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New York - Revised Highly Qualified Teachers State Plan (MS Word)

New York State’s

Revised Plan

to Enhance Teacher Quality

THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK

The New York State Education Department

Albany 12234

July 2006

CONTENTS������������������������������������������������������������������������� PAGE

Executive Summary

Table of Acronyms

Part 1.� Federal Teacher Quality Requirements…………… 1

Part 2.� New York State’s Teacher Quality Agenda………. 5

Part 3.� Gap Analysis…………………….…………………….. 6

Part 4.� Strategies to Close the Gaps….……………………11

Part 5.� Action Steps……………………………………………12

ATTACHMENTS� �

A� Data Sources ……………………………………….……….30

B� Evidence for Probable Success of Strategies and

���� Action Steps………………………………….……………..34

�������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PAGE

C�� Federally-funded Partnerships to Support an�

����� Equitable Distribution of Teachers for�

����� High-Need Schools………………………………� 39

D�� Links to Information about New� York State

����� Programs for Teachers…………………………�� 41

E�� May 2006 Regents Item on Teacher

���� Supply and Demand (separate document)

F�� May 2006 Regents Presentation on the

����� Need for Certified Teachers (separate document)

G� May 2006 Presentation to Regional Network

���� Partners group on NYS Teacher Equity Gap

���� (separate document)

H� Lists of LEAs and Schools with Their AMO and

���� AYP Status (separate documents Attachments H-1

���� through H-8)

For further information, contact nclbnys@mail.nysed.gov.

***� INCLUDES ADDITIONAL INFORMATION SINCE SUBMISSION OF JULY 7, 2006. ***

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Executive Summary

The New York State Board of Regents has clear goals for teacher quality in New York State and comprehensive policies for achieving them.� Since 1998, when the Regents called for systemic reforms to improve teaching, raise student achievement and close achievement gaps, the State, institutions of higher education, school districts and others have made significant progress.�

The Regents goals and policies are closely aligned with teacher quality goals in the federal No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB).�� As a result, in May 2006, the U.S. Department of Education (USDOE) determined that New York State was making a good faith effort to comply with the NCLB’s teacher quality goals and, as of 2004-2005, was demonstrating progress.� However, the USDOE asked each state to submit a revised teacher quality plan for peer review.

To meet both State and federal teacher quality goals, New York State must ensure that: (1) low income and minority children have the same access as all other children to appropriately certified, experienced and effective teachers and (2) local educational agencies (LEAs) in all geographic regions of the State have an adequate supply of certified teachers.�

The New York State Education Department plans to use three basic strategies to close the State’s gaps.� First, it will focus on teacher quality in high poverty schools.� Second, it will measure progress using new performance indicators and report to the public.� Third, it will sustain and expand effective partnerships between the State, public schools and districts, higher education, cultural institutions and the business community.

Using these strategies in a coordinated effort across virtually all of its program offices and their partners, the State Education Department will take actions to improve the quality of education for all children in nine areas:� (1) data and reporting systems; (2) pre-service teacher preparation and specialized knowledge and skills for high poverty LEAs; (3) certification and out-of-field teaching; (4) recruitment and retention of certified, highly qualified and experienced teachers; (5) professional development; (6) working conditions in schools and LEAs; (7) monitoring and technical assistance; (8) policy coherence; and (9) limiting the use of the HOUSSE.

Listed below is a summary of the action steps the State Education Department will be taking. These steps are embedded throughout the plan and are included in Attachment E.

Next Steps / Current Actions.� The Department will continue to work with State leaders, the entire education community and others to address teacher shortages.� The following are highlights of the current plan:

Technical Assistance to Support Regional and Local Efforts. The Department will provide annual, detailed, regional workforce and supply and demand data to regional representatives of teacher preparation programs, local school districts and others to help them develop a shared understanding of their challenges and assess the effectiveness of their strategies for addressing them.� Educators are encouraged to advise high school students, community college students and four-year students who have yet to declare a major about careers based on accurate teacher labor market information about math, science and other subjects. They are also encouraged to develop alternative teacher preparation programs in areas where they are needed to attract second career individuals into teaching for specific vacancies in districts.� Many regions have already begun these discussions and the Department’s data and technical assistance will support their efforts.�

Incentives for Retired Teachers to Return to Teaching.� New York’s growing pool of retired teachers can help immediately to reduce shortages.� The Regents have advanced a legislative proposal that would enable retired teachers in identified shortage areas to return to teaching without a pension penalty.�

Incentives for New Teachers.� Financial incentives play an important role in attracting and retaining teachers in hard-to-staff subjects, geographic areas and schools.� We must strengthen the State’s Teachers for Tomorrow program, the State’s Teacher Opportunity Corps program, the New York City Teaching Fellows program, federal loan forgiveness for teachers and other State and federal programs.� The 2006-2007 State Budget includes the Math and Science Teaching Incentive Scholarship program for producing more math and science teachers and the federal government has proposed similar initiatives.� In addition, we must encourage districts to create their own incentive programs, such as the new Housing Incentive program in New York City, which aims to attract experienced and certified math, science and special education teachers to New York City’s highest need schools.

Review of Teacher Certification Requirements.�� When the Regents adopted the Teaching Policy in 1998, they committed to modification of elements of the Policy when necessary.� The Regents have made modifications to the policy concerning teacher certification requirements in response to teacher shortages and other issues.� With new data on teacher shortages and teacher effectiveness now available, further review is needed.� Some of the issues currently under review include:

Interstate Reciprocity.� Can we increase the pool of teachers who enter the teaching profession in shortage areas from states party to the interstate reciprocity agreement?� The Department asks the Regents to endorse the strategy to allow teachers certified in other states, with comparable teacher certification testing requirements, to receive a comparable certificate in New York.� If accepted by the Regents, the Department will advance emergency regulations to implement this recommendation.

Supplemental Certificates. Can we change the requirements for the supplemental certificate to attract more certified teachers to second certification in a subject shortage area?� For example, should existing teachers be permitted to use more related courses (i.e., cognates) to meet the educational requirement for the new certificate, reducing the time they would need to complete all requirements and reducing expenses to school districts and teachers

Special Education Certificates.� Prior to 2004, New York State had one certificate for special education for all subjects in grades Pre-Kindergarten (PreK) through 12 and three disability-specific certificates for grades PreK-12.� The new certification regulations that went into effect in February 2004 created nineteen separate certificate titles for Teachers of Students with Disabilities, including Birth to Grade 2, Grades 1 – 6, Grades 5 – 9 Generalist, Grades 5 – 9 Specialist (math, biology, chemistry, physics, earth science, social studies, English and language other than English) and Grades 7 - 12 Specialist (math, biology, chemistry, physics, earth science, social studies, English and language other than English). The change from four K-12 certificate titles to nineteen certificate titles is causing shortages that will have a significant impact on students with disabilities in “special classes” (as opposed to students in inclusive settings) because federal law requires teachers of special classes to be certified in special education and demonstrate subject matter competency for all core assignments.� The Department is meeting with educators across the State, reviewing certification data by title and reviewing policy options for addressing both student needs and shortage issues.�

Alternative Teacher Preparation Programs.� Since 2000, when the Regents authorized alternative teacher preparation programs, multiple programs have been established in New York City and at a few upstate institutions.� The Department has begun conversations with colleges and districts that are implementing alternative teacher preparation programs to identify changes that would make them more effective at meeting local district needs and will be reporting to the Board of Regents on this initiative in the near future.

Support Innovative Practices.� The need for certified teachers requires us to reach beyond traditional partners and engage the entire education community and other key stakeholders.�� The Department has begun this work and it will continue; two examples are listed below.

IBM Initiative.� The Department is working with IBM to launch a national program to assist IBM employees to transition to teaching in the shortage areas of math and the sciences.� While this initiative is important for the additional math and science teachers it will bring to New York State, it also serves as a national model for other businesses and industries.� The Department is working to ensure that the New York component of this national effort is successful and is pleased to report that IBM’s first cohort of teacher candidates in New York will have at least 50 participants.� This effort is intended to serve as a model for other corporations to support future teachers.� Several additional corporations located in New York have already expressed an interest in this model.

Public Broadcasting.� The public broadcasting stations in New York State have developed high quality educational materials for students and teachers, including PBS Teach Line, Video on Demand, PBS Parents, Homework Hotline, SED Programming, and PBS Kids.� The Department is contracting with the Association of Public Broadcasting Stations (APBS) to prepare an initial implementation plan for a project entitled “Encouraging Entry into Teaching Shortage Areas and Key Professions.” The plan is focused on underserved communities to interest individuals in those communities in preparing for critical shortages in such areas as special education, math and science teachers, nursing, pharmacy, physical therapy, occupational therapy, etc. Once this implementation plan is fully developed, the Department, possibly in conjunction with the Association of Pubic Broadcasting Stations, will seek foundation and governmental grants to implement it.�

Ensure That All Teachers Are Appropriately Certified.� In order to fully implement the Regents Teaching Policy and meet the teacher quality goals of the federal Government, the Regents could, after reviewing relevant data and engaging with local educators, set a date certain by which, statewide, all teachers who are teaching specific subjects must be certified in those subjects.

As required by the U.S. Department of Education, this plan describes New York’s strategies and action steps.� It also includes (1) a description of State data sources on teacher quality; (2) links to evidence for the probable success of planned action steps; and (3) links to information about the State’s teacher quality programs.

During the next six months, the State Education Department will review this plan with the partners whose support is essential to its successful implementation.� Amendments may be made to the plan in response to this review.�


Table of Acronyms

AMO������������� ������������� ������������� Annual Measurable Objective (for teacher quality)

APPR������������� ������������� ������������� Annual Professional Performance Review

ATP������������� ������������� ������������� Alternative Teacher Preparation

AYP������������� ������������� ������������� Annual Yearly Progress (for student achievement)

BOCES������������� ������������� ������������� Boards of Cooperative Educational Services

CCSSO������������� ������������� ������������� Council of Chief State School Officers

CTE������������� ������������� ������������� Career and Technical Education

DCEP������������� ������������� ������������� District Comprehensive Educational Plan

DINI������������� ������������� ������������� District in Need of Improvement

EMSC������������� ������������� ������������� SED’s Office of Elementary, Middle, Secondary and Continuing Education

ESOL������������� ������������� ������������� English for Speakers of Other Languages

FTE������������� ������������� ������������� Full-time Equivalent

HEA������������� ������������� ������������� Higher Education Act

HQ������������� ������������� ������������� Highly Qualified

HQT������������� ������������� ������������� Highly Qualified Teacher

HOUSSE������������� ������������� ������������� High Objective Uniform State Standard of Evaluation

IDEA������������� ������������� ������������� Individuals with Disabilities Education Act

IMF������������� ������������� ������������� Institutional Master File

LEA������������� ������������� ������������� Local Educational Agency

NCLB������������� ������������� ������������� No Child Left Behind Act of 2001

NSF������������� ������������� ������������� National Science Foundation

NSRC������������� ������������� ������������� National Science Resource Center

NYC������������� ������������� ������������� New York City (as opposed to the Rest of State)

NYC DOE������������� ������������� ������������� New York City Department of Education

NYLASER������������� ������������� ������������� NYS Leadership and Assistance for Science Education Renewal

NYS������������� ������������� ������������� New York State

NYSDLC������������� ������������� ������������� New York State Distance Learning Consortium

OCE������������� ������������� ������������� SED’s Office of Cultural Education

OHE������������� ������������� ������������� SED’s Office of Higher Education

OMS������������� ������������� ������������� SED’s Office of Operations and Management Services

OP������������� ������������� ������������� SED’s Office of the Professions

PBS������������� ������������� ������������� Public Broadcasting System

PMF������������� ������������� ������������� Personnel Master File

RSSC������������� ������������� ������������� Regional School Support Center

SAHE������������� ������������� ������������� State Agency for Higher Education

SEA������������� ������������� ������������� State Education Agency

SED (or NYSED)������������� New York State Education Department

SINI������������� ������������� ������������� School in Need of Improvement

SUNY������������� ������������� ������������� State University of New York

SURR������������� ������������� ������������� School Under Registration Review

TCERT������������� ������������� ������������� SED’s teacher certification system prior to March 2006

TEACH������������� ������������� ������������� SED’s teacher certification system as of March 2006

USDOE������������� ������������� ������������� U.S. Department of Education

VESID������������� ������������� ������������� SED’s Office of Vocational & Educational Services for Individuals with Disabilities

VLS������������� ������������� ������������� Virtual Learning System�������������


Part 1.� Federal Teacher Quality Requirements

Federal Requirements for Teacher Quality

The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) has teacher quality requirements that are implemented by federal regulations.� Section 200.57(a) of Title 34 of the Code of Federal Regulations requires states that receive funds under Title I, Part A of the NCLB to have a plan that:

 ensures all public elementary, middle and secondary school teachers who teach “core academic subjects” are “highly qualified” not later than the end of the 2005-2006 school year;

 establishes annual measurable objectives for each local educational agency (LEA) and school that include, at a minimum, annual increases in the percentage of:

--������������� “highly qualified” teachers of “core academic subjects” at each LEA and school; and

--������������� teachers of “core academic subjects” who are receiving “high-quality” professional development to enable them to become highly qualified and effective teachers;

 ensures that Title I schools provide instruction by “highly qualified” teachers;

 ensures that minority children and children from low-income families are not taught at higher rates than other children by inexperienced, unqualified, or out-of-field teachers;

 describes the strategies the State will use to:

 help LEAs and schools meet the NCLB’s requirements;

 monitor the progress of LEAs and schools in meeting the NCLB’s requirements; and

 ensure that the NCLB’s goals are achieved and that progress is publicly reported.

Federal regulations require LEAs receiving NCLB funds to have comparable plans for their schools.�

Federal Implementation of Teacher Quality Requirements

Soon after the NCLB was enacted, the U.S. Department of Education required all states to submit teacher quality plans as part of their applications for NCLB funds.� In October 2005, the USDOE notified the states that they would not face penalties if they failed to meet the NCLB’s teacher quality goals by 2005-2006 provided that they were making a good faith effort to meet the goals and demonstrated progress.�� Emphasizing that teacher quality is a strategy for raising student achievement, the U.S. Secretary of Education stated:

“Personnel decisions are made at the State and local levels, and the law relies on education leaders in the State to make the best educational decisions for improving student achievement.”�

In March 2006, the USDOE informed the states that it would conduct a review of each state and would require states that were not making a good faith effort or demonstrating progress toward meeting the NCLB’s teacher quality goals to submit a revised teacher quality plan and/or face financial penalties.� Also in March 2006, the USDOE notified states that its new interpretation of the NCLB required states to limit their use of the High Objective Uniform State Standard of Evaluation (HOUSSE), a statutory option for teachers to demonstrate that they know the subject(s) they are teaching, after the end of school year 2005-2006.�

In May 2006, the USDOE determined that New York State was one of the states that was making a good faith effort to comply with the NCLB’s teacher quality requirements and faced no financial penalty but that New York State was required to submit a revised teacher quality plan for peer review.�

Required Elements for Revised State Plans

The USDOE requires revised state plans to address the six required elements and their sub-elements that are cited in italics on this page and the following pages.� (The text in bold refers readers to the sections of this revised plan that address each required element and sub-element.)�

Required Element 1

The revised plan must provide a detailed analysis of the core academic subject classes in the State that are currently not being taught by highly qualified teachers. The analysis must, in particular, address schools that are not making adequate yearly progress and whether or not these schools have more acute needs than do other schools in attracting highly qualified teachers. The analysis must also identify the districts and schools around the State where significant numbers of teachers do not meet HQT standards, and examine whether or not there are particular hard-to-staff courses frequently taught by non-highly qualified teachers.�� See Part 3 (Gap Analysis) and Attachments A, E and F for responses to all the questions for Required Element 1.

a. Does the revised plan include an analysis of classes taught by teachers who are not highly qualified? Is the analysis based on accurate classroom level data?��

b. Does the analysis focus on the staffing needs of schools that are not making AYP? Do these schools have high percentages of classes taught by teachers who are not highly qualified?��

c. Does the analysis identify particular groups of teachers to which the State’s plan must pay particular attention, such as special education teachers, mathematics or science teachers, or multi-subject teachers in rural schools?���

d. Does the analysis identify districts and schools around the State where significant numbers of teachers do not meet HQT standards? Does the analysis identify particular courses that are often taught by non-highly qualified teachers?����

Required Element 2

The revised plan must provide information on HQT status in each LEA and the steps the SEA will take to ensure that each LEA has plans in place to assist teachers who are not highly qualified to attain HQT status as quickly as possible.

a. Does the plan identify LEAs that have not met annual measurable objectives for HQT?�� See Part 3 (Gap Analysis).

b. Does the plan include specific steps that will be taken by LEAs that have not met annual measurable objectives?��� See Action Steps, Area 7.

c. Does the plan delineate specific steps the SEA will take to ensure that all LEAs have plans in place to assist all non-HQ teachers to become HQ as quickly as possible?�� See Action Steps, Area 7.


Required Element 3

The revised plan must include information on the technical assistance, programs, and services that the SEA will offer to assist LEAs in successfully completing their HQT plans, particularly where large groups of teachers are not highly qualified, and the resources the LEAs will use to meet their HQT goals.�� See Action Steps, Areas 5 and 7 and Attachment G for responses to all questions in Required Element 3.

a. Does the plan include a description of the technical assistance the SEA will provide to assist LEAs in successfully carrying out their HQT plans?�

b. Does the plan indicate that the staffing and professional development needs of schools that are not making AYP will be given high priority?��

c. Does the plan include a description of programs and services the SEA will provide to assist teachers and LEAs in successfully meeting HQT goals?�

d. Does the plan specifically address the needs of any subgroups of teachers identified in Requirement 1?��

e. Does the plan include a description of how the State will use its available funds (e.g., Title I, Part A; Title II, Part A, including the portion that goes to the State agency for higher education; other federal and State funds, as appropriate) to address the needs of teachers who are not highly qualified?��

f. Does the plan for the use of available funds indicate that priority will be given to the staffing and professional development needs of schools that are not making AYP?��

Required Element 4

The revised plan must describe how the SEA will work with LEAs that fail to reach the 100 percent HQT goal by the end of the 2006-07 school year.�� See Action Steps, Area 7 for responses to all questions in Required Element 4.

a. Does the plan indicate how the SEA will monitor LEA compliance with the LEAs’ HQT plans described in Requirement 2 and hold LEAs accountable for fulfilling their plans?��

b. Does the plan show how technical assistance from the SEA to help LEAs meet the 100 percent HQT goal will be targeted toward LEAs and schools that are not making AYP?��

c. Does the plan describe how the SEA will monitor whether LEAs attain 100 percent HQT in each LEA and school:

  • in the percentage of highly qualified teachers at each LEA and school; and
  • in the percentage of teachers who are receiving high-quality professional development to enable such teachers to become highly qualified and successful classroom teachers?��

d. Consistent with ESEA �2141, does the plan include technical assistance or corrective actions that the SEA will apply if LEAs fail to meet HQT and AYP goals?


Required Element 5

The revised plan must explain how and when the SEA will complete the HOUSSE process for teachers not new to the profession who were hired prior to the end of the 2005-06 school year, and how the SEA will limit the use of HOUSSE procedures for teachers hired after the end of the 2005-06 school year to multi-subject secondary teachers in rural schools eligible for additional flexibility, and multi-subject special education teachers who are highly qualified in language arts, mathematics, or science at the time of hire.�� See Action Steps, Areas 7 and 9 for responses to all questions in Required Element 5.

a. Does the plan describe how and when the SEA will complete the HOUSSE process for all teachers not new to the profession who were hired before the end of the 2005-06 school year?

b. Does the plan describe how the State will limit the use of HOUSSE after the end of the 2005-06 school year to the following situations:

a. Multi-subject secondary teachers in rural schools who, if HQ in one subject at the time of hire, may use HOUSSE to demonstrate competence in additional subjects within three years of the date of hire; or

b. Multi-subject special education teachers who are new to the profession, if HQ in language arts, mathematics, or science at the time of hire, may use HOUSSE to demonstrate competence in additional subjects within two years of the date of hire.

Required Element 6

The revised plan must include a copy of the State’s written “equity plan” for ensuring that poor or minority children are not taught by inexperienced, unqualified, or out-of-field teachers at higher rates than are other children.��

a. Does the revised plan include a written equity plan?� This entire plan is New York State’s written equity plan.���

b. Does the plan identify where inequities in teacher assignment exist?� See Part 3 (Gap Analysis) and Attachments E and F.

c. Does the plan delineate specific strategies for addressing inequities in teacher assignment?� See Action Steps in Areas 1-8 and Attachment G.

d. Does the plan provide evidence for the probable success of the strategies it includes?�� See Attachment B.

e. Does the plan indicate that the SEA will examine the issue of equitable teacher assignment when it monitors LEAs, and how this will be done?�� See Action Steps, Area 7.

1


Part 2.� New York State’s Teacher Quality Agenda

The New York State Board of Regents has clear goals for teacher quality in New York State and comprehensive policies for achieving them in order to raise student achievement and close achievement gaps.� New York State’s teacher quality goals are closely aligned with the NCLB’s teacher quality goals, as explained in New York State’s December 2003 updated plan to enhance teacher quality, available at http://www.highered.nysed.gov/nclb012004.htm.�

Since 1998, when the Regents revised their goals and policies for teacher quality, the State, institutions of higher education, school districts and others have made significant reforms.� At the State level alone, reforms have included, but are not limited to:�

  • holding teachers and other school professionals accountable for all students’ achievement by setting standards, assessing progress and publicly reporting results;
  • upholding higher standards for all teacher preparation programs, including requiring accreditation and accountability based on certification examination pass rates;
  • banning all uncertified teachers as of September 1, 2005 and setting higher standards for all new teachers, including an academic major, subject matter examinations, an additional 100 hours of field experience beyond student teaching, including field experience in high need schools, and, for teachers with professional certification, completion of 175 hours of professional development every five years;
  • creating new pathways to certification to increase the supply of teachers for hard-to-staff schools and subject areas, and obtaining two discretionary federal grants to support teachers in alternate pathways;
  • requiring districts to (1) provide mentoring for all first-year teachers, paid for, in part, by increases in State aid; (2) create and implement professional development plans based on assessments of local needs; and (3) conduct State-defined Annual Professional Performance Reviews (APPRs) of all teachers;
  • launching a state-of-the-art online certification system, called TEACH, to certify qualified applicants as quickly as possible;
  • supporting teacher quality and equitable distribution with such programs as Teachers of Tomorrow, the Teacher Opportunity Corps, Troops to Teachers, Albert Shanker stipends for National Board certification, Teacher Centers, Intensive Teacher Institutes for ESOL and bilingual general and special education teachers, and, starting in 2006-2007, a new Math and Science Teacher Scholarship program with a five-year service requirement;
  • funding Regional Network Partners that provide technical assistance and professional development to high need, low-performing districts and schools;
  • reporting on teacher supply and demand to promote local and regional planning by districts, teacher preparation institutions and other stakeholders;
  • funding independent, scholarly research on the teacher workforce, the equitable distribution of teachers, the impact of Regents teaching reforms and teachers’ effectiveness in raising student achievement (for example, see Boyd, Grossman, Lankford, Loeb and Wyckoff study on page 34); and
  • implementing the teacher quality requirements in the NCLB and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) by providing guidance and technical assistance to the field, making changes to data systems to monitor and report progress and overseeing LEAs’ use of federal funds for teacher quality.�


Part 3.� Gap Analysis

New York State is making a good faith effort to meet State and federal teacher quality goals, has made demonstrable progress, and will continue to do so.� Between 2000-2001 and 2004-2005, the latest year for which complete data are available, the percent of full-time equivalent (FTE) teachers without appropriate certification for their assignments dropped from 13 to 8 percent, due primarily to the Regents phasing out the use of uncertified teachers.� Preliminary data suggest that even more progress was made in 2005-2006.�

Data for school year 2004-2005 were used for a gap analysis.� The data sources provide accurate data at the classroom level, as described in Attachment A.

Gap 1

Less than one percent of LEAs did not meet both the statewide Annual Measurable Objective (AMO) for teacher quality and their Annual Yearly Progress (AYP) target for student achievement.�

Section 2141 of the NCLB requires the State to identify all LEAs that have not met their Annual Measurable Objective (AMO) for teacher quality and their Annual Yearly Progress (AYP) for student achievement for three consecutive years in order to implement accountability requirements.� This plan sets a statewide AMO at 90 percent for 2004-2005 (and at 95 percent for 2005-2006) to be consistent with the USDOE’s standard for the states.� In 2004-2005, the latest year for which complete data are available, 118 LEAs out of 832 (14 percent) had less than 90 percent of their classes in core academic subjects taught by highly qualified teachers.� Of those 118 LEAs, only seven also failed to make AYP for three consecutive years.� As required by Section 2141, these seven LEAs are priority districts for the State’s technical assistance and monitoring in 2006-2007.����

As shown in Table 1, there is a relationship between teacher quality and student achievement in 2004-2005 based on the measures required in NCLB Section 2141 for both LEAs and schools.�� LEAs and schools that did not make AYP for three consecutive years were more likely than other LEAs and schools not to have met teacher quality goals.

LEAS

Of the sixteen LEAs that did not meet AYP for student achievement for three consecutive years, 44 percent (7 LEAs) did not meet the 2004-2005 statewide AMO for highly qualified teachers.�

Of the other 816 LEAs, only 14 percent (111 LEAs) did not meet the statewide AMO for highly qualified teachers.

SCHOOLS

Of the 352 schools that did not meet AYP for three consecutive years, 72 percent (254 schools) did not meet statewide 2004-2005 AMO for highly qualified teachers.�

Of the 4,046 other schools, only 26 percent (1,070 schools) failed to meet the statewide AMO.

Attachment H contains lists of LEAs and schools with their AMO and AYP status in 2004-2005.�


Table 1

Distribution of LEAs and Schools

by HQT AMO and AYP status in 2004-2005

HQT AMO status

AYP status for 3 consecutive years

Did not meet

HQT AMO

Met

HQT AMO

Total

LEAs

Did not meet AYP

7

9

16

Met AYP�

111

705

816

All LEAs

118

714

832

Schools

Did not meet AYP

254

98

352

Met AYP

1,070

2,976

4,046

All schools

1,324

3,074

4,398

Includes districts, charter schools, BOCES, State Schools and Special Act School Districts.

HQT AMO denotes the statewide 2004-2005 Highly Qualified Teacher Annual Measurable Objective of 90% of core classes taught by highly qualified teachers.� LEAs and schools that reached 90% met the HQT AMO.

AYP is Annual Yearly Progress for student achievement.� LEAs and schools that did not meet AYP are “In Improvement Status.”� LEAs and schools that met AYP are “Not in Improvement Status” because they are making adequate progress.

Gap 2

Students in high poverty LEAs were more likely than students in low poverty LEAs to have teachers who were not highly qualified and not appropriately certified.�

In 2004-2005, highly qualified teachers taught 93 percent of classes in core academic subjects in New York State, but there were gaps between high poverty and low poverty schools.� Of the more than 42,000 core classes that were not taught by highly qualified teachers, 75 percent were in the Big Five Cities – Buffalo, New York, Rochester, Syracuse and Yonkers –- with the greatest number in New York City because of its relative size.� The Big Five Cities are all high need districts, with high percentages of low-income and minority children.� Statewide, students in the highest poverty LEAs were more likely than children in the lowest poverty LEAs to have core classes not taught by highly qualified teachers and to have teachers who lacked appropriate certification for their teaching assignments, as shown in Table 2.


Table 2

Teacher qualifications by LEA poverty decile

Poverty

decile of LEAs

(N = 792 LEAs)

Percent of core classes

not taught by

highly qualified teachers

(N = 525,539 core classes)

Percent of teaching assignments

not taught by

appropriately certified teachers

(N = 675,868 t assignments)

1 (highest poverty rate)

18

18

2

16

16

3

9

9

4

3

3

5

4

4

6

2

2

7

2

2

8

2

2

9

2

2

10 (lowest poverty rate)

2

2

All deciles

7

7

Includes 792 LEAs that had enrollment and poverty data.� Excludes BOCES.� Teaching assignments not taught by appropriately certified teachers include approved “incidental” teaching that is permitted by State regulations when there are demonstrated teacher shortages. Percentages are the same in both columns although they are based on different measures.

Gap 3

Students in high poverty LEAs were more likely than students in low poverty LEAs to have inexperienced teachers.

In 2004-2005, students in the highest poverty LEAs were nearly twice as likely as children in the lowest poverty LEAs to have inexperienced teachers, as shown in Table 3.� Because the poverty decile of an LEA was positively correlated with its minority enrollment, as shown in Table 3, it is clear that minority students were more likely than non-minority students to have inexperienced teachers.


������������� Table 3

Percent of teachers with less than 3 years experience

and percent of students who are minorities

by LEA poverty decile

Poverty

decile of LEAs

(N = 792 LEAs)

Percent of teachers with less than 3 years experience

(N = 216,161 teachers)

Percent of students who are minorities

(N = 2,797,792 students)

1 (highest poverty rate)

15

91

2

15

80

3

12

41

4

7

27

5

9

28

6

8

14

7

8

12

8

8

15

9

8

13

10 (lowest poverty rate)

8

13

All deciles

11

47

Includes 792 LEAs that had enrollment and poverty data.� Excludes BOCES.

Gap 4

In high poverty LEAs, high percentages of classes in many core academic subjects were taught by teachers without appropriate certification.�

Of the more than 42,000 core classes not taught by highly qualified teachers in 2004-2005, 87 percent were taught by teachers without appropriate certification, as shown in Table 4.� These teachers were either (1) uncertified and holding only a modified temporary license during the last year such licenses were permitted; or (2) certified but teaching out-of-field due to shortages or administrative decisions.� Preliminary 2005-2006 data for New York City, shown in Attachments E and F, suggest that significant progress was made since 2004-2005 but that challenges still remain.� Attachments E and F show the percent of teachers in 2004-2005 without appropriate certification for their assignments in core and non-core subjects in New York City, the Big Four Cities (Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse and Yonkers) and each region of the State, and also show preliminary 2005-2006 data for New York City.� Subjects with the highest percentages of teachers without appropriate certification were English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and bilingual education, languages other than English, math, science and special education, with some variation by geographic region.


Table 4

Distribution of Core Classes Not Taught by Highly Quality Teachers

in New York State in 2004-2005

(N = 42,143 core classes not taught by HQ teachers)

Elementary general education classes with certified but not HQ teachers�� ������������� �� 4%

Elementary special education classes with certified by not HQ teachers�������������� 0%

Elementary general or special education classes without certified teachers����� 16%

Secondary general education classes with certified but not HQ teachers������������� �� 8%

Secondary special education classes with certified but not HQ teachers������������� �� 1%

Secondary general and special education classes without certified teachers������������� � 71%����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������

���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� TOTAL������������� 100%

HQ means “highly qualified.”��

Gap 5

In some subjects and geographic regions, the supply of new teachers was not adequate to meet demand, making it difficult for high poverty LEAs to recruit and retain highly qualified teachers.�

Between 2000 and 2005, New York State certified enough new teachers from all pathways to certification to meet overall demand in all subjects except math and reading/literacy.� However, in some regions of the State, including New York City, there were not enough newly certified teachers to meet demand in the arts, career and technical education, English, ESOL and bilingual education, languages other than English, sciences, social studies and special education.�� Shortages of certified teachers have the greatest impact on high-poverty LEAs because these LEAs rely more than other LEAs on hiring inexperienced, newly certified teachers.� For example, in 2004-2005, 95 percent of hires in New York City had no experience, more than twice the rate of the rest of the State.� Attachments E and F show subjects with teacher shortages in New York City, the Rest of State (defined as New York State outside of New York City) and each geographic region of the State.�

Gap 6

Demand for certified and highly qualified teachers is likely to persist.�

Demand for certified and highly qualified teachers is likely to persist for at least a decade in all regions of New York State, with high poverty LEAs facing the greatest challenges as they compete with other districts and states for the pool of newly certified teachers.� Retirements will cause most of the demand.� In 2004-2005, 18 percent of New York State’s public school workforce was age 55 or older and 48 percent was age 45 or older.� Factors that are likely to sustain demand in New York State include (1) policies that raise teacher-to-student ratios, such as class size reduction, academic intervention services and first-year mentoring for new teachers; and (2) policies that increase total enrollment, such as universal pre-school, full-day kindergarten, five-year high school programs for special populations of students and high school retention initiatives.� Factors that may reduce the number of vacancies for teachers include (1) higher retention rates for new teachers due to required mentoring for first-year teachers; and (2) State and local financial constraints.

1


Part 4.� Strategies to Close the Gaps

The New York State Education Department will use three basic strategies to meet State and federal teacher quality goals.

Strategy 1

Focus on the equitable distribution of certified, highly qualified and experienced teachers by taking the action steps in Part 5 of this plan.�

Strategy 2

Annually measure progress toward goals and report publicly.

a.������������� Certified and highly qualified teachers.� What percent of classes in core academic subjects are not taught by highly qualified teachers?

  • Measure:� Percent of FTE assignments taught by teachers without appropriate certification
  • Measure:� Percent of classes in core academic subjects not taught by teachers who are highly qualified

b. ������������� Equitable distribution of teachers.� Are children from low-income families and minority children more likely than other children to have inexperienced, unqualified and out-of-field teachers?�

  • Measure:� Percent of classes in core academic subjects taught by teachers who are not highly qualified by LEA poverty level
  • Measure:� Percent of teachers with less than three years experience by LEA poverty level

Strategy 3

Sustain effective partnerships.� Partners include:�

1


    • The federal government
    • New York State’s Governor and Legislature
    • The Board of Regents and the New York State Education Department’s (SED) program offices
    • LEAs and schools
    • Statewide and Regional Network Partners (which include Bilingual Education Technical Assistance Centers, Special Education Training and Resource Centers, School Support Services Network, Staff and Curriculum Development Network, New York State Teacher Centers, Regional Adult Education Network and Regional School Support Centers)
    • The New York State Professional Standards and Practices Board for Teaching, the Committee of Practitioners and other SED advisory groups
    • the New York Comprehensive Center, funded by the U.S. Department of Education
    • New York State’s higher education community
    • Other New York State agencies
    • The business community, including the media
    • The non-profit sector, including teachers’ unions, professional associations and foundations
    • Public broadcasting stations, museums, libraries and other cultural institutions

1



Part 5.� Action Steps

Framework

New York State’s action steps are organized around nine areas, listed below, that were adapted from a framework developed by the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO).�

      Data and reporting systems Pre-service teacher preparation and specialized knowledge and skills for high poverty LEAsCertification and out-of-field teachingRecruitment and retention of certified, highly qualified and experienced teachers Professional developmentWorking conditions in schools and LEAsMonitoring and technical assistancePolicy coherenceLimiting the use of the HOUSSE

Action steps in all nine areas of Part 5 reflect the three basic strategies in Part 4, Strategies to Close the Gaps.��

Context

1.1 Scope.� This plan focuses on action steps to be taken by the New York State Education Department (SED).� The plan does not represent LEAs or SED’s other partners.�

1.2 Consultation.� SED routinely consults with the Committee of Practitioners, the Professional Standards and Practices Board for Teaching and other advisory groups and stakeholders about policies and procedures relating to State and federal teacher quality goals.� Action steps in this plan are consistent with consultation that occurred in the past.� However, the USDOE’s timeline for submitting this plan precluded SED from using its usual consultation procedures in the development of this plan.� Therefore, during the next six months, SED will review this plan with the partners whose support is essential for its success.�� By the end of December 2006, SED will ask its primary partners to support the action steps in this plan.� The primary partners for this consultation will include:� (1) the Committee of Practitioners; (2) the Professional Standards and Practices Board for Teaching; (3) teachers’ unions; (4) the Big Five City school districts; (5) superintendents of Boards of Cooperative Educational Services (BOCES); (6) Deans and Directors of Teacher Education programs; and (7) the Commissioner’s Advisory Panel on Special Education Programs and Services.� Amendments to this plan may be made as a result of this review.

1.3 Continuation of effective approaches.� Trend data show that existing approaches have helped New York State make progress toward meeting State and federal teacher quality goals.� Therefore, some action steps call for continuing these successful approaches.

1.4 Measurement timing.� The results of new action steps taken in 2006-2007 are unlikely to be measured in teacher quality data that will be collected to represent the teaching workforce in October 2006.�� The 2006-2007 data will measure action steps that are taken up to the data collection day in October 2006.� Action steps taken after the data collection day will be reflected in teacher quality data collected in October 2007 for school year 2007-2008 and in later school years later.� Action steps in Area 7 (monitoring and technical assistance) are likely to have the greatest impact during 2006-2007, while action steps in other areas are likely to have a longer term impact on teacher quality and the equitable distribution of teachers.

1.5 Implementation.� SED is organized into six major program areas:� (1) Office of Elementary, Middle, Secondary and Continuing Education (EMSC); (2) Office of Vocational and Educational Services for Individuals with Disabilities (VESID); (3) Office of Higher Education (OHE), including the Office of Teaching Initiatives (OTI) which certifies all school professionals; (4) Office of the Professions (OP), which licenses professionals, including some who are employed in schools, such as speech-language pathologists; (5) Office of Cultural Education (OCE); and the Office of Operations and Management Services (OMS), which supports the other offices and agency leadership.� Because responsibility for the State’s teacher quality agenda is shared by several program areas, SED has an agency-wide Teacher Quality Cabinet (TQC) to coordinate its teacher quality policies, procedures and initiatives.� The TQC, which advises agency leadership, developed this plan and will ensure its implementation.� Each action step in this plan is associated with the program area(s) and unit(s) that have primary responsibility for ensuring that it is implemented.�� Table 5 shows the extent to which multiple program offices in SED have shared responsibility for the action steps to enhance teacher quality in New York State.

1.6 EMSC’s structure for monitoring and technical assistance of LEAs and schools.� SED’s Office of Elementary, Middle, Secondary and Continuing Education (EMSC) has primary responsibility for monitoring LEAs and schools and providing them with technical assistance.�� Within EMSC, two offices share responsibility for these roles, one for New York City, where a centralized approach is effective, and one for other regions of the State, which relies on the expertise and support of Regional Network Partners to assist its staff in working with schools most in need of improvement.� Action steps reflect these separate approaches.� The Office of School Improvement and Community Services (New York City) is noted as EMSC-School Improvement [NYC], and the Office of School Improvement (Regional) is noted as EMSC-School Improvement [R].


Table 5

Overview of Shared Responsibility for Action Steps

Action

Step

SED Program Offices *

Action Step

SED Program Offices *

EMSC

OHE

VESID

OCE

EMSC

OHE

VESID

OCE

1.1

X

5.1

X

1.2

X

5.2

X

1.3

X

X

5.3

X

X

1.4

X

5.4

X

X

X

1.5

X

X

5.5

X

2.1

X

5.6

X

X

2.2

X

5.7

X

X

2.3

X

6.1

X

2.4

X

6.2

X

X

2.5

X

6.3

X

2.6

X

6.4

X

2.7

X

6.5

X

3.1

X

6.6

X

3.2

X

6.7

X

3.3

X

X

7.1

through

7.13

X

4.1

X

X

8.1

X

4.2

X

8.2

X

4.3

X

8.3

X

X

X

4.4

X

8.4

X

X

X

4.5

X

9.1

X

X

X

4.6

X

9.2

X

X

X

9.3

X

9.3

X

*SED’s Office of Operations and Management Services (OMS) supports all of the Action Steps through its Office of Human Resources, Office of Legislation, Office of Counsel, Office of Information and Technology Services and other units.


Action Steps - Area 1�

Data and reporting systems�

1.1 DATA COLLECTION.� Continue to collect teacher-level and assignment-level data from all public schools, verify each teacher’s certification status for each assignment and provide feedback to LEAs about each teacher’s certification and highly qualified status.� Continue to work with LEAs to make teacher quality data available as early as possible.� Begin collecting data in 2006-2007 about LEAs’ use of the HOUSSE to measure progress in reducing reliance on the HOUSSE over time.� See Action Steps, Area 9.� (EMSC-Information and Reporting Services)

1.2 PUBLIC REPORTING.� Continue to report to the public on indicators of statewide, LEA and school progress on teacher quality and add the new measures in Part 4 of this plan.� Provide the New York City Department of Education with SED’s teacher quality data for inclusion in its school report cards to ensure data consistency between the State and New York City.�� Add new teacher quality indicators, such as (1) the percent of teachers with less than three years experience; and (2) annual turnover rates for teachers with less than five years experience, to Comprehensive Information Reports for schools and LEAs.� (EMSC-Information and Reporting Services)

1.3 TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE.� Continue to provide technical assistance to LEAs to improve the accuracy, completeness and timeliness of teacher-level and assignment-level data.� See Action Steps, Area 7. (EMSC-Information and Reporting Services; School Improvement [R] and [NYC] & VESID)

1.4 INFORMATION TOOLS.� Based on� pilots with 2004-2005 data, create monitoring and analysis files, described in� Attachment A, Items A.5 and A.6, for SED, Regional Network Partners and LEAs to support monitoring, technical assistance and local and regional planning and improvement.� (EMSC-Information and Reporting Services)

1.5 BUILD CAPACITY.� As resources permit, continue enhancing data systems to: (1) issue all teaching certificates online; (2) provide online, public access to the certification status of every teacher; (3) post an assignment-to-certificate crosswalk online as technical assistance for LEAs assigning duties to teachers; (4) add a new, unique, longitudinal identifier to each teacher’s certification and public school employment records to permit data linking and public release; (5) obtain data from students in the teacher education pipeline to support teacher supply and demand projections and planning to avert shortages; and (6) share certification and employment data with teacher preparation institutions so that they can track their graduates for assessment and planning purposes.� (OHE- Teaching Initiatives; EMSC-Information and Reporting Services;� OHE-Special Projects)


Action Steps - Area 2�

Pre-service teacher preparation and specialized knowledge and skills for effective teaching in high poverty LEAs

2.1������������� TEACHER PREPARATION STANDARDS.� Continue to require all teacher preparation institutions, and particularly those that prepare teachers for high poverty schools, to instruct future teachers to be effective with diverse learners, assess their graduates’ effectiveness in the classroom and improve their programs in response to their assessment results.� (OHE-College and University Evaluation)

2.2 ������������� ALTERNATIVE TEACHER PREPARATION.� Continue to encourage teacher preparation institutions to offer more alternative teacher preparation programs (ATP) to meet the needs of high-poverty, low-performing schools and support their efforts to obtain State and federal funds for this purpose.�� Review State regulations governing ATP programs and, as needed, recommend changes to the Board of Regents.� (OHE-College and University Evaluation)

      SPECIALIZED KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS.� Work with partners to identify research-based “best practices” for recruiting and preparing teachers to be effective in high poverty schools and to promote those practices.� (OHE-College and University Evaluation)
      POLICY ALIGNMENT.� Partner with the New York Comprehensive Center to engage faculty from teacher preparation institutions whose graduates work in high poverty schools about the importance of preparing teachers to use scientifically based reading instruction.� Continue informing teacher preparation institutions about the State’s Learning Standards, model curricula and assessments in order to align teacher preparation with instruction in schools, including high poverty schools.� (OHE-College and University Evaluation)
      RESEARCH TO INFORM POLICY.� Continue to provide databases and financial support to the Education Finance Research Consortium based at the University at Albany, for independent research about New York State’s teaching workforce and its effectiveness.� (EMSC-Educational Management)
      INFORMATION.� Continue to provide teacher preparation institutions with current teacher supply and demand data by subject, region and Big Five City so that these institutions can improve their program planning and student advisement and work more effectively with local and regional LEAs to increase the supply of certified teachers for high-poverty schools.� See Attachments E and F.� (OHE-Special Projects)
      INFORMATION.� Partner with colleges and universities, teachers’ unions and others to inventory online courses available for certification in shortage subjects and inform LEAs and teachers about them.� (OHE-College and University Evaluation)


Action Steps - Area 3

Certification and out-of-field teaching

3.1� ������������� INFORMATION TOOLS.� Provide monitoring and analysis files with data on out-of-field teaching by subject to priority and other LEAs and to Regional Network Partners in support of local and regional planning.� See Action Steps 1.4, 5.3 and Area 7.� In New York City, continue working with the New York City Department of Education to provide each principal with New York City data on his/her teachers’ qualifications for each assignment and work with priority LEAs to ensure appropriate placements of teachers and identify teachers needing additional support to become highly qualified.� (EMSC- School Improvement [R] and [NYC])

3.2� ������������� TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE.� Provide technical assistance to LEAs about assigning certified teachers to in-field duties.� Encourage LEAs to use all available federal and State funds to help certified teachers in surplus areas, such as elementary education, to obtain a supplementary certificate in a shortage ������������� subject.� (EMSC- School Improvement [R] & [NYC])� See Action Steps in Area 7.

3.3� ������������� POLICY ALIGNMENT.� Review certification requirements and seek authority from the Regents to remove unnecessary barriers that may be causing shortages and out-of-field teaching.� For example, review certification requirements in special education to widen the scope of practice of special education teachers.� See Action Step 8.1.� (OHE- Teaching Initiatives;� OHE- Quality Assurance & Vesid)


Area 4

Recruitment and retention of certified, highly qualified and experienced teachers

4.1 ALLOCATION OF FUNDS.� Administer State and federal teacher quality programs to give priority to high poverty, low performing schools and LEAs to the extent permitted by law.� Such programs include, but are not limited to:

    • NYS Teachers of Tomorrow program ($25,000,000 in 2006-2007);
    • NYS Teacher Opportunity Corps ($713,000 in 2006-2007);
    • NCLB Title II A SAHE grants (the NYS Teacher-Leader Quality Partnership Program) ($6,000,000 in 2005-2006);
    • NYS Science and Technology Entry Program (STEP) and the Collegiate Science and Technology Entry Program(CSTEP) ($19,000,000 in 2006-2007);
    • NYS Albert Shanker stipends for National Board Certification ($500,000 in 2006-2007)
    • Bilingual Special Education Intensive Teacher Institute ($900,000 in 2005-2006);
    • Higher Education Support Center ($875,000 in 2005-2006);
    • Bilingual Personnel Development Center ($150,000 in 2005-2006);
    • NYS Mentor Teacher Internship Program ($6,000,000 in 2006-2007); and
    • NYS Math and Science Teaching Incentive Program (over $2,000,000 in 2006-2007).�

Attachment D has links to online information about these and other programs.� (OHE-K-12 Initiatives and Access; OHE- Teaching Initiatives; & VESID-Policy Development)

4.2 PARTNERSHIPS AND INFORMATION.� Continue the partnership that helps IBM retirees become certified teachers in math and science and invite the New York State Business Council to promote other partnerships for recruiting teachers for high poverty schools with the larger business community.� Partner with other State agencies and statewide professional associations to launch a public information campaign about State, federal and private benefit programs for teachers who work in shortage subjects and high-poverty schools.�� Such programs include the federal HEA Title IV loan forgiveness, federal scholarships, National Science Foundation (NSF) Robert Noyce Scholarship Program and NSF Math and Science Partnership Network, as listed in Attachment C.� (OHE- Quality Assurance; OHE-Teaching Initiatives)

4.3 POLICY ALIGNMENT.� Strengthen advocacy for State and federal programs that help high poverty LEAs recruit and retain teachers.�� For example, promote a State bill that would permit retired public servants to teach in high poverty schools without a pension penalty and develop other bills for tax incentives or other strategies.� (OHE- Quality Assurance)

4.4 ������������� INFORMATION.� In partnership with public broadcasting stations, LEAs and teacher preparation institutions, develop strategies with public radio and television stations to develop public information initiatives for recruiting and retaining teachers for shortage subjects and high-poverty LEAs and schools and from high poverty and minority communities.� (OCE- Educational Television & Public Broadcasting)


4.5 ������������� TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE AND MONITORING.� Require LEAs that did not meet their Annual Yearly Progress (AYP) for student achievement and Annual Measurable Objective (AMO) targets for highly qualified teachers to have revised teacher quality plans and provide technical assistance on the development of such plans.� See Action Steps in Area 7. (EMSC-Office of School Improvement [R] & (NYC] )

4.6 DISTANCE EDUCATION.�� Encourage LEAs to adopt distance education solutions in rural areas where highly qualified teachers are not available to teach every core subject.� The New York State Distance Learning Consortium (NYSDLC), formed in 1994, oversees a broadband two-way distance learning network that reaches school buildings throughout the State and allows classrooms to connect with one another and with cultural institutions, such as the New York Hall of Science, for virtual hands-on activities. The NYSDLC provides access to core material as well as to advanced placement courses.� (EMSC- School Improvement [R])


Area 5

Professional development

5.1 CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS.� Continue to implement the State requirement for new teachers certified after February 1, 2004 – including new teachers in high poverty LEAs – to complete 175 hours of professional development every five years in order to maintain their professional certification. (OHE- Teaching Initiatives)

5.2 TEACHING PRACTICE REQUIREMENTS.� Continue to enforce State and federal requirements for all LEAs to implement needs-based professional development plans and State requirements for all teachers to have an Annual Professional Performance Review (APPR) to identify strengths and professional development needs.� [EMSC- School Improvement (R) & (NYC)]�

5.3 ALLOCATION OF FUNDS FOR TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE PARTNERS.� Continue to use Title II A statewide funds to support a network of seven Regional School Support Centers (RSSCs), technical assistance centers that serve low performing schools and LEAs identified by the SEA based on NCLB criteria.� RSSCs provide support through a variety of planning, needs assessment, coordination and professional development activities.� Depending on the needs identified by targeted schools and LEAs, RSSCs provide some or all of the following technical assistance supports:

  • work with the school leadership team to analyze data and determine teaching and learning needs;
  • provide professional development for teachers, principals and/or pupil services personnel;
  • develop or assist LEAs in the development and use of proven, innovative strategies to deliver targeted intensive professional development programs (particularly in ELA and mathematics), with ongoing follow-up;
  • provide assistance to LEAs for the development and implementation of professional development programs for school leaders;
  • support activities that ensure teachers are able to use challenging State academic content standards, student academic achievement standards and State assessments to improve instructional practices and improve student academic achievement; and
  • convene Regional Network Partners at regional planning meetings to determine LEAs’ needs and provide appropriate, coordinated technical assistance.� Regional Network Partners include:� Bilingual Education Technical Assistance Centers, Special Education Training and Resource Centers, School Support Services Network, Staff and Curriculum Development Network, New York State Teacher Centers, Regional Adult Education Network and Regional School Support Centers.� (EMSC- School Improvement [R]; VESID )

5.4 PARTNERSHIPS FOR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT.� Continue to use partnerships to provide high-quality professional development to teachers and administrators in high poverty, low performing schools.��

  • In partnership with the New York Comprehensive Center, continue to provide tri-annual, multi-day professional development for representatives of Regional Network Partners and SED staff to engage in professional development focused on ensuring that technical assistance and professional development supports are provided coherently and without duplication.
  • Through RSSCs and Regional Network Partners, continue to provide identified LEAs with high quality, continuous, sustained, research-based, content-based professional development opportunities aligned with LEA School Improvement Plans.� Continue to focus on building the skills of teachers in working with historically underserved student groups.
  • Continue to provide high quality, continuous, sustained and research-based professional development opportunities to identified LEAs through State and federal grant programs (e.g., Mathematics and Science Partnerships Programs, Reading First, NCLB Title II A State Agency for Higher Education (SAHE) grants, NYS Teacher Opportunity Corps, and NYS Minority Teacher Internship Program) to build the skills of teachers to work with historically underserved student groups, especially in high poverty schools.
  • In a new partnership with the National Science Resources Center (NSRC), provide professional development in science to leadership teams from the Big Five Cities and three Rest of State teams through the New York State Leadership and Assistance for Science Education Renewal (NY LASER) project.� This initiative, scheduled to start in 2006-2007, will provide an intensive 18-month leadership training program that will be customized for each district’s needs and will use a comprehensive approach to support district-wide systemic change in inquiry-based science education.
  • Encourage LEAs, and high poverty LEAs in particular, to adopt distance learning solutions for professional development, to allow teachers to engage in anywhere, anytime learning to enhance their qualifications. The SUNY Learning Network allows individuals to complete graduate-level courses offered online by faculty at the State University of New York’s 64 campuses.� New York’s public television stations offer PBS TeacherLine New York, a USDOE-funded professional development initiative that provides more than 90 online courses designed to help teachers master pedagogical techniques and course content in mathematics, reading, science, and technology integration. Each course is research-based and facilitated by a master teacher.
  • In the Rest of State, continue to provide professional development to high poverty/high minority districts through Destination Diploma forums (for High School reform) and Urban Forums.� Both initiatives are multi-day collegial seminars.� Destination Diploma forum participants are high school leadership teams from 127 districts statewide with low high school graduation rates.� Urban Forums are provided for the Big Four Cities� – Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse and Yonkers – and are based on topics chosen by representatives of the Big 4 districts who are also instrumental in planning the forums.�
  • In New York City, continue to provide direction, ongoing technical assistance and support to build the skills of New York City teachers working with historically underserved student groups, especially in high poverty schools.�� Continue the Department’s fiscal support of several capacity building professional development activities in New York City.� These activities include a series of Reading and Mathematics Institutes, the Citywide Early Childhood Conference and the Destination Diploma High School Forum.� The Reading and Mathematics Institute is a series of professional development sessions for teacher staff developers and school administrators from high poverty, low performing schools and schools farthest from the State standard.� The Citywide Early Childhood Conference provides curricula and support strategies that focus on effective early childhood interventions and quality early childhood programming to over 1,500 early childhood educators.� Destination Diploma is a two day high school forum designed to bring educators and stakeholders from across New York State together to examine effective strategies for improving graduation rates and performance on State exams.
  • Continue to support professional development opportunities that are designed to attract and retain school administrators, including Special Leadership Institutes and collaboration with Harvard University via the Harvard Principals’ Institute.� These initiatives provide opportunities for principals and superintendents of high need urban schools and districts to strengthen their professional and instructional leadership skills.
  • In the Rest of State, continue to disseminate information about various professional development opportunities (such as USDOE’s Teacher-to-Teacher initiative and other regional and/or national opportunities) through listservs and SED’s web site.� In New York City, expand listservs to include representation from teacher and administrator bargaining organizations.
  • Sponsor monthly conference calls involving (1) SED curriculum specialists; (2) Big Five City Math, ELA, Science and Social Studies Directors; and (3) leadership of professional associations in those curriculum areas to address shared interests and concerns.

(EMSC- School Improvement [R] & [NYC]; EMSC Curriculum &� Instructional Support; VESID –Special Education Quality Assurance; OHE- Teaching Initiatives; OHE- K-16 Initiatives and Access Programs; OCE- Educational Television and Public Broadcasting)

5.5 BUILD CAPACITY.� Continue to enhance SED’s online Virtual Learning System (VLS) as a resource for teachers, including teachers in high poverty schools, and provide technical assistance about the VLS. (EMSC- Curriculum &� Instructional Support and EMSC- School Improvement [R])��

5.6 ALIGN CAPACITY.� In partnership with the New York Comprehensive Center, enhance SED’s comprehensive assessment strategy to provide diagnostic information to teachers to guide instruction and strengthen the professional development role of Regional School Support Centers and other network resources that serve high poverty, low performing schools.� Link the Public Broadcasting System’s TeacherLine New York and Public TV’s research-based literacy programs, funded through USDOE Ready to Learn, with the Regional Network Partner initiative to ensure that professional development in enhanced literacy instruction reaches the classrooms of targeted districts.� (EMSC- School Improvement [R] & OCE- Educational Television and Public Broadcasting)

5.7������������� INFORMATION.� Promote National Board Certification in high poverty schools by publicizing the availability of Albert Shanker stipends.� As needed, seek support from foundations affiliated with the National Board for professional teaching standards to help more teachers in high poverty schools become National Board certified.� See http://www.nbpts.org/candidates/availscholar.cfm.� Through the State Library’s services, enhance publicity about funding for partnerships of teacher preparation institutions and school districts that provide high quality professional development to teachers.� Federal funding sources are listed in Attachment C.� They include the National Science Foundation, which funds projects in New York City, at Hofstra University and SUNY at Stony Brook and their partners, SUNY at Brockport and its partners, SUNY at Buffalo (University Center), Cornell University, Dowling College and SUNY at Fredonia.� (OHE- Teaching Initiatives; OHE- K-16 Initiatives and Access Programs; OCE- Educational Television and Public Broadcasting)

Area 6

Working conditions in schools and LEAs

LEADERSHIP PREPARATION.� Continue to improve school and district working conditions by strengthening preparation programs for school and district leaders and holding programs accountable for results under new leadership preparation program standards.� (OHE- College and University Evaluation)

LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT.� Continue to provide opportunities and support for existing school and district leaders to change working conditions through professional development that helps them become more effective. See Action Steps 5.3 and 5.4.�� (EMSC- School Improvement; EMSC- Curriculum &� Instructional Support; VESID–Special Education Quality Assurance; OCE- Educational Television and Public Broadcasting)

LEADERSHIP CERTIFICATION.� Continue to improve working conditions by implementing new certification standards for school and district leaders adopted in June 2006.� See http://www.regents.nysed.gov/2006Meetings/June2006/0606heppa4.htm. (OHE- Teaching Initiatives)

INFORMATION TOOLS.� Provide school-level analysis files with teacher turnover and teacher experience indicators to LEAs for local planning and accountability purposes.� See Action Steps 1.4, 5.3 and in Area 7.� (EMSC- School Improvement [R] & [NYC])

TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE.� Through Regional Network Partners, continue to provide coherent and unduplicated supports and leadership development for high poverty LEAs, including the use of needs assessment, planning and data analysis that engage the LEA leadership team with the various partners serving the LEA.� See Action Step 5.3.� [EMSC-School Improvement (R)]

IDENTIFY RETENTION STRATEGIES AND ADVOCACTE FOR RESOURCES.� Working conditions impact teacher retention and student learning.� With partners, continue to advocate for State aid for schools (for facilities, instructional resources and teacher compensation and retention) and identify additional strategies to improve retention.� � (EMSC-Deputy Commissioner)

INFORMATION AND MONITORING.� Continue to improve data collection and reporting about persistently dangerous schools as a strategy for reducing dangers and enhancing both working and learning conditions.� Continue to monitor schools for accurate reporting of data about dangers; provide technical assistance to LEA for accurate and complete reporting; and provide ongoing technical assistance to LEAs’ leaders, parents, teachers and others to reduce incidents of violence and improve learning climates.�� (EMSC- Information Reporting Services; EMSC- School Improvement [R] & [NYC] )


Area 7

Monitoring and technical assistance

MONITORING

7.1������������� GUIDANCE ON FEDERAL ACCOUNTABILITY REQUIREMENTS.� Update all LEAs about the consequences of failing to meet AYP for student achievement and AMOs for teacher quality and SED’s implementation of the NCLB’s Section 2141 accountability requirements.� (EMSC- School Improvement [R] &� [NYC])

If an LEA is identified as having failed to meet teacher quality AMOs (e.g., had less than 90 percent of core classes taught by highly qualified teachers in 2004-2005 and less than 95 percent in 2005-06), it must, through the Consolidated Application and District Comprehensive Education Plan (DCEP) processes and as a condition of receiving Title II A funds, develop a teacher quality plan that describes the specific steps it will take to ensure that all teachers become highly qualified as quickly as possible.�

If� an LEA is identified as having failed both to meet teacher quality AMOs and to make AYP for three consecutive years, SED will enter into an agreement with the LEA on its use of LEA Title II A funds in accordance with Section 2141.�

STRATEGIC USE OF DATA.� Use the latest available teacher quality data to identify and prioritize LEAs for monitoring and technical assistance interventions.� For this purpose, priority LEAs are defined as LEAs with the largest number of core classes not taught by highly qualified teachers that also did not meet AYP and AMOs.� The statewide teacher quality AMO for monitoring and technical assistance priority is at least 90 percent of core classes taught by highly qualified teachers in school year 2004-2005 and 95 percent in school year 2005-2006.� (EMSC- School Improvement [R] & NYC])

APPROVAL OF LOCAL FUNDING.� For all LEAs identified as not meeting teacher quality AMOs, and for all LEAs with schools not meeting teacher quality AMOs, review 2006-2007 Consolidated Local Applications and District Comprehensive Education Plans (DCEPs) for evidence that required teacher quality plans describe sufficient and realistic strategies and activities to reach highly qualified teacher goals and equitable teacher distribution goals.� For all LEAs identified as failing to meet both teacher quality AMOs and failing to make AYP for three years, and for all LEAs with schools failing to meet both teacher quality AMOs and failing to make AYP for three years, enter into an agreement with the LEA on its use of Title II A funds in accordance with Section 2141.� As a precondition for approval of 2006-2007 Title budgets, ensure that LEA plans describe uses of Title I professional development set-asides and Title II A funds that describe sufficient and adequate strategies to meet teacher quality goals by the end of school year 2006-2007 or as soon as possible.� (EMSC- School Improvement [R] & [NYC])�

ALIGNMENT.� In 2006-2007, monitor priority LEAs (identified in Action Step 7.2).� Revise the New York City Eight Year NCLB Monitoring Review Schedule to target priority districts and continue annual monitoring of four to six NYC districts’ compliance with NCLB teacher quality provisions.� Align the Regional 2006-2007 Title II A monitoring schedule to target priority LEAs and other high poverty and high minority districts that have an inequitable distribution of highly qualified teachers between high and low poverty schools within the LEA.� (EMSC- School Improvement [R] & [NYC])

MONITORING VISITS.� Assess implementation of LEAs’ efforts to meet highly qualified teacher goals.�� Focus Regional and New York City monitoring processes on district planning for, and implementation of, equitable district and classroom placement of highly qualified and experienced teachers.� Use available local teacher quality data – described in Attachment A, Items A.5 and A.6 – as the framework for monitoring visit discussions.� Continue, as part of the Title II A monitoring process, to assess district implementation of New York State’s required mentoring program for new teachers.� Encourage districts to use Title II A funds to mentor teachers new to the district and/or teachers changing the level at which they are teaching.� Continue to ensure, as part of the Title II A monitoring process, that professional development is both aligned with each LEA’s needs assessment and is high quality, continuous and sustained.� Continue to ensure, as part of the Title II A monitoring process, that LEAs are appropriately using the HOUSSE.� (EMSC-School Improvement [R] & [NYC])�

SED COORDINATION.� Establish an internal SED work group to ensure coordination of findings on highly qualified teachers by different SED units that conduct monitoring reviews, including Title I, Special Education and Title III offices.� Add LEAs that other offices have identified with significant HQT problems to Title II A monitoring schedules. (EMSC- School Improvement [R] & [NYC])�

TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

LEAS’ TEACHER QUALITY PLANS.� Use direct technical assistance approaches (workshops, on-site visits, videoconference, and phone) to assist LEAs in developing their required teacher quality plans.� Provide this assistance to those LEAs that: (1) have the largest number of core classes not taught by HQT and not meeting AYP; (2) are identified, through desk audits of required highly qualified teacher and equitable teacher distribution plans as having inadequate strategies to ensure that they will reach required goals; (3) are identified by the internal coordination group (see Item 7.6) as in need of such support; and (4) voluntarily request such assistance.� (EMSC- School Improvement [R] & [NYC])

AGREEMENTS WITH IDENTIFIED LEAS’.� For all LEAs identified as failing both to meet teacher quality AMOs and to make AYP for three years, and for all LEAs with schools failing both to meet both teacher quality AMOs and to make AYP for three years, provide direct technical assistance in the development of the strategies and activities the LEA will use to improve teacher quality and ensure the equitable distribution of highly qualified teachers in buildings and classrooms.� Such technical assistance may include reviewing the LEA’s district-level and school-level teacher quality data with the district leadership team to determine priority needs; working with the team to plan realistic strategies for meeting those needs; and working with school leadership teams to develop professional development strategies and activities, based on scientifically based research, that the LEA will use to meet highly qualified teacher and student learning goals.� SED and/or Regional Network Partners will work directly with teachers and principals involved in such plans to determine professional development activities that meet the definition in NCLB Section 9101 and that address highly qualified teacher needs.� SED will require that a reasonable portion of the LEA’s Title II A funds be made available to identified schools to support their plans.� (EMSC- School Improvement [R] & [NYC])

COMMUNICATION AND PARTNERSHIPS.� Mobilize the P-12 and higher education communities to address teacher quality gaps.� Focus on the equitable distribution of certified, highly qualified and experienced teachers.� Disseminate information about New York State’s equitable teacher gap and strategies to help close it to all SED partners.� Respond to requests for information and technical assistance to close the gap.� (EMSC- School Improvement [R] & [NYC])� See Attachments E, F and� G.��

PARTNERSHIPS IN NEW YORK CITY.� Continue to coordinate SED technical assistance and support for the New York City Department of Education (NYC DOE) via monthly “Cross Functional Task Force” meetings where system-wide changes are planned.� Task force members represent SED, the NYC DOE and the United Federation of Teachers.� Continue working with the Task Force to develop strategies to assist principals in making teaching assignments that match teachers’ qualifications.� Continue assisting the NYC DOE in its design of programs to help all teachers become highly qualified.�� Continue assisting the NYC DOE to enhance the completeness, accuracy and timeliness of its teacher quality data and school-level reports generated from it.� Continue efforts (via monthly School Improvement Liaisons’ Network Meetings and District Comprehensive Educational Plan (DCEP) Training Sessions) to encourage districts to use all available funds to help teachers become highly qualified; to recruit high quality certified teachers, particularly in shortage areas; and to ensure that experienced and qualified teachers are equitably distributed between classrooms of poor and minority children and those of other students.� (EMSC- School Improvement [NYC])

SHORTAGE SUBJECTS.� To the extent specific subgroups of teachers are not highly qualified, continue working with Regional Network Partners to suggest strategies and resources to help LEAs help these teachers become highly qualified.� (EMSC- School Improvement [R] & [NYC])

HOUSSE LIMITATION.� Continue to provide technical assistance to LEAs about implementing the HOUSSE in permissible areas.� (EMSC- School Improvement [R] & [NYC])

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT.� Provide an array of professional development opportunities focused on the needs of priority LEAs.� See Action Steps, Area 5.� Through web site links, listservs, monitoring visits, Regional Network Partner meetings and other means, share information about standards and practices supporting high quality professional development and publicize opportunities to engage in regional, statewide and national professional development.�� (EMSC- School Improvement [R] & [NYC] & EMSC-Curriculum and Instructional Support)


Area 8

Policy coherence

    • CERTIFICATION POLICY.� Review certification requirements to determine their impact on shortages for high poverty schools and seek authority from the Regents to revise them, as needed, while maintaining high standards.� Examples include interstate reciprocity requirements, scope of practice of new certificate titles and the impact of new certificate titles and types on teacher tenure.� (OHE- Teaching Initiatives)
    • ACCOUNTABILITY POLICY.� Use an accountability approach to ensure that public reporting of data and sanctions for high poverty, low performing schools and LEAs do not have the undesirable impact of discouraging effective teachers and administrators from working in them. (EMSC-Deputy Commissioner)
    • RESOURCES.� Build partnerships to maximize resources available to meet the teacher quality needs of high poverty, low performing schools.� For example, seek partners for an HEA Title II Teacher Quality Enhancement State Grant.�� (OHE, EMSC & VESID – Deputy Commissioners)
    • COMMUNICATIONS.� Enhance SED communications about funding opportunities for preparing, recruiting and retaining highly qualified teachers and providing professional development to teachers in high poverty and low performing LEAs.� ( EMSC-School Improvement[R] & [NYC]; OHE- Teaching Initiatives; OCE Educational Television and Public Broadcasting)


Area 9

Limiting the use of the HOUSSE

HOUSSE limitation schedule

As required by the USDOE’s March 2006 interpretation of the HOUSSE, New York State will (1) complete the HOUSSE process for teachers not new to the profession who were hired on or before June 30, 2006; and (2) limit the use of HOUSSE procedures for teachers hired after June 30, 2006 to multi-subject secondary teachers in rural schools eligible for additional flexibility, and multi-subject special education teachers who are highly qualified in English/language arts, mathematics or science at the time of hire.�

9.1������������� REGULATIONS AND GUIDANCE.� SED will amend our regulations and issue guidance to LEAs about the HOUSSE limitation, about completing the HOUSSE process for all teachers not new to the profession who were hired on or before June 30, 2006, and about limiting the use of HOUSSE procedures for teachers hired after June 30, 2006 to the two circumstances permitted by the USDOE.� SED guidance will inform LEAs about ways to ensure that all teachers are highly qualified for each subject they teach without the use of the HOUSSE.� SED guidance will change existing State policy on the HOUSSE that permits LEAs to accept or reject HOUSSE determinations from other LEAs when they hire and assign a teacher.� The new policy will require LEAs to accept HOUSSE determinations from other LEAs when a teacher changes employment, thereby reducing the need for the HOUSSE when teachers who are not new to the profession change employers.��� (OHE-Special Projects; EMSC-School Improvement; VESID)

9.2������������� TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE.� SED’s technical assistance, monitoring protocols and requirements for revised LEA teacher quality plans will reinforce SED’s new guidance.� Also, as applicable under the new HOUSSE limitation schedule and the completion of school year 2005-2006, SED will continue to implement the four strategies that it submitted to the USDOE in January 2006 (cited below) in response to the USDOE’s findings about the use of the HOUSSE in New York State during a November 2005 monitoring visit.� The USDOE approved these strategies in April 2006.�� Attachment G is an example of SED’s use of these strategies.�� (EMSC-School Improvement; VESID; OHE-Special Projects)

  • “The first strategy will be widespread dissemination of HOUSSE requirements by posting reminders on our website and in two electronic field newsletters, EMSC News and Notes, and School Executive’s Bulletin. “
  • “The second strategy will be targeted dissemination and technical assistance regarding HOUSSE requirements to our Regional Network Partners and SED liaisons to the networks and to the Big Five Cities.� The dissemination and technical assistance will occur through listservs, presentations and workshops.”
  • “The third strategy involves Title II Part A monitoring of LEAs.� Highly Qualified Teacher data will be analyzed to identify districts not on track to meet the June 2006 deadline.� Districts furthest from meeting the June 2006 deadline will be added to the 2006-2007 monitoring schedule.�� A question regarding the percent of not-highly-qualified teachers who might be HOUSSE-eligible will be added to the monitoring instrument.� All monitored districts will be provided with a hard-copy description of HOUSSE requirements and procedures.”
  • “The fourth strategy will be to provide direct technical assistance to selected districts with Schools In Need of Improvement that are also at risk of not meeting the June 2006 highly qualified teacher requirement.� The technical assistance will be provided through video-conferences and on-site meetings.”

9.3������������� DATA COLLECTION.� SED will begin collecting data in 2006-2007 on LEAs’ reliance on the HOUSSE to track the reduction in the reliance on the HOUSSE over time.� LEAs are required to determine whether their teachers are highly qualified and to maintain records when they use the HOUSSE, so they will have the capacity to submit data on their use of the HOUSSE.� (EMSC-Information and Reporting Services)

9.4������������� CERTIFICATION.� SED will continue to implement teacher certification requirements that make virtually all newly certified teachers highly qualified so long as they are assigned to teach in their areas of certification.

Recommendation

New York State believes the use of HOUSSE should be reduced and the New York State Education Department will work with the LEAs to ensure the elimination of the HOUSSE as required by the USDOE. As a practical matter, there should be a reduced need for States and LEAs to use the HOUSSE after June 30, 2006, because most veteran teachers would have been evaluated under HOUSSE and most new teachers will meet the highly qualified standard by virtue of holding State certification.� However, New York State recommends additional flexibility be given to allow states and LEAs to continue the use of HOUSSE on a limited basis in other situations where it is needed, such as where a veteran highly qualified teacher in one subject must be assigned to teach another subject, or where a district, despite its best efforts to hire only highly qualified teachers, must hire a new teacher who is not highly qualified to teach the assigned subject and that teacher becomes highly qualified over time. This flexibility is supported by NCLB, and it is New York’s opinion that the HOUSSE standard may not be legally phased out by USDOE or inappropriately restricted beyond its reasonable statutory meaning.� New York is concerned that an unintended consequence of the elimination of HOUSSE at this time may be a negative impact on student learning if LEAs are forced to rely on substitute teachers rather than certified teachers who may not meet the definition of highly qualified.� As New York’s data indicates, if this impact occurred, it will be greater on high poverty LEAs.


Attachment A

Data Sources

A.1.�� Teacher certification (TCERT and TEACH)

New York State’s TCERT teacher certification system was replaced in spring 2006 by a new system called TEACH.� Teachers certified prior to TEACH’s implementation will only have TCERT data elements that are listed here.� Teachers certified after TEACH’s implementation have additional data elements (such as college major) that are not listed here.�� Data are gathered as part of the administrative process of certification.� This summary of TCERT data elements is based on information provided by the Office of Teaching Initiatives in December 2004.

APPROXIMATE SIZE

More than 50,000 new credentials issued each year

SELECTED DATA ELEMENTS

�������������

������������� INDIVIDUALS

������������� ������������� To be added:� Unique ID for individual������������� �������������

1


������������� ������������� SSN

������������� ������������� Last name

������������� ������������� First name

������������� ������������� Middle Initial

������������� ������������� Street Address

������������� ������������� Apartment

������������� ������������� City

������������� ������������� State

������������� ������������� ZIP

������������� ������������� Date of birth (redacted)

������������� ������������� Gender

������������� ������������� Citizenship

IRP code (Inventory of Registered�� Programs)

������������� ������������� Institution name

������������� ������������� Degree code

������������� ������������� Date degree conferred

������������� ������������� Dates of exams

������������� ������������� Exam scores

������������� ������������� Pass/Fail status of exams

1


CERTIFICATE APPLICATIONS (as many as needed)

������������� ������������� To be added:� Unique ID for individual�������������

1


������������� ������������� SSN of applicant

Type of certificate (provisional, initial, etc.)

������������� ������������� Certificate area or title

Process used to apply for or qualify for certificate

������������� ������������� Date (effective date of certificate)

������������� ������������� Printed (date certificate was printed)

1


CERTIFICATES ISSUED (as many as needed)

������������� ������������� To be added:� Unique ID for individual

1


������������� ������������� SSN of certificate holder�������������

������������� ������������� Last name

������������� ������������� First name

������������� ������������� Middle initial

������������� ������������� Type of certificate

������������� ������������� Certificate area or title

Process by which certificate was obtained

������������� ������������� Effective date

������������� ������������� Cert Status (active, expired)

������������� ������������� Recommending institution

Addressed certificate mailed to (redacted)

������������� ������������� CST exam title

������������� ������������� CST exam score

������������� ������������� CST pass/fail status

1


������������� �������������


A.2.�� Public school personnel and their assignments (Personnel Master File)

The Personnel Master File (PMF) is part of SED’s Basic Education Data System (BEDS).� It is the data source for school professionals employed in New York State’s public schools, their assignments, their qualifications for each assignment and their work locations.� The file includes teachers, administrators and other professionals.� Data are gathered in an annual survey of school personnel.� Many fields are pre-filled to ensure that data are accurate from year to year.� Further information about the PMF is available at http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/irts/beds/home.shtml.

APPROXIMATE SIZE (per year)

More than 220,000 individuals employed each year with more than 600,000 assignments

SELECTED DATA ELEMENTS

������������� Instruction

������������� TEACHERS

������������� ������������� ������������� To be added:� New TEACH ID

1


School or BOCES code

Last Name

First Name

Middle Initial

SSN

Gender

Degree status

NCLB Professional Development

Educational Experience – Years in District

Educational Experience – Years in Total

Number of months employed per year

Percent of time employed in this district

Date of birth

Current annual salary

Legal certification status

1


������������� ASSIGNMENTS (for up to 8 assignments):

1


������������� ������������� Assignment code

������������� ������������� Grade level

������������� ������������� Registrations

Number of weeks per year

Reported NCLB highly qualified status

Assignment certification status

1


������������� Other than Instruction

������������� EMPLOYEES

������������� ������������� To be added:� New TEACH ID�������������

1


������������� ������������� School or BOCES code

������������� ������������� Last Name

������������� ������������� First Name

������������� ������������� Middle Initial

������������� ������������� SSN

������������� ������������� Gender

������������� ������������� Degree status

Educational Experience – Years in District

Educational Experience – Years in Total

Number of months employed per year

Percent of time employed in this district

Date of birth

Current annual salary

Legal certification status

1


������������� ASSIGNMENTS (for up to 4 assignments)�������������

1


������������� ������������� Assignment code

������������� ������������� General grade level

Number of pupils with whom employee has regular direct contact in this assignment

Experience in this assignment area in years)

Percent of time in this assignment

Assignment certification status

1


������������� �������������

1


������������� �������������


A.3.�� School and district characteristics (Institutional Master File and related files)

The Institutional Master File (IMF) and related files are part of SED’s Basic Education Data System (BEDS).� The IMF and related files are the data source for characteristics of schools, districts and BOCES.� Characteristics include but are not limited to:

������������� Number and characteristics of students (grade level, gender, race/ethnicity, poverty, etc.)

������������� Number and characteristics of staff (e.g., race/ethnicity of staff, which cannot be collected on the PMF)

Accountability and performance status (SURR, SINI, DINI, etc. computed from student-level test results)

There are approximately 5,000 building sites on the IMF and they can be aggregated to approximately 800 LEAs (districts, charter schools, BOCES and State schools).� Every school and LEA has a unique BEDS ID.� IMF data are aggregate data collected at the school-level or district-level.� Related data files are constructed from individual level data (e.g., assessment results) aggregated to the school and district levels.

Some IMF and report card data for each school, district and BOCES are available online at http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/irts/.� In addition, files with all relevant ID codes can be requested from SED’s Office of Information and Reporting Services (IRS).� More information about the IMF and related files is available at http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/irts/beds/home.shtml.

A.4.�� Relationships between data sources

All data can be linked through the ID codes as shown below.�

Table of IDs That Link Data Sources

Units of analysis

Data source

ID codes

School

employees

LEAs & schools

P-12

students

Assignments

Certificate

Titles

Certification candidates & certificate recipients

TEACH

SSN *

CertTitle ID

Certificates issued

TEACH

SSN *

Cert Title ID

Public school employees

PMF

SSN *

BEDS ID

Assgmt ID

Public school assignments

PMF

SSN *

BEDS ID

Assgmt ID

CertTitle ID

LEAs & schools

IMF +

BEDS ID

P-12 students, their characteristics & their assessment results

New unit record system

BEDS ID

Student ID

* Plans exist for adding a unique, publicly releasable, longitudinal ID for every individual with a TEACH and PMF record.�


A.5.�� Analysis files for teacher quality

As a pilot with 2004-2005 data, SED created two analysis files for teacher quality.� One file has school-level data; the other has district-level data.� SED is using the 2004-2005 files to identify and prioritize schools and LEAs for technical assistance and monitoring during 2006-2007.� Each file has data for each of the topics listed below.�� Analysis files will be created for future years as data become available.

School or district characteristics (from IMF and related files)

b. Year

c. Geographic region within State

d. Regional School Support Center (if applicable)

e. School or district ID and Name

f. School grade configuration

g. Title I status

h. NCLB accountability status

i. NYS accountability status (for non-Title I schools and districts)

j. SURR status

k. Student enrollment�

l. Poverty status of students

m. Minority status of students

n. Teacher turnover

School or district teacher characteristics (from PMF)

o. Number of teachers

p. Certification status of teachers

q. Professional development status of teachers

r. Experience status of teachers

s. Educational attainment of teachers

Reasons for core classes not being taught by highly qualified teachers (from PMF)

t. Number of core classes

u. Number and percent of core classes not taught by HQ teachers

v. Number and percent of core classes in each March 2006 USDOE category

Characteristics of all teaching assignments held by individuals without appropriate certification (from PMF)

w. Number of all teaching assignments

x. Number and percent of all teaching assignments not held by appropriately certified individuals, in total and in each subject area (arts, career and technical education, early childhood and elementary education, English, ESOL and bilingual, languages other than English, library/school media specialist, math, physical education, reading and literacy, science, social studies and special education)

Characteristics of classes in core academic subjects not taught by highly qualified teachers (from PMF)

y. Number of all CORE teaching assignments

z. Number and percent of all CORE teaching assignments not taught by HQ teachers, in total and in each subject area (arts, career and technical education, early childhood and elementary education, English, ESOL and bilingual, languages other than English, math, reading and literacy, science, social studies and special education)

A.6.�� Monitoring files for teacher quality

As a pilot, SED created an Access database from 2004-2005 PMF data that generates reports for SED and Regional Network Partners.� For each LEA and school, reports show the number and percent of teachers who are not appropriately certified or not highly qualified in each academic subject they teach.� The New York City Department of Education provides its school-level teacher quality files to SED for monitoring purposes.


Attachment B

Evidence for Probable Success of Strategies and Action Steps

There is an extensive body of research describing the challenges of ensuring that children in high poverty schools have certified, highly qualified, effective and experienced teachers and suggesting effective approaches for addressing them.�� In the context of local control of schools in New York State, action steps in this plan were based on this research.�

The list of selected research references in this attachment is based primarily on a literature review prepared by Dr. Cynthia Prince who heads the Teacher Quality Network of the Council of Chief State School Officers.�� Dr. Prince finds that there are basically four ways to achieve an equitable distribution of teachers.�

Increase the supply of teachers for high poverty schools by increasing the pipeline of teachers in traditional and alternative routes.� The pipeline can be increased with financial incentives such as scholarships and loan forgiveness and by recruiting in high poverty communities.�

Increase the supply of teachers for high poverty schools by using incentives to redistribute existing teachers.� Incentives may include housing, tax benefits, pay-for-performance, differential pay, bonuses for National Board certification and lifting pension penalties for retired teachers who are rehired.�

Reduce demand for teachers in high poverty schools by improving the knowledge and skills of teachers already working in them so that the teachers become highly effective and have job satisfaction that encourages them to stay on the job.� Strategies include targeted professional development, required and funded mentoring and induction for new teachers and the use of supports such as master teachers, coaches and turn-around teams.

Reduce demand for teachers in high poverty schools by improving the working conditions that cause teachers to avoid or leave these schools.� Strategies include policies and programs that attract and retain effective principals who can, in turn, attract effective teachers; targeting resources to improve schools and physical working conditions; and improving school safety and discipline.

Research references

The following list of references links research evidence to the action steps in this plan.

������������� INCREASE THE PIPELINE OF TEACHERS FOR HIGH POVERTY SCHOOLS

Teacher labor markets and teacher recruitment

ACTION STEPS – AREAS 1 AND 4

SUNY at Albany, Education Finance Research Consortium, Condition Report, 2003

http://www.albany.edu/edfin/CR03.BLLW.TeacherMkts.pdf

http://www.teacherpolicyresearch.org/ResearchPapers/tabid/103/Default.aspx


The New Teacher Project, Research Reports, 2003 and 2005

http://www.tntp.org/ourresearch/overview.html

�������������

������������� The effectiveness of various pathways to teacher certification

������������� ACTION STEPS – AREAS 2 AND 3

Darling-Hammond, L. (2002, September 6). Research and rhetoric on teacher certification: A response to “Teacher Certification Reconsidered.” Education Policy Analysis Archives, 10(36). http://epaa.asu.edu/epaa/v10n36.html

Education Week. “Research Center: Alternative teacher certification.” http://www.edweek.org/rc/issues/alternative-teacher-certification/

Feistritzer, C.E. Profile of Troops to Teachers.� Washington, DC: National Center for Education Information. http://www.teach-now.org/NCEI_TT_v3.pdf

Feistritzer, C.E. (2005). Profile of alternative route teachers. Washington, DC: National Center for Alternative Certification. http://www.ncei.com/PART.pdf

Jacobson, L. “Alternative routes attracting unlikely candidates,” Education Week, February 23, 2005. http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2005/02/23/24altern.h24.html

Jacobson, L. “More teachers trained in alternative routes,” Education Week, June 15, 2005. http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2005/06/15/40report-1.h24.html

Keller, B. “Math, science graduates sign on to teach,” Education Week, June 14, 2006. http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2006/06/14/40tfa.h25.html

Laczko-Kerr, I., & Berliner, D. (2002, September 6). The effectiveness of ‘Teach for America’ and other under-certified teachers on student academic achievement: A case of harmful public policy.” Education Policy Analysis Archives, 10(37). Retrieved 6/19/06 from http://epaa.asu.edu/epaa/v10n37/.

Teacher Policy Research Center, SUNY at Albany http://www.teacherpolicyresearch.org/PolicyBriefs/tabid/148/Default.aspx

Viadero, D. “Teachers from alternate routes scrutinized,” Education Week, September 28, 2005. http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2005/09/28/05alternate.h25.html

Boyd, D, Grossman, P, Lankford, H., Loeb, S. & Wyckoff, J.� (2006)� “How Changes in Entry Requirements Alter the Teacher Workforce and Affect Student Achievement.”�� Education Finance and Policy.

Financial incentives for teachers

ACTION STEPS – AREA 4

Kirby, S., Naftel, S., & Berends, M. (1999). Staffing at-risk school districts in Texas: Problems and prospects, pp. 57-58. Santa Monica, CA: RAND. http://www.rand.org/pubs/monograph_reports/MR1083/index.html.

Prince, C. (2003). Higher pay in hard-to-staff schools: The case for financial incentives. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press, Inc.

Shields, P., Esch, C., Humphrey, D., Young, V., Gaston, M., & Hunt, H.� (1999). The status of the teaching profession: Research findings and policy recommendations. A report to the Teaching and California’s Future Task Force, p. 49. Santa Cruz, CA: The Center for the Future of Teaching and Learning. http://www.cftl.org/documents/stp1999full.pdf


������������� REDUCE ATTRITION OF TEACHERS IN HIGH POVERTY SCHOOLS

������������� Causes of attrition and the value of comprehensive induction for new teachers

������������� ACTION STEPS – AREA 4

������������� Alliance for Excellent Education, Issue Brief, August 2005

http://www.all4ed.org/publications/TeacherAttrition.pdf

New Teacher Center at the University of California, NTC Policy Brief, April 2006

http://newteachercenter.org/nyc_policy_paper.php

ECS – Ingersoll and Kralik, February 2004

http://www.ecs.org/ecsmain.asp?page=/html/publications/home_publications.asp

Barnette Berry, NASSP Bulletin, March 2004, Vol. 87, No. 638, pp. 5-27.

Reducing teacher turnover through mentoring and induction

ACTION STEPS – AREA 4

Alliance for Excellent Education. (2004). Tapping the potential: Retaining and developing high-quality new teachers. Washington, DC: Author. http://www.all4ed.org/publications/TappingThePotential/TappingThePotential.pdf

Center for Teaching Quality. (2006, June). “Why mentoring and induction matters and what must be done for new teachers.” Teaching Quality Across the Nation: Best Practices & Policies, 5(2).

Education Week (2005). “Quality Counts 2005 (No Small Change: Targeting Money Toward Student Performance).” Bethesda, Md.: Author.

Ingersoll, R. (2001). “Teacher turnover and teacher shortages: An organizational analysis,” American Educational Research Journal, 38(3), 499-534.

Smith, T., & Ingersoll, R. (2004). “What are the effects of induction and mentoring on beginning teacher turnover?” American Educational Research Journal, 41(2).

Villar, A. (2004). Measuring the benefits and costs of mentor-based induction: A value-added assessment of new teacher effectiveness linked to student achievement. Santa Cruz, CA: New Teacher Center.

������������� IMPROVE TEACHER EFFECTIVENESS IN HIGH POVERTY SCHOOLS

National Board Certification

ACTION STEPS – AREA 5

Berry, B., & King, T. (2005, May). Recruiting and retaining National Board Certified Teachers for hard-to-staff, low-performing schools: Silver bullets or smart solutions. Southeast Center for Teaching Quality.� http://www.teachingquality.org/pdfs/RecruitRetainHTSS.pdf

Blair, J. “National certification found valid for teachers,” Education Week, October 25, 2000. http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2000/10/25/08nbpts.h20.html?levelId=2300

Cavalluzzo, L. (2004, November). Is National Board Certification an effective signal of teacher quality? Alexandria, VA: CNA Corporation.� http://www.cna.org/documents/CavaluzzoStudy.pdf

Goldhaber, D., & Anthony, E. (2005, November 29). Can teacher quality be effectively assessed? National Board Certification as a signal of effective teaching. Washington, DC: Urban Institute.� http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/411271_teacher_quality.pdf�������������

Keller, B. “Critical study of NBPTS spurs state advisory group to act,” Education Week, May 15, 2002. http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2002/05/15/36board.h21.html?levelId=2300

Keller, B. “Study for NBPTS raises questions about credential,” Education Week, May 17, 2006. http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2006/05/17/37nbpts.h25.html

Keller, B. “NBPTS upgrades profession, most agree, despite test-score letdown,” Education Week, June 14, 2006. http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2006/06/14/40nbpts.h25.html

Kennedy Manzo, K. “Ariz. study sees benefits in National-Board Certification.” Education Week, September 15, 2004. http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2004/09/15/03nbpts.h24.html

Sanders, W., Ashton, J., & Wright, S.P. (2005, March 7). “Comparison of the effects of NBPTS certified teachers with other teachers on the rate of student academic progress.” Report prepared for the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. Cary, NC: SAS Institute, Inc. http://www.nbpts.org/pdf/sas_final_report.pdf

Stone, J. (2002, May). “The value-added achievement gains of NBPTS-certified teachers in Tennessee: A brief report.” Education Consumers Consultants Network, 2(5). http://www.education-consumers.com/oldsite/briefs/stoneNBPTS.shtm

Vandevoort, L., Amrein-Beardsley, A., & Berliner, D. (2004, September 8). National Board Certified Teachers and their students’ achievement. Education Policy Analysis Archives, 12(46). http://epaa.asu.edu/epaa/v12n46/

Ensuring that teachers have access to high quality professional development

ACTION STEPS – AREA 5

Koppich, J. E. (Winter 2002).� “Using Well-Qualified Teachers Well: The Right Teachers in the Right Place with the Right Support Bring Success to Troubled New York City Schools.”��� American Educator.� 26(4).

������������� Killian, J. (1999).� Islands of Hope in a Sea of Dreams: A Research Report on the Eight Schools ������������� That Received the National Award for Model Professional Development.

http://www.wested.org/wested/pubs/online/PDawards/welcome.shtml�������������

Increasing the number of National Board Certified Teachers in high need schools

ACTION STEPS – AREA 5

Humphrey, D., Koppich, J., & Hough, H. (2005, March 3). Sharing the wealth: National Board Certified Teachers and the students who need them most.� Education Policy Analysis Archives, 13(18).� http://epaa.asu.edu/epaa/v13n18/

Rotherham, A. (2004, March). Opportunity and responsibility for National Board Certified Teachers. Washington, DC: Progressive Policy Institute.� http://www.ppionline.org/documents/Certified_Teachers_0304.pdf

California:� NBCTs in California are eligible for a $20,000 award if they work in low-performing schools for four years: http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/sr/nb/index.asp

Georgia:� NBCTs in Georgia receive a 10% salary supplement if they teach full-time in a Needs Improvement School: http://public.doe.k12.ga.us/DMGetDocument.aspx/WEB%20NBPTS%20Information%20Law%20Changes%2005%20revised.doc?p=39EF345AE192D900F620BFDE9C014CE65F48E7E4CC653240FB35D5F11BB46BAFE613361C1F24DADA&Type=D

New York:� NBCTs who serve as master teachers in low-performing New York State schools may receive an annual stipend of $10,000 for up to three years through the New York State Master Teacher Program: http://www.highered.nysed.gov/kiap/TEACHING/TOT/teachers_of_tomorrow_introductio.htm


������������� IMPROVE WORKING CONDITIONS FOR TEACHERS IN HIGH POVERTY SCHOOLS

������������� ACTION STEPS – AREA 6

Relationship between working conditions and student achievement

Center for Teaching Quality

http://www.teachingquality.org/twc/whatweknow.htm


Attachment C

Federally-funded Partnerships to Support

an Equitable Distribution of Teachers for High-Need Schools

Teacher Next Door Program

Helps high-need districts attract and retain teachers by helping teachers buy homes in low--income neighborhoods.

http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/reo/goodn/tnd.cfm

Teacher Loan Forgiveness Program – FFEL and Direct Loan Programs

Provides up to $17,500 in federal loan forgiveness for certain math, science, and special education teachers employed for five consecutive years in a low-income school

http://studentaid.ed.gov/PORTALSWebApp/students/english/cancelstaff.jsp?tab=repaying

NOTE: All schools operated by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) are considered low-income schools for teacher loan forgiveness purposes.

Federal Perkins Loan Teacher Cancellation

Cancels 100% of federal Perkins loans for teachers who work for a full academic year in a low-income school. (Teachers of hard-to-fill subjects such as special ed, math, science, bilingual education, and foreign languages are also eligible for loan cancellation.)

http://studentaid.ed.gov/PORTALSWebApp/students/english/cancelperk.jsp?tab=repaying

Transition to Teaching grants

USDOE description:

“The Transition to Teaching program supports the recruitment and retention of highly qualified mid-career professionals, including qualified paraprofessionals, and recent college graduates who have not majored in education to teach in high-need schools and districts through the development of new or enhanced alternative routes to certification.”

http://www.ed.gov/programs/transitionteach/index.html

Improving Teacher Quality State Grants to State Agencies for Higher Education (SAHEs)

USDOE description:

“The purpose of Title II, Part A is to help increase the academic achievement of all students by helping schools and school districts ensure that all teachers are highly qualified to teach. Through the program, State educational agencies (SEAs) and Local educational agencies (LEAs) receive funds on a formula basis, as does the State agency for higher education (SAHE). The SAHE provides competitive grants to partnerships comprised, at a minimum, of schools of education and arts and sciences along with one or more high-need LEAs.”

http://www.ed.gov/programs/teacherqual/index.html

Indian Education Professional Development Grants

USDOE description:

“The program is designed to prepare and train Indians to serve as teachers and school administrators. Professional development grants are awarded to increase the number of qualified individuals in professions that serve American Indians; to provide training to qualified American Indians to become teachers, administrators, teacher aides, social workers, and ancillary education personnel; and to improve the skills of those qualified American Indians who already serve in these capacities.”

http://www.ed.gov/programs/indianprofdev/index.html�

USDOE-Funded Mathematics and Science Partnerships, Title II, Part B

USDOE description:

“The U.S. Department of Education’s Mathematics and Science Partnerships (MSP) program is administered by the Academic Improvement and Teacher Quality Program (AITQ) in the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education (OESE) under the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, Title II, Part B. The MSP supports partnerships between the mathematics, science, and/or engineering faculty of institutions of higher education and high need school districts. Other partners may include schools of education, business, and nonprofit organizations. The program’s goal is to increase student achievement through increasing teachers� content knowledge and pedagogical skills.”

http://www.ed-msp.net/protected/overview.jsp?.lat

National Science Foundation-Funded Mathematics and Science Partnerships, MSPnet

NSF description:

“Through MSP, NSF awards competitive, merit-based grants to teams composed of institutions of higher education, local K-12 school systems, and their supporting partners…A major research and development effort, the MSP program responds to concern over the performance of the nation's children in mathematics and science. Institutions of higher education - their disciplinary faculty in departments of mathematics, the sciences and/or engineering, education faculty and administrators - partner with K-12 districts and others to effect deep, lasting improvement in K-12 mathematics and science education through five key features: Partnership-Driven, Teacher Quality, Quantity and Diversity, Challenging Courses and Curricula, Evidence-Based Design, and Institutional Change and Sustainability.”

http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm

Robert Noyce Scholarship Program

NSF description:

“The Robert Noyce Scholarship program seeks to encourage talented science, technology, engineering, and mathematics majors and professionals to become K-12 mathematics and science teachers. The program provides funds to institutions of higher education to support scholarships, stipends, and programs for students who commit to teaching in high need K-12 schools.”

http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5733&org=DUE&from=home

Copyright � 2006 Council of Chief State School Officers. All rights reserved.

This table is used with the permission of the CCSSO.


Attachment D

Links to Information about New York State Programs for Teachers

STATE CONTEXT

  • New York State Learning Standards (July 1996)� http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/ciai/pub.html
  • Regents Task Force on Teaching Report (1998) New York’s Commitment:� Teaching to Higher Standards http://www.nysed.gov/facmtg/paper20.pdf
  • Summaries of Regents Meetings http://www.regents.nysed.gov/meet.html

POLICY GUIDANCE AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE ON NCLB AND IDEA TEACHER QUALITY STANDARDS

  • The NCLB’s Requirements for Teachers and Title I Paraprofessionals in New York State

������������� http://www.highered.nysed.gov/nclbhome.htm

  • Local Consolidated Application for 2006-2007

������������� http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/titlei/ca0607/cover.htm

  • Email HELPLINE: NCLBNYS@mail.nysed.gov������������������

ACCESS TO HQT THROUGH DISTANCE LEARNING��������

  • New York State Distance Learning Consortium http://www.nysdlc.org/AboutNYSDLC.shtm

TEACHER EDUCATION

  • Inventory of Registered Programs (IRP) http://www.nysed.gov/heds/IRPSL1.html
  • Standards for Teacher Education Programs http://www.highered.nysed.gov/ocue/.
  • Standards for Alternative Teacher Certification Programs http://www.highered.nysed.gov/ocue/
  • Federal Grants for Alternative Teacher Certification Programs in New York City

������������� http://www.highered.nysed.gov/ocue/

  • Pass Rates on Teacher Certification Exams for New York State Institutions

������������� http://www.highered.nysed.gov/tcert/respublic/heir.htm

  • Distance Higher Education Initiative (DHEI) http://web1.nysed.gov/ocue/distance/
  • Education Programs Offered at a Distance

������������� http://web1.nysed.gov/ocue/distance/searchSubjDetail.asp?subjareanum=8

    • Regents Accreditation of Teacher Education Programs http://www.highered.nysed.gov/ocue/
    • PBS TeacherLine New York http://teacherline.nylearns.org/
    • SUNY Learning Network http://sln.suny.edu/sln_aboutsln.htm

TEACHER CERTIFICATION

  • General Information� - Office of Teaching Initiatives http://www.highered.nysed.gov/tcert/
  • Standards for Certification (guidance) http://www.highered.nysed.gov/tcert/certificate/index.html
  • Standards for Certification (regulations) http://www.highered.nysed.gov/tcert/part80.htm
  • Certification email HELPLINE: TCERT@mail.nysed.gov

TEACHING PRACTICE

  • Mentoring Requirements

������������� ������������� http://www.highered.nysed.gov/tcert/resteachers/guidemenprog.htm

  • Professional Development Requirements for Certification (Draft Guidelines)

������������� ������������� http://www.highered.nysed.gov/tcert/resteachers/175.htm


    • Professional Development Plans – Section 100.2(dd) of Commissioner’s Regulations�������������

������������� http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/part100/opener.html

    • Annual Professional Performance Reviews – Section 100.2(o) of Commissioner’s Regulations

������������� http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/part100/opener.html

    • New York State Mentor Teacher Internship Program

������������� http://www.highered.nysed.gov/tcert/resteachers/mentorinternship.htm

  • Guidance on new teacher induction and support

������������� http://www.highered.nysed.gov/tcert/resteachers/teacherinduction.htm

  • Albert Shanker Grant Program

������������� http://www.highered.nysed.gov/tcert/resteachers/albertshanker.htm

  • New York State Teacher of the Year Program

������������� http://www.highered.nysed.gov/tcert/showcase/teacherofyear.htm

������������� Better Beginnings Program

������������� http://www.highered.nysed.gov/tcert/showcase/bbawardees.htm

  • Teacher-Leader Quality Partnership Program

������������� http://www.highered.nysed.gov/kiap/COLLEGIATE/TLQP/dde%20description.htm

  • New York State Virtual Learning System (VLS)

������������� http://vls.nysed.gov/vls

TEACHER RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION

  • General Information� http://www.highered.nysed.gov/tcert/
  • Job banks� http://www.highered.nysed.gov/tcert/career/joblinks.htm
  • Professional Standards and Practices Board for Teaching

������������� http://www.highered.nysed.gov/tcert/resteachers/standardboard_main.htm

  • Teachers of Tomorrow Program�� http://www.highered.nysed.gov/tcert/resteachers/tot.htm
  • Teacher Opportunity Corps

������������� http://www.highered.nysed.gov/kiap/TEACHING/TOC%20RFP/teacher_opportunity_corps_fact_p.htm

  • Troops to Teachers Program�� http://www.highered.nysed.gov/tcert/career/troopsteachers.htm
  • Science and Technology Entry Program (STEP)� http://www.highered.nysed.gov/kiap/step/step.htm
  • Collegiate Science and Technology Entry Program (CSTEP)

������������� http://www.highered.nysed.gov/kiap/COLLEGIATE/CSTEP%202004/introduction_to_cstep.htm

  • Speech-Language Pathologists and other high need fields

������������� http://www.regents.nysed.gov/2005Meetings/July2005/0705brca8.htm

  • New York State Math and Science Teaching Incentive Program� - New in 2006-2007 http://www.hesc.com/bulletin.nsf/0/e5c556e7c96fabce85257170005aef7b?OpenDocument

INFORMATION

  • Basic Education Data System (BEDS) http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/irts/
  • New York State Report Card (655 Report) http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/irts/655report/home.shtml
  • New York State School Report Cards http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/irts/reportcard/home.shtml
  • BOCES Report Cards http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/repcrd2004/boces/home.shtml
  • New York City Annual Report Card� http://www.nycenet.edu/daa/ASR/
  • Teacher Supply and Demand Data – Updated in May 2006

������������� http://www.highered.nysed.gov/tsdregents052006.htm

  • Education Finance Research Consortium� http://www.albany.edu/edfin/


Attachment E

May 2006 Regents Item on Teacher Supply and Demand

http://www.highered.nysed.gov/tsdregents052006.htm

Attachment F

May 2006 slide show on The Continuing Need for Certified Teachers

http://www.highered.nysed.gov/tsdregents052006.htm (scroll down to find link)

Attachment G

May 2006 slide show on Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Challenge

Attachment H

Lists of LEAs and Schools with Their AMO and AYP Status (Attachments H-1 through H-8)

H-1.������������� LEAs in improvement status with less than 90% HQT� (N=7)

H-2. ������������� Schools in improvement status with less than 90% HQT (N=254)

H-3- ������������� LEAs with less than 90% HQT� (N= 118, includes H-1 LEAs)

H-4. ������������� Schools with less than 90% HQT (N=1,324, includes H-2 schools)

H-5. ������������� LEAs with greater than or equal to 90% HQT (N= 714, includes H-7 LEAs)

H-6. ������������� Schools with greater than or equal to 90% HQT (N=3,074, includes H-8 schools)

H-7. ������������� LEAs in improvement status with greater than or equal to 90% HQT (N=9)

H-8. ������������� Schools in improvement status with greater than or equal to 90% HQT (N=98)

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