business (then the world's largest) to Cable & Wireless. so in some sense
>CWO would (have) been a good fit for OzEmail... but UUNet (the WorldCom
>subsidiary that will control OzEmail) is probably better.
>
>dant

For reference, here are the official press releases from both OzEmail and
MCIWorlCom. Apologies for the formatting of this email.

Regards,

Matthew Batten



N E W S R E L E A S E

OzEmail Announces Issue of 14.9% Stake
to MCI WorldCom

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT:
Sean Howard, Michael Ward - Sydney, Australia - (+61 2) 9433 2400

Sydney, Australia, December 14, 1998 - OzEmail Limited (Nasdaq: OZEMY,
ASX:OZM) ("the Company") today announced that it has issued 21,863,174
ordinary shares (equivalent to 2,186,317 ADSs), constituting
approximately 14.9%
of the outstanding shares following the issuance, to UUNET Holdings
Australia Pty Limited, a wholly owned subsidiary of MCI WorldCom Inc.,
at a
purchase price equal to US$2.00 per share (equivalent to US$20.00 per
ADS).
OzEmail said that its Board of Directors had approved the issue of the
shares.

MCI WorldCom has advised the Company that MCI WorldCom intends to make a
take-over bid for all outstanding shares of the Company at a price of
US$22.00 per ADS (US$2.20 per share) net to the seller in cash. At the
OzEmail board meeting, Malcolm Turnbull, Sean Howard, and Trevor
Kennedy, directors of the Company (who together beneficially owned
approximately
54% of the outstanding OzEmail shares prior to the MCI WorldCom
issuance)
indicated that, subject to reviewing the offer documents to be prepared
by MCI WorldCom and, absent a more favourable offer, they intended to
accept the offer. The Board indicated that it intends to make a
recommendation
to OzEmail shareholders after it has had an opportunity to review MCI
WorldCom's offer document and Part A Statement.

Goldman Sachs Australia LLC acted as the financial adviser to OzEmail
Limited.

________________________________________________________________________
____
_________________

Contacts:

For Media:
Jim Monroe, MCI WorldCom +1 202 887 2241
pager: 800 724 3624 pin # 1561552

For Investors:
Gary Brandt, MCI WorldCom +1 601 360 8544

MCI WorldCom Announces Intention to Acquire Australia's OzEmail Limited

Telecom Firm has Purchased 14.9 percent of Australian ISP

Jackson, MS, December 13, 1998 and Sydney, Australia, December 14, 1998
--
MCI WorldCom, Inc. (Nasdaq: WCOM) today acquired 21,863,174 newly issued
ordinary shares in OzEmail Limited ("OzEmail") and announced that it
will
make a cash offer for all of the issued ordinary shares (including ADSs)
of OzEmail (Nasdaq: OZEMY, ASX: OZM).

UUNET Holdings Australia Pty Limited, a wholly owned subsidiary of MCI
WorldCom, will make an all cash offer to acquire all of the issued
ordinary shares of OzEmail at a price of US$2.20 per share, currently
equivalent
to approximately A$3.54 per share(1), including ADSs at a price of
US$22.00
per ADS. OzEmail has 146,732,714 ordinary shares issued and outstanding
after the placement to MCI WorldCom, representing a total value for
OzEmail's ordinary issued and outstanding shares of approximately
US$322.8 million, currently equivalent to approximately A$520.0
million(1), based
on MCI WorldCom's offer price.

MCI WorldCom acquired the relevant interest in 21,863,174 ordinary
shares by way of a share subscription agreement with OzEmail at US$2.00
per
share, currently equivalent to approximately A$3.22 per share(1). The
share
subscription agreement gave MCI WorldCom a relevant interest in
approximately 14.9 percent of OzEmail's expanded issued and outstanding
ordinary shares.

Subject to completion of the transaction, OzEmail would become the
Australian Internet operating arm of MCI WorldCom's UUNET subsidiary, a
global leader in Internet communications solutions.

"The Asia-Pacific region is of key strategic importance to us and the
synergies between OzEmail and MCI WorldCom are clear," said MCI WorldCom
Vice Chairman John Sidgmore. "The local fiber we are deploying in
Australia complements OzEmail's Internet presence and the vast
international resources of MCI WorldCom, particularly our worldwide
Internet backbone, will bring improved global connectivity to OzEmail's
customers."

OzEmail is one of the most successful Internet Service Providers (ISPs)
in
Australia. Based in Sydney, the firm offers a wide range of Internet
services throughout both Australia and New Zealand. OzEmail's network
includes approximately 80 Points of Presence (POPs) covering virtually
the
entire Australian population, as well as 15 POPs in New Zealand, which
provides equally comprehensive coverage in that market. OzEmail's
services
include dial-up and leased line Internet access, wholesale services to
other ISPs, web hosting services through its subsidiary WebCentral and
Internet-based voice offerings.

The offer provides OzEmail shareholders with a premium of approximately
50
percent over the weighted average trading price of OzEmail shares over
the
last three months on the Nasdaq National Market(2)."

The offer will remain open, unless extended, for at least one month from
the date of the offer, which is expected to be in early January.
Pending
commencement of the offer, a copy of any offering documents filed with
the
Australian Securities and Investments Commission ("ASIC") will also be
filed by MCI WorldCom with the United States Securities and Exchange
Commission ("SEC") as an exhibit to its current report on Form 8-K, as
soon
as practicable after their registration with the ASIC.

The offer will be conditional upon, among other things:
� MCI WorldCom being entitled to proceed, under the Australian
Corporations
Law, to compulsory acquisition of all of OzEmail's shares at the
expiration
of the offer;
� all Australian and other necessary governmental and regulatory
approvals
being received, including approval by the Foreign Investment Review
Board
in Australia; and
� no prescribed occurrences (as defined in the Australian Corporations
Law)
(including, for example, the grant of options, liquidation or asset
disposition) occurring in relation to OzEmail or any of its subsidiaries
during the offer period.

Under the offer, OzEmail shareholders will be able to elect to receive
payment in either US or Australian dollars. Australian dollar payment
will
be converted from US dollars using the exchange rate when funds are paid
by
MCI WorldCom.

Merrill Lynch & Co will act as Dealer Manager for the offer in the
United
States and as financial adviser to MCI WorldCom. For further
information
in relation to the offer, please contact Bruce McLennan or Fleur Jouault
at
Merrill Lynch in Australia on +612 9226 5306/5342.

MCI WorldCom is a global communications company with revenue of more
than
$30 billion and established operations in over 65 countries encompassing
the Americas, Europe and the Asia-Pacific regions. MCI WorldCom is a
premier provider of facilities-based and fully integrated local, long
distance, international and Internet services. MCI WorldCom's global
networks, including its state-of-the-art pan-European network and
transoceanic cable systems, provide end-to-end high-capacity
connectivity
to more than 38,000 buildings worldwide. For more information on MCI
WorldCom, visit the World Wide Web at http://www.mciworldcom.com or
http://www.wcom.com.

(1) Exchange rate of US$1: A$0.6208 as of December 11, 1998.
(2) Per Bloomberg Financial Markets from Friday December 11, 1998.


___________________________________________________________________________
Matthew Batten Phone: +61 8 8303 3317
Manager, Corporate Sales Fax: +61 8 8303 6066
OzEmail Camtech Internet Email: mattb@ozemail.camtech.net.au
WWW: http://www.camtech.net.au Mobile: 0419 900 361

--- Level 8, 10 Pulteney Street Adelaide SA 5000, Australia ---

- OZEMAIL CAMTECH INTERNET - Fast Reliable Service -
___________________________________________________________________________

From richard@auscoms.com.au Wed Dec 16 05:35:29 1998
From: richard@auscoms.com.au (richard@auscoms.com.au)
Date: Wed, 16 Dec 98 14:35:29 +1000
Subject: Education on the line
Message-ID: <9812169137.AA913779353@mail.auscoms.com.au>


Gerry White wrote:

>Whoa there! Lets not get too carried away by one piece of research on the
>use of computers in schools which puts a critical view on the use of
>computers in education.

We're not, Gerry. I think most of the commentary is concerned with priorities --
whether or not the money going into something sexy is doing so at the expense of
more basic educational values.

>There is heaps of evidence on the benefits of students using computers in
>education across the board e.g. reading, writing, spelling, social >cohesion
etc. which are well documented.

<rant>
And which are contradicted by roughly the same number of studies which say
computers don't make a difference. Personal belief: computers are only of value
IF they are integrated into educational strategies. And if they don't divert
dollars from other places. And if it's not just a way for an otherwise
anti-public-education ministry/political party to prove they care. We're a
first-world country, for heavens' sake, and it's easier to find millions for
computers than tens of thousands to clean the *** toilets!

>The knockers will always gain an attention spot in the media.

This isn't "the media", it's a discussion group of people with expertise and
opinions. And my crit of the media is that they slavishly print Micro$oft,
Qompaq, et al press releases about the wonderful things their products do for
schools without asking why?

[snip]
>Computers are excellent learning and communication tools which are >emerging as
part of an infrastructure to underpin our knowledge based >society. Surely these
are fundamentsal aspects upon which education is >built.

Nope. (A cruel person would say that spelling is "fundamentsal," but I don't say
that :-)) I say that understanding _is_ fundamental, that critical thought is
fundamental, that interpersonal communication is fundamental -- and none of
these are imparted per se by computers.

Yes, computers are part of the infrastructure. "Knowledge-based" society,
though, is nothing more than industry cant. It's nothing new: except in purely
barbaric societies, knowledge was _always_ of critical value.

>And using computers in education is only partly about familiarity of them >in
the workplace, although I hear industries crying out for an improved >computer
skills base in the workforce.

So why do it in the classroom, in the certain knowledge that skills learned now
will be obsolete by the end of school?

>Building a skilled workforce does not happen in three weeks but takes many
>years and needs to start at an early age to be effective.

Furthermore: whatever industry says, education does _not_ exist solely to
provide cannon fodder for industry. Nor is there a guarantee that the presence
of a computer in the classroom is the differentiating factor: India is
outgrowing Australia in terms of software engineers -- most of whom had _less_
access than we do to computers at school.
</rant>

Richard Chirgwin





Regards
Gerry White

-----Original Message-----
From: Janet Whitaker <jwhit@PrimeNet.Com>
To: Tony Barry <me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au>; link@www.anu.edu.au
<link@www.anu.edu.au>
Date: Monday, 14 December 1998 23:08
Subject: Re: Education on the line


>re Tony's post about computers in schools ...
>
>Yeah, and there is a big problem with school fees supposedly voluntary
being
>put through collection agencies in Victoria, despite the minister saying
>he'll 'do something' to schools that use strong arm tactics. <shaking
head>
>sort of makes one wonder about priorities, doesn't it? Kids can't go to
the
>zoo unless their single parent pays up their fees, but the gubmint can come
>up with zillions to put a few computers in schools. And don't even talk
>about music and art.....
>
>Jan
>
>
>JLWhitaker Associates
>Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
>jwhit@primenet.com -- http://www.primenet.com/~jwhit/whitentr.htm
>
>





From chrisc@socialchange.net.au Wed Dec 16 15:49:54 1998
From: chrisc@socialchange.net.au (Chris Connolly)
Date: Wed, 16 Dec 1998 14:49:54 -0000
Subject: Privacy legislation - Government announcement
Message-ID: <01be2903$57cdd320$0100a8c0@admin>

Tom wrote:

>Just received this curiously worded announcement from the
Attorney-General's
>Office.

Yes it is true. Alston and Williams announced privacy legislation for the
private sector at 12pm today. No media release on their web sites yet but
you can get it from AGs on (02) 6277 7300.

Here is a copy of the Campaign for fair privacy laws media release:

Campaign for fair privacy laws
GPO Box 846 Sydney 2001

Media Release 16/12/98

Privacy legislation a big win for consumers

The federal Government today announced that it had changed its mind and
decided to finally introduce privacy legislation for the private sector.
This follows more years of debate about whether privacy protection should be
provided through voluntary standards or through legislation.

“This is a big win for consumers”, said Mr Chris Connolly, National
Coordinator of the Campaign for Fair Privacy Laws. “After months of
argument, the federal Government has finally decided to take effective
action on privacy. Consumer groups and privacy advocates have worked hard to
convince government and business that the best way to protect privacy is to
back up industry codes with enforceable legislation. It’s great to see that
hard work pay off.”

Federal Privacy legislation should:

# provide enforceable standards for industry practice
# provide effective remedies and sanctions when privacy is breached
# improve confidence in new technologies, especially electronic commerce
# bring Australia into line with International standards

Mr Connolly said that privacy and consumer groups looked forward to working
with business and government on the details of the legislation. “There is an
opportunity now to develop world class privacy protection, and to finally
fulfil government promises made back in 1996.”

Although few details have been released at this stage, Mr Connolly was
willing to give cautious support to the Government’s proposed ‘light touch’
approach to legislation, but warned that additional resources would be
required. “We should flag, even at this early stage, that the Office of the
Privacy Commissioner will require additional support and funding if an
effective scheme is to be developed. The current Privacy Commissioner
recently announced her resignation and the Office has only just survived a
massive (40%) budget cut.”

More details:

Chris Connolly
Campaign for Fair Privacy Laws
(02) 9281 4452
m 0414 938942

Tim Dixon
Australian Privacy Foundation
(02) 9231 4949
m 0411 114411

The Campaign for Fair Privacy Laws is a loose affiliation of privacy
advocates and consumer organisations, set up in 1997 to lobby for improved
privacy legislation.



From me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au Wed Dec 16 05:42:17 1998
From: me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Wed, 16 Dec 1998 15:42:17 +1100
Subject: 2GB online
Message-ID: <v02110102b29ce1c91526@[203.37.43.24]>

>From Net News 16 December 1998

SYDNEY NEWS
Sydney radio station 2GB has just launched what it calls Australia's first
'radio news on demand' service at http://www.2GBnews.com where you can
listen to the latest news bulletin, or launch a player which automatically
plays the news each hour.

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au Wed Dec 16 05:42:14 1998
From: me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Wed, 16 Dec 1998 15:42:14 +1100
Subject: MORE GO SHOPPING
Message-ID: <v02110101b29ce1ba118c@[203.37.43.24]>

>From Net News 16 December 1998

MORE GO SHOPPING
The E-Commerce Times reports that a survey sponsored by World Research
and EarthLink shows 70% of Internet users have used or plan to use the
Internet for shopping this year, compared to only 21% percent last year.
The top three reasons people are shopping on the Internet include no
crowds (80%), convenience of shopping any time (75%), and no traffic or
parking problems (70%). See
http://www.ecommercetimes.com/news/articles/981214-1a.shtml

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au Wed Dec 16 05:42:11 1998
From: me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Wed, 16 Dec 1998 15:42:11 +1100
Subject: Sun and Oracle Sidestep Windows
Message-ID: <v02110100b29ce131f17a@[203.37.43.24]>

>From Tech Talk's Daily Tech News Clicks for Tuesday December 15, 1998

Sun and Oracle Sidestep Windows
http://www.thestandard.com/articles/display/0,1449,2854,00.html?home.tf
Sun and Oracle are not only among the most vocal, virulent and outspoken
opponents facing Microsoft, they are also two rare companies that own core
technologies that could actually block Microsoft's aims. Monday, the two
announced a technology agreement aimed at subverting Microsoft's Windows NT
strategy. Claiming that Windows 2000, the next version of Windows NT, will
be too late to market and too limited to be of use, Sun and Oracle are set
to introduce a new database appliance, code-named Raw Iron. Contrary to
early published reports, the new devices will not run without an operating
system. Instead, the appliances, to be available beginning in March, will
use a scaled-down version of Sun's Solaris OS. "We don't have time to wait
for Windows 3000," quips Oracle CEO Larry Ellison.

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From chrisc@socialchange.net.au Wed Dec 16 16:47:31 1998
From: chrisc@socialchange.net.au (Chris Connolly)
Date: Wed, 16 Dec 1998 15:47:31 -0000
Subject: Fw: Australian Privacy Foundation - media release
Message-ID: <01be290b$6457b040$0100a8c0@admin>


Linkers,

More on privacy. So what do the industry players think? Good news?

>Media release from the Australian Privacy Foundation at 3pm today:
>
>GOVERNMENT MOVE ON PRIVACY LAWS WELCOMED
>
>The Government’s decision today to extend privacy laws to business has
>been welcomed by the Australian Privacy Foundation.
>
>"The Government’s decision is a big win for Australian consumers," said
>Privacy Foundation Director, Tim Dixon. "It will help give consumers
>greater control over their personal information, and improve their
>confidence in using new technologies.
>
>"Australians can look forward to cutting down unwanted intrusions on
>their privacy, being able to access and correct information which
>organisations hold on them, and stopping businesses passing on their
>information to others without their consent."
>
>"At a time when there’s an increasing feeling that they have lost
>control of how their personal information is collected and used, this is
>a very positive step. Self-regulation could never deliver the privacy
>safeguards which consumers rightfully demand."
>
>The Coalition promised to extend privacy laws before the 1996 election,
>but the commitment was dropped in March 1997 with the Prime Minister
>citing concerns about unwanted red tape. Since then, the Privacy
>Foundation and a coalition of consumer groups has campaigned to put
>privacy legislation back on the government’s agenda.
>
>"We appreciate the Government’s concern to avoid red tape. But business
>has nothing to fear from well-designed privacy laws - they are an
>essential part of an information economy. The Government’s announcement
>today has recognised that fact," Mr Dixon said.
>
>"Whether it’s in the hands of government or business, Australians have a
>right to expect that their personal information will be treated with
>respect.
>
>"Of course there will be several issues to address in the design of the
>privacy legislation, to ensure that consumers get the protection they
>deserve. We look forward to working with the Government and other groups
>in the new year, to fashion a world best-practice framework for privacy
>protection."
>
>
>Release December 15 1998 3pm. For further information, contact:
>Tim Dixon, Director, 02-9231 4949 or 0411-114411




From tonyb@netinfo.com.au Wed Dec 16 05:47:06 1998
From: tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Wed, 16 Dec 1998 15:47:06 +1100
Subject: Government to strengthen privacy protection
Message-ID: <v02110105b29ceb505260@[203.37.43.24]>

>Date: Wed, 16 Dec 1998 13:43:51 +1100 (EST)
>From: owner-all@minister.dca.gov.au
>X-Authentication-Warning: edison.dca.gov.au: majordom set sender to
>owner-all using -f
>subject: New Ministerial Media Release
>Sender: owner-all@minister.dca.gov.au
>Precedence: bulk
>Status:
>
>The following ministerial media release is availbale at:
> http://www.dcita.gov.au/cgi-bin/graphics.pl?path=3416
>
>Government to strengthen privacy protection
>
>Senator the Hon Richard Alston The Hon Daryl Williams AM QC
>MP
>Minister for Communications, the Attorney-General
>Information Economy and the Arts
>
>The Attorney-General, Daryl Williams, and the Minister for Communications,
>Information Technology and the Arts, Senator Richard Alston, today
>announced that the Government will legislate to support and strengthen
>self-regulatory privacy protection in the private sector.
>

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From marghanita@ramin.com.au Wed Dec 16 05:57:21 1998
From: marghanita@ramin.com.au (M. da Cruz)
Date: Wed, 16 Dec 1998 15:57:21 +1100
Subject: MCI WorldCom offers to buy OzEmail
References: <9812169137.AA913759839@mail.auscoms.com.au>
Message-ID: <36773DB1.2E57@ramin.com.au>

Thanks - this was a somewhat faceteous question, as a reaction to the
second paragraph of Mark Hollands editorial in Tuesday's Australian.

It appears:

>From personal memory: Sydney University was offering Dial up access to
the Internet for "non-commercial" use only, in 1991.

>From Linkers: Dialix & Connect.com were around in Sydney in 1992.

According to Mark Hollands OzEmail opened their doors in 1995 - which
none the less is a spectacular performance by OzEmail.

I suspect Access One purchased by OzEmail last year was also knocking
around before 1995, then there was Pegasus and Microplex.

Roger.. some more to research and add to your history.

Marghanita
--
Marghanita da Cruz
Principal Consultant
Ramin Communications
http://www.ramin.com.au
Tel: (+61) 0414-869202


From chrisc@socialchange.net.au Wed Dec 16 17:12:26 1998
From: chrisc@socialchange.net.au (Chris Connolly)
Date: Wed, 16 Dec 1998 16:12:26 -0000
Subject: Privacy legislation - Government announcement
Message-ID: <01be290e$df148ee0$0100a8c0@admin>

And now the Government press release is up at:

http://www.dca.gov.au

under the "newsroom heading"

Chris.




From promoter@acn.net.au Wed Dec 16 06:45:17 1998
From: promoter@acn.net.au (Australia's Cultural Network Promoter)
Date: Wed, 16 Dec 1998 16:45:17 +1100
Subject: Call for papers/Advance Notice Community Networking Conference 1999
Message-ID: <199812160545.QAA18930@www.artsinfo.net.au>

Thanks to Ken Young for Advance Notice of the Community Networking
Conference 1999.

Just a reminder to Ken and others with conferences that if you have not
already done so, you can submit them to Australia's Cultural Network
Event Finder at:

http://acn.net.au/cgi-bin/events

We try to get all listings up promptly. There are currently over 1,000
events listed, from conferences, exhibitions and film screenings, through
to Christmas pantomimes, bush dancing and platypus spotting.

Best wishes for the holiday season

Michael Dupe'
Promoter
Australia's Cultural Network

_________________________________________________________________
Australia's Cultural Network
http://www.acn.net.au
THE internet gateway to Australian culture

Add your events, submit your website, search for information about
Australian culture, join the 'ausculture' discussion list
____________________________________________________________________

email: promoter@acn.net.au
Ph: +61 (0)2 6253 2399
Fax: +61 (0)2 6253 2172

Postal address:
Australia's Cultural Network
New Media Section
Department of Communications, Information Technology and the Arts
GPO Box 2154
Canberra A.C.T. 2601
Australia

From sbarry@qantm.com.au Wed Dec 16 07:53:16 1998
From: sbarry@qantm.com.au (Barry, Sarah)
Date: Wed, 16 Dec 1998 16:53:16 +1000
Subject: FW: Where is OzLists
Message-ID: <7403C35670E7D011AB720000F80398CA3C4AAA@ZEUS>

Linkers,

After Linda left Griffith, Ozlists was maintained by me as the
Griffith webmaster. Since my departure from GU it has not had much
maintenance at all. I'm not sure what GU intend to do with it if
anything. An old version (July 97) is available at

http://www.qantm.com.au/staff/sbarry/ozlists/

if people are trying to get information about older lists.

Regards
Sarah Barry

-----Original Message-----
From: Sandra Davey [mailto:sldavey@fl.asn.au]
Sent: Tuesday, December 15, 1998 7:05 PM
To: link@www.anu.edu.au
Subject: Where is OzLists

G'day everyone,

I am trying to find ozlists, the super list maintained by Linda Herron
at Griffith Uni. The normal URL of http://www.gu.edu.au/gint/ozlists
tells me it's not there and it will be available next semester. Can
anyone shed any light?
Cheers
Sandra


________________________________________________________________________
____
___
Sandra Davey
SMS Consulting
Email: sldavey@sms.com.au
Ph: +61 2 9267 6344

From DTebbutt@acp.com.au Wed Dec 16 08:51:17 1998
From: DTebbutt@acp.com.au (Dan Tebbutt)
Date: Wed, 16 Dec 1998 17:51:17 +1000
Subject: Sun and Oracle Sidestep Windows
Message-ID: <199812160715.SAA16287@boomer.anu.edu.au>

>http://www.thestandard.com/articles/display/0,1449,2854,00.html?home.tf
>Sun and Oracle are not only among the most vocal, virulent and outspoken
>opponents facing Microsoft, they are also two rare companies that own core
>technologies that could actually block Microsoft's aims.

When will these naivists learn that technology is not going to stop MS.
technology is not why MS wins in the first place. they are simply the best
at playing politics+marketing+plausible_technology_story

dant

From ggebesse@nsw.bigpond.net.au Wed Dec 16 13:01:33 1998
From: ggebesse@nsw.bigpond.net.au (Peter Bowditch)
Date: Wed, 16 Dec 1998 22:01:33 +1000
Subject: MCI WorldCom offers to buy OzEmail
In-Reply-To: <199812160057.LAA10578@boomer.anu.edu.au>
Message-ID: <199812161101.WAA04033@m5.c2.telstra-mm.net.au>

> Why does everyone in Australia insist on calling it "MCI"? it's WorldCom.

Perhaps because the company refers to itself as MCI WorldCom.

http://www.wcom.com/


........................................................
Peter Bowditch Mobile: 0419219659
Gebesse Computer Consultants peterb@gebesse.com.au
Parramatta NSW Australia http://www.gebesse.com.au/
ACT! Certified Consultant

From rsedc@urgento.gse.rmit.EDU.AU Wed Dec 16 13:07:17 1998
From: rsedc@urgento.gse.rmit.EDU.AU (dchia)
Date: Wed, 16 Dec 1998 23:07:17 +1100
Subject: Trivia on Spread Spectrum
Message-ID: <3677A275.82564538@urgento.gse.rmit.edu.au>

http://wireless.oldcolo.com/hedy.htm

The spread spectrum technology behind secure communication and mobile
phone
was invented and patented by Hedy Lamarr in 1941, allegedly the most
beautiful
woman at that time, allegedly the actress in the film Ecstasy which
was banned
in US, a Ziegfeld girl, and the receiver of the EFF Pioneer Award in
1997 for
technical contribution to the development of communication technology.
She managed
such achievement in between her numerous marriages and divorces (6),
as shown by the
timeline

http://www.geocities.com/Hollywood/Hills/1797/time.htm

Her co-inventor is a music composer (music is frequency hopping anyway
:) but
Hedy was the one who recognized the need, allegedly came up with the
idea, and the military
equipment background (her first husband was a armament manufacturer),
and they patented
the secret communication system for controlling torpedo.

For those who want a more academic source try

Cryptology and the origins of spread spectrum
D Kahn, IEEE Spectrum v 21 no 9 (Sep 1984) pp 70 -- 80
"One of the inventors of spread specturm was the actress Hedy Lamarr,
who obtained a US patent in 1941 on a frequency agile torpedo control
system."



David Chia, RMIT University

From hgalatis@educationau.edu.au Wed Dec 16 13:12:53 1998
From: hgalatis@educationau.edu.au (Helen Galatis)
Date: Wed, 16 Dec 1998 22:42:53 +1030
Subject: Call for papers/Advance Notice Community Networking Conferenc
e 1999
Message-ID: <F9DFDF6B3084D011862E00A0C95B95031A1FFF@SERVER2>

We would also like to list conference information on our Australian and
International Conferences and events noticeboards. So send conference
details to:
EdNA http://www.edna.edu.au via webdesk@edna.edu.au

Thank you

Helen


> Thanks to Ken Young for Advance Notice of the Community Networking
> Conference 1999.
>
> Just a reminder to Ken and others with conferences that if you have
> not
> already done so, you can submit them to Australia's Cultural Network
> Event Finder at:
>
> http://acn.net.au/cgi-bin/events
>
> We try to get all listings up promptly. There are currently over 1,000
>
> events listed, from conferences, exhibitions and film screenings,
> through
> to Christmas pantomimes, bush dancing and platypus spotting.
>
> Best wishes for the holiday season
>
> Michael Dupe'
> Promoter
> Australia's Cultural Network
>
> _________________________________________________________________
> Australia's Cultural Network
> http://www.acn.net.au
> THE internet gateway to Australian culture
>
> Add your events, submit your website, search for information about
> Australian culture, join the 'ausculture' discussion list
> ____________________________________________________________________
>
> email: promoter@acn.net.au
> Ph: +61 (0)2 6253 2399
> Fax: +61 (0)2 6253 2172
>
> Postal address:
> Australia's Cultural Network
> New Media Section
> Department of Communications, Information Technology and the Arts
> GPO Box 2154
> Canberra A.C.T. 2601
> Australia

From webtalk@purescript.com.au Wed Dec 16 15:41:07 1998
From: webtalk@purescript.com.au (Eric Scheid)
Date: Thu, 17 Dec 1998 01:41:07 +1100
Subject: ADOPT AN MP
Message-ID: <199812161441.BAA19619@mail.mel.aone.net.au>

Brenda Aynsley <bpa@iss.net.au> sent the following on 16/12/98 12:02:
...
>&l=mailbox%3A/e%7C/Users/bpa/mail/lists.sbd/link%3Fid%3Dv0211010db29bf84a1
>40f%2540%255B203.37.43.24%255D%26number%3D5494432
...
>It seems that both my mailbox location (directory) on my pc (it's not
>quite right tho' if I read it correctly it assumes the directory is on the
>C drive) and tony's IP address are now captured by this process and
>recorded at stand.org.uk. I'm not sure I like this and cant work out what
>the advantage is for stand.org or why they would do this? Anyone suggest
>what the pros and cons are?

What you are looking at there, right where your mailbox location is, is
the HTTP referrer that your browser sent to the site. I'd doubt very much
that they are specifically targeting yours (or anyones) email box, but
rather that they are very much interested in just where is referring hits
to them. Furthermoret's not stand.org's code, but
<http://x3.extreme-dm.com> code -- they supply a certain snippet of
source code which you insert into your page, and they provide a free
counter and mini-logger service.

My logs are full of referrer urls which happen to be mailboxes of one
kind or another (eg. hotmail). Plus 'news:', 'bookmarks:', and even
'wtv-mail:'.

e.

From brd@dynamite.com.au Wed Dec 16 22:38:47 1998
From: brd@dynamite.com.au (Bernard Robertson-Dunn)
Date: Thu, 17 Dec 1998 08:38:47 +1100
Subject: The world works in mysterious ways
Message-ID: <36782867.CF4FCD92@dynamite.com.au>

This is extracted from ComputerWorld Today
Thursday, 17 December, 1998

Guest column: The end of the world as we know IT
Opinion

Now that 1998 is nearly buggered, it's time to pontificate about what
will happen during 1999 in the fabulous world of IT.

Networking

By the middle of 1999 IT managers everywhere will notice that the back
room is overflowing with 486 PCs that they've yanked out because they
failed the Y2K tests. An innocuous e-mail will arrive, pointing out that
Linux is immune to old BIOS faults.

Click on the link below for the full story
http://www2.idg.com.au/CWT1997.nsf/CWTCurrent/NT00006A7E

--
There's more to light than the opposite of dark.
-- Ric Ocasek

Regards
brd

Bernard Robertson-Dunn
Canberra Australia
brd@dynamite.com.au

From fist@ozemail.com.au Wed Dec 16 23:35:53 1998
From: fist@ozemail.com.au (Stewart Fist)
Date: Thu, 17 Dec 1998 09:35:53 +1100
Subject: <no subject>
Message-ID: <199812162326.KAA26443@fep9.mail.ozemail.net>

In view of recent charges against Telstra's profiteering off calls from
fixed to cellphones, this might be of interest to linkers:


U.K. orders reduction in cell phone charges
By Kurt Oeler
Staff Writer, CNET News.com
December 15, 1998, 9:20 p.m. PT

The British government ordered three leading phone companies to lower the
price of calls to mobile phones, after concluding they are "too high" in
relation to costs and "against the public interest."

Acting on a Monopolies and Mergers Commission (MMC) investigation that it
requested, the Office of Telecommunications (Oftel) said it will require
British Telecom (BT) to cut the cost of calling Vodafone and Cellnet
cellular phones by 25 percent.

Consumers should save about one billion pounds over three years, Oftel
estimated, but the move seems to run counter to Britain's reputation for
successful telecommunications deregulation.

------------------------------------------------------------------
Stewart Fist - Independent writer and columnist
70 Middle Harbour Road, LINDFIELD, NSW, 2070, Australia
Ph: +612 9416 7458 Fax: +612 9416 4582
------------------------------------------------------------------
The Australian <http://www.newsit.com.au/index_opinion.htm>
The ABC <http://www.abc.net.au/http/sfist/>
Electric-words <http://www.electric-words.com>
------------------------------------------------------------------

From edireport@attmail.com Thu Dec 17 12:42:44 1998
From: edireport@attmail.com (Stewart Carter)
Date: Thu, 17 Dec 1998 11:42:44 +0000
Subject: Email traffic statistics - help wanted
Message-ID: <winATT-3_01-edireport-600@attmail.com>

Linkers,

I'm wondering if anybody knows of any statistical sources, on or off-line
which could give me some figures on email traffic on a national, regional or
indeed any basis really.

Cheers

Stewart Carter
Electronic Commerce Report
edireport@attmail.com
Ph 0411 477 149

From rsedc@urgento.gse.rmit.EDU.AU Thu Dec 17 01:57:43 1998
From: rsedc@urgento.gse.rmit.EDU.AU (David Chia)
Date: Thu, 17 Dec 1998 11:57:43 +1100 (EST)
Subject: Wireless PoPs (was Re: National bandwidth inquiry)
In-Reply-To: <9812169137.AA913759579@mail.auscoms.com.au> from "richard@auscoms.com.au" at Dec 16, 98 09:05:57 am
Message-ID: <199812170057.LAA02048@urgento.gse.rmit.EDU.AU>

>
> Thanks David. You're right, that's what spread spectrum is for -- but I think
> this underlines the point I made which started this thread, that things ain't as
> simple as they look at first glance. The debate started with a simple "why not
> use data on CB radio?" which became "data plus encryption plus an a community
> arrangement about channel allocation" which now becomes "data plus encryption
> plus a different radio system" etc (because I don't know any $40 CB transceivers
> that support spread spectrum).
>
> Please, everybody, I'm not knocking the idea of remote area connectivity. I just
> don't want to see a mistaken belief that it's simple; it's counter productive.
> What if a Canberra reader of this list were to decide that the Nats would be
> overjoyed if we handled a few simmple administrative details and made CB radio
> the vehicle of remote area Internet connectivity? An unholy mess, wasted money,
> and real service delivery would be delayed...
>

It is simple and cheap really :) Hedy Lamarr's proof of concept design for
the spread spectrum patent used 88 channels which corresponded to the
88 keys on a piano, and frequency synchronization was provided by the
automatic playing piano roll. So it is a simple matter of hooking up the
CB radio to the piano roll and the computer :)

Rapidly hopping pattern improves robustness. Thus important urgent
message could be broadcast using "The Flight of the Bumble Bees".
Flood warning could be sent out using "Raindrops Keep Falling On
My Head". Long winded policy speech best delived with "Bolero".
Protest message can be shot across using "1812 Overture", only
a small problem of how to simulate cannon blasts on piano :)

Merry Xmas.


David Chia, RMIT University

From Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au Thu Dec 17 10:57:23 1998
From: Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au (Roger Clarke)
Date: Thu, 17 Dec 1998 20:57:23 +1100
Subject: 'Cyber Checklist Protects Christmas Shoppers'
Message-ID: <v03130308b29e84721fb7@[203.58.40.176]>


With the Compliments of Peter Monaghan at Capital Monitor:
http://www.capmon.com


The Hon Joe Hockey MP
Minister for Financial Services and Regulation
Federal Member for North Sydney

MEDIA RELEASE
CYBER CHECKLIST PROTECTS CHRISTMAS SHOPPERS
[I think that's PR-speak for '... Checklist TO PROTECT ... Shoppers']

The [N.S.W.] Minister for Financial Services and Regulation, Joe Hockey,
today issued a checklist aimed at protecting consumers when they bought
Christmas gifts over the Internet.

The Minister, who is responsible for consumer affairs, said a recent ABS
survey showed that Australian were increasingly using the Internet to buy
goods with 425,000 people making 1.3 million orders and purchases over the
Internet in the 12 months to August. More than half of these cyber shoppers
spent up to $250.

In light of this Internet use, the Minister recommended shoppers should:

- Read privacy and security information carefully before making a
purchase. You might want to ensure your email address does not
automatically go onto a mailing address.

- If buying items from overseas, make sure the company pays for any
returns if something goes wrong.
[Odd advice, that one]

- Make sure the company you are dealing with includes a postal address
and telephone number.

- If you are not familiar with a particular brand, contact the company
first and get more information. Sometimes information has been posted
on the Internet but not updated for some time.

- Check that the Internet site is secure - you should look for a closed
key or closed padlock symbol in the bottom comer of the company's
computer screen.
[Mmmm, that one could do with a bit of refinement]

- You should note any representations about whether or not the goods are
actually in stock and any guarantees about delivery time.

- Also, check the refund and returns policy

[All in all, not all of what an experienced net-user or a smart-alec
consultant would offer; but it does seem that we're gradually moving out
of total turkey territory!]

Media contact: Matthew Abbott, Minister's office 0262777230,0413076213
17 December 1998
7/98

A service of CAPITAL MONITOR
(02) 62734899
Caution: scanned document. May Contain minor errors


Roger Clarke http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/
http://www.etc.com.au/Xamax/
Xamax Consultancy Pty Ltd, 78 Sidaway St, Chapman ACT 2611 AUSTRALIA
Tel: +61 2 6288 1472, and 6288 6916 mailto:Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au

Visiting Fellow, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology
The Australian National University Canberra ACT 0200 AUSTRALIA
Information Sciences Building Room 211 Tel: +61 2 6249 3666



From tonyb@netinfo.com.au Fri Dec 18 01:33:30 1998
From: tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Fri, 18 Dec 1998 11:33:30 +1100
Subject: Y2K disclosure legislation
Message-ID: <v0211010eb29f5329d21c@[203.37.43.24]>

>Date: Thu, 17 Dec 1998 18:44:20 +1100 (EST)
>From: owner-all@minister.dca.gov.au
>X-Authentication-Warning: edison.dca.gov.au: majordom set sender to
>owner-all using -f
>subject: New Ministerial Media Release
>Sender: owner-all@minister.dca.gov.au
>Precedence: bulk
>Status:
>
>The following ministerial media release can be found at:
>http://www.dcita.gov.au/cgi-bin/graphics.pl?path=3418
>
>
>Y2K disclosure legislation
>
>The Minister for Communications, Information Technology and the Arts,
>Senator Richard Alston, today announced that the Government will legislate
>to encourage greater voluntary disclosure and exchange of information on
>Year 2000 (Y2K) readiness and
>remediation efforts.
>
>Terry O'Connor, Minister's office 0419 636 879

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From tonyb@netinfo.com.au Fri Dec 18 08:23:28 1998
From: tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Fri, 18 Dec 1998 18:23:28 +1100
Subject: National Bandwidth Inquiry - terms of reference
Message-ID: <v0211011cb29fb3556ad0@[203.37.43.24]>

>Date: Fri, 18 Dec 1998 16:13:45 +1100 (EST)
>From: owner-all@minister.dca.gov.au
>X-Authentication-Warning: edison.dca.gov.au: majordom set sender to
>owner-all using -f
>subject: Ministerial Media Release
>Sender: owner-all@minister.dca.gov.au
>Precedence: bulk
>Status:
>
>The following ministerial media release is available at:
>http://www.dcita.gov.au/cgi-bin/graphics.pl?path=3423
>
>National Bandwidth Inquiry - terms of reference
>
>The Minister for Communications, Information Technology and the Arts,
>Senator Richard Alston, today released the detailed terms of reference for
>an inquiry into the issues associated with bandwidth availability and
>pricing within Australia and to and from Australia.
>
>Terry O'Connor, Minister's office 02 6277 7480

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From jerremy_jones@hotmail.com Fri Dec 18 10:01:46 1998
From: jerremy_jones@hotmail.com (Jerremy Jones)
Date: Fri, 18 Dec 1998 01:01:46 PST
Subject: Anne Moffat is a MOO COW
Message-ID: <199812180901.BAA17852@law-f113.hotmail.com>

Don't worry Andrew. No-one takes Anne Moffat seriously.

I've lost count of how many times this issues has come up and someone
has answered her but ##!!@ she always comes back with her shrill bank
bashing. Unbelievable!

For the record, again. Internet IS different to Mail/Telephone order.
The risks ARE greater.

1) Scale
2) Speed
3) Geographic reach
4) Identity (easier to create a virtual 'front' than a non-virtual one)

A bodgy MOTO operation would have to outlay big money first to get the
orders (ie advertise, etc) then to process them (phone lines, mail
staff, etc) and geography is also a consideration. With the net you
have instant worldwide reach without the same infrastructure costs.

AND it is not, primarily, an issue of consumer risk. It is an issue of
Merchant risk that banks face. A bodgy Internet operation can rake in
the orders, bank them and be gone. It is only when they start hitting
the cardholders statements, perhaps a month later, that the banks are
alerted. What happens then? The cardholder is re-imbursed but the bank
has no 'live' merchant to charge back to.

Conclusion: ANNE MOFFAT IS A MOO COW (but, of course, Anne knows that
already - she knows everything and no-one else has a valid opinion)

Anne, hurry up and retire.


> -----Original Message-----
> From: Andrew Duncan [SMTP:aduncan@webwerks.co.nz]
> Sent: 17 December 1998 14:36
> To: ica@cmis.csiro.au
> Subject: Re: Electronic Cash for the Net Fails to Catch On
>
> Ann Moffat, whoever she is, wrote:
>
> >>Caution, checks and balances, doing things properly can have a
benefit.
> >>A major reason for the Asian meltdown is because, in many countries,
> >>these things were not in place.
> >
> >who on earth are you? a luddite???
> >
>
> Brilliant use of English, exquisitely insulting, well done.
>
> >the asian banks failed because they were run by incompetent people &
lent
> >to greedy business people without security.
> >
>
> Duh. Checks and balances are expected to prevent loans to business
people
> without adequate security, whether greedy or not. Competent people
ensure
> such checks and balances are in place.
>
> >nothing to do with computers.
> >
>
> Possibly, but banking without computers is, like printing without
presses,
> something of a pointless exercise.
>
> >of course you have to have checks & balences commensurate with the
system
> &
> >its use. in replying to perry g you are replying to the guy who was
> >responsible for computer security at asx. its 'timid' attitudes like
> yours
> >that are holding back ec.
> >
>
> If, by timid, you mean cautious, then I'm in favour of it. Caution is
> welcome in any institution whose collapse can affect an entire nation.
>
> If you want to live on the cutting edge, try dealing with more
> free-wheeling organisations, such as credit card companies. I believe
that
> the SET protocol will be widely implemented, accepted and used Real
Soon
> Now, perhaps in time for the Christmas greedfest ;o)
>
> Happy landings,
>
> Andrew Duncan
> ---------------------------------------------------------
> Topography -- it's everywhere you want to be.
>
> voice: +64 9 623 2926
> web: http://www.webwerks.co.nz/
> email: aduncan@webwerks.co.nz
> icq: 21862033, webwerks
> ---------------------------------------------------------

______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

From gwhite@educationau.edu.au Fri Dec 18 10:29:53 1998
From: gwhite@educationau.edu.au (Gerry White)
Date: Fri, 18 Dec 1998 19:59:53 +1030
Subject: Education on the line
Message-ID: <F9DFDF6B3084D011862E00A0C95B95031AE0C3@SERVER2>

Sandie Downey wrote:

>Have a look at what they are doing in Canada
>www.schoolnet.ca

>Vicnet is also doing a lot or work with putting computers into schools
especially in remote and isolated towns in >Victoria.

And Vicnet is doing a good job.

Have a look at what they are doing in Australia at
http://www.edna.edu.au

Regards
Gerry White

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Sandie Downey [SMTP:sandied@vicnet.net.au]
> Sent: Wednesday, December 16, 1998 10:30 AM
> To: Gerry White
> Cc: link@www.anu.edu.au
> Subject: Re: Education on the line
>
> At 12:22 AM 12/16/98 +1030, Gerry White wrote:
> >Whoa there! Lets not get too carried away by one piece of research on
> the
> >use of computers in schools which puts a critical view on the use of
> >computers in education.
>
>
> Have a look at what they are doing in Canada
> www.schoolnet.ca
>
> Vicnet is also doing a lot or work with putting computers into schools
> especially in remote and isolated towns in Victoria.
>
> Sandie
>
>
> Sandie Downey
> Skills.net Roadshow Co-ordinator
> http://cf.vicnet.net.au/skillsnet/
> Phone 0411 738 407 or 018 842 619
>
>

From jcram@qednsl.qld.gov.au Fri Dec 18 22:50:49 1998
From: jcram@qednsl.qld.gov.au (Jennifer Cram)
Date: Sat, 19 Dec 1998 07:50:49 +1000 (EST)
Subject: A.. M.. is a [sexist gratuitous insult]
In-Reply-To: <199812180901.BAA17852@law-f113.hotmail.com>
Message-ID: <Pine.LNX.3.93.981219074832.18479A-100000@cooroomba.qednsl.qld.gov.au>

Seems it might be time for a reminder about netiquette - and defamation.



From Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au Fri Dec 18 23:43:08 1998
From: Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au (Roger Clarke)
Date: Sat, 19 Dec 1998 09:43:08 +1100
Subject: Human Rights Watch report
Message-ID: <v0313031fb2a08ac12c38@[203.58.40.176]>


Human Rights Watch has issued a report about restrictions on Internet
speech around the world. The full report, "Freedom of Expression on the
Internet", is at
http://www.hrw.org/hrw/worldreport99/special/internet.html

A summary can be found at:
http://www.nytimes.com/library/tech/98/12/cyber/cyberlaw/18law.html


Roger Clarke http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/
http://www.etc.com.au/Xamax/
Xamax Consultancy Pty Ltd, 78 Sidaway St, Chapman ACT 2611 AUSTRALIA
Tel: +61 2 6288 1472, and 6288 6916 mailto:Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au

Visiting Fellow, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology
The Australian National University Canberra ACT 0200 AUSTRALIA
Information Sciences Building Room 211 Tel: +61 2 6249 3666



From tonyb@netinfo.com.au Sat Dec 19 00:27:58 1998
From: tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Sat, 19 Dec 1998 10:27:58 +1100
Subject: A.. M.. is a [sexist gratuitous insult]
Message-ID: <v0211011fb2a0948c55aa@[203.37.43.24]>

At 7:50 AM 19/12/98, Jennifer Cram wrote:
>Seems it might be time for a reminder about netiquette - and defamation.

I have emailed some comments to Jerremy Jones concerning his posting.

Tony

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From gtaylor@efa.org.au Sat Dec 19 01:09:26 1998
From: gtaylor@efa.org.au (Greg Taylor)
Date: Sat, 19 Dec 1998 10:09:26 +1000
Subject: IETF opposes harmful changes to Wassenaar Arrangement
Message-ID: <3.0.3.32.19981219100926.00742aa0@mail.gil.com.au>

[forwarded message]

Message-Id: <199812182315.SAA10709@ietf.org>
To: IETF-Announce: ;
Subject: Harmful changes to Wassenaar Arrangement
Date: Fri, 18 Dec 1998 18:15:36 -0500
From: Steve Coya <scoya@ns.cnri.reston.va.us>


The IAB and the IESG deplore the recent changes to the Wassenaar
Arrangement (http://www.wassenaar.org) that further limit the
availability of encryption software by including it in the Wassenaar
agreement's list of export controlled software (section 5.A.2.a.1
of the list of dual-use goods, WA LIST 98 (1)). As discussed in
RFC 1984, strong cryptography is essential to the security of the
Internet; restrictions on its use or availability will leave us
with a weak, vulnerable network, endanger the privacy of users and
businesses, and slow the growth of electronic commerce.

The new restrictions will have a particularly deleterious effect
on smaller countries, where there may not be enough of a local
market or local expertise to support the development of indigenous
cryptographic products. But everyone is adversely affected by
this; the Internet is used world-wide, and even sites with access
to strong cryptographic products must be able to talk to those who
do not. This in turn endangers their own security.

We are happy that the key size limit has been raised in some cases
from 40 bits to 64; however, this is still too small to provide
real security. We estimate that after a modest capital investment,
a company or criminal organization could crack a 64-bit cipher in less
than a day for about $2500 per solution. This cost will only drop
in coming years. A report released about three years ago suggested
that 90-bit keys are the minimum for long-term security.

Brian Carpenter (IAB Chair)
Fred Baker (IESG and IETF Chair)




From adamb@netstorm.net.au Sat Dec 19 01:28:23 1998
From: adamb@netstorm.net.au (Adam Burns)
Date: Sat, 19 Dec 1998 11:28:23 +1100
Subject: MCI WorldCom offers to buy OzEmail
Message-ID: <3.0.32.19981219112208.010e71f4@soy.cyber.com.au>



At 05:38 PM 12/15/98 +1100, M. da Cruz wrote:
>for the Australian Internet Folklore record, was Connect.com.au or
>OzEmail the first commercial ISP in Australia?

It depends what you call an ISP. An obsessive but misleading requirement
for popular literature is that an 'ISP' qualifies by possessing it's own
telecommunications infrastructure all across the nation. Another strange
'hardliner' definition is owning your own international internet IP link
qualifies an ISP.

If you call an Internet Service Provider someone who commercially provided
internet (not store and forward UUCP/Fido/BBS) access services, then (Byron
Bay and then Brisbane based) Pegasus Networks is probably the first
Australian ISP with a national user base and national access.

Pegasus was an AARNet affiliate (because it's local and APC
(http://www.apc.org) content was highly sought after by academics
nationally) about the time AARNet moved to international IP connectivity.
It also installed the nation's first non-academic gopher server - although
not quite first in a web server - it hosted the first Cool Site of the Day
sited within Australia.

Pegasus (and AusNet) was bought by Microplex over a year ago.

Hugh Irvine from Connect.Com shook dust from many an academic attending the
1993 AARNet Workshop by announcing the establishment of a public commercial
and non-academic international net link, effectively breaking the 'academic
use only' barrier imposed on all connectivity within AARNet.

Regards,

Adam.
(a stable hand for about 4 years ... :-)



From Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au Sat Dec 19 01:45:35 1998
From: Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au (Roger Clarke)
Date: Sat, 19 Dec 1998 11:45:35 +1100
Subject: History of Internet in Oz [Was: Re: MCI WorldCom offers to
buy OzEmail]
In-Reply-To: <199812140804.SAA05710@pegasus.com.au>
Message-ID: <v03130323b2a0a54f6dfb@[203.58.40.176]>


Adam Burns <adamb@netstorm.net.au> wrote:
>If you call an Internet Service Provider someone who commercially provided
>internet (not store and forward UUCP/Fido/BBS) access services, then (Byron
>Bay and then Brisbane based) Pegasus Networks is probably the first
>Australian ISP with a national user base and national access.


Among the responses that I received to my request for info related to:
http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/II/OzIHist.html
and which I will reflect in a revised version shortly, was the following.


ianp@peg.apc.org (Ian Peter) advised me:
>Of course I am biased but I dont think a history is complete without a
>mention of Pegasus Networks, which was the first organisation to offer full
>public access to the Internet in Australia in September 1989, and actually
>preceded AARNET (But not the previous ACS-Net). Pegasus introduced many
>people and organisations, and preceded connect.com, Ozemail etc by several
>years. It was Australia's first ISP.
>
>Some of that history is at http://www.peg.apc.org/~ianp, but my articles
>there >are more about history of community networking than the particular
>Australian
>context.
>
>There is also a good history article at http://www.firstmonday.dk with
>some >early Australian refs - I think its a History of UseNet.

True, thanks Ian: I'm a subscriber, but hadn't pored over it carefully enough:
http://www.firstmonday.dk/issues/issue3_7/chapter3/index.html
http://www.firstmonday.dk/issues/issue3_10/coffman/index.html


Roger Clarke http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/
http://www.etc.com.au/Xamax/
Xamax Consultancy Pty Ltd, 78 Sidaway St, Chapman ACT 2611 AUSTRALIA
Tel: +61 2 6288 1472, and 6288 6916 mailto:Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au

Visiting Fellow, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology
The Australian National University Canberra ACT 0200 AUSTRALIA
Information Sciences Building Room 211 Tel: +61 2 6249 3666



From tswarner@dynamite.com.au Sun Dec 20 01:23:16 1998
From: tswarner@dynamite.com.au (Terry Swarner)
Date: Sun, 20 Dec 1998 11:23:16 +1100
Subject: 3rd International Trade Conference New Mexico
Message-ID: <367C4373.BB8E8CF@dynamite.com.au>

In case anyone is in New Mexico -- a Free Conference to attend:

New Mexico's Stake in Global Trade: Building Opportunities with
Latin America & the Pacific Rim

Third Annual International Trade Conference January 21, 1999

Intel Corporation, Conference Chair
Senator Jeff Bingaman, Honorary Chairman
New Mexico US Japan Center, Conference Organizer

Schedule: http://www.nmjc.org/nmstake99.html for updates.

Register on-line at: http://www.nmjc.org/itc99.html

Conference attendance is free (with the exception of meals) but
advanced
registration is required as space is limited. Registration must be
received
by 8 January 1999, to guarantee space.

Conference Sponsors

Asian Technology Information Program, Economic Strategy Institute,
Intel Corporation
Los Alamos National Laboratory, Motorola, Inc., Sandia National
Laboratories

Supporting Organizations

Delta Airlines ~ Hyatt Regency, New Mexico State University,
College of Business Administration and Economics, Sumitomo Sitix
Silicon

Contributing Organizations

Albuquerque Economic Development ~ Honeywell Avionics Defense
Systems
Japan America Society of New Mexico ~ Japan External Trade
Organization
(JETRO)New Mexico State Trade Division ~ Physical Science
Laboratory (PSL) ~
Santa Teresa Development Corporation ~ Stahmann Farms, Inc.
The Las Cruces Business Forum ~ Waste Management Education &
Research
Consortium (WERC) ~ United States Commercial Service (Department
of
Commerce)


From embk@mailcity.com Sun Dec 20 10:12:10 1998
From: embk@mailcity.com (embk@mailcity.com)
Date: Sun, 20 Dec 1998 03:12:10 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Your Account info.
Message-ID: <199812200912.DAA19912@mexpru.mcsa.net.mx>


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From Fiona.Ey@ag.gov.au Mon Dec 21 02:01:08 1998
From: Fiona.Ey@ag.gov.au (Ey, Fiona)
Date: Mon, 21 Dec 1998 12:01:08 +1100
Subject: Electronic Transactions Bill Seminar
Message-ID: <8F68BED53675D21191440020AFF0ABDC380603@cbrml50.ag.gov.au>

Linkers

Please find below a flyer for the Electronic Transactions Bill Seminar that
the Commonwealth Attorney-General's Department will be holding on 28 January
1999 in Sydney.

Regards

Fiona Ey
Government Lawyer
Information and Security Law Division
Attorney-General's Department

fiona.ey@ag.gov.au
Tel (02) 6250 5434
Fax (02) 6250 5985


ELECTRONIC TRANSACTIONS BILL SEMINAR:
THE LEGAL FRAMEWORK TO FACILITATE ELECTRONIC COMMERCE

9.00 AM TO 12.30 PM, 28 JANUARY 1999
STATE LIBRARY OF NSW, MACQUARIE ST, SYDNEY

This half day seminar is the first in a series to be conducted by experts
within the Commonwealth Attorney-General's Department on current issues and
recent developments in information law.

It will focus on the draft Electronic Transactions Bill, the blueprint for a
national uniform legislative scheme for electronic commerce in Australia.

The Commonwealth is leading the development of an Australian legal framework
for electronic commerce, in consultation with the States and Territories.
The draft Electronic Transactions Bill has been designed to provide a light
handed regulatory framework which promotes the growth of electronic commerce
and provides greater certainty for electronic businesses.


WHAT THE SEMINAR WILL DO

* provide a first-hand update on the Electronic Transactions Bill's
development;
* discuss the implications of the Bill and how it will operate; and
* allow input into the legislation's development and the policy
underpinning it.


WHO SHOULD ATTEND

* legal compliance managers, in-house counsel, solicitors and legal
advisers;
* contract managers, government advisers and general managers; and
* information technology advisers and consultants.


SEMINAR FEE

The seminar fee is $350, including morning tea and conference documentation.
There is an early bird fee of $300 for payments received before 15 January
1999.

Once your registration is received your place is automatically reserved.
Payment is required before the seminar.


CANCELLATIONS

If you are unable to attend, a substitute delegate is welcome at no extra
charge. Cancellations received in writing up to COB 22 January 1999 will
receive a refund, less $50 service charge. No refunds can be made for
cancellations received after 22 January 1999.


FURTHER ENQUIRIES

For further information about the Commonwealth's work on the legal aspects
of electronic commerce, please visit our web site at:
http://www.law.gov.au/ecommerce.

If you have any enquiries about the seminar or require any special
arrangements please contact Rachel White on telephone (02) 6250 5432 or
email rachel.white@ag.gov.au.


HOW TO REGISTER

Email: ecommerce@ag.gov.au (please include full credit card details)
Telephone: (02) 6250 5432
Facsimile: (02) 6250 5985 (please include full credit card details)
Post: Rachel White, Information and Security Law Division
Attorney-General's Department, Robert Garran Offices National Circuit Barton
ACT 2600

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------

REGISTRATION DETAILS

Name:
Position:
Organisation:
Address:
Postcode: Email:
Telephone: Fax:

PAYMENT OPTIONS

Please complete the following credit card details:

Visa Mastercard Bankcard
Card number
Card Holder's Name
Expiry Date Signature

If paying by cheque, please make cheques payable to: CPM -
Attorney-General's Department (ISLD).



From c.lim@acif.org.au Mon Dec 21 07:16:31 1998
From: c.lim@acif.org.au (Chiang LIM)
Date: Mon, 21 Dec 1998 16:16:31 +1000
Subject: ACIF: New Draft Code for Public Comment
Message-ID: <01BE2CFD.5E0D98D0@ACIF-CHIANG>

The Australian Communications Industry Forum (ACIF) invites public comment from industry and consumers on its recently released

DR ACIF C531 - DRAFT COMMERCIAL CHURN INDUSTRY CODE

The Draft Commercial Churn Industry Code specifies an industry agreed transfer form template, industry agreed transfer processes, billing liabilities and churn safeguards. It also provides guidelines on churn process milestones and target timelines. The Code applies to all Access Service Deliverers and Service Providers who supply services to End Users.

The Australian Communications Industry Forum (ACIF) was established by the telecommunications industry to manage communications self-regulation within Australia. It's primary role is to develop and administer Technical Standards, Industry Codes and Industry Services that promote both the long-term interests of end-users and the efficiency and international competitiveness of the Australian communications industry

ACIF welcomes your input.

Copies of the Draft Industry Code can be obtained from ACIF:
Telephone: (02) 9959 9111
Facsimile: (02) 9954 6136
E-mail : acif@acif.org.au
Web site: www.acif.org.au

PUBLIC COMMENT PERIOD CLOSES AT 5.00 P.M. ON FRIDAY 29 JANUARY 1999

Regards,
Chiang Lim
Project Manager
ACIF
Tel: +61 2 9959 9111 (General)
Tel: +61 2 9959 9123 (Direct)
Fax: +61 2 9954 6136
WWW: http://www.acif.org.au/
E-mail: c.lim@acif.org.au



From me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au Mon Dec 21 07:37:05 1998
From: me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Mon, 21 Dec 1998 17:37:05 +1100
Subject: Internet developer wants coder tax break
Message-ID: <v02110126b2a3602b7ff9@[203.37.43.24]>

>From Tech Talk's Daily Tech News Clicks for Friday December 18, 1998

Internet developer wants coder tax break
http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/wires2/1218/t_rt_1218_2.sml
What's a good way to promote open-source software development? Simple. Give
hackers who write it a tax break, says open-source backer Carl Malamud.
Malamud, who pioneered Internet radio broadcasting, pitched the idea in a
memorandum emailed Wednesday to several members of Congress. Under the
open-source software development model, any programmer has access to a
software product's underlying source code. This allows developers worldwide
to "get under the hood'' of the software and make modifications

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au Mon Dec 21 07:36:59 1998
From: me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Mon, 21 Dec 1998 17:36:59 +1100
Subject: Ovum predicts 500 million Internet users by 2005
Message-ID: <v02110125b2a360177b4d@[203.37.43.24]>

>From Tech Talk's Daily Tech News Clicks for Friday December 18, 1998

Ovum predicts 500 million Internet users by 2005
http://www.zdnet.co.uk/news/1998/50/ns-6429.html
The number of Internet connections will increase fourfold over the next
seven years, according to a new report from analyst Ovum. The report
predicts 500 million users online, including 206 million dial-up connections
and 17.5 million permanent connections, by 2005. The US market will, says
the report, become saturated after 2002. Thereafter, the biggest increase in
numbers will come from Western Europe and Japan. Developing countries,
particularly those in Latin America and Eastern Europe, will also see strong
growth rates.

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au Mon Dec 21 07:37:08 1998
From: me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Mon, 21 Dec 1998 17:37:08 +1100
Subject: Online Business to Hit $1.3 Trillion In 2003
Message-ID: <v02110127b2a3604084ef@[203.37.43.24]>

>From Tech Talk's Daily Tech News Clicks for Friday December 18, 1998

Online Business to Hit $1.3 Trillion In 2003
http://www.internetnews.com/Reuters/1998/12/1801-online.html
U.S. business trade on the Internet will explode from $43 billion in 1998 to
$1.3 trillion in 2003, Forrester Research Inc. predicted in a report.
Forrester said it expected on-line business trade to surpass 9 percent of
total U.S. business sales by 2003. On-line business trade will find its way
into all U.S. business supply chains over the next five years, although not
all industries will adopt Internet commerce at the same rate, the report
said. Forrester said it expected nearly $20 billion in on-line sales in
1998. By 2003, the leading industries will include aerospace and defense,
petrochemicals, utilities, and motor vehicles, Forrester said

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au Mon Dec 21 07:37:11 1998
From: me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Mon, 21 Dec 1998 17:37:11 +1100
Subject: Asian ISP Market Needs to Focus
Message-ID: <v02110128b2a3605188ea@[203.37.43.24]>

From Tech Talk's Daily Tech News Clicks for Friday December 18, 1998

Asian ISP Market Needs to Focus
http://www.nua.ie/surveys/?f=VS&art_id=905354594&rel=true
The number of Internet subscribers in Asia is expected to reach 7.36 million
by the end of 1998, according to a report by Paul Budde Communications.
However, ISPs and businesses will have to bear in mind that, for the
foreseeable future, their online audience will remain the business market
and the top end of the residential market. The increasing dominance of
national carriers in the local access provider market means that small ISPs
will have to offer packages with a strong consumer focus in order to survive

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From kgeisel@actonline.com.au Mon Dec 21 11:41:38 1998
From: kgeisel@actonline.com.au (Karin Geiselhart)
Date: Mon, 21 Dec 1998 21:41:38 +1100
Subject: evals of gov online initiatives
Message-ID: <3.0.5.32.19981221214138.007e7170@pop1.actonline.com.au>

Can anyone point me towards commentary or evaluations of government on-line
initiatives such as EdNA, FedLink or Australia's Cultural Network in the
academic (info tech or public policy, etc) literature?

Much thanks,

Karin Geiselhart


PhD student
Faculty of Communication
University of Canberra
http://student.canberra.edu.au/~u833885/home.htm

From andrew.roberts@webz.com.au Tue Dec 22 08:07:24 1998
From: andrew.roberts@webz.com.au (Andrew Roberts)
Date: Tue, 22 Dec 1998 17:07:24 +1000
Subject: Conference: The Protection of Intellectual Property in the Digital Age
Message-ID: <001901be2d79$c7113900$c0c0c0c0@z1>

Linkers,

Anne Fitzgerald of Software Engineering Australia has asked me to pass along
details of this conference to the Link List.

Regards, Andrew


---------------------------

Apologies if you have already received advice about the following event...

Southern Cross University Law School presents....

** The Australasian Intellectual Property Conference **

Friday 5 - Saturday 6 March 1999
Calypso Plaza Resort, Coolangatta, Queensland

THE PROTECTION OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY IN THE DIGITAL AGE

Keynote Speakers

Professor Rochelle C Dreyfuss, New York University Law School
Professor Wendy J Gordon, Boston University Law School
Professor Jerome H Reichman, Vanderbilt Law School

Sponsors

Software Engineering Australia
Gadens Lawyers, Brisbane
Deacons Graham & James, Brisbane


The Protection of Intellectual Property in the Digital Age
Southern Cross University Law School, NSW, Australia

The conference will be held on Friday, March 5 and Saturday, March 6,
1999. Registrants will receive admission to the conference, lunch, morning
and afternoon tea for the two days, a satchel and a folder containing
materials. The reception and the conference dinner are optional extras.
Subsequently, a book will be published containing the conference
proceedings.

For further information contact Norsearch Conference Services at Southern
Cross University on:
Tel: +61 2 66 203 932
Fax: +61 2 66 221 954
Email nsearch@scu.edu.au
Registration brochure available January 1999. Email us your details to be
added to our expressions of interest mailing list.

Conference Convenor: Gail E Evans, Southern Cross University Law School
Email: gevans@scu.edu.au

Conference Website: <http://www.scu.edu.au/schools/lawj/aipc/>


Topics will include:

The protection of databases, software and other valuable information
products
Government policy and the national information economy
The statutory licensing of information under draft Article 2B of the
United States Uniform Commercial Code
The various ways in which the law of civil obligations, including the
role of unjust enrichment, might assist in protecting information
products
The extent to which the current mechanisms for international lawmaking
within WIPO and WTO can accommodate the needs of the information society

The patenting of computer software
The administration of internet domain names
Approaches to fair use in the digital age
Cultural issues relating to intellectual property in the digital age
Challenges for teaching intellectual property in the digital age.


PROGRAM

Thursday 4 March 1999

Reception 6.00pm hosted by Professor Barry Conyngham, Vice-Chancellor,
Southern Cross University

Friday 5 March 1999

8.15am - 8.45am
Registration

8.45am - 9.15am
Welcome and Introductory Address: Senator the Hon Richard Alston,
Minister for Communications, Information Technology and the Arts,
Canberra

9.15am - 10.00am
Imagining the Digital Environment
Associate Professor Brian Fitzgerald, Head of the Law School, Southern
Cross University
Chair: Victor Perton, Member Legislative Assembly, Victoria

10.00am - 11.00am
Information Licences and Privately-Legislated Intellectual Property
Rights
Professor Jerome H Reichman, Vanderbilt Law School
Chair: Justice David Levine, Supreme Court of NSW

11.00am - 11.30am
Break

11.30am - 12.15pm
Government Policy: The Information Economy
Adrian McCullagh, Director of Electronic Commerce, Gadens Lawyers,
Brisbane
Dr Paul Twomey, Chief Executive, National Office Information Economy
Chair: Tom Cochrane, Pro-Vice Chancellor, Information & Academic
Services, Queensland University of Technology

12.15pm - 1.15pm
The Impact of Information Licences on Trade Secret Law
Professor Rochelle C Dreyfuss, New York University Law School
Chair: Justice Roger Giles, NSW Court of Appeal

1.15pm - 2.30pm
Lunch

2.30pm - 3.15pm
The Microsoft Case: Competition Rules For The 21st Century?
Associate Professor Katrin Cutbush-Sabine, University of Technology,
Sydney
Chair: Professor Geoff Dromey, Director, Software Quality Institute,
Griffith University

3.15pm - 4.00pm
The Global Protection of Informational Products
Gail E Evans, Southern Cross University Law School
Chair: Professor Rochelle C Dreyfuss, New York University Law School

Friday 5 March 1999

4.00pm - 4.30pm
Break

4.30pm - 5.30pm
Parallel Session A
The Administration of Internet Domain Names
Phillip Hourigan, Partner, Deacons Graham & James, Brisbane
Associate Professor Brian Fitzgerald, Head of the Law School, Southern
Cross University
Michael Wolnizer, Davies Collison Cave, Melbourne
Peter Coroneos, President, Internet Industry Association

Parallel Session B
The Patenting of Computer Software
Professor Rochelle C Dreyfuss, New York University Law School
David Webber, Partner, Davies Collison Cave, Melbourne
Natalie Stoianoff, Faculty of Law, University of Wollongong


Conference Dinner 8.00 PM: Dinner Address "Privacy in the Digital Age"
by Victor Perton, MLA, Chair of the Data Protection Advisory Committee,
Victoria


Saturday 6 March 1999

8.45am - 10.30am
Forum on Reverse Engineering
Chair: Professor Paul Bailes, Head of the Department of Computer Science
and Electrical Engineering, University of Queensland
Jonathan Band, Partner, Foerster and Morrison, Washington DC
Anne Fitzgerald, Technology Lawyer, Software Engineering Australia
Dr Cristina Cifuentes, Department of Computer Science and Electrical
Engineering, University of Queensland
Professor William Caelli, Head of the School of Data Communications,
Queensland University of Technology
Phil Scanlan, CEO, Software Engineering Australia

Break
10.30am - 11am

11am - 12pm
Protecting Information Products from Use by Strangers: Does the Law
Provide Alternative Routes to Compensation?
Professor Wendy J Gordon, Boston University Law School
Chair: Justice Desmond Drummond, Federal Court of Australia

12pm - 12.45pm
Panel Session on Database Protection
Professor Jerome H Reichman, Vanderbilt Law School
Chris Creswell, Consultant, Intellectual Property Branch, Commonwealth
Attorney-General's Department, Canberra
Stephen Fox, Principal Legal Officer, International Copyright Section,
Intellectual Property Branch, Commonwealth Attorney-General's Department

12.45pm - 2.00pm
Lunch

2.00pm - 2.45pm
Parallel Session A
Cultural Issues Relating to Intellectual Property in the Digital Age
Maroochy Barambah, Turrbal Songwoman, Artistic Chief Executive, Daki
Budtcha Records, Brisbane
Ade Kukoyi, Managing Director, Daki Budtcha Records, Brisbane
Colin Golvan, Barrister at Law
Dr Cristoph Antons, Faculty of Law, La Trobe University, Victoria

Parallel Session B
Panel Session on Fair Use
Professor Wendy J Gordon, Boston University Law School
Associate Professor Andrew Christie, Law School, University of Melbourne

Anne Fitzgerald, Technology Lawyer, Software Engineering Australia
Tom Cochrane, Pro-Vice Chancellor, Information & Academic Services,
Queensland University of Technology

2.45pm - 3.15pm
Parallel Session A
University Copyright in the Digital Age
Ann Monotti, Faculty of Law, Monash University, Victoria
Chair: Professor Barry Conyngham, Vice-Chancellor, Southern Cross
University

Parallel Session B
The Author in the Digital Age
Judith Bannister, Law School, Flinders University, South Australia

Parallel Session C
Trade Secrecy Protection In The Digital Age
Associate Professor Megan Richardson, Law School, Melbourne University


3.15pm - 3.45pm
Break

3.45pm - 5.00pm
Open Forum on Teaching Intellectual Property in the Digital Age
Chair: Ian Iredale, Law Faculty, University of Western Sydney

5.00pm - 5.30pm
Conference Summary and Close


Cost

Rates are available for Industry ($450) and Academic/Government and Non
Profit delegates ($350). Optional functions include Welcome ($15) and
Conference Dinner ($50).


Accommodation

The conference venue, Calypso Plaza Coolangatta, is offering special rates
from $115 per night for standard rooms and $150 per night for duluxe rooms.
Accommodation can be booked upon registering for the conference. Calypso
Plaza overlooks Coolangatta/Greenmount Beach and features a freeform heated
tropical lagoon pool. The property is 4 1/2 Star and has dailing
servicing, room service, 24 hour reception and air-conditioning.

Transport

Ansett Australia has been appointed official airline for the AIPC99.
Special airfares of up to 45% discount off the full economy airfare are
available to all delegates attending the conference. Call 131300 and
quote MC01639 for your flight to Coolangatta. It is only a short
distance by taxi, approximately 12 minutes, from Coolangatta Airport to
the Calypso Resort.

Climate

The climate is subtropical and the region enjoys 300 days of sun a year.
The conference falls in summer when the temperature will be approx. 27 -
37 Celsius.

Sponsorship and Exhibition

There are still opportunities to become a sponsor or be a part of the
exhibition. For further information telephone Norsearch Conference
Services on 02 6620 3932 or email: nsearch@scu.edu.au

For further information contact Norsearch Conference Services
Tel: +61 2 66 203 932
Fax: +61 2 66 221 954
Email nsearch@scu.edu.au
Registration brochure available January 1999. Email us your details to be
added to our expressions of interest mail list.


From acreed@netspace.net.au Tue Dec 22 13:05:54 1998
From: acreed@netspace.net.au (Adam Creed)
Date: Tue, 22 Dec 1998 23:05:54 +1100
Subject: Blue Mountain and Microsoft
Message-ID: <3.0.5.32.19981222230554.0095ba70@pop.netspace.net.au>

FYI, this was discussed before on this list, the conclusion
was that Blue Mountain won the court case (to a limited degree).

E-greeting card firm wins Microsoft case
By Reuters <http://www.news.com/News/Item/0,4,30205,00.html>

Merry Christmas all

Adam Creed


From kelso@melbpc.org.au Tue Dec 22 12:55:11 1998
From: kelso@melbpc.org.au (Kelso)
Date: Tue, 22 Dec 1998 22:55:11 +1100
Subject: What's in store for us in 1999/2000
Message-ID: <000101be2da1$ee05e1a0$129e0ccb@kelso>

As 1998 draws to a close, it's timely to ask: Regarding the on-line world and related events in telecommunications and broadcasting in Australia/elsewhere, what's likely to be in store for us during the next year or two? Any takers?

Cheers

Ross Kelso


From brd@dynamite.com.au Tue Dec 22 23:21:47 1998
From: brd@dynamite.com.au (Bernard Robertson-Dunn)
Date: Wed, 23 Dec 1998 09:21:47 +1100
Subject: (USA) Schools find hidden costs of high tech
Message-ID: <36801B7B.B448C065@dynamite.com.au>

<brd>
Oh, what a surprise!
The more complex the world, the greater the number of potential
unintended consequences.
</brd>

San Jose Mercury News
Schools find hidden costs of high tech.
http://www7.mercurycenter.com/local/education/docs/teched122298.htm
Posted at 9:57 p.m. PST Monday, December 21, 1998
BY LARRY SLONAKER Mercury News Staff Writer

THE QUESTION asked in the mid-'90s, amid the optimistic din created by
high tech, was, ''How do we get more computers in our classrooms?''
Swiftly, that question has given way to one more difficult -- ''How can
we afford to keep them?''

As business leaders clamor for more emphasis on technology in schools,
educators are finding it is far more expensive to maintain than almost
anyone had foretold. Technology now consumes money, facilities and time
formerly reserved for once-sacrosanct areas -- libraries, arts and
vocational classes, even textbooks.

''Education is a zero-sum game,'' said Gary Bloom, a former school
superintendent and now associate director of the New Teacher Center at
University of California-Santa Cruz. ''So every nickel spent, and every
square foot used, could have been used for something else.''

Experts say that for every thousand dollars spent on computer equipment,
a school winds up paying as much as $300 every year for maintenance and
repair.

At Wilcox High School in Santa Clara, for example, a computer lab now
sits where a wood shop used to be. At Sylvandale Middle School in South
San Jose, a librarian position was eliminated to create a spot for a
computer technician.

''You can't make these decisions without affecting other programs,''
Sylvandale Principal Rafael Cruz said.

Unlike school systems in some parts of the country, most California
schools don't have budgets dedicated to technology. So the
administrators who do the spending find themselves constantly borrowing
from one area or other to keep their systems afloat.

''We have to make decisions on how much to spend for technology, how
much for texts, how much for employee compensation, all out of the same
batch,'' said Larry Aceves, superintendent of the Franklin-McKinley
School District, which includes Sylvandale. ''That dollar gets chewed up
in various different ways.''

And it only goes so far. All across the country, ''high-tech stuff is
being bumped to the top of the (spending) list,'' said Alex Molnar,
professor of education at the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee and
author of a book criticizing corporate influence in schools. ''And
following the hydraulic principle, whatever is at the bottom simply
drops out.''

Many California educators feel there's little left to drop. The state
already ranks dead last nationally in the number of students per
guidance counselor and per librarian, according to EdSource, an
education think tank in Palo Alto. The state is next to last in
student-teacher and student-principal ratios.

And even with the much-publicized drives to place technology in its
schools, the state is in the bottom five in student-computer ratio.

Of course, the financial struggles of California's schools started long
before the push toward high tech. As a result, educational hallmarks of
a previous generation -- from art supplies to building maintenance, from
after-school sports to school nurses -- have dwindled or vanished in
recent years.

But today, with widespread calls for more education funding, many fear
the biggest share of any new money will be devoured by technology.

''You can start a new music or art program relatively inexpensively,''
said Harvey Barnett, a researcher at WestEd, a regional education think
tank. ''But in order to do anything with technology . . . it's a big
hit.''

`It's kind of alarming'

At Santa Clara Unified School District, ''our technical support division
has become almost as big as our curriculum instruction division,''
Superintendent Paul Perotti said. ''It's kind of alarming.

''Not that I don't believe in (school technology). But as we acquire
more and more . . . it's requiring manpower like we never imagined.''

When a computer crashes or the network goes down, ''who takes care of
that is a real question for us,'' Aceves said. ''It's kind of like, we
bought all this stuff, and extended ourselves all the way out on skinny
branches.''

To maintain their balance atop those branches, administrators must make
hard choices. The choices vary from district to district and school to
school. But most often funds for technology come from one of two
sources: the facilities budget, which is supposed to help maintain
California's often decrepit school buildings; and the curriculum and
instruction budget, which pays for traditional supplies such as
textbooks.

Grants, donations help

Sometimes schools avoid dipping into those funds by winning sizable
one-time grants and donations, from the district, the state or private
business. Particularly in Silicon Valley, schools have happily accepted
countless donations of goods and services from area high-tech companies.
Many businesses have ''adopted'' certain schools, setting them up with
equipment and wiring for networks, assisting teachers in learning the
systems, and donating outmoded but still usable products.

''We're about five years behind the industry in this school,'' said Dane
Caldwell-Holden, English teacher and technology director at Wilcox. ''As
long as we're five or six years out, there are enough companies in the
valley who want to get rid of (outdated) equipment that it's not an
issue.''

But Wilcox is not a typical beneficiary of corporate donations.
Caldwell-Holden's knowledge and zeal about computers -- he's happy to
accept three old 486 PCs, just to put together one serviceable computer
-- make Wilcox the envy of many schools in the area, which have neither
the expertise nor the funds for a technology director.

This has helped the school avoid a pitfall of funding related to private
business donations, as well as past government funding. The
contributions often are made to cover start-up costs. But money to keep
the systems up and running has been harder to come by. Schools have
found there's no guarantee that a business there to help today will be
around tomorrow.

At Sylvandale, Aceves said, a Silicon Valley software company installed
wiring and computers, and made one classroom a beta site for testing
educational software. The experiment has brought an enthusiastic
response from teachers and students.

But eventually, Aceves predicted, the company is ''going to go away.
Once you have the technology in place, your problems have just begun.''

Smart Valley disbands

Likewise, perhaps the most influential single agent to bring technology
to area schools was Smart Valley Inc., an offshoot of Joint Venture
Silicon Valley. Smart Valley helped organize NetDay here, and later
headed up drives to place 9,000 computers in state schools.

But last month that agency dissolved itself, declaring that its mission
had been accomplished. Schools were left to find other resources for
maintaining technology.

A director of Smart Valley, Karen Greenwood, did go on to help establish
a users group for school network managers. Ongoing support for schools,
she said, ''is a very critical issue.''

Some educators also have reservations about what private business
expects in return for donations. When seeking help, the school often
must submit a proposal, assuage concerns about how the technology will
be used, and otherwise be answerable to the donor.

''Industry expectations aren't always in line with schools'
expectations,'' Cruz said. ''We just don't speak the same language.''

And yet school administrators do continue to seek and welcome the help
of businesses. They feel they have little choice, because their own
resources are so limited, and the costs of maintaining earlier donations
are so expensive.

''One of the ways districts are being stuck now is, they all did NetDay,
and everybody got hot about wiring schools,'' Barnett said. ''But nobody
considered the long-term (costs).''

By the year 2000, schools nationwide will be spending about $9 billion a
year on computer technology, according to IDC/Link, a market research
company based in New York. Maintenance costs in subsequent years are
sure to be huge. Barnett puts that annual cost at about 20 to 30 percent
of acquisition costs.

''Who's going to pay for all that?'' he asked. ''Cupcake sales won't do
it.''

Less-obvious trade-offs

Beyond materials and technicians, schools pay for technology with
trade-offs that aren't obvious, but still costly. Space is at a premium
in most schools and computer labs often take over a segment of school
libraries that used to be filled with bookshelves.

Also, because staffs always are limited, many schools borrow on the
amateur expertise of teachers like Caldwell-Holden to keep systems
running. But that often takes one more teacher out of a classroom.

Some schools, including Wilcox, try to get around maintenance costs by
teaching students to do the work. While the students get experience that
could help them as they enter the job market, they also use up an
elective course that otherwise might teach them a foreign language, an
appreciation for art or a vocational skill.

If the trade-offs faced by administrators are difficult now, they
promise only to get worse, as business and government move forward with
plans to put more technology into the schools.

Greenwood and others say the answer is for California schools to create
portions of their budgets dedicated to technology. While that would help
solve the financial burden high-tech places on schools now, it doesn't
address the impact on other programs.

There is widespread agreement that technology will continue to consume a
growing share of school budgets. Some wonder whether enough thought has
been given to the consequences.

''We haven't stopped and analyzed if that's where we really ought to
be,'' Bloom said.

--
Regards
brd

Bernard Robertson-Dunn
Canberra Australia
brd@dynamite.com.au

From ggebesse@nsw.bigpond.net.au Wed Dec 23 00:42:07 1998
From: ggebesse@nsw.bigpond.net.au (Peter Bowditch)
Date: Wed, 23 Dec 1998 09:42:07 +1000
Subject: Blue Mountain and Microsoft
In-Reply-To: <3.0.5.32.19981222230554.0095ba70@pop.netspace.net.au>
Message-ID: <199812222242.JAA18769@m5.c2.telstra-mm.net.au>

On 22 Dec 98, at 23:05, Adam Creed wrote:

> FYI, this was discussed before on this list, the conclusion
> was that Blue Mountain won the court case (to a limited degree).

This must have been a massive disappointment to Blue Mountain, who expected to
get lots of cash. Instead, a remarkably smart judge just ordered Microsoft to supply a
bit of free consulting to these turkeys to show them how to make email messages
that don't look like they come from a spam factory.

I hope the shyster acting for Blue Mountain was billing on contingency. 50% of nothing
was about all his advice was worth.

I notice that the Blue Mountain web site is supposed to be "one of the 15 most
popular on the World Wide Web". Perhaps it would be even more popular if they
employed some professional programmers to write Java that doesn't cause IE4 to
crash. (Maybe that is just a deliberate counterattack against Microsoft, but somehow I
just think it's incompetence.) I leave for another time any discussion about the
absurdity of claiming even the possibility of any valid universal ranking of web site
accesses.

........................................................
Peter Bowditch Mobile: 0419219659
Gebesse Computer Consultants peterb@gebesse.com.au
Parramatta NSW Australia http://www.gebesse.com.au/
ACT! Certified Consultant

From hartr@redhat.com Tue Dec 22 23:24:28 1998
From: hartr@redhat.com (hartr@redhat.com)
Date: Tue, 22 Dec 1998 14:24:28 -0800 (PST)
Subject: What's in store for us in 1999/2000
In-Reply-To: <000101be2da1$ee05e1a0$129e0ccb@kelso>
Message-ID: <199812222224.OAA16396@bree.support.redhat.com>

On 22 Dec, Kelso wrote:

> As 1998 draws to a close, it's timely to ask: Regarding the on-line
> world and related events in telecommunications and broadcasting in
> Australia/elsewhere, what's likely to be in store for us during the
> next year or two? Any takers?

I would suggest that one of the major impacts in the software world
will be due to the continuting spread of Open Source Software and its
increasing mindshare.

In the longterm, the impact of Open Source will have repercussions far
wider than just the Linux operating system.

The control of intellectual property has increased significantly in
recent decades; the Open Source economic model (one of cooperation in
content, competition in service delivery) can be applied beyond simply
software.

I expect to see this model being looked at and (in suitably
modified form) tries increasingly outside the software industry.

--

Robert Hart hartr@redhat.com
Red Hat Software Inc (California Office)
Phone: +1 650 967 0888



From rpj@ise.canberra.edu.au Wed Dec 23 01:10:11 1998
From: rpj@ise.canberra.edu.au (Ross Johnson)
Date: Wed, 23 Dec 1998 11:10:11 +1100 (EST)
Subject: Blue Mountain and Microsoft
In-Reply-To: <199812222242.JAA18769@m5.c2.telstra-mm.net.au>
Message-ID: <Pine.LNX.3.95.981223110030.2256B-100000@swan.canberra.edu.au>

Sorry, I just can't restrain myself. If IE4 crashes when fed a bunch of
bytes from the Internet, then that is a bug in IE4. If Windows crashes
as a result of a problem in IE4, then ... well, what can I say that hasn't
already been said?

On Wed, 23 Dec 1998, Peter Bowditch wrote:

> On 22 Dec 98, at 23:05, Adam Creed wrote:
>
> > FYI, this was discussed before on this list, the conclusion
> > was that Blue Mountain won the court case (to a limited degree).
>
> This must have been a massive disappointment to Blue Mountain, who expected to
> get lots of cash. Instead, a remarkably smart judge just ordered Microsoft to supply a
> bit of free consulting to these turkeys to show them how to make email messages
> that don't look like they come from a spam factory.
>
> I hope the shyster acting for Blue Mountain was billing on contingency. 50% of nothing
> was about all his advice was worth.
>
> I notice that the Blue Mountain web site is supposed to be "one of the 15 most
> popular on the World Wide Web". Perhaps it would be even more popular if they
> employed some professional programmers to write Java that doesn't cause IE4 to
> crash. (Maybe that is just a deliberate counterattack against Microsoft, but somehow I
> just think it's incompetence.) I leave for another time any discussion about the
> absurdity of claiming even the possibility of any valid universal ranking of web site
> accesses.
>
> ........................................................
> Peter Bowditch Mobile: 0419219659
> Gebesse Computer Consultants peterb@gebesse.com.au
> Parramatta NSW Australia http://www.gebesse.com.au/
> ACT! Certified Consultant
>

Ross Johnson



From sldavey@fl.asn.au Wed Dec 23 04:21:50 1998
From: sldavey@fl.asn.au (Sandra Davey)
Date: Wed, 23 Dec 1998 14:21:50 +1100
Subject: New .AU Working Group on Australian Domain Names
Message-ID: <3.0.1.32.19981223142150.00c0c90c@203.61.218.131>

Dear Linkers,

The newly formed .AU Working Group on Australian Domain Names, recently
created by NOIE, has launched its public website. You'll find us at
http://au.moniker.net

The Working Group has an objective to establish, in conjunction with the
Internet community, an organisation capable of taking over the delegation
of the .au namespace by March 1999.

All documents generated by the Working Group, including minutes and draft
documents, are available for public scrutiny and comment. In addition a
public announcement list is also available so you can be notified
instantaneously of new additions and updates to the website. The Working
Group will use this mailing list as the primary way to notify the community
of progress by the Working Group and updates to the site.

The .AU Working Group looks forward to your participation.

Please redirect this mail to interested parties.

With best regards,

Sandra Davey
.AU Working Group
Email: sldavey@fl.asn.au



From ggebesse@nsw.bigpond.net.au Wed Dec 23 06:15:36 1998
From: ggebesse@nsw.bigpond.net.au (Peter Bowditch)
Date: Wed, 23 Dec 1998 15:15:36 +1000
Subject: Blue Mountain and Microsoft
In-Reply-To: <Pine.LNX.3.95.981223110030.2256B-100000@swan.canberra.edu.au>
References: <199812222242.JAA18769@m5.c2.telstra-mm.net.au>
Message-ID: <199812230416.PAA20444@m5.c2.telstra-mm.net.au>

Ross Johnson says

> Sorry, I just can't restrain myself. If IE4 crashes when fed a bunch of
> bytes from the Internet, then that is a bug in IE4. If Windows crashes as
> a result of a problem in IE4, then ... well, what can I say that hasn't
> already been said?

Pardon?

Java isn't just a "bunch of bytes from the Internet". It's a bunch of
bytes which tell my browser to do something. In Blue Mountain's
case, it told my browser to stop working. Java from Microsoft, IBM,
Sun, Symantec, and the hundred and one other places I go each
day doesn't crash my browser.

Talk sense or don't talk at all.


.....................
Peter Bowditch
peterb@gebesse.com.au
http://www.gebesse.com.au

From brd@dynamite.com.au Wed Dec 23 06:22:01 1998
From: brd@dynamite.com.au (Bernard Robertson-Dunn)
Date: Wed, 23 Dec 1998 16:22:01 +1100
Subject: Blue Mountain and Microsoft
References: <199812222242.JAA18769@m5.c2.telstra-mm.net.au> <199812230416.PAA20444@m5.c2.telstra-mm.net.au>
Message-ID: <36807DF9.5B6C76A8@dynamite.com.au>

Peter Bowditch wrote:
>
> Ross Johnson says
>
> > Sorry, I just can't restrain myself. If IE4 crashes when fed a bunch of
> > bytes from the Internet, then that is a bug in IE4. If Windows crashes as
> > a result of a problem in IE4, then ... well, what can I say that hasn't
> > already been said?
>
> Pardon?
>
> Java isn't just a "bunch of bytes from the Internet". It's a bunch of
> bytes which tell my browser to do something. In Blue Mountain's
> case, it told my browser to stop working. Java from Microsoft, IBM,
> Sun, Symantec, and the hundred and one other places I go each
> day doesn't crash my browser.

If the browser cannot handle an invalid input and crashes, then it's the
fault of the browser. There could be all sorts of reasons why the input
might be invalid and any decent software should be able to handle error
conditions.

> Talk sense or don't talk at all.

Link is a civilised list. I, for one, would appreciate if it stayed that
way.

Seasons greetings to all.

--
What is fun about a balloon? you hold it, and it does nothing.
Eventually, it pops, flys away, or deflates.
Any of those three ends in disappointment
-- Unknown (via Tony B)

Regards
brd

Bernard Robertson-Dunn
Canberra Australia
brd@dynamite.com.au

From darius@connect.com.au Wed Dec 23 07:50:25 1998
From: darius@connect.com.au (Kevin Littlejohn)
Date: Wed, 23 Dec 1998 17:50:25 +1100
Subject: Blue Mountain and Microsoft
In-Reply-To: Your message of "Wed, 23 Dec 1998 15:15:36 +1000."
<199812230416.PAA20444@m5.c2.telstra-mm.net.au>
References: <199812230416.PAA20444@m5.c2.telstra-mm.net.au> <199812222242.JAA18769@m5.c2.telstra-mm.net.au>
Message-ID: <199812230650.RAA00300@koro.off.connect.com.au>


>>> "Peter Bowditch" wrote
> Ross Johnson says
>
> > Sorry, I just can't restrain myself. If IE4 crashes when fed a bunch of
> > bytes from the Internet, then that is a bug in IE4. If Windows crashes as
> > a result of a problem in IE4, then ... well, what can I say that hasn't
> > already been said?
>
> Pardon?
>
> Java isn't just a "bunch of bytes from the Internet". It's a bunch of
> bytes which tell my browser to do something. In Blue Mountain's
> case, it told my browser to stop working. Java from Microsoft, IBM,
> Sun, Symantec, and the hundred and one other places I go each
> day doesn't crash my browser.

<rant>

First rule for secure programming (and any programming worth it's salt) is to
sanitise your input. Especially when coming from something as strange as
the internet, allowing your input to potentially crash your program _is_
a bug - such conditions are called 'Denial of Service attacks', and are
often of high enough importance to rate mention on security mailing lists,
amongst other places.

First aim of any program should be to be stable under it's operating
conditions. In the case of web browsers, their operating conditions are
diverse - so more attention should be paid to making the software stable
before adding new features. Not exactly MS'es forte, judging on previous
behaviour.

</rant>

Why are you so willing to run software that so obviously doesn't take
appropriate care when dealing with it's environment? That's more of a risk
than I'd put my workstation under regularly...

KevinL
(part-time security BOFH)

--------------- qnevhf@obsu.arg.nh ---------------
Kevin Littlejohn,
Technical Architect, Connect.com.au
Don't anthropomorphise computers - they hate that.

From robinst@ariel.ucs.unimelb.EDU.AU Wed Dec 23 08:35:32 1998
From: robinst@ariel.ucs.unimelb.EDU.AU (Robin M. Stephens)
Date: Wed, 23 Dec 1998 18:35:32 +1100 (AEDT)
Subject: Blue Mountain and Microsoft
In-Reply-To: <199812230416.PAA20444@m5.c2.telstra-mm.net.au>
Message-ID: <Pine.SUN.3.95.981223182823.2662A-100000@ariel.ucs.unimelb.EDU.AU>

On Wed, 23 Dec 1998, Peter Bowditch wrote:

> Ross Johnson says
>
> > Sorry, I just can't restrain myself. If IE4 crashes when fed a bunch of
> > bytes from the Internet, then that is a bug in IE4. If Windows crashes as
> > a result of a problem in IE4, then ... well, what can I say that hasn't
> > already been said?
>
> Pardon?
>
> Java isn't just a "bunch of bytes from the Internet". It's a bunch of
> bytes which tell my browser to do something. In Blue Mountain's
> case, it told my browser to stop working. Java from Microsoft, IBM,
> Sun, Symantec, and the hundred and one other places I go each
> day doesn't crash my browser.

The Hotjava and Netscape JVM can all handle Blue Mountain's Java code. I
don't see how it is Blue Mountains fault that Microsoft can't stick to a
standard.

> Talk sense or don't talk at all.

Talk politely or don't talk at all.

Robin


From stephen@melbpc.org.au Wed Dec 23 09:37:06 1998
From: stephen@melbpc.org.au (Stephen)
Date: Wed, 23 Dec 1998 19:37:06 +1100
Subject: link reporting error
Message-ID: <3.0.1.32.19981223193706.00738d54@popa.melbpc.org.au>

Hello

Whilst link is relatively quiet, I'd like to bring this up. Earlier this
year I re-posted a message to link regarding a new email-telegram service
recently introduced by British Post.

Although the URL for the site was correct, the accompanying text had been
altered. Unfortunately I did not check this and simply reposted the email
to link. Thanks to Bernard for picking up this inconsistency. Such errors
have not, and will, not occur again.

Link members probably don't remember the posting in question, but believe
me, I certainly do. What a pity, normally such a reliable source too. Ahh
well, no real harm done this time. However, over the years on link I have
noticed a few probable errors. Might I suggest that anyone posting please
apply normal journalistic practices in order to check the accuracy of the
material sent? Perhaps the journalists on link might care to outline the
extent of checking of factual content deemed appropriate for publication?

Surely link members deserve nothing less ..

Goodwill to all,
Stephen Loosley.

From kgeisel@actonline.com.au Tue Dec 22 23:43:19 1998
From: kgeisel@actonline.com.au (Karin Geiselhart)
Date: Wed, 23 Dec 1998 09:43:19 +1100
Subject: New .AU Working Group on Australian Domain Names
In-Reply-To: <3.0.1.32.19981223142150.00c0c90c@203.61.218.131>
Message-ID: <3.0.5.32.19981223094319.007eba20@pop1.actonline.com.au>

Well done Sandra,

The WG site looks like a sincere effort at openness and transparency of
process.

Karin G


PhD student
Faculty of Communication
University of Canberra
http://student.canberra.edu.au/~u833885/home.htm

From gooda@news.com.au Thu Dec 24 00:30:40 1998
From: gooda@news.com.au (Adam Good)
Date: Thu, 24 Dec 1998 10:30:40 +1100
Subject: Season Greetings
Message-ID: <010b01be2ecc$4135bf00$360145a5@adam.ni.com.au>

The News Interactive team would like to say thank you.... and wish you all a
fabulous Christmas and a Wonderful New Year.

See you all in 1999 bigger and better than ever.
http://www.ni.com.au/season_greetings/

________________________
adam good
online executive producer
news interactive
www.news.com.au

(612) 9288 1718
0418 426 640


From michael@impty.com.au Thu Dec 24 02:24:55 1998
From: michael@impty.com.au (impty-michael)
Date: Thu, 24 Dec 1998 12:24:55 +1100
Subject: Walkely awards - any info sites?
Message-ID: <199812240125.MAA24739@boomer.anu.edu.au>

A request for help:

I am looking for any information about the Walkely awards for Journalism.

Does anyone know of a site that I can go to for more information?

Michael Dupe'

From PTalty@dwrsb.gov.au Thu Dec 24 03:24:49 1998
From: PTalty@dwrsb.gov.au (Peter Talty)
Date: Thu, 24 Dec 1998 12:24:49 +1000
Subject: Business Entry Point metadata guide
Message-ID: <s682329f.061@dwrsb.gov.au>

To linkers interested in business/government electronic interactions:

The Business Entry Point initiative site (http://www.business.gov.au) has been active and growing for six months. Today a related site was released (http://about.business.gov.au) which will become one of the ways in which BEP involves and communicates with stakeholders.

- A draft BEP metadata specification is on the 'about' site.

I invite interested government agency (and others) to join the email list 'beplist' as described on 'about'. The list will be used in the new year to discuss the project, technology options, what business wants, and to inform about progress.

Seasons Greetings

Peter Talty
Business Entry Point Management Branch
24/12/98


From PTalty@dwrsb.gov.au Thu Dec 24 03:51:10 1998
From: PTalty@dwrsb.gov.au (Peter Talty)
Date: Thu, 24 Dec 1998 12:51:10 +1000
Subject: Business Entry Point metadata specification
Message-ID: <s68238d8.095@dwrsb.gov.au>

To linkers interested in business/government electronic interactions:

1. The Business Entry Point initiative site (http://www.business.gov.au) has been active and growing for six months. Today a related site was released (http://about.business.gov.au) which will become one of the ways in which BEP involves and communicates with stakeholders.

2. A draft BEP metadata specification (compiled by Ian Macintosh and Ben Healy, AusIndustry), is on this 'about' site.

3. I invite interested government agency (and others) to join the email list 'beplist' as described on 'about'. The list will be used in the new year to discuss the project, technology options, what business wants, and to inform about progress.

Seasons Greetings

Peter Talty
Business Entry Point Management Branch
DEWRSB
24/12/98



From tomw@acslink.net.au Thu Dec 24 04:17:36 1998
From: tomw@acslink.net.au (Tom Worthington)
Date: Thu, 24 Dec 1998 14:17:36 +1100
Subject: What's in store for us in 1999/2000
Message-ID: <2.2.32.19981224031736.006a5398@mail.mpx.com.au>

At 22:55 22/12/98 +1100, Kelso wrote:

>...what's likely to be in store for us during the next year or two? ...

Perhaps you should check last year's predictions s first. ;-)

>Any takers?

Okay here are some, less serious that others:

* AUSTRALIA POWERS AHEAD: With Europe busy getting its systems to work with
Monetary Union, all innovative thought in the USA going into how to
structure the post-trust-case baby-Microsofts and Asia still recovering from
recession, Australia takes over innovation in IT for the world.

* LINUX TAKES OFF: Having met the BSI+ in 1998, Linux becomes the operating
system of choice for high-technology company servers and power users.
Netscape regains market share from MS-IE, based on its Linux implementation.
Office automation software for Linux becomes available on a "free, but pay
for support" model, eclipsing MS-Office. Apple's IMac-2 with Linux becomes
the hot PC of 1999. Red Hat software decide to move operations to Australia,
with Sydney becoming the center of the IT world.

+ BSI: Book-Shelf Indicator: Measure of trend in the It industry,
based on the number of books on a topic in bookstores.

* IT SKILLS SHORTAGE: Under pressure to train more people, on-line distance
education becomes the model for IT education in 1999. This starts a trend in
general tertiary education and University campuses become support centers
for global distance education.

* GOVERNMENT SUPPORT FOR IT: The Federal Government realizes the importance
of IT to the national economy and implements the recommendations of the IT
R&D report "Sink or Swim", increasing research funding, development
incentives, removes impediments to venture capital.

* E-COMMERCE: Standards Australia forms a non-profit organization to
implement PKAF, with representatives from industry. Federal and State
governments introduce legislation recognizing PKAF and Australia becomes the
world leader in e-commerce as a result.

* ENCRYPTION EXPORT: Senator Alston decides it is better to break a
commitment to the US Government than the Australian people and lifts all
restrictions on encryption software. This is explained as an
"interpretation" of the Wassenaar agreement. US authorities are furious, but
USA needs Australia's support, given domestic problems with President Gore's
impeachment and disagreements with UN Secretary-General Hussen.

* DESK-TOPS CE OR EPOC?: With the server operating system of choice firmly
with Linux, Windows CE and EPOC battle it out for the corporate desk-tops of
the world.

* SUB NOTEBOOK RENAISSANCE: Sub-notebook PCs, the size of a B5 sheet of
paper and 2-4 cm thick, become cheap ($500 to $2,000) and very popular.
These have basic OA software in-built, can connect to the Internet and can
operate on a LAN. More expensive units have a disk drive and color camera
next to the screen for video-conferencing. Many people have thrown out their
pocket size PDAs and gone for a paper diary and a sub-notebook PC.
Sub-notebooks use the MS-CE or EPOC operating systems, but a "Tiny Linux" is
in development.

* BUSH TELEGRAPH: Australia's implementation of community supported "Data
CB" rapidly matures from just packet radio, to a sophisticated spread
spectrum system. It spreads first to Australian cities and then other
countries, providing the first telecommunications in much of the developing
world. Telcos and larger ISPs start to call for regulation, but like the
original Internet, low cost, anarchic wireless networking proves unstoppable.

* LEOS LAY LOW: A looming glut of satellite capacity becomes a reality in
late 1999, as new satellite start-ups realize only a few rich people are
prepared to pay $7 a minute for poor sound quality over a bulky portable
satellite phone. In contrast low cost data-only LEO services become popular
as a supplement to terrestrial wireless Internet services, with cheap PC
cards for notebooks. Traditional GEO companies do okay with the expanding
services of supplying data links to wireless ISP stations.

* HDTV DOESN'T HAPPEN: US equipment manufacturers and broadcasters discover
that consumers aren't willing to pay thousands more for a big bulky TV which
makes most programs (which aren't in HDTV format) look worse. Internet
standards for digital video at flexible data rates and resolutions are
quickly adopted and supersede HDTV. One success is music video stations,
using limited full motion video and animated programs (cartoons) multi-cast
via the Internet and on FM radio sub-carriers.

* AUSTRALIA SAVES THE WORLD FROM Y2K AND MAKES A PACKET: Having fixed
serious Y2K problems in Australia by June 1999, Australian IT professionals
find their skills in high demand overseas. Less prepared and now desperate
governments and companies around the world pay exorbitant prices for
Australian Y2K expertise. Apart from solving Australia's balance of payments
problem in six months, this establishes Australia as the world center for IT
project management and professional software development.

* ON-LINE BOOKSTORES GO BROKE: Many investors lost their money in the 1999
crash of on-line bookstore stocks. The development of on-demand book
printers with zero stock policies put old fashioned on-line book stores out
of business. Several companies realized in 1999 that they needed to just add
a cover printing and binding facility to a laser printer to make a complete
book printing press. The trend started with a book demand printed by the ACS
in mid-1999. On-line printers can now make any one of millions of books in
their catalog in two minutes and have it automatically packed for delivery.
Retail book stores have reinvented themselves as on-demand walk-in book
printers.

* ELECTRONIC BOOKS DON'T HAPPEN: Hardware based electronic book products
failed in the market in 1999. Readers decided that they didn't want to pay
several hundred dollars for a special function portable computer and bought
sub-notebooks in preference. Standard web based formats replaced the
proprietary formats of the electronic book companies. Reading from
electronic screens was still seen as inferior for all but technical and
reference material, with people buying laser printed paper books for
recreational reading.

* NOIE REDUNDANT: The Federal Government denied that NOIE had been scrapped
in March 1999. The official line was that NOIE had been merged with the
Office of Government On-line for increased efficiency. However, an insider
revealed that the new National Office of Government On-line (NOGO) had
replaced all of NOIE's policy functions with a subscription to US Government
publications: "This way we get the same policy six months earlier and a lot
cheaper".

* LINK INSTITUTE ESTABLISHED: The Governor General of Australia opened the
Link Institute's new offices at the ANU in Canberra. With a $500,000 grant
from industry, matched by the federal government, Link will continue its
pioneering work on public policy. Government sources denied rumors that the
$500,000 grant came from the millions saved from scrapping NOIE. When
accused of using public money for round the world "fact finding" junkets, A
Link director replied: "we need to keep up the fine tradition of work in
this field".


Tom Worthington http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw PO Box 13
Immediate Past President Belconnen ACT 2617
Australian Computer Society tomw@acslink.net.au
----------------------------------------------------------------------
IRC 1999 Topics Needed: http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw/irc/irc.html


From karina@acwa.asn.au Thu Dec 24 04:39:00 1998
From: karina@acwa.asn.au (Karina Brisby)
Date: Thu, 24 Dec 1998 14:39:00 +1100
Subject: Business Entry Point metadata guide
References: <s682329f.061@dwrsb.gov.au>
Message-ID: <3681B753.62E9@acwa.asn.au>

Is there a list or website for community/individuals and government
electronic interactions?

Karina


Peter Talty wrote:
>
> To linkers interested in business/government electronic interactions:
>
> The Business Entry Point initiative site (http://www.business.gov.au) has been active and growing for six months. Today a related site was released (http://ab
>
> - A draft BEP metadata specification is on the 'about' site.
>
> I invite interested government agency (and others) to join the email list 'beplist' as described on 'about'. The list will be used in the new year to discuss the project, technology options, what business wants, and to inform about progress.
>
> Seasons Greetings
>
> Peter Talty
> Business Entry Point Management Branch
> 24/12/98

From hforde@ozemail.com.au Thu Dec 24 05:02:27 1998
From: hforde@ozemail.com.au (Helen Forde)
Date: Thu, 24 Dec 1998 15:02:27 +1100
Subject: Walkely awards - any info sites?
Message-ID: <1.5.4.32.19981224040227.006961c4@mail2.ozemail.com.au>

You'll find it at www.walkeyawards.aust.com

At 12:24 24/12/98 +1100, you wrote:
>A request for help:
>
>I am looking for any information about the Walkely awards for Journalism.
>
>Does anyone know of a site that I can go to for more information?
>
>Michael Dupe'
>
>


From rw@firstpr.com.au Thu Dec 24 14:20:30 1998
From: rw@firstpr.com.au (Robin Whittle)
Date: Thu, 24 Dec 1998 23:20:30 +1000
Subject: What's in store for us in 1999/2000
In-Reply-To: <000101be2da1$ee05e1a0$129e0ccb@kelso>
Message-ID: <199812241123.WAA00674@gair.firstpr.com.au>

One thing that unfortunately is going to increase is the number of
emails, like the one Ross sent, which do not respect the long
established, perfectly sensible, but never-formalised-because-it-is-
so-obvious practice of making line lengths no more than 80
characters, unless there is a good reason - such as tabular data or a
long URL.

In a recent consultancy job I did, this question arose and some users
of Novell Groupwise and other proprietary email systems - for which
the Internet and its conventions are apparently a distant concern -
suggested that all email be sent with arbitrary line lengths. This
is technically possible using the quoted/printable MIME type as Ross'
email used. Without using this mime type, long paragraphs would
break the 1024 limit on line length set by the Internet standards. I
have an instance of Groupwise doing exactly that, with resultant
breaking of the line by a mail server it passed through. Groupwise
is a monster. There is apparently a single setting for the entire
system which wraps text before it is sent to the Internet. Very
often this is off, and the internal Groupwise arrangement is all
paragraphs to be sent without any returns at all.

There are lots of problems caused by >80 character line lengths. If
anyone is interested, I can put my extensive critique of the problem
on my web site.

There will be lots of good developments in the new year too! I hope
that one of them is Optus finally using their HFC cable for broadband
Internet access. Another even more important development will be the
near completion of the Southern Cross trans-Pacific cable!

- Robin



===============================================================

Robin Whittle rw@firstpr.com.au http://www.firstpr.com.au
Heidelberg Heights, Melbourne, Australia

First Principles Research and expression: music, Internet
music marketing, telecommunications, human
factors in technology adoption. Consumer
advocacy in telecommunications, especially
privacy. Consulting and technical writing.

Real World Electronics and software for music: eg.
Interfaces the Devil Fish mods for the TB-303.

===============================================================

From ggebesse@nsw.bigpond.net.au Thu Dec 24 14:26:27 1998
From: ggebesse@nsw.bigpond.net.au (Peter Bowditch)
Date: Thu, 24 Dec 1998 23:26:27 +1000
Subject: Walkely awards - any info sites?
In-Reply-To: <199812240125.MAA24739@boomer.anu.edu.au>
Message-ID: <199812241227.XAA21257@m5.c2.telstra-mm.net.au>

On 24 Dec 98, at 12:24, impty-michael wrote:

> A request for help:
>
> I am looking for any information about the Walkely awards for Journalism.
>
> Does anyone know of a site that I can go to for more information?
>
> Michael Dupe'

The official website is http://www.walkleyawards.aust.com but it is still
calling for nominations for 1998 and tells us that the awards will be given
out on 2 December, 1998. The ABC won a heap of the 1998 awards but
the only stuff on their web site is the 1997 and earlier results. Fairfax
papers won almost all the rest, but you have to pay to see their online
archives.

Bizarre!! Perhaps it is meant to be a secret. Try email to
ewalters@meaa.aust.com who seems to be a contact.



.....................
Peter Bowditch
peterb@gebesse.com.au
http://www.gebesse.com.au

From dmiller@ilogic.com.au Fri Dec 25 23:18:39 1998
From: dmiller@ilogic.com.au (Damien Miller)
Date: Sat, 26 Dec 1998 09:18:39 +1100 (EST)
Subject: Blue Mountain and Microsoft
In-Reply-To: <199812230416.PAA20444@m5.c2.telstra-mm.net.au>
Message-ID: <Pine.LNX.4.04.9812260906270.438-100000@mothra.ilogic.com.au>

On Wed, 23 Dec 1998, Peter Bowditch wrote:

> Ross Johnson says
>
> > Sorry, I just can't restrain myself. If IE4 crashes when fed a
> > bunch of bytes from the Internet, then that is a bug in IE4. If
> > Windows crashes as a result of a problem in IE4, then ... well,
> > what can I say that hasn't already been said?
>
> Pardon?
>
> Java isn't just a "bunch of bytes from the Internet". It's a bunch of
> bytes which tell my browser to do something. In Blue Mountain's
> case, it told my browser to stop working.

HTML and email are also examples of "bytes which tell my computer to
do something". I'm sure you would consider it a bug if they crashed
your browser.

Java is only slightly different, in that it describes a program rather
than a document (though this distinction is blurring with DHTML,
DOM and the like). Java does have a comprehensive security model, a
so-called "sand-box" in which Java programs are allowed to play. If
a Java program, buggy or otherwise, does something which escapes the
confines of the sand-box (such as crashes your browser), then it is
the fault of either the JVM (Java Virtual Machine) or the sand-box
design itself.

Since others have reported that the same applet functions with other
browsers and JVMs, it is safe to say that it is (yet another)
deficiency of the Microsoft JVM.

This is the same JVM which has Microsoft in court with Sun for
violation of the Java license agreement.

> Talk sense or don't talk at all.

Your lack of understanding is no justification for rudeness.

Regards,
Damien Miller

--
| "Bombay is 250ms from New York in the new world order" - Alan Cox
| Damien Miller - http://www.ilogic.com.au/~dmiller


From bje@cygnus.com Sat Dec 26 00:49:21 1998
From: bje@cygnus.com (Ben Elliston)
Date: Sat, 26 Dec 1998 10:49:21 +1100 (EST)
Subject: Blue Mountain and Microsoft
In-Reply-To: <Pine.LNX.4.04.9812260906270.438-100000@mothra.ilogic.com.au>
Message-ID: <Pine.LNX.3.95.981226104527.243A-100000@moshpit.cygnus.com>

Another case in point for programs that should be defensive about bad
data: Microsoft not so recently claimed that SAMBA clients that could
crash Windows machines we not playing fairly. Soon after, they were
shown the error of their ways and they fixed some of the problems in their
server code that made assumptions about the validity of the client talking
to it.

As I understand it, Andrew Tridgell has now written a torture test that
barrages Windows machines with SMB messages of all kinds in the hope of
finding more problems like this one.

Ben


From r.polanskis@nepean.uws.edu.au Sat Dec 26 02:03:43 1998
From: r.polanskis@nepean.uws.edu.au (Rachel Polanskis)
Date: Sat, 26 Dec 1998 12:03:43 +1100 (EST)
Subject: Blue Mountain and Microsoft
In-Reply-To: <Pine.LNX.4.04.9812260906270.438-100000@mothra.ilogic.com.au>
Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.4.00.9812261150210.500-100000@isis.virago.org.au>


On Sat, 26 Dec 1998, Damien Miller wrote:

> Since others have reported that the same applet functions with other
> browsers and JVMs, it is safe to say that it is (yet another)
> deficiency of the Microsoft JVM.
>
> This is the same JVM which has Microsoft in court with Sun for
> violation of the Java license agreement.

This is why the the many cases against MS are so important.
We expect quality in most of what we surround ourselves with
throughout our lives.
Everything it seems, except computer software, which is IMHO the
ultimate commodity product, but marketed like it was actually
far more valuable than it's actual worth.

By allowing monopolies like MS to exist, the quest for quality gets lost
in the rush to "produce more units" and "increase mindshare".
This Blue Mountain thing may or may not be a scam, but the facts are
that a ruling was made against MS.
I would be suspicious too, given MS's track record in the past.
I don't trust Microsoft and never will. It looks like, right or wrong,
a few US judges are deciding the same thing for themselves....


rachel

--
Rachel Polanskis Kingswood, Greater Western Sydney, Australia
grove@zeta.org.au http://www.zeta.org.au/~grove/grove.html
r.polanskis@nepean.uws.edu.au http://www.nepean.uws.edu.au/ccd/
"Yow! Am I having fun yet?!" - John Howard^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H Zippy the Pinhead


From r.polanskis@nepean.uws.edu.au Sat Dec 26 02:07:37 1998
From: r.polanskis@nepean.uws.edu.au (Rachel Polanskis)
Date: Sat, 26 Dec 1998 12:07:37 +1100 (EST)
Subject: Blue Mountain and Microsoft
In-Reply-To: <Pine.LNX.3.95.981226104527.243A-100000@moshpit.cygnus.com>
Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.4.00.9812261203590.500-100000@isis.virago.org.au>


On Sat, 26 Dec 1998, Ben Elliston wrote:

> As I understand it, Andrew Tridgell has now written a torture test that
> barrages Windows machines with SMB messages of all kinds in the hope of
> finding more problems like this one.

Apparently, Andrew Tridgell's SAMBA software is so good that it helped
the MS programming team working on SMB to understand the protocol and their
own work!

Wow...
Now I know where all those returned "... for Dummies" books end up ;)

--
Rachel Polanskis Kingswood, Greater Western Sydney, Australia
grove@zeta.org.au http://www.zeta.org.au/~grove/grove.html
r.polanskis@nepean.uws.edu.au http://www.nepean.uws.edu.au/ccd/
"Yow! Am I having fun yet?!" - John Howard^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H Zippy the Pinhead


From tonyb@netinfo.com.au Sun Dec 27 04:51:02 1998
From: tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Sun, 27 Dec 1998 14:51:02 +1100
Subject: Carrier performance during September 1998 Quarter
Message-ID: <v02110103b2ab593f8465@[203.37.43.24]>

PORTFOLIO: COMMUNICATIONS INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND THE ARTS PORTFOLIO
TITLE: ACA: Media Releases - 54 of 1998 [Carrier performance during
September 1998 Quarter]
URL: http://www.aca.gov.au/media/54-98.htm
SNIPPET: Media Release . Contact:dfrey@aca.gov.au .Date: 22 December 98
.www.aca.gov.au/media/ . Media Release No.54 of 1

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From brd@dynamite.com.au Mon Dec 28 02:22:31 1998
From: brd@dynamite.com.au (Bernard Robertson-Dunn)
Date: Mon, 28 Dec 1998 12:22:31 +1100
Subject: Can IBM make Linux blue?
Message-ID: <3686DD57.D4629A52@dynamite.com.au>

The world gets ever stranger. IBM supporting open source software?!?!?

A pointer via Tasty Bits from the Technology Front for 12/23/98
at http://tbtf.com/archive/12-23-98.html

..Can IBM make Linux blue?

This account [19] is a ZDnet exclusive on a rumor that IBM is studying
how best to offer support for Red Hat Linux.

[19] http://www.zdnet.com/zdnn/stories/
printer_friendly/0,5444,2177559,00.html

--
I dread success. To have succeeded is to have finished one's business on
earth, like the male spider, who is killed by the female the moment he
has succeeded in his courtship. I like a state of continual becoming,
with a goal in front and not behind.
-- George Bernard Shaw.

Regards
brd

Bernard Robertson-Dunn
Canberra Australia
brd@dynamite.com.au

From rene@pobox.com Mon Dec 28 10:49:40 1998
From: rene@pobox.com (Irene Graham)
Date: Mon, 28 Dec 1998 19:49:40 +1000
Subject: Blue Mountain and Microsoft
In-Reply-To: <3.0.5.32.19981222230554.0095ba70@pop.netspace.net.au>
References: <3.0.5.32.19981222230554.0095ba70@pop.netspace.net.au>
Message-ID: <369453b0.36352923@mail.bit.net.au>

On Tue, 22 Dec 1998 23:05:54 +1100 Adam Creed <acreed@netspace.net.au>
wrote:

>FYI, this was discussed before on this list, the conclusion
>was that Blue Mountain won the court case (to a limited degree).
>
>E-greeting card firm wins Microsoft case
>By Reuters <http://www.news.com/News/Item/0,4,30205,00.html>

It seems there's considerably more to this case than is readily obvious
from news reports:
http://www3.bluemountain.com/home/ImportantNotice.html?122198

Also, Microsoft seems to have a rather peculiar understanding of part of
the Court's Temporary Restraining Order
http://www3.bluemountain.com/home/courtorder122198.html

"3. Microsoft shall post a clear and conspicuous warning which is
displayed to every Internet user that chooses to download the current, and
any future, beta or commercial release of Internet Explorer 5.0 containing
a version of Outlook Express with a junk mail filter that states as
follows:
" "WARNING: Users are advised that Outlook Express comes
equipped with a 'junk' e-mail filter which, when turned on, may
relegate legitimate e-mails, such as electronic greeting cards from
family or friends to the junk mail folder, and dispose of them
according to the user's preferences." "

So, where is this "clear and conspicous warning"?

http://www.microsoft.com/msdownload/iebuild/ie5b2_win32/en/ie5b2_win32.htm
On the bottom of that page, well below where one clicks to download the
product, Microsoft has a tiny link to "Important Notices". If one clicks on
that, and then wades half way through the page, one eventually finds the
warning. This doesn't strike me as being "a clear and conspicuous warning
which is displayed to every Internet user that chooses to download" the
product.

Irene

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Irene Graham, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. PGP key on h/page.
Burning Issues: <http://www.pobox.com/~rene/>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


From rene@pobox.com Mon Dec 28 10:51:58 1998
From: rene@pobox.com (Irene Graham)
Date: Mon, 28 Dec 1998 19:51:58 +1000
Subject: Oz Schools block Privacy Discussions as a "Criminal Skill"
Message-ID: <36955440.36497111@mail.bit.net.au>

During the past 12 months or so, Smartfilter (previously known as Webtrack)
has been blocking discussions about privacy and encryption as a "criminal
skill", i.e. the equivalent of bomb making instructions (see message below
from PRIVACY Forum Digest moderator).

Smartfilter is (at least I assume it still is) installed on the Ozemail web
proxy through which all NSW DSET (Department of School Education and
Training) schools gain, or do not gain, access to web sites. (DSET schools
were provided with Cyberpatrol as well - overkill?).

A number of other Australian ISPs also offer a Smartfilter-ed web proxy to
schools who, like the NSW Government, are apparently happy to have an
American company decide what is or isn't appropriate for Australian
students.

Smartfilter joins the ever growing list of censorware products known to
throw out the baby with the bathwater...

http://www.vortex.com/privacy/priv.07.21
-----begin extract------

>PRIVACY Forum Digest Sunday, 20 December 1998 Volume 07 : Issue 21
[...]
>Date: Wed, 16 Dec 98 12:25 PST
>From: lauren@vortex.com (Lauren Weinstein; PRIVACY Forum Moderator)
>Subject: Privacy Discussions Classified as a "Criminal Skill"
>
>Greetings. Is discussing privacy in the PRIVACY Forum a criminal skill?
>According to one widely used commercial web filtering tool, the answer was
>yes! The controversy over software to block access to particular sites,
>based on perceived content, has been continuing to rage. Attempts to
>mandate the use of such software in environments such as libraries and
>schools have raised a variety of serious concerns. In addition to fairly
>straightforward freedom of speech issues, another factor revolves around
>how accurate (or inaccurate) these filtering systems really are.
>
>I've now seen firsthand that errors by a filtering system can indeed be quite
>serious, an event that seems to certainly validate some of these concerns.
>But there is something of a silver lining to the story, as we'll see later.
>
>I recently was contacted by someone at a large corporation, who was trying
>to reach the PRIVACY Forum web site, which is constantly being referenced by
>individuals and commercial, educational, government, and other sites around
>the world. This person was upset since whenever they attempted to reach
>the http://www.vortex.com site and domain that hosts the PRIVACY Forum,
>their web software blocked them, informing them that the block was in place
>due to the site being categorized as containing "criminal skills."
>
>As the webmaster for the vortex.com domain, this certainly came as news to
>me. The message they received didn't give additional information--they
>didn't even know exactly where it came from. It was apparent though, that
>the entire organization was probably blocked from reaching the PRIVACY
>Forum, since the filtering software in question was affecting a main
>firewall system.
>
>After a number of phone calls and discussions with the system administrator
>for that organization, the details began to emerge. The company was running
>a filtering software package from Secure Computing Corporation of San Jose,
>California. This package received weekly updates of blocked sites in a wide
>variety of categories, one of which was "criminal skills."
>
>The administrator had no idea what rationale was used for these decisions,
>they just pulled in the list each week and applied it. He immediately placed
>vortex.com on a local exception list so that it would no longer be blocked to
>their users.
>
>I then turned my attention to Secure Computing. After a number of calls, I
>found myself speaking with Ken Montgomery, director of corporate
>communications for that firm. He confirmed the information I had already
>received. The filtering product in question ("SmartFilter") was apparently
>not being marketed to individuals, rather, it was sold to institutions,
>corporations, etc. to enforce filtering policies across entire entities.
>The product covers a wide range of information categories that users of the
>software can choose to block. He said that the majority of blocked sites
>were in categories involving pornography, where there was (in his opinion)
>no question of their not belonging there.
>
>The "criminal skills" category reportedly was broadly defined to cover
>information that might be "of use" to criminals (e.g. how to build bombs).
>He had no explanation as to why my domain had been placed in that list,
>since by no stretch could any materials that are or have ever been
>there fall into such a categorization. He did discover that the
>classification of my domain had occurred over a year ago (meaning
>other sites could have been receiving similar blocking messages for
>that period of time when trying to access the PRIVACY Forum) and
>that the parties who had made the original classification were no longer
>with their firm--so there was no way to ask them for their rationale.
>(All of their classifications are apparently made by people, not
>by an automated system.)
>
>However, it seems likely that the mere mentioning of encryption may have
>been enough to trigger the classification. The administrator at the
>organization that had originally contacted me about the blocked access, told
>me that the main reason they included the "criminal skills" category in
>their site blocking list was to try prevent their users from downloading
>"unapproved" encryption software. This was a type of information that he
>believed to be included under the Secure Computing "criminal skills"
>category (the "logic" being, obviously, that since criminals can use
>encryption to further their efforts, encryption is a criminal skill). He
>also admitted that he knew that their users could still easily obtain
>whatever encryption software they wanted anyway, but he had to enforce the
>company policy to include that category in their blocking list.
>
>As PRIVACY Forum readers may know, no encryption software is or ever has
>been distributed from here. The topic of encryption issues does certainly
>come up from time to time, as would be expected. For the mere *mention* of
>encryption in a discussion forum to trigger such a negative categorization
>would seem to suggest the fallacy of blindly trusting such classification
>efforts.
>
>Mr. Montgomery of Secure Computing initially suggested that it was up to
>their customers to decide which categories they wanted to use in their own
>blocking lists--he also stated that as a company they were opposed to
>mandatory filtering regulations. I suggested that such determinations by
>their customers were meaningless if the quality of the entries in those
>categories could not be trusted and if errors of this severity could so
>easily be made. I felt that this was particularly true of a category with
>an obviously derogatory nature such as "criminal skills"--the ramifications
>of being incorrectly placed into such a category, and then to not even
>*know* about it for an extended period of time, could be extreme and very
>serious.
>
>To their credit, my argument apparently triggered a serious discussion
>within Secure Computing about these issues. I had numerous subsequent
>e-mail and some additional phone contacts with Mr. Montgomery and others
>in their firm concerning these matters. First off, they apologized
>for the miscategorization of vortex.com, and removed it from the
>"criminal skills" category (it was apparently never listed in any
>other of their categories).
>
>Secondly, they have agreed with my concerns about the dangers of such
>miscategorizations occurring without any mechanism being present for sites
>to learn of such problems or having a way to deal with them. So, they will
>shortly be announcing a web-based method for sites to interrogate the Secure
>Computing database to determine which categories (if any) they've been
>listed under, and will provide a means for sites to complain if they feel
>that they have been misclassified. They've also suggested that their hope
>is to provide a rapid turnaround on consideration of such complaints.
>
>While by no means perfect, this is a step forward. I would prefer a more
>active notification system, where sites would be notified directly when
>categorizations are made. This would avoid their having to
>check to see whether or not they've been listed, and needing to keep
>checking back to watch for any changes or new categorizations. If more
>filtering software companies adopt the Secure Computing approach, there
>would be a lot of checking for sites to do if they wanted to stay on
>top of these matters. Secure Computing feels that such notifications are
>not practical at this time. However, their move to provide some
>accountability to their filtering classifications is certainly preferable to
>the filtering systems which continue to provide no such facilities and
>operate in a completely closed environment.
>
>So, we make a little progress. The PRIVACY Forum and vortex.com are no
>longer miscategorized and have been removed from all Secure Computing block
>lists. Secure Computing was polite and responsive in their
>communications with me, and will establish the system discussed above in
>reaction to my concerns. Web filtering of course remains a highly
>controversial topic with many serious negative aspects, but we see that when
>it comes to dealing with the complex issues involved, it would be a mistake
>to assume that all such filters all created equal.
>
>--Lauren--
>Lauren Weinstein
>Moderator, PRIVACY Forum
>http://www.vortex.com
>
-----end extract------

Related information:

Ozemail's intranet for NSW DSETschools
http://www.ozemail.com.au/dsenet/intranet.html
DSET Site Filtering Problems
http://www.ozemail.com.au/~pware/misc/dse_access.html
Peacefire page about Smartfilter
http://www.peacefire.org/censorware/SmartFilter/
Smartfilter categories and examples of blockable material ranging from the
Wall Street Journal to ...
http://www.mns.net.au/info/SmartFilter.html


Irene

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Irene Graham, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. PGP key on h/page.
The Net Censorship Dilemma: <http://www.pobox.com/~rene/liberty/>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


From sgwilson@kpmg.com.au Tue Dec 29 07:02:01 1998
From: sgwilson@kpmg.com.au (Stephen Wilson)
Date: Tue, 29 Dec 1998 17:02:01 +1100
Subject: EC and Electronic Community
Message-ID: <40D136701005D211A3EF0080C864BD0E016026BF@MELBOURNE>


[long post follows]

Roger

Thanks for the opportunity to comment on your new papers. To summarise, my
comments have to do with different expectations of the speed of development
of e-comm, misconceptions of how public key infrastructure (PKI) works, and
with rigour needed in the formulation of Internet policy.


A. General comment on both papers - why the impatience?

In general, why the rush to judgement over the apparent slowness of
electronic commerce to take off? The Web itself is only five years old and
the idea of doing actual business over this medium is perhaps less than
three years old.

Many commentators I think are prone to let the consumer e-comm
experience dominate their analysis of all e-comm (in particular, note that
the failure of so many Internet payments schemes tells us very little about
the robustness of e-comm in general since most business transactions are
actually paid for on account). Taking the broader perspective, we should
count many more successes, including the ASX Enterprise Market, Gadens
Lawyers' Virtual Office, Ernst & Young's Ernie, and Dun & Bradstreet's
business information extranet. And whole industry sectors - like equities
trading and travel - are excelling at Internet business.


B. On "Key Issues in Electronic Commerce and Electronic Publishing"

In Exhibit 4.1 you reel off an impressive list of "Impediments to
Business-with-Business EC". But what would have us make of this grab-bag of
problems? Give up altogether? Or acknowledge that most of them are in fact
commonplace in the management of any change programme? Do you mean to
represent issues like "organisational resistance" and "limited availability
of technical skills" as inevitable or intrinsic?


In section 4.2 (d) - "Identification, Anonymity and Pseudonymity" -
you recite some serious misconceptions about digital signatures. The
statement "Conventional digital signature technology involves compulsory and
authenticated identification of the parties to an electronic transaction" is
simply wrong. As I have explained many times, X.509 technology is entirely
flexible with respect to personal identification. There are a small number
of Certification Authorities and early PKI schemes (none of which are
compulsory) which implement strenuous personal identification policies, but
the clear trend in industry and in standards is towards policy flexibility,
fit for the purpose of particular applications.

I note that you once again cite your "Public Key Infrastructure
Position Statement" of 6 May 1998. There are several errors in that paper
which I shall address separately below.

You go on to argue for three "less threatening" approaches. Two of
these (eligibility authentication and pseudonymous transactions) are in fact
at hand in the current X.509 technology, and the third (value
authentication) is likely to be solved by attribute certificates beginning
in 6 to 12 months time.


C. On "The Willingness of Net-Consumers to Pay: A Lack-of-Progress
Report"

Do you really advocate that Internet policy be built largely upon
science fiction, cartoons and bumper sticker slogans?


D. On "Public Key Infrastructure Position Statement"

This paper is cited as Clarke 1998d in "Key Issues in Electronic Commerce
and Electronic Publishing". I take the liberty here of offering a critique
since it contains several errors that would appear to strengthen the case
you are trying to make against PKI.

I am afraid that your conception of "Conventional, Hierarchical PKI" is
wrong on almost all counts. Let me address your complete list of features,
with particular reference to the Australian PKAF model:

RC>a single key-pair per person
No. PKAF (as well as Gatekeeper) places no restriction on the number of
key-pairs.

RC>a 'distinguished name' that denies the opportunity for pseudonyms
No. A CA can readily create pseudonyms from the DN structure.

RC>little or no choice in the manner in which the key-pair is generated
No. PKAF and Gatekeeper allow for end-user key generation so long as a
standards certified method is used. This is in the interest of keying
material quality and serves to protect users.

RC>issuer-ownership of the key-pair
No. If the user generates their own key-pair, then it is their property.

RC>little or no choice as to what token will be used
No. Nothing in a PKI limits token choice per se but certain standards are
being set in the interests of keying material quality. At present, there
are very few tokens on the market. This is changing rapidly, without impact
on or from PKIs themselves.

RC>little or no choice as to who will issue the token
No. If choice is limited at present, it is due to availability. It has
nothing to do with PKI.

RC>issuer-ownership of the token
Variable. Some tokens will be disposable like phone cards. Others will
probably remain the property of the issuer.

RC>little or no choice in the [CA]
No. A PKI represents a collection of CAs. The whole idea is to create a
range of CAs, fit for different purposes.

RC>a hierarchy of certificate 'authorities'
Yes. A PKI is indeed a hierarchy of CAs. But what's your point? It seems
as though the very mention of the word "hierarchy" (and "authority" too?) is
sufficient to damn an entire project!

Conversely, your proposed 'compulsory' characteristics of a PKI in section 4
are in fact overwhelmingly possessed by the PKAF model. By my count, 10 out
of 11 of your requirements are met by the standards and models being
developed by Standards Australia and by the Certification Forum of
Australia. The 11th - personal ownership of the token - is a matter for
individual CAs and in any case is not self-evidently critical.

I agree wholeheartedly with your arguments in favour of role-related
key-pairs and multiple digital personae. All I can say is that the
Australian PKI models and standards do in fact meet your needs and therefore
deserve more careful treatment in your work.

Finally and in passing at the end of section 6 you state that "web-of-trust
approaches ... appear to offer much greater promise [than PKI]". Such a
statement really needs to be substantiated. I am not aware of any strong
argument in favour of web-of-trust. I have previously posted to some of the
lists my analysis of the shortcomings in web-of-trust, which include
difficulty in scaling, lack of uniformity of identification, and lack of
protection for personal identification data.



Thanks again for the opportunity to comment on your work. I think we're all
looking for more contributions to the important and increasingly scrutinised
area of PKI policy.


Cheers,

Stephen Wilson
Associate Director
KPMG Certification Authority, Sydney
45 Clarence St
Sydney NSW 2000
Australia
P +612 9335 8944
F +612 9335 7078





-----Original Message-----
From: Roger Clarke [mailto:Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au]
Sent: Monday, 7 December 1998 10:35 am
To: link@www.anu.edu.au; ica@cmis.csiro.au;
forum1@propagate.net
Subject: EC and Electronic Community


I'd greatly appreciate feedback on a couple of new papers.
Thanks in advance!


Key Issues in Electronic Commerce and Electronic
Publishing

http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/EC/Issues98.html

Abstract
An overview of electronic commerce is provided. Electronic
publishing is
examined as a particular form of electronic commerce. In
comparison with
the explosion of energy that characterised the arrival of
electronic
communities, electronic commerce and publishing are merely
struggling
towards their expected, very bright future. This paper
identifies the most
important of the issues that confront the application of the
Internet for
professional and commercial purposes.

Key bits are:

- a revised description of the phases of electronic
publishing

http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/EC/Issues98.html#EP

- a compressed version of impediments to
business-with-business EC:

http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/EC/Issues98.html#Iss1

- a new statement of issues in electronic publishing:

http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/EC/Issues98.html#Iss3



The Willingness of Net-Consumers to Pay: A
Lack-of-Progress Report

http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/EC/WillPay.html

Abstract
Consumer Internet commerce won't work unless participants
pay for what they
buy. But there has been a marked reluctance among net-users
to actually
part with their money. This document discusses the
origins of netizens'
apparent unwillingness to pay; describes some of the
attempts that have
been made to winkle them out; argues that marketers have
still got it
seriously wrong; and proposes ways in which progress can be
made.
The essence of the argument is that marketers must learn
that the world has
changed, that significantly different approaches are needed,
and that these
must be grounded in a deep appreciation of Internet culture.



Roger Clarke
http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/

http://www.etc.com.au/Xamax/
Xamax Consultancy Pty Ltd, 78 Sidaway St, Chapman ACT 2611
AUSTRALIA
Tel: +61 2 6288 1472, and 6288 6916
mailto:Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au

Visiting Fellow, Faculty of Engineering and Information
Technology
The Australian National University Canberra ACT 0200
AUSTRALIA
Information Sciences Building Room 211 Tel: +61 2
6249 3666


"This email is intended only for the use of the individual or entity
named above and may contain information that is confidential and
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From jwhit@PrimeNet.Com Tue Dec 29 22:06:31 1998
From: jwhit@PrimeNet.Com (Jan Whitaker)
Date: Wed, 30 Dec 1998 08:06:31 +1100 (EST)
Subject: Student free speech upheld in US high school
Message-ID: <199812292106.IAA16590@mars.planet.net.au>

>From CNN:
Judge: Suspension over Web page
violates free speech

December 29, 1998
Web posted at: 9:03 AM EST (1403 GMT)

CAPE GIRARDEAU, Missouri (AP) -- A student's free-speech
rights were violated when he was suspended for posting a personal Web page
critical of his high school, a federal judge has ruled.
[snip rest]

http://cnn.com/US/9812/29/web.lawsuit.ap/

Jan

JLWhitaker Associates
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
jwhit@primenet.com -- http://www.primenet.com/~jwhit/whitentr.htm



From dmiller@ilogic.com.au Wed Dec 30 01:12:52 1998
From: dmiller@ilogic.com.au (Damien Miller)
Date: Wed, 30 Dec 1998 11:12:52 +1100 (EST)
Subject: Don't You Get It? (MP3)
Message-ID: <Pine.LNX.4.04.9812301112390.431-100000@mothra.ilogic.com.au>



--
| "Bombay is 250ms from New York in the new world order" - Alan Cox
| Damien Miller - http://www.ilogic.com.au/~dmiller

---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Tue, 29 Dec 1998 11:35:41 -0500
From: glen mccready <glen@qnx.com>
To: 0xdeadbeef@substance.abuse.blackdown.org
Subject: Don't You Get It?
Resent-Date: Tue, 29 Dec 1998 11:33:12 -0500
Resent-From: 0xdeadbeef@substance.abuse.blackdown.org



Forwarded-by: Nev Dull <nev@bostic.com>
Forwarded-by: Michael Preston <michael_preston@cgp.org>

Don't You Get It? 98-12-18 11:24:35
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Silicon Alley Daily - Thursday, December 17, 1998
"Don't You Get It?"
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Editorial

Public Enemy, Rio, the Radiohead effect, MP3, and the Future of the
Music Industry--or Why I'll Never Pay $15 for a CD Again
--------------------
In the past month, the debate over the MP3 file format boiled over,
changing the music industry forever. The revolutionary rap group
Public Enemy got into a heated battle with PolyGram records when Chuck
D, the group's outspoken leader, decided to release their next album
in its entirety on the band's website www.public-enemy.com. But
PolyGram fought back, and Public Enemy was forced to pull the tracks
from the site.

During my brunch with GeoCities founder Dave Bohnett in L.A. a few
weeks ago, Bohnett showed me his portable, $200 MP3 player from
Diamond MultiMedia. The device weighs 2.4 ounces, has no moving parts,
holds an hour's worth of music, doesn't skip, and runs on one AA
battery for 12 hours. It hooks up to your PC via a parallel port.
Bohnett is really excited about the technology and is thinking about
all kinds of interesting ways of incorporating it into his community
website. When I got back to New York, he sent me one of his extra Rios
to use until my back-ordered ones arrive.

For the past week, I've been running around town with my MP3 player.
This is the device I've been waiting for. I can go running with it
because it doesn't skip. It sounds like a CD, and it only requires
one AA battery. Plus, I can drag and drop songs from my desktop onto
my Rio player and load it up with new songs every day.

In the interest of investigative journalism, I've been surfing the Web
to see how many MP3 files I can find. I've been able to download about
400 tracks that are taking up 1.5 megs of my eight-gigabyte hard
drive. I paid for none of them. Those tracks are probably worth
$1,000, especially considering I'm downloading the best tracks instead
of whole albums.

What MP3 has done for me more than anything is spark my interest in
music again. Why? First, because I can sample songs from my desktop 24
hours a day. If I don't like the songs, I delete them. If I like them,
I research the artist further. I call this the Radiohead effect
because since finding a bunch of Radiohead tracks on the Net, I've
become a huge fan of their music. I've been talking them up to all of
my friends. Nothing would please me more than e-mailing a few of their
songs to Dave Bohnett and saying, "Hey, check this band out! Let me
know if you like them." However, right now that would be illegal. I
would also love to burn a CD for my brother on our $300 CD burner that
we use for the magazine. The blank disks are only $1.50. Of course, I
would never do that. ;-)

So, what does this mean for Radiohead? What if I didn't pay for their
album, but sent it to 10 of my friends? Do you think they would prefer
10 new fans or the $2 from me buying their CD? I can tell you this,
the next time Radiohead is in New York, I plan on buying tickets to
their show, and I would definitely buy a Radiohead T-shirt. If they
were on HBO, I would tune in.

Would I pay for Radiohead's next album? Not unless I could get it for
less than $5. I am the music industry's worst nightmare. And I'm not
the only one. The millions of kids on AOL right now who live and
breathe the Net are starting to think music is supposed to be free.

This week, music industry executives and the Recording Industry
Association of America (RIAA) announced the creation of the Secure
Digital Music Initiative (SDMI), a "framework to work with the
technology community to create a voluntary digital music security
specification by next fall." NEXT FALL?!?!? Hello? This should have
happened two years ago! Sorry major record labels-it's too little, too
late. The genie is out of the bottle. Your own artists are sick of
you, and many of the Net-savvy ones like Public Enemy see MP3 as the
road to emancipation.

Everyone is talking about the various technologies like Liquid Audio
that provide secure transmission of music over the Net. These things
have been around for a long time, but they will only work if the music
industry changes its pricing model.

Can piracy be stopped on the Net? Not a chance. Piracy on the Web is a
never-ending battle, just ask Paramount's legal department about
StarTrek sites. I think the music industry will be able to do a good job
of stopping MP3 websites. But there is no way it will be able to
stop millions of people from doing point-to-point copies. While
e-mailing images and text is popular already, MP3 files are all the
rage now.

I'm thrilled that technology is going to decimate the music industry.
These guys have been selling $15 to $17 CDs for 10 years when it costs
only $1 to produce them. With the reduction in packaging and the
factories paid for 100 times over, the industry should have reduced
the cost a long time ago. I can tell you right now that I will never
again pay $15 for an album. I'm not saying I'm going to steal music,
but the music industry has painted consumers into a corner by limiting
choice and keeping prices artificially high. Unless the price of CDs
drops to less than $10 apiece, the industry is going to crash and burn
big time. The music industry, because of its greed, has lost me as a
revenue source forever. But the artists have found a brand new fan.

Instead of buying a 200-disc CD player for my loft, I'm going to turn
all my CDs into MP3 files and leave them on a PC stereo. Why? Because
setting up a traditional stereo costs as much as buying a sub-$1,000
PC with a 10-gig hard drive. I'll be able to create my own play lists
so I can have a Frank Sinatra section, a Bob Dylan section, a pop
section, and a classical section. After I load all of those songs into
my machine, I can give the old CDs away. Would that be illegal? Do you
think most consumers will care if it is? I could even borrow a bunch
of disks from my friends at the office, load them into my PC, and give
them back the next day. Of course, that would be illegal, too.

I'm not the only one with grand MP3 visions--meet Ryan Veety of
Middletown, New York (www.ryanspc.com/carmp3/). Ryan is building, for
around $750 in parts, a Lynx-based MP3 player for his car that will
hold 2.5 gigs of music. At five megs a song, that's around 500 songs.
There is no reason he couldn't spend another $150 for a 10-gig drive
and house 2,000 songs.

Looking at my Diamond Rio player, Palm III and Sony cell phone, I
can't help but imagine a world where all three are merged. There is no
reason why a Palm Pilot can't play and store MP3 files. I would be
very surprised if the next version didn't come with MP3 support and a
headphone jack.

During my travels on the Net, I was able to download a bunch of
Beastie Boys tracks. Not only was someone giving these tracks away for
free, but they had remixed them. If the music industry is not ready
for users to download music, how does it feel about them changing
their intellectual property and republishing it?

In five years, many established artists will have little or no need
for a record label. That is what the technology revolution does, it
takes out the middleman. Will the record labels exist in 10 years?
Sure, but they are going to have to do a lot of soul searching to
figure out what their value is in a world where they don't own, and
can't control, the distribution.

Artists hate their record labels, record labels are scared, and
consumers have a cheaper and better option. Sounds like a revolution
to me.

Now if only Michael Jordan and David Falk would start their own
basketball league.

Jason McCabe Calacanis
editor@siliconalleyreporter.com


From tomw@acslink.net.au Wed Dec 30 03:55:05 1998
From: tomw@acslink.net.au (Tom Worthington)
Date: Wed, 30 Dec 1998 13:55:05 +1100
Subject: Red Hat Linux hot with the coffee shop
Message-ID: <2.2.32.19981230025505.006eb158@mail.mpx.com.au>

I sat down in a coffee shop here in Sydney to write a review of "You've Got
Mail!". However on the way I purchased a copy of "The Linux Pocket Book"
from the news-agent. This is a 128 page, $14.95 booklet from APC Magazine,
which includes a CD-Rom, with a copy of Red Hat Linux 5.2

On approaching the counter to order a coffee, I was greeted with "Red Hat,
we have been trying to buy shares in them!", followed by a three minute
dissertation on how there was lots of free software for Linux and wasn't
good to have an alternative to Microsoft's monopoly.

Two interesting things seem to be happening here:

1. Red Hat is managing to make itself synonymous with Linux
2. The "free shareware - paid support" business model seems to get
simplified in the consumers mind to "free software - what's support?".


Tom Worthington http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw PO Box 13
Immediate Past President Belconnen ACT 2617
Australian Computer Society tomw@acslink.net.au
----------------------------------------------------------------------
IRC 1999 Topics Needed: http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw/irc/irc.html


From tomw@acslink.net.au Wed Dec 30 03:55:09 1998
From: tomw@acslink.net.au (Tom Worthington)
Date: Wed, 30 Dec 1998 13:55:09 +1100
Subject: You've Got Mail - The Movie That Made E-mail Romantic
Message-ID: <2.2.32.19981230025509.006e4d6c@mail.mpx.com.au>

If you have a soft spot for romantic comedy and can ignore some of the gaps
of logic, it is well worth seeing "You've Got Mail".

As the web site says: http://www.youvegotmail.com/cmp/n1-intro.html

"Once upon a time there were two bookstore owners. One was a passionate
young woman who ran a small children's bookstore. The other was the owner of
Manhattan's largest book superchain, a man whose enterprise could put every
independent bookstore out of business. The man and the woman were natural
enemies. But when they coincidentally -- and anonymously -- met in
cyberspace, they accidentally fell in love."

The Internet only gets an occasional mention in "You've Got Mail". TOM HANKS
and MEG RYAN (as Joe Fox and Kathleen Kelly), romance each other via
remarkably quick dial-up modem connections to AOL, with e-mail and chat.

This is a romantic comedy set in the age of e-mail, so we can forgive some
of the storybook nature of the technology. These people never surf the web,
get any mail from anyone else, or any spam. Their ISP responds very quickly
and there is never a busy signal. Tom uses an IBM Thinkpad, Meg has an Apple
and AOL gets a plug on-screen each time they log on.

This is a formula movie: take the stars of the 1993 "Sleepless in Seattle",
in essentially the same roles, use the setting of the Ernst Lubitsch comedy
"The Shop Around the Corner" and substitute e-mail for paper mail. However,
the formula works well. The movie might do much for e-mail's rather dull
image as the Cinderella of the 'net, doing a lot of the work, but with the
web getting the credit.

However on another level the real romance of the film is between the
scriptwriter and the city of New York. This is the New York of Wood Allen,
where everyone is rich or a struggling writer. No one in this New York has
to really work for a living, they just attend parties with the rich and famous.

The small bookstore v book superchain story of the movie might be seen as a
metaphor for small IT companies battle with Microsoft (in the move, as in
the real world generally, the big guy wins).

One curious omission was the lack of a URL on the movie credits. There is a
web site, of course, done in the usual PR style (lots of graphics and
frames, no alternate text, hard to navigate and arbitrary URLs). There are
some nice touches, such as links on children's literacy:
http://www.youvegotmail.com/cmp/5main.html

It is a surprise that AOL isn't handing out a starter CD-ROM to each
theater-goer. Meg what is your e-mail address? ;-)


Tom Worthington http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw PO Box 13
Immediate Past President Belconnen ACT 2617
Australian Computer Society tomw@acslink.net.au
----------------------------------------------------------------------
IRC 1999 Topics Needed: http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw/irc/irc.html


From scott@doc.net.au Wed Dec 30 05:48:15 1998
From: scott@doc.net.au (Scott Howard)
Date: Wed, 30 Dec 1998 15:48:15 +1100
Subject: You've Got Mail - The Movie That Made E-mail Romantic
In-Reply-To: <2.2.32.19981230025509.006e4d6c@mail.mpx.com.au>; from Tom Worthington on Wed, Dec 30, 1998 at 01:55:09PM +1100
References: <2.2.32.19981230025509.006e4d6c@mail.mpx.com.au>
Message-ID: <19981230154814.A17595@marvin.doc.net.au>

On Wed, Dec 30, 1998 at 01:55:09PM +1100, Tom Worthington wrote:
> If you have a soft spot for romantic comedy and can ignore some of the gaps
> of logic, it is well worth seeing "You've Got Mail".
[...]

> It is a surprise that AOL isn't handing out a starter CD-ROM to each
> theater-goer. Meg what is your e-mail address? ;-)

They are. Anyone who sees the movie at the Village cimena in George St
Sydney (and possibly others) is being given the good old "100 hours free"
cdrom.

Scott.

From ggebesse@nsw.bigpond.net.au Wed Dec 30 12:59:09 1998
From: ggebesse@nsw.bigpond.net.au (Peter Bowditch)
Date: Wed, 30 Dec 1998 21:59:09 +1000
Subject: You've Got Mail - The Movie That Made E-mail Romantic
In-Reply-To: <2.2.32.19981230025509.006e4d6c@mail.mpx.com.au>
Message-ID: <199812301059.VAA15681@m5.c2.telstra-mm.net.au>

There's a nice interview with Tom Hanks at
http://www.zdnet.com/yil/content/mag/9811/hanks.html where he talks about the film.

I like his comment about how "This was essentially the 47th remake of The Shop
Around the Corner".


.....................
Peter Bowditch
peterb@gebesse.com.au
http://www.gebesse.com.au

From jwhit@PrimeNet.Com Wed Dec 30 21:14:18 1998
From: jwhit@PrimeNet.Com (Jan Whitaker)
Date: Thu, 31 Dec 1998 07:14:18 +1100 (EST)
Subject: You've Got Mail - The Movie That Made E-mail Romantic
Message-ID: <199812302014.HAA20241@mars.planet.net.au>

At 01:55 PM 12/30/98 +1100, Tom Worthington wrote:
>If you have a soft spot for romantic comedy and can ignore some of the gaps
>of logic, it is well worth seeing "You've Got Mail".

And if you want to see a sad TV rip-off of a movie watch The Net on
Wednesday nights on 10. I wonder how the ad ran for the casting call for
the lead - if you don't look and sound like Sandra Bullock, don't apply. It
feels like one of those surreal celebrity impersonators, a deja vu sort of
thing, but not.

Apparently it is a serial. Last night's episode which I watched because it
was listed to be about net censorship and I wanted to see how it would be
handled, ended with the new boyfriend of the heroine joining a law firm that
happens to have the head Praetorian [they're the bad guys in the story] as
one of the partners of the firm. Oh, and the boyfriend's uncle is a state
supreme court judge who was set up by a city (? they never made that clear
what he was a councilor of) councilor to get an automatic download of child
porn from Scandinavia while, get this, the judge's daughter's 'open line
download' was happening for her kid's area on the web. Sure... The judge
is/was pro free speech while the councilor is pro censorship. The set up
was to get the judge to change his vote to be PRO censorship as well because
the net is such a dangerous place after all and it succeeded.

The discovery by the heroine, Angela, through her online contacts, is that
the said councilor is a major stock holder in the net-sensor-chip [clever,
eh?] that will supposedly deal with the dastardly dangerous information on
the net. Hmmmm....sort of makes one wonder what the real story is on some
of the real censorship efforts in the RW - is the motive morality or money?

Anyway, if you have nothing better to do on a Wednesday night, have a look
at the program. I think the interesting thing about these fiction programs
is that they continue to expose the net in different ways via a medium that
some have said is most threatened by the net itself. And the talk shows are
doing some of the same, incorporating email from viewers in the show.

And while I'm on that subject of tv, what do you think of the Yahoo ads?
I'm fascinated that a search/portal? service is advertising on tv! Where do
they get the money for that advertising? What is the business problem and
plan that backs up that economic model? It would be interesting to find out
if there was any increase in hits on Yahoo as a result. I tend to use them
as a starting point for searches anyway, but I wonder if the web address is
on the screen long enough for non-users to even understand the concept and
have a go as a result. I do like the images of the fisherman and his large
catch, though. That is clever, much better than gramps and his glasses and
his sour wife.

Jan

JLWhitaker Associates
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
jwhit@primenet.com -- http://www.primenet.com/~jwhit/whitentr.htm



From tonyb@netinfo.com.au Thu Dec 31 01:49:55 1998
From: tonyb@netinfo.com.au (Tony Barry)
Date: Thu, 31 Dec 1998 11:49:55 +1100
Subject: Y2K - first ripples?
Message-ID: <v0211010db2b07a201e02@[203.37.43.24]>

Linkers

We may well see some of the first ripples of y2k in the next day for those
programs which have to roll over dates a year hence. It will be interesting
to see how big these ripples are. Should be some more on 1 July 1999.

Tony

. . . . . . . . . .
Tony Barry | Library Affiliate | Principal
. . . . . . . . . . | ANU Library | Ningaui Pty Ltd
tonyb@netinfo.com.au | Tony.Barry@anu.edu.au | me@Tony-Barry.emu.id.au
+61 2 6241 7659 | +61 2 6279 8479 | +61 04 1242 0397

http://purl.oclc.org/NET/Tony.Barry




From brd@dynamite.com.au Thu Dec 31 01:57:51 1998
From: brd@dynamite.com.au (Bernard Robertson-Dunn)
Date: Thu, 31 Dec 1998 11:57:51 +1100
Subject: Women in IT. Was: You've Got Mail
References: <199812302014.HAA20241@mars.planet.net.au>
Message-ID: <368ACC0F.79C964D3@dynamite.com.au>

A certain Ms Ann Moffatt was interviewed on Radio National this morning
on the subject of women in IT. She was commenting on a report that said
"things should be doe to make IT more attractive to female students".

Ann, it seems, is a (the?) founder of Females in IT - FIT. Many of the
women I know in the IT business actively dislike such organisations -
they want to make it on their own merits, not with the dubious
assistance of some arbitrary or artificial scheme/policy.

The thrust of Ann's and the report's conclusions is that IT has a bad
image and it does not appeal to women.

Given the high number of women in the areas of IT in which I work, the
high proportion of women Linkers and the existence of films such as
You've Got Mail with a high profile females (Meg Ryan - sigh...) and
shows such as The Net - does IT really have a bad image?

Happy New Year to the Link Community and thanks for an informative and
enjoyable 1998.

--
Women who seek to be equal to men lack ambition.
-- unknown

Regards
brd

Bernard Robertson-Dunn
Canberra Australia
brd@dynamite.com.au

From afreeman@pcug.org.au Thu Dec 31 03:08:10 1998
From: afreeman@pcug.org.au (Andrew Freeman)
Date: Thu, 31 Dec 1998 13:08:10 +1100
Subject: Women in IT. Was: You've Got Mail
In-Reply-To: <368ACC0F.79C964D3@dynamite.com.au>
References: <199812302014.HAA20241@mars.planet.net.au>
Message-ID: <3.0.3.32.19981231130810.00ad3880@dynamite.com.au>

At 11:57 AM 31/12/98 +1100, Bernard Robertson-Dunn wrote:
...
>Ann, it seems, is a (the?) founder of Females in IT - FIT. Many of the
>women I know in the IT business actively dislike such organisations -
>they want to make it on their own merits, not with the dubious
>assistance of some arbitrary or artificial scheme/policy.
...
Bernard

You raise some interesting points. The ACS has a Women in Technology (WIT)
committee. Its Web page is at:
http://www.acs.org.au/boards/cab/wittr.html
There are regular luncheons of ACS ACT WIT held in Canberra, which you
would be welcome to attend (details in above Web page), should you wish to
get a better feel for why people might wish to join groups such as WIT.

There is also a WIT mail list, which all people with an interest in WIT
related issues are welcome to join - it can be joined via the lists engine at:
http://www.acs.org.au/index-lists.htm

Such organisations as FIT and WIT provide a venue for people with a common
concern, to meet and network - they are not schemes or policies, though
some members of these groups may advocate such schemes or policies as
mentor schemes, or summer schools, with a particular focus on assisting
females who wish to progress in the area of information technology, and I
see nothing objectionable about this.

Regards

Andrew R. Freeman, FACS Location: Belconnen Canberra ACT Australia
Key e-mail: afreeman@pcug.org.au WWWeb: http://www.pcug.org.au/~afreeman
Director, Community Affairs Board, Australian Computer Society (1996/99)
ACS CAB World Wide Web URL: http://www.acs.org.au/boards/cab/cabtr.html

From ggebesse@nsw.bigpond.net.au Thu Dec 31 06:25:58 1998
From: ggebesse@nsw.bigpond.net.au (Peter Bowditch)
Date: Thu, 31 Dec 1998 15:25:58 +1000
Subject: Women in IT. Was: You've Got Mail
In-Reply-To: <368ACC0F.79C964D3@dynamite.com.au>
Message-ID: <199812310425.PAA17688@m5.c2.telstra-mm.net.au>

On 31 Dec 98, at 11:57, Bernard Robertson-Dunn wrote:

> A certain Ms Ann Moffatt was interviewed on Radio National this morning on
> the subject of women in IT. She was commenting on a report that said
> "things should be doe to make IT more attractive to female students".

My first supervisor when I started in the computer business many years
ago was a woman, or at least I thought so. Perhaps I was wrong as
scientific research has shown this to be almost impossible.

Some background: When I was a student at Macquarie University a few
years back, I had the misfortune to be forced to talk to sociologists and I
came across a thing called Rosemary Pringle. Poor sad Rose made a
career out of the oppression of women, a piece of evidence for this which
she never used being that she held a tenured associate professorship
without benefit of a doctorate. Rose and her best friend Anne Game wrote
a book called "Gender at Work" (ISBN 0-86861-261-8) which was the
result of many years of research (paid for by we taxpayers) into how
women could not get decent jobs. There was a chapter in the book
devoted to the computer business.

Here is a sample. Please remember that a) this was the result of a
scientific research project, b) taxpayers paid for the research, c) this
claptrap was set as a textbook in a reputable Australian university, d) I
am not making this up, and e) it does not represent either my opinion or
my experience.

======Begin quote======

Toys for the boys: sexuality and the computer

We will not understand the problems that women face in the computer
industry by restricting ourselves to an economic analysis, even one that
takes account of gender. Lurking behind this is the symbolism of the
computer, which we have to acknowledge and attempt to demystify. We
have pointed to the association between masculinity and machines. This
goes back to the time when a connection with machinery was made a
criterion of 'skill'. The computer is the ultimate in machines, the giant
phallus. Men see it as an extension of the social power they are allocated
through possession of a penis. Indeed they see it as an extension of the
penis. And just as they regard their dicks both as supremely powerful and
as playthings, so they do the computer. Simultaneously, they regard
women as toys and as objects to have power over.

======End quote======



........................................................
Peter Bowditch 03 YEAR PIC 9999 COMP-4.
Gebesse Computer Consultants peterb@acslink.net.au
Parramatta NSW Australia http://www.gebesse.com.au/
http://www.acs.org.au/nsw

From tomw@acslink.net.au Thu Dec 31 07:36:05 1998
From: tomw@acslink.net.au (Tom Worthington)
Date: Thu, 31 Dec 1998 17:36:05 +1100
Subject: Hottest Topics on Link in 1998
Message-ID: <2.2.32.19981231063605.006b7e54@mail.mpx.com.au>

For the hottest topics on Link in 1998 see:
http://www.acs.org.au/president/1998/past/link98.htm

This is a list of the most frequently discussed topics each month on the
Link Mailing List for 1998. The summary was complied manually, from the
monthly Link archives. Topics with ten or more postings were selected.

Shown below are: topic (number of postings) originator & date.

In the web version the originator's name is linked to the first posting and
you can follow the thread of conversation from there.

Any suggestions as to what the top ten topics should be?


January

* Analogue Phones and Brain Tumours (16) Bernard Robertson-Dunn 05 Jan
* bugs: who should fix them? (10) Richard Welykochy 23 Jan
* Clinton To Release Internet Naming Policy On Web (15) Bernard
Robertson-Dunn 28 Jan
* CyberSitter over-zealousness (10) Ross Johnson 16 Jan
* Internet monitoring and licensing proposal (11) Glen Turner 19 Jan
* More on cable TV boxes (11) Jan Whitaker 12 Jan
* ninemsn (11) Bernard Robertson-Dunn 01 Jan
* OGIT Project Gatekeeper (11) Carl.Makin@aipo.gov.au 28 Jan
* Will someone upgrade e-mail applications (12) Stewart Fist 26 Jan
* Y2K and embedded system (11) Stewart Fist 06 Jan
* Y2K tax deductions (fwd) (10) Rachel Polanskis 7 Jan

February

* 1GHz CPUs (19) Bernard Robertson-Dunn 05 Feb
* Case Adjourned (19) Thomas P. Koltai 5 Feb
* Charging authors for E Publishing (14) Tony Barry 17 Feb
* Clinton budgets more for high tech (13) Bernard Robertson-Dunn 04 Feb
* Deetya (30) Bernard Robertson-Dunn 02 Feb
* Deetya and document standards (17) Robert Hart 5 Feb
* Electronic voting (18) Bill D'Arcy 6 Feb
* RFI: chat room dangers (16) Roger Clarke 20 Jan
* Smashing censorware (31) Rick Welykochy 10 Feb
* The Ausnet Hack (11) Thomas P. Koltai 4 Feb
* your mail (11) Jennifer Cram 2 Feb

March

* [Fwd: Stroustrp on C++...] (10) Ramin Marzbani 08 Mar
* Australia's Education Industry (16) Stephen 17 Mar
* Compression Algorithm (15) Stephen 24 Mar
* Digital Television (21) Trevor Jordan 26 Mar
* Files on email (13) Peter Cox 11 Mar
* Is this the longest domain in the world? (12) Rachel Polanskis 10 Mar
* memberlist of link mailinglist (10) Felipe Rodriquez 06 Mar
* Yellow Pages Priority Advantage (31) Roger Clarke 23 Mar

April

* (fwd) W3C focus on privacy, not security (10) David Chia 16 Apr
* Commonwealth Government Entry Point on the Internet (10) Jan Whitaker
31 Mar
* Encouraging On-Line Commerce (12) Stephen 18 Apr
* Intellectual Property in IT (16) richard@auscoms.com.au 07 Apr
* No ISDN!? (16) Ben Elliston 8 Apr
* Price of local and international calls (12) Bernard Robertson-Dunn 22
Apr
* Vic & NSW govts scramble to attract Intel chip-plant (16) George
Michaelson 13 Apr

May

* ACS Welcomes Tax Relief for Y2K Work (46) Tom Worthington 13 May
* Multi-language web pages - mixed results (10) Tom Worthington 4 May
* New Time problem (16) Stewart Fist 21 May
* Resellers and Registries EOI. (12) Adam Todd 12 May
* Telecommunications Access Issues (19) Shara Evans 19 May 1998
* Using telephone wiring for high speed access (10) Karin Geiselhart 07
May
* Voice traffic vs Internet (12) Stewart Fist 05 May

June

* Confusing .au.com domain (19) Robin Whittle 16 Jun
* HTML in email (21) Robin Whittle 6 Jun
* INET: Are there no issues any more? (17) Ramin Marzbani 04 Jun
* Internet credit card transactions (29) DD - Helen Roberts 3 Jun
* Press Releases on fed.gov.au (10) Tony Barry 22 Jun
* Quantum crypto program (17) Robin Whittle 11 Jun
* Rate of technology change (12) Bernard Robertson-Dunn 22 Jun
* The dumb country (17) Bernard Robertson-Dunn 24 Jun
* Win98 and TV upgrades (11) Ben Elliston 17 Jun

July

* Different definitions - broadcast (11) Jan Whitaker 6 Jul
* Is it any wonder? (18) Nicholls, David 16 Jul
* New release from Minister's office (17) Jan Whitaker 30 Jun
* PC (16) Stewart Fist 10 Jul
* Privacy (19) richard@auscoms.com.au Tue, 07 Jul 98 09:17:57 +1000

August

* CGT and other whinges (10) Bernard Robertson-Dunn 14 Aug
* Content Blocking Report (33) Danny Yee 5 Aug
* Getting a KeyPOST Digital Certificate - Part 1 - Applying (18) Tom
Worthington 19 Aug

September

* Censoring the Internet with PICS (24) Colin Richardson 17 Sep
* Depressed Internet Users (10) Bernard Robertson-Dunn 06 Sep
* MS Word Format Difficulties (18) Roger Clarke 10 Sep
* Personal computers? (20) Ben Elliston 1 Sep
* RE: MS Word Format Difficulties (13) Bruce Kay 11 Sep
* Telstra threatens removal of PAPL services (20) Rachel Polanskis 21
Sep
* the elections and the web (16) Ramin Marzbani 09 Sep

October

* AOL Jack Davies National Press Club Address (12) Tom Worthington 08
Oct
* Branding, domain names et al. (14) Bernard Robertson-Dunn 17 Oct
* Coca-Cola-Amatil and 'branding' of chips (11) George Michaelson 15
Oct
* Email line lengths (10) Robin Whittle 7 Oct
* Recording of Telephone Calls. (13) Adam Todd 01 Oct
* Telstra to offer rural Australia free e-mail (12) Bernard
Robertson-Dunn 15 Oct

November

* IT skills (17) Matthew Allen 24 Nov
* RE: IT skills (The pros of double degrees?) (16) Andrew Roberts 24
Nov
* RE: MP3 HITS BACK (15) Rankine, Alastair 3 Nov

December

* 'Digital jukebox' self-programmed music CD in OZ? (10) George
Michaelson 4 Dec
* 30 MILLION USE HOTMAIL (29) Tony Barry 2 Dec
* Blue Mountain and Microsoft (12) Adam Creed 22 Dec
* National bandwidth inquiry (15) Tony Barry 10 Dec
* National bandwidth inquiry) (12) richard@auscoms.com.au 14 Dec


Tom Worthington http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw PO Box 13
Immediate Past President Belconnen ACT 2617
Australian Computer Society tomw@acslink.net.au
----------------------------------------------------------------------
IRC 1999 Topics Needed: http://www.acslink.net.au/~tomw/irc/irc.html


From Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au Thu Dec 31 07:56:18 1998
From: Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au (Roger Clarke)
Date: Thu, 31 Dec 1998 17:56:18 +1100
Subject: Hottest Topics on Link in 1998
In-Reply-To: <2.2.32.19981231063605.006b7e54@mail.mpx.com.au>
Message-ID: <v03130307b2b0cec820dd@[203.58.40.178]>


Tom Worthington <tomw@acslink.net.au> wrote:
>For the hottest topics on Link in 1998 see:
>http://www.acs.org.au/president/1998/past/link98.htm
>This is a list of the most frequently discussed topics each month ...
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

I don't think this is much of a metric, Tom.

A cynic could argue that, a significant proportion of the time, the
signal/noise ratio of messages drops steeply after the first few postings
...

Okay, I agree that *some* threads have been valuable for extended periods,
but it needs some counterbalancing metric to show that up; and boy that's
hard.

Another confounding variable is the number of threads in which a sub-thread
or a new thread should have been spawned, i.e. 'Topic Z [Was: Topic Y]'


Roger Clarke http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/
mailto:Roger.Clarke@anu.edu.au
Visiting Fellow, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology
The Australian National University Canberra ACT 0200 AUSTRALIA
Information Sciences Building Room 211 Tel: +61 2 6249 3666

Xamax Consultancy Pty Ltd, 78 Sidaway St, Chapman ACT 2611 AUSTRALIA
Tel: +61 2 6288 1472, and 6288 6916
mailto:Roger.Clarke@xamax.com.au http://www.xamax.com.au/



From bje@cygnus.com Thu Dec 31 08:08:19 1998
From: bje@cygnus.com (Ben Elliston)
Date: Thu, 31 Dec 1998 18:08:19 +1100 (EST)
Subject: Y2K - first ripples?
In-Reply-To: <v0211010db2b07a201e02@[203.37.43.24]>
Message-ID: <Pine.LNX.3.95.981231180654.2186A-100000@moshpit.cygnus.com>

> We may well see some of the first ripples of y2k in the next day for those
> programs which have to roll over dates a year hence. It will be interesting
> to see how big these ripples are. Should be some more on 1 July 1999.

I also understood that many pieces of software use `99' as an arbitrary
marker. For example, at the university I studied at, they had to adjust
their student database system to accomodate for this before students
enrolled in 1999.

You're right, though--it should be interesting to watch ..

Ben


From ggebesse@nsw.bigpond.net.au Thu Dec 31 15:29:44 1998
From: ggebesse@nsw.bigpond.net.au (Peter Bowditch)
Date: Fri, 1 Jan 1999 00:29:44 +1000
Subject: Happy New Year
Message-ID: <199812311329.AAA04130@m5.c2.telstra-mm.net.au>

Happy New Year everyone.

To see the words of THAT song we are going to get sick of:

http://www.gebesse.com.au/1999

........................................................
Peter Bowditch 03 YEAR PIC 9999 COMP-4.
Gebesse Computer Consultants peterb@acslink.net.au
Parramatta NSW Australia http://www.gebesse.com.au/
http://www.acs.org.au/nsw

From jwhit@PrimeNet.Com Thu Dec 31 21:52:18 1998
From: jwhit@PrimeNet.Com (Jan Whitaker)
Date: Fri, 1 Jan 1999 07:52:18 +1100 (EST)
Subject: Sydney Harbour fireworks display on CNN online
Message-ID: <199812312052.HAA03904@mars.planet.net.au>

If you want to relive a partial representation of the fantastic finale of
the fireworks New Year's Eve, they are available at:

javascript:openWindow('/WORLD/asiapcf/9812/31/new.year.01/quicktime.html','q
t_two','width=290,height=300,resizable=no,menubar=no,toolbar=no,location=no,
directories=no,scrolling=yes')


[doncha just love javascript? If that is too much to deal with, go to
cnn.com and click on the link below the headline story]

Jan

JLWhitaker Associates
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
jwhit@primenet.com -- http://www.primenet.com/~jwhit/whitentr.htm



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