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C1. Book List

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Specific to Clinical Practice

General AOD Books

Management of Alcohol and Drug Problems

Hulse, G., White, J. & Cape, G. (Eds.) 2002, Management of Alcohol and Drug Problems, Oxford University Press, South Melbourne, Victoria.

A comprehensive and thorough Australian coverage of the range of AOD issues that is up-to-date and provides an evidence-based reference for medical staff at all levels of experience.� It introduces the fundamentals of alcohol and drug use, as applied to a clinical setting, with assessment, diagnostic and management strategies and tools. Key practice points and suggested further readings are included. A number of chapters provide a contextual flavour via case studies and case study points. Additional case studies are in Alcohol and Drug Problems: A Case Studies Workbook (see below for details).

Organised into four parts: Part 1 focuses on the context for drug use including historical aspects, aetiology, assessment and general treatment considerations. Part 2 provides details of drugs used, their pharmacology, epidemiology and specific ways of assessing and treating the problems arising from use. Part 3 looks at specific populations in which drug and alcohol issues are especially problematic. Part 4 reviews specific issues that arise during clinical practice, including aspects of safe prescribing.

404 pages ������������� �������������

ISBN 0195513312

Available from: www.oup.com.au

Alcohol and Drug Problems: A Case Studies Workbook

Hulse, G. (Ed.) 2004, Alcohol and Drug Problems: A Case Studies Workbook, Oxford University Press, South Melbourne, Victoria.

This ‘case series exercise and record book’ is designed to be used in conjunction with Management of Alcohol and Drug Problems (above). The workbook aims to assist medical practitioners to increase their awareness of commonly encountered AOD-related problems, identify appropriate clinical questions and responses, and understand the clinical framework for the management of different AOD-related presentations. Cases have been prepared by practising clinicians and AOD experts.

Organised into seven chapters including drug class (e.g. opioids) and issues (e.g. comorbidity). Each chapter contains four relevant case studies with triggers to highlight specific events relevant to the presentation. The title of each case reflects the context of the patient’s presentation. Each case contains specific learning objectives and follows the course of clinical management (from presentation to case outcomes) over periods of months and years.

236 pages������������� �������������

ISBN 0195516990

Available from: www.oup.com.au

Alcohol and Other Drugs: A Handbook for Health Professionals

NCETA. 2004, Alcohol and Other Drugs: A Handbook for Health Professionals, 3rd Edn., Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing, Canberra.

This popular handbook is for a wide range of health professionals including non-specialist medical practitioners, nurses and other health and human service workers. This is a substantially revised version of the 1993 edition with expanded topics such as polydrug use and coexisting mental health problems and newer topic areas such as gambling. The information provided reflects evidence-based perspectives that are of practical value to the clinician. It provides links and contacts and identifies other resources for more in-depth information.

Organised into five parts: Part 1 provides an overview and introduction and explains general principles of management and intervention. Part 2 focuses on specific drugs and includes pharmacology, patterns of use, physical and psychological effects, assessment/diagnosis and management. Part 3 looks at non-medical interventions (psychosocial and alternative therapies). Part 4 focuses on special issues such as pregnancy and drug use, coexisting mental illness, health professionals as patients and gambling. Part 5 provides a set of tools and guidelines such as CIWA–AR and AUDIT.

294 pages

ISBN 0 642 82312 X

Available in electronic format at: www.nceta.flinders.edu.au

Drug Use and Drug-related Harm: A Delicate Balance

Ryder, D., Salmon, A. & Walker, N. 2001, Drug use and Drug-related Harm: A Delicate Balance, IP Communications, Melbourne.

A straightforward and accessible presentation of drug use and drug-related harm that incorporates Australian research and policy discussion. It addresses some of the most controversial issues in the drug field, adopts a social model for drug use and examines five drugs. The authors’ central message is that drug use is a complex phenomenon requiring a complex and diverse response if harmful use is to be avoided.

Organised into four sections: Section 1 sets the scene by dealing with concepts of drug use and an evidence-based approach. Section 2 examines three factors – the drug itself, the drug user and environmental factors. Section 3 focuses on minimising drug-related harm through demand reduction, supply control and harm reduction. Section 4 expands on five drugs – alcohol, tobacco, cannabis, heroin and psychostimulants. There are key references, key terms and an index.

282 pages plus index

ISBN 0 9578617 10

More information is available at: ipcomm@bigpond.com

Health Behaviour Change: A Guide for Practitioners

Rollnick, S., Mason, P. &� Butler, C. 1999, Health Behaviour Change: A Guide for Practitioners, Churchill Livingstone, Edinburgh.

This book aims to provide health professionals with a method that they can use to help patients make decisions about health behaviour change in a range of settings. The method is applicable to any behaviour and can be used in health promotion consultations as well as with those patients with a chronic condition. Problems of resistance and lack of motivation are explored and practical strategies to manage them are given. Short case examples and dilemmas from clinical practice settings help to ground the method in reality. The tone and use of graphics highlight the process and make the book readable and accessible to a wide audience of practitioners.

Organised into three parts: Part 1 sets the scene with key tasks in consultations about behaviour change and the foundations of theory and practice. Part 2 looks in more detail at the tasks; i.e. getting started – rapport, agendas and assessment, exploring importance and confidence building, exchanging information and reducing resistance. Part 3 titled ‘Application’ focuses on common clinical encounters, training health professionals and broader horizons.

217 pages plus index

ISBN 0443 058504

Working with Substance Misusers: A Guide to Theory and Practice

Petersen, T. & McBride, A. 2002, Working with Substance Misusers: A Guide to Theory and Practice, Routledge, London.

The book is a basic guide to the practice of working with people experiencing alcohol and other drug problems in the UK. Therefore its style and language differs somewhat from literature written for the Australian context. It introduces the reader to commonly used psychoactive drugs, popular theories, approaches to treatment, and skills required to work with people experiencing problems related to their use of alcohol or other drugs. Of particular interest is that each chapter encourages reading and reflection via learning objectives and activities, and includes review questions, role plays, group work exercises and debating points. Part 3, whilst interesting and informative, is based on the UK drug context and is therefore less relevant to Australia. Costs approximately $60.00.

Organised into 5 parts: Part 1 focuses on the basics. Part 2 looks at the care and treatment of substance misusers including client assessment, behavioural and cognitive approaches, brief interventions and family interventions. Part 3 focuses on organisational and policy issues. Part 4 looks at some specific populations including dual diagnosis, women and young people. Part 5 provides nine case studies.

362 pages

ISBN 041523568 5 (pbk)


The DISE Manual

Carmichael, C. 2001, The DISE Manual: A Resource Manual for Directions in Illicit Substance Education, QADREC, Brisbane.

This clear, easy to read Directions in Illicit Substance Education (DISE), is a training resource developed by the Queensland Alcohol and Drug Research and Education Centre (QADREC) for frontline workers in the human service sector.� The manual complements face-to-face training by providing trainers with concise and accurate descriptions about key topics and information necessary for understanding the nature, use and context surrounding the use of illicit drugs.

Organised into 3 sections: Section 1 focuses on basic concepts including drugs and drug-related harm, harm minimisation, perspectives on psychoactive drugs and patterns of drug use. Section 2 introduces drugs and effects (including intoxication and withdrawal), routes of administration and substance dependence. Section 3 provides an overview of assessment and interventions, including motivational interviewing and referral.

54 pages

ISBN 1 8649 9504 1

The manual can be obtained at: ftp://sph.uq.edu.au/qadrec/DISE-MANUAL.pdf

The Role of Families in the Development, Identification, Prevention and Treatment of Illicit Drug Problems

Mitchell, P., Spooner, C., Copeland, J., Vimpani, G., Toumbourou, J., Howard, J. & Sanson, A.� 2001, The Role of Families in the Development, Identification, Prevention and Treatment of Illicit Drug Problems, NHMRC, Commonwealth of Australia, Canberra.

The influence of the family on the uptake and discontinuation of drug use is complex. This publication reviews the main risk and protective factors that involve the family. It provides figures and tables on these as well as an ‘influences’ model and a matrix of preventative/early intervention programs involving families. Changes in family structures and family functions and how these changes impact on illicit drug use problems are also featured.

Six sections: Section 1 focuses on the role of family factors in the aetiology of illicit drug use problems (i.e. family factors, peers and family, coping and social skills, school, traumatic life events, socioeconomic status). Section 2 explores the epidemiology of risk and protective factors for illicit drug problems amongst Australian families. Section 3 looks at prevention and early intervention programs involving families. Section 4 focuses on families and treatment of drug problems. Sections 5 and� 6 consider issues for research in service and policy development and future directions.

66 pages plus references

ISBN 1864960752

http://www.dofa.gov.au/infoaccess/general/purchase_info_products.htm


Evidence Supporting Treatment: The Effectiveness of Interventions for Illicit Drug Use

Gowing, L., Proudfoot, H., Henry-Edwards. S. & Teesson, M. 2001, Evidence Supporting Treatment: The Effectiveness of Interventions for Illicit Drug Use, ANCD Research Paper 3, Australian National Council on Drugs, Canberra.

For GPs and clinicians with an interest in evidence regarding treatment options for patients who are drug dependent. A two page table at the beginning of this report gives a brief overview of treatment effectiveness – approach, outcomes and evidence for opioids, psychostimulants, cannabis and all illicit drugs with follow-up page references.� An executive summary is also included. The main body of the report includes information on patterns of drug use in Australia, the concepts that underlie treatment interventions and treatment descriptions for specific drugs as well as generic interventions such as ‘making contact and engaging users’.

Orientation (‘In a Nutshell’ and ‘Executive Summary’) and main body with five sections: Section 1 gives the background and scope of the report and methodology used to assess research evidence. Section 2 focuses on illicit drug use in Australia – the nature of drug dependence, risk factors, patterns, prevalence, trends and costs. Section 3 explores treatment principles and Section 4 reviews the available research evidence. Section 5 provides concluding comments with appendices for further reading, a glossary of terms and information on the pharmaceutical drugs discussed in the report.�� �������������

84 pages plus references

ISBN 1 877018 02 3

www.ancd.org.au ������������� Email: ancd@ancd.org.au


Resource Kit for GP Trainers on Illicit Drug Issues

Part C1: Book List


Clinical Practice Guidelines & Information Booklets

Clinical Treatment Guidelines for Alcohol and Drug Clinicians

Bucovaz, S. & Kinsey R. (eds.) 2000, Clinical Treatment Guidelines for Alcohol and Drug Clinicians, Turning Point Alcohol and Drug Centre, Victoria.

These guidelines were developed in response to a need for a definitive resource for the treatment of people with alcohol and other drug problems. The guidelines are written in a style that is practical and accessible, providing clinicians with user-friendly tools and effective guidelines for the application of clinical skills in day-to-day client care. Each title includes principles of application, practice guidelines and worksheets.

Titles in the series include ‘Key Principles and Practices’, ‘Motivational Interviewing’, ‘Relapse Prevention’, ‘Reducing Harm for Clients who Continue to Use Drugs’, ‘Controlled Drug Use Interventions’, ‘Effective Weed Control: Working with Cannabis Users’, ‘Working with Polydrug Users’, ‘Assertive Follow-up’, ‘Prescribing for Drug Withdrawal’ and ‘Managing Difficult and Complex Behaviours’.

Each guideline is approximately 30 pages and costs $20.00.

For more information and an order form visit the Turning Point website or email.

www.turningpoint.org.au�� Email: info@turningpoint.org.au

Australian Alcohol Guidelines

NHMRC. 2001, Australian Alcohol Guidelines: Health Risks and Benefits, National Health and Medical Research Council, Canberra.

These evidence-based guidelines were developed to provide Australians with the knowledge and understanding of how to avoid and minimise harmful consequences of alcohol use.� The document is intended for professionals, educators and policy makers.

The guidelines include drinking guidelines for the whole population and particular groups, The Guidelines include sections titled ‘Context and Evidence Base’, ‘Alcohol and its Effects’, ‘Patterns of Drinking in Australia’, ‘Levels of Risk and Benefits’, ‘Research Questions’ and Glossary and Acronyms.

128 pages and costs approximately $16.95.

ISBN 1864960175

Available through the AusInfo Government Bookshop toll-free number 132 447 or at: http://www.pc.gov.au/publications/index.php
or: http://www1.drugaware.com.au/pages/alcohol_5.asp

Alternatively, contact the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC). http://www.nhmrc.gov.au/publications/index.htm


Guidelines for the Treatment of Alcohol Problems

Shand F., Gates J., Fawcett, J. & Mattick, R. 2003, Guidelines for the Treatment of Alcohol Problems, Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, Canberra.

The National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre (NDARC) prepared these comprehensive and practical guidelines for the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing. The guidelines are based on evidence about the effectiveness of treatments, and on the clinical experience of an expert panel. The guidelines aim to provide evidence that guides treatment, education and professional development.

The guidelines include ‘Access to Treatment and Overcoming Barriers’, ‘Screening and Assessment’, ‘Patient-treatment Matching’, ‘Alcohol Withdrawal Management’, ‘Post-withdrawal Treatment Setting’, ‘Brief Interventions’, ‘Psychosocial Interventions’, ‘Relapse Prevention’, ‘Extended Care’, ‘Intervention for Specific Client Groups’ and ‘How to Put it Together’.

176 pages plus appendices

ISBN 0 642 82383 9

Available from the Population Health Division of the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, either online (PDF) or in hard copy.

http://www.health.gov.au/pubhlth/publicat/index.htm

The Treatment of Alcohol Problems: A Review of the Evidence

Shand, F., Gates J., Fawcett, J. & Mattick R. 2003, The Treatment of Alcohol Problems: A Review of the Evidence, Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, Canberra.

This is a companion document to Guidelines for the Treatment of Alcohol Problems, providing a comprehensive review of the literature and updated guidelines for the treatment of alcohol problems.

The review contains two main sections:

  • Description of the prevalence and patterns of, and the harms associated with, drinking in Australia and
  • Review of the evidence for the effectiveness of the main treatments available for alcohol use disorders.

99 pages plus appendices

ISBN 0 642 82383 9

Available from the Population Health Division of the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, either online (PDF) or hard copy.�

http://www.health.gov.au/pubhlth/publicat/index.htm


National Recommendations for the Clinical Management of Alcohol-Related Problems in Indigenous Primary Care Settings

Hunter, E., Brady, M. & Hall W. 1999, National Recommendations for the Clinical Management of Alcohol-Related Problems in Indigenous Primary Care Settings, Commonwealth Department of Health and Aged Care, Canberra.

This provides primary care practitioners with advice about the management of Indigenous patients who present with alcohol-related problems. The recommendations are presented with detailed attention to the context and social complexities in which such problems are embedded.

The content includes ‘Background Information’, ‘Terminology’, ‘The Indigenous Australian Setting’, ‘Alcohol’, ‘Management General Principles’, ‘Population Management Approaches’, ‘Clinical Care’, ‘Medical Comorbidity’, ‘Psychiatric

Comorbidity’ and ‘Continuing Care’.

63 pages plus appendices.

In electronic format at: http://www.health.gov.au/oatsih/pubs/alco.htm

To obtain a hard copy email oatsih.enquiries@health.gov.au or phone 02 6289 5279.

Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs: Guidelines for Nurses and Midwives

This resource package contains three titles. It is provided in a tagged folder to enable the ready insertion of updates and additional information as it becomes available.

  1. Framework for Policy and Standards

DeCrespigny, C. & Cusack, L. 2003, Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs: Guidelines for Nurses and Midwives: A Framework for Policy and Standards, version 2, August, Flinders University and Drug and Alcohol Services Council, Adelaide.

This document describes key policy principles of effective nursing practice in responding to AOD work. It focuses on a partnership approach to responding to AOD-related issues, and standards of nursing care within this context.

  1. Clinical Guidelines

DeCrespigny, C., Talmet, J., Modystack, K., Cusack, L., & Watkinson, J. 2003, Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs Guidelines for Nurses and Midwives: Clinical Guidelines, updated version, August, Flinders University and Drug and Alcohol Services Council, Adelaide.

While written with a nursing focus, this title provides clear and concise guidelines for practice and intervention with patients experiencing AOD-related harms in Australia.

The guidelines include patterns and contexts of use, theories that inform current practice, strategies to assist clinicians to engage in effective patient care (including issues of diversity), drug-specific information and treatment and intervention issues (e.g. early and brief intervention, intoxication and withdrawal management). Appendices contain frequently used tools and scales (e.g. an assessment proforma, AUDIT, CIWA–AR, withdrawal scales for illicit drugs, Glasgow Coma Scale and a Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS) scoring chart).

  1. Quick Clinical Reference – Flip chart

DeCrespigny, C., Talmet, J., Modystack, K., Cusack, L. & Watkinson, J. 2003, Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs Guidelines for Nurses and Midwives: Quick Clinical Reference, Version 2, Flinders University and Drug and Alcohol Services Council, Adelaide.

This flip chart is presented in a ‘ready reckoner’ format to guide assessment and intervention in AOD work. It is designed to hang on a wall or stand upright to enable quick reference.

The Quick Clinical Reference contains an assessment and intervention flow chart and key points for each The major drug classification such as drug group, onset of action, indicators for use, signs of intoxication, withdrawal or toxicity and main pharmacological treatments (where applicable).

ISBN 0 646 337882

For online copies go to the DASC website at www.dasc.sa.gov.au or contact Professor Charlotte deCrespigny at the School of Nursing and Midwifery, Flinders University 08 8201 5226. Cost $105.

Review of Diagnostic Screening Instruments for Alcohol and Other Drug Use and Other Psychiatric Disorders

Dawe, S., Loxton, N., Hides, L., Kavanagh, D. & Mattick, R.P. 2002 Review of Diagnostic Screening Instruments for Alcohol and Other Drug Use and Other Psychiatric Disorders, 2nd edn., Canberra Monograph Series, National Drug Strategy (Australia), no. 48, Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing, Canberra.

This latest edition provides AOD clinicians and GPs with a comprehensive review of screening instruments that aid diagnosis and assessment of patients who have a drug use and/or mental health problem. A consistent approach is given for each instrument by providing key references, a boxed summary, description and development, reliability and validity, administration and scoring, availability and cost and a copy of the instrument.�

Organised into five parts: Part 1 covers general issues including the background and context of the review and principles regarding reliability, validity, sensitivity and specificity. Part 2 focuses on the role of diagnosis of substance use disorders and mental problems. The authors provide a description of the CIDI. Part 3 provides a comprehensive review of screening tools and diagnostic instruments for substance misuse including alcohol, nicotine and other drugs. Part 4 concentrates on screening and assessment of psychiatric problems with descriptions of various instruments. Part 5 provides recommendations for future research.

142 pages plus references

ISBN 0 642 82124 0

Available at: http://www.health.gov.au/pubhlth/publicat/document/mono48.pdf


Diagnosis and Management of Alcohol Misuse: A Guide for General Practice in Australia

APF (Alcohol Pharmacotherapy Forum) 2001, Diagnosis and Management of Alcohol Misuse: A Guide for General Practice in Australia, Intramed Pty. Ltd., North Sydney.

This is a concise booklet to assist GPs to detect and manage patients who misuse alcohol – both those who are in the risky or harmful drinking category and those who are alcohol dependent. Pharmacotherapy and non-pharmacotherapy management options are covered. Appropriate referral and resource networks are included. The booklet was developed by a group of addiction medicine practitioners with experience and expertise in the treatment of people with alcohol problems through an unconditional educational grant from Alphapharm Pty. Limited. Highly recommended for all GPs.�

Organised into 4 sections: Two major sections – ‘Detection and Diagnosis’ and ‘Management of Alcohol Misuse’, follow an introduction. ‘Referral and Resources’ forms the last section.

24 pages

Available from Alphapharm representatives

Clinical Guidelines and Procedures for the Use of Methadone in the Maintenance Treatment of Opioid Dependence

Henry-Edwards, S., Bell, J., & Ritter, A. (2003). Clinical Guidelines and Procedures for the Use of Methadone in the Maintenance Treatment of Opioid Dependence, Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, Canberra.

These guidelines were prepared to help medical practitioners select and manage patients who seek methadone maintenance treatment for opioid dependence. The content is designed to complement the National Policy on Methadone Treatment and local jurisdictional policies and requirements for methadone prescribing. They are based on local and international literature, other published guidelines, and clinical experience in Australia with the use of methadone treatment. Rigorous review of these guidelines has taken place. They have been formally endorsed by the RACGP and APSAD.

There are four sections to these guidelines. The four sections include ‘Clinical Pharmacology’ (e.g., what is methadone?), ‘Entry into Methadone Treatment’ (e.g., assessment), ‘Guidelines for Maintenance Treatment’ (e.g., dosing, adjunct treatment) and ‘Common Management Issues’ (e.g., side effects, overdose). The appendices contain information on possible drug interactions with methadone, assessment of intoxication and withdrawal, urine sampling and resources for patients.

36 pages plus appendices

ISBN 0 642 82261 1

Available from the Population Health Division of the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, either online (PDF) or hard copy.

http://www.health.gov.au/pubhlth/publicat/dociment/methadone_cguide.pdf

Clinical Guidelines and Procedures for the Use of Naltrexone in the Management of Opioid Dependence

Bell, J., Kimber, J., Lintzeris, N., White, J., Monheit, B., Henry-Edwards, S., Mattick, R., Ali, R., Ritter, A., & Quigley, A. (2003). Clinical Guidelines and Procedures for the Use of Naltrexone in the Management of Opioid Dependence, Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, Canberra.

These guidelines were prepared to help medical practitioners select and manage patients who seek naltrexone hydrochloride for the prevention of relapse to and withdrawal from opioid dependence. It is also designed to assist in the provision of accurate information concerning naltrexone. The approach taken in developing these guidelines was to review published evidence with attention being paid to controlled trials. These guidelines were prepared under the auspices of the National Expert Advisory Committee on Illicit Drugs (NEACID) in collaboration with the National Evaluation of Pharmacotherapies for Opioid Dependence (NEPOD) project, the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) and the Australian Professional Society on Alcohol and Other Drugs (APSAD). They have been formally endorsed by the RACGP and APSAD.

There are five sections to these guidelines. The five sections include ‘Clinical Pharmacology of Naltrexone’ (e.g., rationale for use of naltrexone), ‘Entry Into Naltrexone Treatment’ (e.g., assessment), ‘Treatment for Naltrexone’ (e.g., dosing, duration of treatment), ‘The Use of Naltrexone in Withdrawal’ (e.g., rapid detoxification) and ‘Patient Information and Warnings on Naltrexone Treatment’. The appendices contain information on Narcan challenge, induction using buprenorphine, opioid withdrawal and intoxication states.

28 pages plus appendices

ISBN 0 642 82262 X

Available from the Population Health Division of the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, either online (PDF) or hard copy.

HtmlResAnchor http://www.health.gov.au/pubhlth/publicat/document/naltrexone_cguide.pdf

National Clinical Guidelines and Procedures for the use of Buprenorphine in the Treatment of Heroin Dependence

Lintzeris, N., Clark, N., Ritter, A., Ali, R., Bell, J., Hawkin, L., Henry-Edwards, S., Mattick, R.P., Monheit, B., Newton, I., Quigley, A., Whicker, S., White, J. (2001). National Clinical Guidelines and Procedures for the use of Buprenorphine in the Treatment of Heroin Dependence, Commonwealth of Australia, Canberra.

These guidelines provide a broad policy context and framework for State and Territory policies that are concerned with the treatment of heroin dependence with buprenorphine.� Buprenorphine, in sublingual tablet form (Subutex�), has recently been registered in Australia for the management of opioid dependence including maintenance and detoxification, within a framework of medical, social and psychological treatment.� This preparation is effective both in the long-term, as a maintenance treatment program, and in the short-term as part of a heroin withdrawal program.� The guidelines were developed through a consensus process by a working party of senior Australian clinicians and researchers who have experience in the use of buprenorphine. The guidelines have been endorsed by the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners, the Royal Australian College of Physicians and the Australian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

The guidelines contain Five Sections and cover both maintenance and withdrawal programs using buprenorphine.� Section 1 explains the clinical pharmacology of the preparation; Section 2 covers the commencement of buprenorphine treatment; Section 5, complications and adverse events; and Section 6 discusses prescribing and dispensing issues.� In all of these sections, both maintenance and withdrawal programs are covered.� In Sections 3 and 4, however, guidelines and procedures are set out separately for each program; with maintenance treatment in Section 3, and withdrawal programs in Section 4.

54 pages plus appendices

ISBN 0 642 73573 5

Available from the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing as a PDF file.

http://www.nationaldrugstrategy.gov.au/publications/illicit.htm

Resource Kit for GP Trainers on Illicit Drug Issues

Part C1: Book List

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